Review: 2019 Merida One-Twenty 8000

Nov 26, 2018 at 22:56
by David Arthur  



All-new for 2019, the Merida One-Twenty is a shorter travel 29er that's designed to be a fast, agile and capable bike. Merida might not traditionally be a brand to get the juices flowing, but they have really stepped up their efforts to produce a range of full suspension bikes to tempt you away from more popular choices.

This latest generation One-Twenty uses the company’s familiar Float Link to provide 120mm rear wheel travel paired with a 130mm fork, a choice of 29” or 27.5” wheels and aluminum and carbon frame options to provide a raft of price points. Geometry has been refined with a slacker head angle and increased standover compared to the previous model, moving it further away from its original cross-country roots.

Merida One-Twenty 8000 Details

• Intended use: XC / trail
• Frame construction: CF4 carbon fiber, Float Link suspension
• Travel: 120mm rear / 130mm front
• Wheel size: 29" or 27.5 Plus
• Head angle: 67.3º
• Reach: 455mm (size large)
• Chainstay length: 435mm
• Wheelbase: 1185mm
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL
• Weight: 28.10 lbs (size large, without pedals)
• Price: £6,000 UK (as tested)
• More info: merida-bikes.com

The range starts at £1,500 with the One-Twenty 400 and eight models to choose from right up to the £6,000 One-Twenty 8000 tested here, which gets you a considerable burly spec including a Pike RCT3 130mm fork, FSA Gradient LTD carbon wheels, Maxxis Minion DHR II WT 2.4” front tire, SRAM Eagle drivetrain and Code RSC brakes, all bolted onto a full carbon fiber frame and swingarm.


bigquotesThe lightweight frame, with a burly build, meaty tires, efficient suspension, and revised geometry ensures the One-Twenty doesn’t shy away when faced with very technical and demanding trails.





Merida 120


Construction & Features

There’s a shared design language across Merida’s full suspension range, it looks very similar to the One-Sixty I tested last year. It’s a smart looking frame with a swoopy top tube to increase standover and allow longer 150mm dropper posts to be used so you can more easily size up.

This top-end bike has the company’s lightest CF4 carbon front triangle and swingarm with full internal cable routing, a BB92 press-fit bottom bracket and a 1x-specific frame design. Other details include chainstay and downtube protectors to ward off rock strikes, Boost front and rear axles and an integrated headset inside the tapered head tube. Colour and graphics are subjective, so I’ll let you decide if the green getup works for you or not.

To ensure the One-Twenty range is accessible and aspirational, there’s a choice of aluminum and carbon frames. Since this model sits right near the top of the range, it has a full carbon frame weighing a claimed 2,103g (incl. shock hardware) for a medium. The aluminum frame comes in at 3,020g so a sizeable saving if your pockets are deep enough to opt for carbon.

Merida 120
Light and stiff carbon frame.

Merida 120
Tapered head tube and internal cables.
Merida 120
The curved stays maximize heel clearance.

Merida 120
Space for a full-size water bottle.


Geometry & Sizing

Probably the most important change to talk about is the geometry tweaks, which will come as no surprise in this current climate of “slacker, longer, lower”. Up front, the head angle now sits at 67.3-degree with a 75.5-degree seat angle, a 455mm reach for a size large and 10mm shorter chainstays at 435mm for the 29er.

The One-Twenty is available in four sizes - S to XL - with 29” wheels and just two sizes on the 27.5” bike.

Merida 120


Suspension Design

Merida has settled on its Float Link suspension design for a number of years. It comprises a linkage driven single pivot and a floating shock, not dissimilar to Trek’s Full Floater design. It's used across the company's range of full suspension bikes right up to the 160mm One-Sixty.

There’s a trunnion mount shock, and the leverage ratio has been reduced so that less air pressure is needed. The spring rate is also more progressive than the previous version to ensure it is able to meet the demands of riders that want a hard-charging short travel bike.


Merida 120
120mm out of the Float Link suspension layout.


Components

Specifications
Price $7178
Travel 120
Rear Shock Rock Shox Deluxe RT3, platform
Fork Rock Shox Pike RCT3, Air, 130mm suspension travel, Tapered
Headset FSA NO.47/50CF, 2191026456
Cassette Sram X01 Eagle
Crankarms Sram Descendant Carbon Eagle, 32 teeth
Bottom Bracket Sram X01 Eagle
Pedals N/A
Rear Derailleur Sram X01 Eagle
Chain Sram X01 Eagle
Front Derailleur N/A
Shifter Pods Sram X01 Eagle
Handlebar MERIDA Expert TR, 760mm width, 20mm rise
Stem MERIDA Expert TR, 35mm diameter, 0° stem angle
Grips Merida
Brakes Sram Code RSC / Sram Code RSC
Wheelset FSA Gradient LTD, 110x15mm width front hub, 148x12mm width rear hub, 29mm inner width, 6 bolt, Sram XD
Hubs FSA Gradient LTD
Rim FSA Gradient LTD
Tires Maxxis Minion DHR II, 29.5x2.4", fold, TR EXO 3C / Maxxis Forekaster, 29x2.35", fold, TR EXO Dual
Seat Prologo Nago X20
Seatpost KS LEV Integra, 30.9mm diameter, 0mm setback, S 125mm travel seatpost - M/L/XL 150mm travel seatpost,


Merida 120





Bike Setup

As I found with the longer travel One-Sixty I previously tested, getting the suspension dialed into my liking with the Merida was an easy process, not least helped by the useful sag indicators on the RockShox shock and fork.

After some experimenting, I settled on 130psi in the rear shock and 72psi in the fork. This provided ample sensitivity with good deep stroke support, and full travel achieved on bigger impacts with no nasty bottom out.

As well specced as the Merida is, the only parts I felt I needed to change during the test was to fit a wider 780mm handlebar and shorter stem, and swap the Prologo saddle for something more comfortable.
Merida 120
David Arthur // Technical Editor
Age: 37
Location: Gloucestershire, UK
Height: 5'11"
Ape Index: +4"
Weight: 143 lbs
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @davidjarthur


Merida 120


Climbing

That the One-Twenty cleans climbs for breakfast is no surprise. The 28.1 lb weight, stiff frame and firm suspension makes for very fast and efficient climbing. It devoured all my local climbs, short and steep or long and grindy, with as much ease as you can expect for a bike of this weight. The wide-range Eagle groupset certainly helped too; who said a 50t sprocket would never catch on? I certainly gave the huge sprocket a hammering taking the Merida up the steepest walls I could find.

I found the sizing and reach on the size large made for a very comfortable ride. It’s not the rangiest bike in the world, I’d perhaps like a bit more reach personally, especially after testing the Cotic FlareMax, but it’s usable on all sorts of terrain. It’s got a great deal of agility and quickness of steering that makes piloting it through twisting trails with lots of close proximity trees at the high speeds a lot of fun.

