dualsuspensiondave

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dualsuspensiondave mikekazimer's article
May 9, 2019 at 15:17
May 9, 2019
Opinion: Why Is Everyone Talking About Seat Tube Angles?
@davidsamuelhu: The steep seat tube angles don't have anything to do with seat height which is where the knee issues are likely to come from unless you never stretch. Riding a bunch without stretching the ITB can cause some patellofemoral pain. Knee extension should be closer to about 15 - 20 degrees from full extension for optimum power with most people (160 - 165 degrees of extension). Knee relative to spindle doesn't really matter much for that situation (knee pain).
dualsuspensiondave danielsapp's article
Apr 23, 2019 at 11:43
Apr 23, 2019
Review: 2019 Pivot Trail 429 - A Little Bit of Travel, A Whole Lot of Fun
@Ttimer: I didn't believe the hype until I rode multiple LT 29ers with both offsets. Bike journalists and product managers do agree on it. It's common sense from an engineering perspective. Go ride multiple LT 29ers back to back with both offsets. It's nothing like the small changes with axles and all that. FYI, I'm on 11 speed still, and don't buy into marketing until it's proven.
dualsuspensiondave danielsapp's article
Apr 23, 2019 at 9:08
Apr 23, 2019
Review: 2019 Pivot Trail 429 - A Little Bit of Travel, A Whole Lot of Fun
It makes a huge difference on long travel 29ers. You won't be seeing many without the shorter offset. Grip and maneuverability are much better.
Apr 13, 2019 at 6:10
Apr 13, 2019
dualsuspensiondave pinkbikeaudience's article
Apr 5, 2019 at 10:03
Apr 5, 2019
Now Finished: Ask Me Anything with Trauma & Orthopaedic Doctor Henry Turner
@GorgeousBeauGaston: You wrongly quoted what I said. Physical Therap[ists go to school for 7-8 years and require a doctoral degree. Both my wife and I have gone through the same training and $200k of student loans to do so. Would make your mechanical engineering degree look like a walk in the park (I'm now a civil engineer). You don't understand that Physical Therapists jobs are to fix the body from a MECHANICAL stand point. You have no idea the knowledge, research, and actual talent it takes to be a PT. They are no way, shape, or form a glorified massage therapist. PT's never recommend the use of drugs in just about any form. People need to understand kinesiology, modalities, medical research, etc. to make any type of judgement about a PT's job. There are good and bad in every line of work, however that's like me disagreeing with you about tolerances and machining without having any formal education. Wake up! The scientific community does agree with me, hence why insurance companies will not currently pay for disc herniation surgery without an emergency situation, and one has to do PT first. Everything billed to an insurance company has to be evidence based with many studies to back it up. Your article gives no other surgical option than fusion and says nothing about microdisectomies because they are not done for DDD as I pointed out. There are genetic components with many health issues, but they don't necessarily show themselves without the things I listed. Environmental factors almost always make the biggest difference in healthcare, that is common sense in the field. Degenerative Disc Disease is something that most people have. I have many degenerated discs right now, and they do not compress the spinal cord unless they are herniated. Therefore you did not have just a degenerative disc, it had to be a herniation to compress the spine that way. Three years ago, I herniated 2 discs from multiple different stresses when training, and making mistakes while being fatigued (very common). I've had DDD for 15 years before that. I went through the normal procedure and had a MRI. Surgery was an option for me because of the severity of a central herniation. I did all of the evidence based therapy everyday. Within 4 months I had almost no pain, and it would only be painful after about 9-10 hours sitting. Fast forward 2 years, not only has all of the pain subsided due to fixing the MECHANICAL part (weak core, poor posture, etc.), but also my deadlift went from 415lbs. before the injuries to 515lbs. One has to work hard to achieve those goals, and most people that normally opt for surgery are not interested in the hard work to fix the issue. Most don't understand that years of rehab and prehab are needed to prevent the injury again. You've got a big misconception of how healthcare works. PT is way under funded because there are no pharmaceutical companies funding the studies. PT is about fixing the problem, not creating a crutch or putting on a band aid. PT clinics are not big business models like the rest of the medical field. Here is a study that shows how to properly treat disc herniations without surgery because the surgery options are not shown to have better long term results. Surgical procedures are shown to not be the most beneficial except for short term pain relief, and in cases that the herniation is a medical emergency (usually less than 5%). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3812831/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2915533/ " Surgical intervention may result in faster relief of symptoms and earlier return to function, although long-term results appear to be similar regardless of type of management. The ultimate decision regarding type of treatment should be based on a surgeon-patient discussion, in light of proper surgical indications, duration of symptoms, and patient wishes."
dualsuspensiondave mattwragg's article
Apr 5, 2019 at 6:31
Apr 5, 2019
Opinion: Carbon and Aluminum Wheels - Does Stiffer Always Mean Better?
Good wheels they are but stiff compared to carbon or a j-bend DT Swiss rim, they are not.
dualsuspensiondave pinkbikeaudience's article
Apr 5, 2019 at 3:18
Apr 5, 2019
Now Finished: Ask Me Anything with Trauma & Orthopaedic Doctor Henry Turner
@GorgeousBeauGaston: Microdiscectomies are not what's done to "fix" degenerative discs. You are not aware of what a degenerative disc is, rather you are talking about herniated discs which are completely different. There is no surgical solution to degeneration of discs other than fusing. We don't have just cartilage between vertebrae. They are fluid filled to act like shock absorbers that have annular rings to protect them. There are a combination of techniques that involve intense strength programs, mobilizations, etc. to fix it. The main component essentially creates a vacuum inside the disc to pull it back back into place. It works, but can take about 2 years to fully rehab. A large percentage of injuries like that, are easily re-injured with surgical techniques. Removing the shock absorber and making yourself a hardtail is not logical. Even after surgery, one would need to do years of strength training to keep it there. The reason for injury like that is due to lack of strength, bad posture, flexion of the spine under load. The majority of surgical patients re-injure themselves in the same spot within 5 years. As a trained professional, with a wife that is a DPT, and also a patient that has fixed their herniations with evidence based PT upon multiple studies and surgeon recommendations, we as a Science community disagree with you.
dualsuspensiondave AndrewTaylor's article
Apr 4, 2019 at 6:14
Apr 4, 2019
Video: Andrew Taylor Visits West Virginia, Tennessee & North Carolina - AT's Ultimate 48 State Road Trip
I always look forward to watching this series. That said, you missed a ton of good riding in Pisgah. That's the beginner trails that you rode there.
dualsuspensiondave pinkbikeaudience's article
Apr 3, 2019 at 9:35
Apr 3, 2019
Now Finished: Ask Me Anything with Trauma & Orthopaedic Doctor Henry Turner
Never have surgery for degenerative discs. The vast majority of people have degenerated discs. Surgery outcomes from fused vertebrae are not good. An intense strength program with deadlifts, and other core work is essential to reducing pain and atrophy.
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