'Efficiency' is a word often bandied about with short travel bikes, and it basically comes down to whether the bike is helping or hindering you when giving the pedals plenty of input. Whether seated or out of the saddle, the Merida definitely makes full use of your input and it makes rapid progress up and over any sort of travel. Even with the suspension in the open setting it feels well controlled without excessive movement on smoother trails, yet it delivers a cushioning effect when you square up against a bigger obstacle.

I’m really impressed with how nice the Float Link suspension feels on the trail. In this shorter travel configuration it’s quite taut and firm feeling, but an underlying sensation of sensitivity for slower speed bumps, building to a nice progressiveness as you push deeper and harder into the reserves of travel. It’s all very predictable, smooth and controlled. It takes repeated impacts well and can cope when you take an unexpected nasty line through a rough and tumble rock garden.

So stable is the rear suspension that the lockout mode was never used, except for maybe one or two steep road climbs, and just to check that it worked. The middle setting is a good option for lots of fast and tamer trails, saving the open mode for the fun descents. And boy is this bike fun on the descents, but more on that later…
Merida 120
The One-Twenty is fast and efficient, and well suited to long days in the saddle.

I found the One-Twenty right at home for short and long distance cross-country rides. Its efficiency helps dispatch big all-day rides with plenty of elevation. There’s space for a full-size bottle in the front triangle so you can easily leave the hydration pack at home, and there’s space for strapping inner tubes and CO2 canisters to the frame.

With its high speed and capability in the rough, it’s a natural choice for big marathon distance rides into the unknown, where the pace and lightness are great allies. The tires and components are probably overkill for a typically groomed and manicured cross-country course, where something like the Specialized Epic, Yeti SB100 or Santa Cruz Blur might be more natural choices. But it's all very welcome when you start descending...

Merida 120


Descending

With short travel bike reviews, this is usually the point where the line ‘great going up, compromised coming down’ gets trotted out. But the Merida bucks the trend, as other short travel bikes like the Intense Sniper are also doing, proving that short travel bikes, when equipped with decent geometry, and in the Merida’s case, solid equipment, aren’t fazed when the trail points down or it gets overly rough and technical.

The One-Twenty was an absolute blast on the descents, allowing you to keep whatever gap you’d opened up on the climb into the following downhill. The geometry and suspension together with the Pike fork and beefy (for a short travel rig) Maxxis tires give the Merida the sort of control, stability and pace not normally seen in short travel bikes. When I received the Merida I wondered whether such equipment would be lost on a short travel bike. Sort of like those Audi Allroads with jacked up suspension and big plastic scuff panels. Well, I was wrong. The Merida managed to maintain that essence of a cross-country bike in its delivery of speed, but was as capable on the descents as some longer travel bikes I’ve ridden. The equipment choices removed some of the normal compromises you get on such short travel setups.

The EX Enduro credit Paul Box

The One-Twenty has genuinely eye-opening capability. It's t’s also ruddy good fun because you can push it and it doesn’t push back, but just asks for more speed and more engagement. I know, that sounds a bit cheesy, but the One-Twenty felt really robust and solid when pummelling through and down rocky chutes and smashing into berms and skimming across roots. The Pike fork is a highlight, giving a stout front-end you can really push into corners.

Only occasionally when deep into a technical trail does it feel short on travel. The Merida won’t soak up the full impact of every root and rock you barrel into, so you have to really ride it, pick your lines, use its low weight to float over bigger impacts to make up for its lack of travel. And you will find yourself getting into situations because the tires and fork allow you to take bolder choices and more speed risk than you might on a conventionally specced short travel bike.

Merida’s designers probably didn’t have enduro down on the list of requirements when designing the One-Twenty, but it proved its worth and capability at a local enduro event, the excellent Ex Enduro three day rampage around Exmoor. Granted, a longer travel bike might have been better suited if you were aiming for the top step, but the trails are nothing out of the ordinary here in the UK, and the Merida showed great mettle in meeting the demands of racing technical trails blind.

I’d have no problem using the One-Twenty for XC and marathon races, but for general trail riding, I appreciated the fork and tires more commonly found on a trail bike with increased confidence in those situations that traditional short travel bikes might have you reaching for a white flag.



How Does it Compare?

Intense Sniper 2018
Intense Sniper XC/Trail
Santa Cruz Blur CC X01 Reserve Photo by James Lissimore
Santa Cruz Blur XC

Short travel bikes are going through a really exciting period of development. Geometry changes are trickling down from enduro and trail bikes and the increasingly demanding cross-country courses are pushing short travel bikes in an exciting direction. I’ve always been a fan of short travel bikes - I like the low weight and efficiency, but the comprised descending capabilities has always been the limiting factor on the most fun part of the ride. These new bikes are changing that, but Merida’s decision to combine modern geometry with beefier equipment has resulted in a bike that is not stunted when it comes to descending performance.

The Intense Sniper XC immediately springs to mind as a short travel bike with modern geometry. I tested it earlier this year and was blown away, a super lithe bike wrapped up with long and slack geometry, it’s a perfect recipe for speed freaks. It has a similar head angle to the Merida but the reach is significantly longer, but in retaining typical cross-country fork and tires it’s hamstrung on rough trails compared to the Merida. Nothing that a change of parts wouldn’t fix, or going up to the Sniper Trail which boasts 120mm travel front and rear.

Perhaps the other contender is the Santa Cruz Blur, a bike that is more contemporary than its predecessor, but the 68-degree head angle is steep compared to the Merida, but as Mike Levy said, the “un-cross-country-like traction and solidness will really let you be a goon on this thing” - it’s more capable than its numbers would have you believe. Regardless, it probably suits more cross-country racing than the Merida unless you changed the fork and tires.

Merida 120
Merida 120


Technical Report


Rock Shox Pike RCT3 fork: What can I say about this fork that hasn't been said before? Smooth, controlled, really well damped, stout chassis, it gave the Merida a reassuring authority on rough and technical trails and the extra weight over a skinner short travel fork is a small price to pay. It makes the most of the 130mm travel composed in all situations and sensitive on the small ripples.

Maxxis Minion DHR II WT/Forekaster tires: Tyres are obviously critical to how a bike rides and I was delighted to have such tenaciously grippy tires on the Merida. Fitting a rear-specific tire on the front might seem odd, but it worked just fine. The rear Forekaster offered good straight-line acceleration and worked hard in the corners and mud to provide consistent grip.

FSA Gradient LTD wheels: I was impressed with the strength and durability of these wheels, especially after riding on a flat tire at the end of one of the timed stages on the Ex Enduro event - the rim was crack-free and still true despite the hammering. The carbon rims have a 29mm internal width so combine well with the Maxxis WT tires, the hookless bead rims were easy to tubeless and the freehub was quick to engage.

KS Integra 150mm dropper post: The lower top tube has allowed Merida to fit 150mm dropper posts on the larger size frames, which was a benefit on steeper trails. The remote lever is a bit short to operate but it works smoothly - I’d rather see the Southpaw remote option. The post itself was smooth, consistent and reliable.




Pros

+ Fun and fast on the all-day rides and XC blasts
+ Impressively capable in the rough and technical stuff
+ Tough and burly equipment extends its range beyond traditional cross-country riding
Cons

- Reach could be a touch longer
- Travel will hold you back before geo and equipment does
- The paint job and decals - sorry Merida, I’m not a fan



Merida 120


Is This the Bike for You?

The burly build means the One-Twenty might not be the first choice for a cross-country racing purist, but if you’re into the idea of a short travel bike because you enjoy riding fast and don’t need a massive amount of travel, this bike fits the bill.


Pinkbike's Take
bigquotes It’s a lightweight and efficient bike that flies up and down trails and will suit hard-charging riders that want a light and fast trail bike. Merida says it’s the best all-round bike in its range and the bike for those people who want just one bike in their life. I could certainly happily use the One-Twenty for pretty much everything. David Arthur







204 Comments

  • + 65
 "The paint job and decals - sorry Merida, I’m not a fan"

So you're saying it looks like mierda?
  • + 12
 Why on earth would they go with the name Merida is beyond me. Just setting themselves up.
  • + 8
 Paint job looks like a YT to me.
  • + 0
 @rrolly: Maybe it's someone's name? But yeah first thing that came to mind -- isn't that Latin for poop?
  • + 12
 @TheR: Merida, it's a spanish city, near guadiana (south part). Formelly called 0Emerida Augusta, was founded by the romans in 25 b.c., and was on of the most important cities in peninsula iberica (portugal+spain). why they called Merida to a bike company , really don't know. for more, just head out to wiki.

BI've seen some HT models @XC races.

btw - talking about names and brands on some countries: Kona ( reades the same as Cona = c*nt). imagine all thr hassle when hearing that kona/hawain jerseys on the road
  • + 17
 Merida 8000? Call me a old fashioned, but I'd rather spend my money on a used Nimbus 2000.
  • + 2
 Name is tight. Paint is a little dated. Sweet bike though, if they get some better branding.
  • + 0
 @sevensixtwo: I love the green! not day glow from a few years ago (glad that died), and not murdered out or throw up (looking at you Intense). And not teal or aqua or whatever that new popular color is.
  • + 50
 I'm not usually one to bitch about price but that's $12,350 CAD. Nothing about this bike justifies that price tag.
  • + 34
 no bike with less than 100hp+ should cost that much.
  • + 25
 Most places here in Aus have it for $6999 so I think the price is a little off
  • + 1
 That's rrp as well
  • - 10
flag Kramz (Feb 11, 2019 at 1:04) (Below Threshold)
 They're selling to legends, like ex pro basketball players, ex (or current) pro hockey players, and stuff, where the price probably doesn't bother them. Only problem is, it leaves the average consumer flabbergasted.
  • + 13
 It's hard to justify 7000GBP for a yeti/intense/pivot, but Merida? pike-equipped? nearly 13kg XC?.
The only explanation is they made 10 of these worldwide just for show, and they'll focus on selling 1500GBP models.
  • + 1
 @Kramz: basketball players make sense Smile that explains why they put these xl monstrocities on their website:
www.rowerymerida.pl/materialy/prod/big/1410.jpg
  • + 0
 Say it’s $6000 (pounds, I’m guessing) a couple times in the review. That $9000 figure would def be a mistake.
  • + 0
 @colincolin: I vehemently agree althought I set this standard at 6,5k MSRP...
  • + 3
 @irck: They haven't figured out yet what bike they tested. The 8000 like it says in the title or the 9000 like it says in the body? A $6000 or $9000 bike?
  • + 8
 Ok so $1500 for the drivetrain and brakes, $800 fork, $1000 wheels, $800 everything else leaves $8000 for the frame. That's why it's called the Merida 8000!
  • - 1
 Merida gets into Dental lawsuit market...
  • + 1
 Oooh! Look! A more expensive Trek!
  • + 2
 @TheR: I have nothing to their bikes, but Merida will have a hard time shaking off "low end bike maker" or "Lame Garda Warrior Bike Company" stigma. Before many low end brands came along, like early direct sales German bikes, Merida was a low end brand. Jose Hermida and Gunn Rita Dahle did not manage to turn it around.
  • + 5
 @Powderface, the price should be 6,000 GBP, which equates to $10,261 CDN. Still not cheap, but that's better than 12k.
  • + 1
 How did manufacturer's justify putting the less than ideal press fit bottom brackets on $5000+ bikes? Once you acknowledge that the marketing around PF30 is total bullsh*t, the only real reason manufacturers use it is to save a few bucks on manufacturing.

If they are paying top of the line price, don't customers deserve the top of the line threaded bottom bracket standard instead of the cookie cutter one? Only cheapskate bike companies use press fit, that's the only real reason.
  • + 8
 @Flowcheckers, BB92 bottom brackets (like what's on the Merida) are much less problematic than PF30 - I can't think of the last time I had an issue with one.
  • + 1
 Maybe they sell them in pairs for $12G Cad?
  • + 9
 companies like Guerrilla Gravity are going to destroy companies selling bikes at these prices
  • + 0
 @mikekazimer: Its still inferior in almost every way compared to a traditional BB. Saying it is "less problematic" doesn't hide the fact that it is inferior and still a problematic design. Bike companies are obviously only doing it to save a few bucks on a $6000 bike, which is absurd. Consumers, and especially reviewers, should not oblige the bike industry like this when the end result is only an inferior product and a sh*tshow of confusing standards.
  • + 22
 This is going to open up a big ol' can of worms, but @Flowcheckers, how is it inferior? Headset cups press in, and you don't hear anyone clamoring for threaded head tubes. I think there's been a lot complaining about pressfit because of PF30 bottom brackets, which were much more prone to creaking due to the amount of leverage generated on those bearings.

Threaded bottom brackets on aluminum frames? I'm all for it. But you can't just tap threads into a carbon frame - it requires *gasp* pressing in and bonding a threaded insert. It seems sort of silly to do that extra step, adding weight and another potential source of creaking, when you could just leave it unthreaded and push in a BB92 bottom bracket.

I wouldn't let my purchasing decision be dictated by whether or not a bike has a threaded or BB92 bottom bracket - there are more important factors to consider.
  • + 4
 @mikekazimer: I came upon a few folks on this site who claimed that BB standard is an extremely important factor. That they would never buy a bike with pressfit and that X bike sucks, one can find similar options with a threaded BB. Please respect that. Someone has to. Otherwise people like me who think that BB Nazis are virtue signalling vegan cat herders will take over...
  • + 8
 @mikekazimer: because a threaded BB is a lot easier for your home mechanic to replace without messing up the BB or the expensive frame and the tool to do it is way cheaper? Because the chances for creaks are way lower? Because the threaded insert is bonded to the frame so that part isn't going to creak with imperfect tolerances like the PressFit BB? Because you can just get 73mm threaded BB and call it a day instead of trying to figure out which of the myriad of PF standards you have on your bike and make sure you get the right one and right cranks/spacing when replacing cranks? Because it was a standard nobody asked for and a solution to a non-existent problem?
  • + 3
 @BaeckerX1: BB92 bearings are big enough to be replaced using a small metal tube and a hammer within same time as it takes to replace threaded BB for someone with basic sensitivity and coordination skills
  • + 2
 @BaeckerX1: make no mistake I prefer threaded but I won't cry as much about it as after 24mm GXP spindles...
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Hammers are definitely my preferred choice for working on my expensive carbon bikes.
  • + 2
 @BaeckerX1: I am just saying that it is not the end of the world. As to expensive carbon bikes I think if you are more scared of treating it just as you would treat an alu frame you should consider changing to road biking or track. Any rock on a trail or bike just tipping over into the forest floor can give it more scratches than a hammer while changing bearings. If someone is afraid of scratching or denting carbon he should not buy carbon. It's a kind of a rather awful petty, one that parents with issues have. Like mine. I know this mental issue very well, they call it caring for the stuff you own, but in reality it is just a form of c*ntery - it sucks.
  • + 2
 A press fit bottom bracket isn't a game changer, I've got one now. I think the issue is that eventually it will ovalize.
The bike will probably be obsolete, but I remember ovalizing the head tube on an early 80's Cannondale roadbike. I tried building it up with jb weld, which worked pretty well for a while, but I eventually got rid of the frame.
I would think a bb receives as much force. Maybe not, as a fork is quite a lever acting on the headtube during braking. "Not an engineer!"
A threaded bb insert in a carbon frame that had keyways, would probably last well past when the bike is obsolete.
  • + 1
 So this bike in Australia costs $7K AUD, not so bad right. However it also costs $7K in France... In euros...

Which is roughly 11K back in Australia... Sooo free trip to here if you want that bike? haha
  • + 3
 You're all wrong. The CAD is worth less than the AUD and is Australia that bike retails for 7k. Y'all got your panties in a twist arguing over nothing.
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns It was a joke. The point is I shouldn't have to "hit it with a small metal tube and a hammer" to solve a problem that didn't exist in the first place (threaded BBs worked great). :eyeroll: Your post comes across as super condescending and maybe you shouldn't make assumptions about people when you post. Your assessment of me couldn't be farther from the truth.
  • + 1
 @BaeckerX1: sorry I meant “you” in general terms. I have no idea what I was writing.
  • + 1
 @Powderface @mikekazimer: Uk price also includes VAT at 20%, which makes the Canadian price more like $8500. To echo your comment, still not cheap, but better than $12k or $10k
  • + 0
 @mikekazimer: still completely rediculous when you can get top tier bikes from other brands such as giant for half the price.
  • + 2
 @mhoshal: the top of the line carbon Giant Trance is $8700 with a pretty comparable spec. The pricing really doesn't seem far off what a bike with X01, top end SRAM brakes, top end fork, carbon cranks and a carbon wheelset costs. From almost anyone other than the direct to consumer brands like YT or upstarts like GG.
  • + 0
 @mikekazimer: @Baeckerx1 brought up these 5 valid points on why Press Fit is inferior, do you disagree with any of them?

"because a threaded BB is a lot easier for your home mechanic to replace without messing up the BB or the expensive frame and the tool to do it is way cheaper? Because the chances for creaks are way lower? Because the threaded insert is bonded to the frame so that part isn't going to creak with imperfect tolerances like the PressFit BB? Because you can just get 73mm threaded BB and call it a day instead of trying to figure out which of the myriad of PF standards you have on your bike and make sure you get the right one and right cranks/spacing when replacing cranks? Because it was a standard nobody asked for and a solution to a non-existent problem?"

His first point can't be emphasized enough, what does it say about the throw mentality of the industry when you cannot remove a perfectly good product from one frame to install it on another? It tells me its an industry that clearly doesn't care about environmental waste or recycling and re-using things.

@woofer brings up the possibility of ovallizing, I've actually seem this happen on a press fit frame, once it starts to get loose during a ride the pedaling forces will grind the frame material away.

Manufacturers such as SRAM are now compromising the integrity of their products to deal with the different bb standards. Instead of choosing the ideal bearing size for the intended bottom bracket, the Dub bb uses a compromised size that works with both standards.

Press fit is a compromise to the industry, wasteful, and often a pain for mechanics and bike shops.

I would also prefer not to work around the toxic glues that are sometimes recommended during the installation process of some press fit bb's.

Press fit is based upon a marketing lie in order to bring down manufacturing costs for bike manufacturers. The end result is compromises everywhere and less profitable bike shops.
  • + 2
 @Flowcheckers: Not to mention that they made us all, the customers, their beta testers while they figured out how to get PressFit BBs right. So many of us were stuck with the creaks and issues associated with the multiple types of PF standards (on expensive bikes mind) while they were constantly tweaking it to fix a problem that we never had with threaded BBs. Now there are generations of bikes with tons of different PF BB types that most bike shops don't stock. You often have to order online when you need a new BB, and moving parts between bikes (like upgrading a frame and saving our parts) is a damn nightmare. I've spoken with my wallet and only buy bikes with threaded BBs. Some people might call that silly, but the only way to get the bike industry to pay attention is to not buy stuff that doesn't work or we don't want (like plus bikes that were once sold as the next best thing for mountain bikes, but are mostly being phased out now). There are so many awesome bikes out now that I'm completely fine eliminating an entire bike if it has a PressFit BB. Look at how many bike companies use the once-standard threaded BBs as a marketing item, so obviously some are noticing.
  • + 2
 I think if you are going to pay $6k for a bicycle you are just going to take it to a shop for a new BB or other specialty tool required work (assuming that you actually ride something like that for leisure vs showing off to your dentist friends). If not, then you probably have the required tools and aren't complaining here anyway.

As for ovalizing the BB. I'd think that is a rare case. If it were more common, everyone would be complaining about it and manufacturers would have moved away from it long ago. My YT has a BB92. I keep it clean and covered in grease to keep crap out. A threaded BB would be better, but so far this one hasn't given me any reason to want something else. YMMV.
  • + 3
 @mikekazimer: I have had four BB92 bikes so far,and never had the slightest problem.
So to the complainers I say WTF are you talking about.
  • + 1
 @wickedfatchance: I had one BB92 bike, an alloy Pivot Mach 5.7. The bike was awesome except after having it for awhile the BB would always develop loud creaks after a month or 2 no matter how many times I changed it or what bike shop I took it to. Maybe there have been some improvements since then, but it was too much of a pain in the ass for me to go back to a bike without a threaded BB, especially since there are so many awesome bikes with threaded BBs. Even bike companies like Evil who started with their new bikes using PressFit BBs (OG Following, Wreckoning, etc.) have gone back to threaded BBs. There's obviously a reason for this.
  • + 1
 @wickedfatchance: I killed RF BB92 for Hope crankset in less than 4 months. Hope bearings in 6-8 months. Changed to Shimano and it is holding up. I blame BB92 + fat axle
  • + 1
 @BaeckerX1: Thankyou for the reply.Do all Pivots with BB92 have the same trouble?
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Not quite understanding.A adapter from pressfit to threaded?
  • + 1
 @wickedfatchance: I don't know. The Pivot Mach 5.7 came out in like 2011 IIRC. I haven't had it in awhile. Not sure about their current bikes. And this wasn't using a 30 axle like Waki said. This was SRAM X9 standard 2x crank at the time.

Waki is talking about using a 30mm spindle (like what RaceFace uses) in a PF92 frame with BB92 bottom bracket, so the bearings are much smaller than what's used in a BB92 for 24mm spindles. With many cranks using 30mm spindles, it's become a problem. The bearings wear out much faster.

www.fanatikbike.com/products/cinch-bb92-bottom-bracket
  • + 1
 @wickedfatchance: I had hope crankset with 30mm spindle. At first I used Race Face BB92 bearings with it. They died quickly. Nothing new from RF. Then I bought Hope. It took them few months more. At that point I have spent around 140$ on 2 pairs of BB bearings, that is like 4 sets of threaded. I got tired of Hope Crankset giving me a few sorts of pain and went for the boring but light and reliable SLX that has 24mm spindle. Larger ball bearings as @BaeckerX1 says.

Now I do get why BB92 exists. It widens the usable BB shell for complex swingarm/ chainstay designs. Like on my bike. What I don’t get is why bikes with simple solutions use it.
  • + 1
 Actually with the thread-together PF90 shells like from Wheels Manuf, they are installed just like the old style threaded ones except I add some Loctite 609. Changing the bearings is harder and the process is more expensive though.
  • + 1
 @JohanG: I am not sure. As long as the BB92 bearings don’t seize in the shell, the process is only a bit more complicated and time taking. I have had outboard threaded bearings seizing on me on several occasions (despite using grease) and then it is just as painful as any BB92 removal. Just in a different way. And you better have a nice threaded BB cup removal tool for this so that when you hammer it, it won’t loosen up damaging the dimples, making you ask for an angle grinder. I never messed up the threads, but was close on a. number of occasions, while many people did screw them up. Ironically, in my experience, steel cro-mo frames are more prone to seizing with outboard bbs
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Light coat of grease and Teflon tape is the most effective thing I've found to use on threaded BB's, prevents creaking and seizing. Super cheap, non toxic. Why are you hammering on the threaded bb tool? Shouldn't be necessary.

@BaeckerX1 I'm with you, I'll never buy a Press Fit frame again as long as there are manufacturers making great bikes with threaded BB's. PF is a potential trouble spot for any frame that has it, and I like to be able to switch parts between frames rather than throw them away.

@mikekazimer The bike industry almost always prioritizes the interests of bike manufacturers over bike shops. The BB sh*tshow we have now is entirely due to bike reviewers and consumers not being critical thinkers and buying bike manufacturers marketing BS hook, line, and sinker.
I appreciate that you are at least all for threaded BB's in aluminum frames and hope you encourage manufacturers to do this.
  • + 2
 @Flowcheckers: why would I hammer a BB tool put around a seized threaded BB? Because it lets go after a few hits, while I don't need to do God knows what by just turning it? "I will never buy a pressfit frame", that's like saying I will never date a girl with brown hair. List of priorities of most people feature BB standard quite far dwn the list, after geometry, wheel size, suspension travel, suspension type, price, material, looks and possibly a few more. Lighten up man.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns:
"God knows what" simply involves the use of a leverage bar instead of potentially damaging your tools, your bike, or your body.

It's important for consumers to take principled stands in order to improve the industry, just my opinion. That's why consumers need to keep bringing this issue up on every bike reviewed on Pinkbike involving a Press Fit BB, reminding consumers and manufacturers that we view it as a compromise. The fact that some manufacturers such as Specialized have listened to consumers and changed back to threaded shows it's working and with more pressure we can eliminate more PF BB's. No lightening up, no compromise, many mechanics and riders desire threaded BB purity. Only exception is on frames where it might be necessary, but that's questionable since in most cases threaded bb gives manufacturers more flexibility.
  • + 1
 @Flowcheckers: so a few knocks with a hammer are more potentially damaging than using a long arm? All that with a tool that works using eccentric force?
  • + 1
 @BaeckerX1: Sorry,I've been offline for a bit.
Are you aware that oversize, outer shell bearings are available to take up clearance issues caused by imperfect manufacturing tolerances?
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I see.So in fact, your issue was caused by fitting a non stock ,bigger,spindle. And was resolved with returning to stock parts.
What's the problem with PP92,again?
  • + 28
 The DHR2 is NOT a rear specific tyre. Just like the DHF isn't front specific
  • - 4
flag Foxy87 (Feb 11, 2019 at 4:53) (Below Threshold)
 Dont say that, I got downvoted alot for it :-D
  • + 7
 funny, look at the WC circuit and a lot of DHR2 on the fronts of bikes...
  • + 8
 Not disputing this (ok, I am a bit), but what do the F and R mean?
  • + 5
 @BenPea: Originally they did mean front and rear but Maxxis dropped that when people started mixing it up.
  • + 5
 @jeremy3220: I thought they stood for "freeride" and "race" but I don't work for Maxxis, so what do I know.
  • + 4
 @dcaf: It was front and rear until Maxxis quickly realized it was a mistake to limit their use. The 2009 catalog clarifies they can be run front or rear but if running both to run the DHF up front and the DHR out back.
  • + 4
 @BenPea: "fast" and "really fast"
  • + 1
 I have come to love the DHF on the rear. Soon I want to try out the DHR2 on front if I could just get ahold of a 29er w/ DD.
  • + 3
 In the words of Spock: "interesting". In what scenario would you put an R on the front and a F on the rear?
  • - 5
flag jjhobbs (Feb 11, 2019 at 7:18) (Below Threshold)
 DHR - Race(grippier/slower)
DHF- Freeride (firmer/faster)
  • + 2
 @BenPea: According to the Internet ist F for Freeride and R for Race. Check the comment section below threshold.

In the end, it probably used to be Front and Rear like Jeremy3220 stated and then changed that. So we are all kind of right ;-D
  • + 0
 @jeremy3220: surely R up front??
  • + 5
 @rock3gozy maxxis seem to think it's designed with the rear wheel in mind:

The Minion DHR II is a complete redesign. Acceleration, cornering and braking have all been improved. The shoulder knobs were borrowed from the legendary Minion DHF and then beefed up to handle duty as a rear tyre. The centre tread has been heavily ramped and siped to roll fast and track straight under braking. Pair the DHR II with the Minion DHF for the ultimate aggressive riding combo!

That's straight from maxxis' website. Of course you can run any tyre on either end, but it's primarily designed to aid braking and acceleration grip (the wider 'paddles' straight across the tread) whereas the f is better for cornering grip with the more in-line lugs. I personally run dhfs both ends, I like the predictability and faster rolling speed, plus I find they last longer.
  • + 5
 @jjhobbs: DHF has greater peak cornering grip so basically any combo except DHR front with DHF rear...which is what people have figured out it seems.
  • - 1
 @inked-up-metalhead: ok, but since when did riders want a beefed up rear tyre? When every tyre review is always grippier front,faster rolling rear.. have I missed a new standerd??
  • + 2
 @jjhobbs: Why would a race tire be designed to be slower?
  • + 1
 @jjhobbs: ask maxxis. I'm only reporting on what their own website states. It's usually the case though, tyres designed for grip and acceleration on the rear often have the same paddle like lugs, whereas fronts often have a more linear tread. Panaracers smoke and dart were the original front and rear specific tread patterns, the rear is literally horizontal bars and the front is forwards pointing arrows.
  • + 1
 @jjhobbs: You want beefed up rear tires for consistency in turns. Also, I tend to beat the crap out of my rear tires.
  • + 0
 @rock3gozy - what? wh... why would you say that?! That's like... saying that Santa Claus does not exist to 2 year old kids. I hope it was worth it for you, you a-hole! Big Grin
  • + 2
 @Foxy87: check out pumpjumpnflows link, straight from the horses mouth. It's front and rear, more of a way to differentiate between the two these days than an actual limitation, yes, but it's definitely what they mean.
  • + 1
 @inked-up-metalhead: back in early 2000s when DHF and DHR indeed meant front and rear. It has been 18 years though... our cognition, way of perceiving the world is constantly changing. Some of us moved on, some didn’t. Some folks surely would tell you that using DHR2 on the front is silly.
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: yep, they now mean Fred and Roger and in 2019 it's ok for both of them to be seen in loving unison on the same bicycle.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Exactly. The original DHR sucked so bad it would be a death sentence on the front. and with the exception of the letters "maxxis dhr", has nothing in common with the DHR2. The DHR2 is so freakin good you can run it front or back with a massive bonus being the braking control when it is on the front. Guess where all your braking power is people? Front...Love it. Have run dual DHF's aswell and they do indeed haul ass...but there's a reason racers would run a DHR2 on the front....braking. "He who brakes last, wins"
  • + 1
 @loopie: Different farts from different parts. I appreciate braking of DHR2 but I don't feel as confident when cornering on it as on DHF. THe latter seems more talkative to me. DHR2 is halfway to HR and HR2 which are on off tyres.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Indeed. I approach it from a weekend warrior perspective these days...I'll sacrifice a fraction of a second in corner speed for the braking control of the other. Custom is very nice too...slice a hair off each side of the "paddle blocks" of the DHR2 and it opens up the corner knobs a hair...But I don't bother anymore to be honest Smile
...the popularity of the HR's is still beyond me when there are DHF/R2's available...haha
  • + 0
 @loopie: it's not only that, the DHF leans over smoothly and kind of feels like it settled. With DHR2 it is a bit of guess work. But still this is bing picky. DHR2 is a great tyre by all books. I just wish the SS had the center knobs of Rock Razor and was widely available in Double Down Razz
  • + 2
 @jjhobbs You may be just trolling or joking, but I'm going to assume you're serious and give you a serious answer. Faster rolling does not mean less durable. This is usually determined by the knob profile and tire compound. You can have a fast rolling rear that is also durable. You want a more durable tire on the rear because that's where you tend to do the most damage in rocks, roots, etc. Many people run a lighter casing on the front because they're lighter on the front of the bike and the front of the bike is floating over obstacles, and then the rear tire is slamming into things because there's more of your weight there. Think about it, when you were running tubes, which did you flat more? Even running tubeless you'll typically see more slashes, sidewall damage, and pinch flats on the rear tire than the front. It's very common to see people running a heavier casing on the rear than the front, or a tire insert in only the rear rim/tire. That's a high level explanation and hope it helps.
  • + 1
 @BaeckerX1: Beefy is what is causing confusion. It could mean harder compound or bigger nobs. Choose the one that makes sense in his question.
  • + 1
 @BenPea: I chose to answer his question seriously instead of being a dick about it because maybe it was a valid, honest question. I approached it as such. Plus the post he was responding to said directly "and then beefed up to handle duty as a rear tyre"
  • + 2
 @BaeckerX1: My answer was meant to have a neutral tone, not trying to be a nob about it. It's not clear to me either.
  • + 1
 @BaeckerX1: makes sense, as re toughness.. but it's toughness is due to a harder compound, hence it's better on the rear.. but isn't the DHR softer?? Hence better on front?
  • + 1
 @jjhobbs: "3C Maxx-Terra is softer and offers more traction than 3C MaxxSpeed, yet provides better treadwear and less rolling resistance than MaxxGrip." ....'Terra' & 'Grip' are available in both DHF/DHR2. A common combo is Grip on the front and Terra on the back.
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: maxxis still list it as a rear tyre, and as the manufacturer I'm gonna listen to them. As I've already stated, if anything yes, it's more of a name than and actual designation of which wheel it can be run on, but the letter r means rear and the letter f means front. What don't you understand about that, the manufacturer says that's what it stands for, and just cos you can run it up front doesn't change what it stands for. It's not a opinion, belief or something open to interpretation, it's what it means. You can't say 'I can run it in the front so it cant possibly mean rear, that would mean I could only run it on the rear', even if it's just historic it's what it means. You can't decide it means something different just because you use it in a different way, that's not how products work. Bananas haven't been renamed edible dildos yet I'm sure people use them that way.
  • - 1
 @inked-up-metalhead: No I don't decide that. That's how social interactions work. I just describe it. I am just giving you an advice: if you say that it means rear and front in a group of good riders - you will be laughed at. I mean you will be lucky if they will laugh (concealed resentment is worse as we learn in high school) If you reply that "Maxxis says that on their website" in a serious tone, they will think you are a dork. They will say Maxxis is stupid if you are lucky. A Question "what does F and R stand for" is liek asking whether goirls boobs feel like bags filled with sand. What is it that you don't understand?
  • + 4
 Proof, once again, that speaking the same language is no guarantee of successful communication.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: hahahahahahahagahahahahHh no. Saying its means down hill freeride will get you laughed at cos that sounds more than rediculous. Everyone I've ever spoken to knows it's front and rear. Again you idiot, you don't have to use it that way, but that's it name. It's name. The fact is referencing it to anyone else id say dhr or dhf, so there's that, but if someone asked me what f and r meant I'd tell them it's front and rear, if they asked why I'd say because maxxis say so. Nothing of that makes me a dork, knowing something, otherwise everyone everywhere ever is a dork for knowing anything.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: I really am struggling to understand how your arguing about the name of something. It's what it's called. Theres no two ways about it, it's its name. I understand perfectly well you can use either either end, as I've stated many times, I'm only saying it's actually name in rear or front. You can't change that, even if it's not how it's used. That's its name, I don't understand how you can try to be so condescending about it when it's a fact.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: how do you think you know better than the manufacturer? Im pretty sure you don't, and your things of its akin to asking if boobs feel like sand bags is like asking 'does it mean freeride and race' because it clearly doesn't, its wrong. I just don't understand how you can be still arguing about it when it's right there for all to see.
  • + 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: are you nuts? i am consdenscending about it because majority of people, including pro racers on World Cup and EWS circuit install DHR2s and DHFs on front and rear regardless of what the manufacturer says. They do not know better, they just do it because it works for them. Nobody normal gives a flying damn what F and R stands for. It just creates unnecessary confusion considering the above. What is it that you don't understand? Are you trying to reinvent something here? Minion SS to be run exclusively for Single Speed bikes?
  • + 5
 So Fred and Roger it is...
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: what bit of its the name do you not understand? Why can you not get your head around it being called something, even if you can use it in a different way? I have never said its meant to only be run on the rear, I've reiterated that many, many times now, you seem too stupid to realise what I'm saying, so one last time:

F means front

R means rear

It's not much more than a name now

I run dhf both wheels

It still means front and rear.

I've never said it should only be used in the denoted location

It's the name.

It's the name.

It's the name.
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns: I can't tell if your a shit troll or a stupid human. Read all of my comments, not once am I arguing it's actual use, I was purely trying to clear up the facts surrounding its name. I have never brought its use into contention, I know you can run it on the front, I have done ffs, I just prefer dhfs, but I'd never say it wasn't a minion dhr meaning downhill rear. Dya know why? Cos that's its f*cking name. There's 2 parts to this that you can't seem to separate, the name and the usage. I'm just trying to get the point across on the name, not the usage. If you can't work out there's a difference I think you should seek help.
  • + 4
 @jeremy3220: no they didn't its the riders that just paid no mind to it the letters are still there and they still mean front and rear.
  • + 2
 @jjhobbs: As @loopie said, both tires come in multiple compounds that are either are softer and grip better at the expense of wear life and rolling resistance, or are harder and roll faster and last longer while not being as grippy. It's not as simple as saying one is softer than the other. Mountain biking has a lot to get your head around for anyone new to the sport.
  • + 1
 @BaeckerX1: not new btw... Regardless of the compound type, the inherent characteristics of the DHR, are better suited to a front mounting.. and yes, I'm a self appointed expert,???? as everyone else on here..
  • + 1
 @jjhobbs: Sorry, not saying you were. I just mean, for those that are new, the bike companies and parts manufacturers certainly don't make it easy. Smile

Personally, I honestly didn't like the DHR2 in the front and run DHF on both sides right now. The DHR2 didn't corner in the front like I came to expect from the DHF for some reason that I couldn't put a finger on. DHR2 is a great tire in the rear with great grip and braking traction if you don't mind the rolling resistance, but it quickly becomes an unbearable boat anchor at the larger WT sizes.
  • + 1
 @BaeckerX1: no probs... Your right though, too many choices.. still think it's strange for
a good grip /braking tyre to be rear specific, but hey ho, I may just go HR2 .. :-)
  • - 1
 To me the way DHR2 corresponds to DHF is that by choosing DHR2 for the front I am trading a bit of cornering predictability, nice lean over feel and rolling resistance for fantastic braking. Now depending on the riding style one may choose one over another. I can see how people who are good at nailing brake spots will love the DHR2, especially those who focus on DH rather than long rides. If you choose softer compounds it is a damn snail. DHF has a really decent rolling for what it does on descents and in DD casing it can get through a lot without puncturing. If only Maxxis redesigned the SS to have Rock Razor style square center knobs
  • - 3
 @jjhobbs: DHR2 is not rear specific Jesus Christ... thousands of damn good riders including pros run it as a front tyre, Bontrager G5 is a copy of it and is being ridden as a front tyre... in fact I haven't seen any Trek athlete using the G4 (which is a copy of DHF)the only rear specific Minion is the SS and you can actually use it as a front tyre for an XC bike. There is nothing confusing about this... other than Maxxis website and folks like @inked-up-metalhead repeating this bullshit.
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: I think what we all need is a brain tread that offers more trolling resistance.
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns: your an idiot. What bit of there's a difference between usage and the name don't you get? I've never once said you can't use it up front, just the r in the name means rear. What is so hard to comprehend about a name being something that the company decides, but the usage is completely down to the consumer? It's the name. Nothing you say will change that.
  • + 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: “your an idiot” Good luck with that. I said through each single of my posts that naming these tyres as front and rear is stupid because it insinuates that they are front and rear specific, then reinforcing this by repeating it again and again is stupid. I could write that You ARE a typical brick head with English flag next to the name but I won’t since I don’t know you.

@BenPea if I wanted to troll here I would say that a white man and a pink man are arguing about dhf and dhr2, while children in Africa are starving.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Calling the British flag English is the only capital felony left in the UK (where there are also starving children, with numbers on the up).
Christ, this is like the clipless debate all over again...
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: autocorrect is a bitch. And you've never said that, you've constantly denied it stands for r because you can use it on the front. And tbh if someone can't work out you can fit a tyre on either wheel probably should stick to the manufacturers recommendations anyway. So really your just perpetuating the biggest problem the world faces, and that's lack of common sense and ability to work shit out for yourself. I'm pretty sure most people can work out its just the name and it doesn't really mean anything other than that's how you denote it.
  • + 0
 Ok ok reset. I honestly cannot believe I had this conversation. I am an idiot. The proof is here. Everyday. With this behavior If I was living in England in 1800s I’d be sent to New Zeland to breed Wombats.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: "I can see how people who are good at nailing brake spots will love the DHR2, especially those who focus on DH rather than long rides" ...That would be me Sir. I brake short and hard...they're on or they're off. Added bonus is when a guy gets off line....that braking control in the front really helps reign it in quick.
  • + 2
 ..I'll just add while I'm here...when asked "But doesn't 'R' stand for 'rear'?" ...I reply, "Yes, DownHillFront & DownHillRear but disregard the Rear designation." ...then we may or may not continue the conversation and I'll explain further....lol
  • + 0
 @loopie: equally you could say ‘when they 1st appeared they were DH front & Rear, but these days as the designed have changed people have found they work well on either end depending on what you want, I.e. DHR in the front for racers wanting good braking or DHF for free riders wanting sideways stability coming off jumps, braking less important so thinking of them as R - Race or F - Freeride maybe less confusing’

Let’s face it if Maxxis started calling them Freeride and race would anyone say it doesn’t make any sense now that no one would point and laugh at a DHR on the front of someone’s bike or a DHF on the rear of someone’s bike?

Back 2013 ish when I bought a new Commencal Supreme Freeride it came with DHF’s front and rear.
  • + 2
 @StevieJB: No prob, it doesn't matter to me too much what people call'em...they're Minions. Both are DH race or anywhere level tires. I suspect the words Race and Freeride are simply coincidental to the minions original designation of a F&R...as a matter of fact, and not that I've been privy to all conversations or articles, but this very comment thread is the first time I've heard it called DHFreeride and DHRace. Anywho...mount'em up and let the good times roll my friends Smile
  • + 1
 @loopie: I think your right, it was a case of someone fishing and forcing words to fit cos they didn't know what it actually was, this was the first time I've heard it to. As I've stated at every point along the way, either tyre can be run either end, it was all the name that I was debating and getting frustrated that people can't understand that just cos they can run it on the front doesn't mean it isn't called dhr(ear).
  • + 26
 $9000 little man. Put that shit in my hand. And if that shit doesn't show, than you owe me, owe me owe.
  • - 5
flag drs140t (Feb 11, 2019 at 3:22) (Below Threshold)
 ????
  • + 3
 Lol!!!
  • + 8
 My jungle love! Owie owie ow! I think I wanna know ya know ya, yeh what....
  • + 8
 @hamplanet: Morris Day and the mother f***in Time!
  • + 4
 Snoogans
  • + 0
 Noise noise noise
  • + 1
 @drs140t:
You dont know Jungle love? That shit is the MAD notes. Writen by god herself and handed down to the greatest band in the world. The mother f’ing Time!
  • + 0
 Snootch to the nootch
  • + 20
 Just bought a 19 Honda 450 CRF....cost less than this bike.
  • + 1
 Oh hell yea. You should throw some dual ti-4's on there
  • + 1
 Like those Hondas...and depreciation will be lower than any mtb...
  • + 1
 @TDMAN: yea dirt bikes dont depreciate and it's prettty damn stupid. people think their 88 cr125 is worth 1700
  • + 13
 10G for a Merida. Probably Mayweather will buy.
  • + 7
 They're smoking some strong stuff over there in Taiwan.
  • + 2
 I doubt it. He can't afford a suit...
  • + 3
 He might, but only because he can’t read the price tag...
  • + 1
 @headshot: Instant death penalty, surely.
  • + 9
 "With short travel bike reviews, this is usually the point where the line ‘great going up, compromised coming down’ gets trotted out."

I would be curious when the last time a line like this actually appeared in a Pinkbike review.
  • + 10
 This is a 123/130 bike why compare it to the Intense Sniper or the SC Blur XC both 100 travel bikes?
  • + 10
 I'm going to get downvoted but I didn't really like this review. It really looks like a generic review "climb like a goat, as capable as longer travel bike in the descent"-style. Those afforementionned "longer travel" bikes are never specifically named, and it often feels like the reviewer is comparing with bikes from 10 years ago...
  • + 6
 It seems like the main complaint/con with 130mm bike reviews is that the shorter travel will hold you back/isn't enough to ride gnarly terrain or steep descents. That's not what the bike is intended for so why is this a negative point in the review? I just don't get it.
  • + 2
 @ThunderChunk I have no clue either... If you buy a 120mm travel bike you know it's a 120mm bike and don't expect it to behave like a 140-160mm.
  • + 4
 And completely not available in the USA. Merida owns 49% of Specialized as well as handles most of their manufacturing and part of the deal where they bailed out Specialized by buying that large percentage was a guarantee that they wouldn't sell their bikes in Canada or the USA. If you want one over here, you basically need to buy one online and get it shipped here, or visit someplace where they are sold (like Mexico) and bring it back yourself.
  • + 1
 IIRC Merida no longer owns that part of Specialized...
  • + 7
 Looks quite nice, too bad it was not compared with the new Giant Trance 29 - that looks like the closest competitor.
  • + 1
 down to the color scheme Smile
  • + 2
 I've got a lot of time for Merida. They seem to operate under the radar and produce some good looking well specced bikes. Rode a 160 last year on a demo and it was great. The prices are a bit high RRP, but here in the UK you can get some blinding deals on them when the sales are on.
  • + 2
 My only comment is that the seat tube seems incredibly long in the large frame size. The large Santa Cruz Tallboy has a 17.72" seat tube which allows for a longer dropper if slamming your seat is desired. Speaking from experience, getting your saddle as low as possible, especially on a shorter travel bike like this, is paramount for gnarly descents.
  • + 4
 The idea of this bike is probably the perfect bike for what 90% of riders out there should be riding, pity about the ridiculous price...
  • + 3
 Lol. $9k for a 28lb "XC" bike?! Jesus what are they smoking. Rocky Mountain makes a better, similar spec'd, stronger framed XC bike for $7k that weighs 4lbs less!
  • + 6
 MIERDA
  • + 1
 ahahahaha hold this W
  • + 3
 Rode this model the weekend, for a short travel bike you can get into a whole heap of trouble with the confidence it gives you, bloomin lovely
  • + 3
 That's the weird thing with these progressive shortish travel bikes. Is getting into unexpected trouble a new mtb genre? If so I think I'm going to splash out on the new Unno Wadavaidon.
  • + 1
 My first "real" bike was Merida mats tfs something... long time ago. It was a fantastic bike in his segment. But this one is like trying to sell a smartfone with Xiaomi name on it for 1500 Euro
  • + 3
 I don't think paint and decals are serious problem for a bike, or affect to the riding skills.
  • + 2
 This means an Enduro 9000 model might be a reality. Please do it...just...please....do it. The comment section....I'm already dying.
  • + 3
 I'm sure it's a good bike but that price puts it up against some pretty stiff competition.
  • + 1
 Had two of those broke both still a very fun bike climbes like a goat and excllent dh capabilteis switched to an e-mtb got fed on clinbing like agoat ????‍♂️????????
  • + 2
 Real question. Why would you ever want less suspension travel? I'm not talking geometry or anything else, but more travel.
  • + 1
 Vorsprung just released a video on this: www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsbMU-JTCJI
  • + 2
 More fun.
  • + 1
 @JohanG: Thanks! That was really informative. It seemed like he doesn't adress progressive spring rates much in the first episode. I'll check out the second part of that video.
  • + 1
 Production costs have not increased by the factors that retail prices have. The prices that bike companies are throwing out these days. It's like they're all taking the piss.
  • - 1
 How am I supposed to get any cred for using unnecessarily little travel if the bike does not come from an edgy company? A true Down Country bike is an updorked 7k wonder from SC, Transition, Yeti or (insert edgy British brand making bikes from steel) Merida doesn’t fit the bill for any money.

EDIT: Did I say updorked? I meant to say upforked...
  • + 3
 Crap spec and what looks likes a mediocre frame for 10k? Hard pass
  • + 1
 Can you comment on this bike compared to the stumpjumper ST 29 model? That bags the shootout! ..
  • + 1
 Does a few million units per year count as under the radar?
The new Pike is really good.
  • + 2
 What bottle cage is that?
  • + 1
 price is over the roof...even 7000CAD would be robbery!
  • + 1
 looks like a giant trace 29 for 3x the price.
  • + 1
 WTF Ape Index: +4" means?
  • + 2
 It means your arm span is 4 inches wider than your height. It's a climber thing primarily.
  • + 1
 I feel like the Ibis Ripley LS would be a better comparison.
  • + 1
 Sorry, I'll take my Orange Stage 4 over this any day.
  • + 1
 Code brakes on an xc rig? why?
  • + 1
 maybe to justify the 7000Euros
  • + 1
 Because Guide sucks, every time a non-XC bike has guide brakes it's listed as a negative. It's funny to note that with Sram you need Dh duty brakes if your bike has more than 100m travel
  • + 1
 Right? It comes with better brakes than my DH bike
  • + 1
 Price aside this thing looks good, would definately like to test one.
  • + 1
 Looks like that's Ali Clarkson's bike. hmmmm.
  • + 1
 $9k? Because Merida.
  • + 1
 $$$$$ HORSE SHIT!
  • + 1
 Makes no sense to me
  • - 1
 Ridiculous price aside, this is one of the best looking bikes around imho.
  • - 1
 Turners are the best looking
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