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duzzi RichardCunningham's article
Feb 12, 2018 at 12:10
Feb 12, 2018
duzzi pinkbikeaudience's article
Feb 2, 2018 at 9:33
Feb 2, 2018
Ask Pinkbike: Whistler, Sprocket Size, and Capable XC Bikes
@hllclmbr: yes of course it is well defined, too bad that the same effect is referred above both and "moment" and "leverage ratio", which have nothing to do with each other. But the point is, again, that the claim is nonsense. Chains work perfectly fine with 20-22 chain rings.
duzzi pinkbikeaudience's article
Jan 31, 2018 at 8:49
Jan 31, 2018
Ask Pinkbike: Whistler, Sprocket Size, and Capable XC Bikes
@Uuno: yes, but so what ... the same happens if you spin at 100 vs 70 rpm. Chains are built to operate with chain rings 22 to 50 ...
duzzi pinkbikeaudience's article
Jan 31, 2018 at 7:59
Jan 31, 2018
Ask Pinkbike: Whistler, Sprocket Size, and Capable XC Bikes
@Uuno: the leverage ratio obviously matter. But it is the ratio that matters not the size of the front chain ring taken by itself. There is no "moment" associated with a smaller chain ring. A bigger front chain ring might reduce friction by some infinitesimal amount, but otherwise it makes no difference to use a 26 or 36, or what used to be a standard 26/28+38, or a dual 36+50 like on many road bikes.
duzzi pinkbikeaudience's article
Jan 30, 2018 at 15:10
Jan 30, 2018
Ask Pinkbike: Whistler, Sprocket Size, and Capable XC Bikes
The silliness that passes for expertise at Pinkbike is sometimes mind boggling. The reason a 1x cannot go much lower than 28 or so chain ring is not an imaginary "moment (leverage ratio)". It is simply because even with a 10 cog in the back you simply would not have a high enough gear in front. The only solution is a bigger and bigger cog, so you can put a larger chain ring and have back a decent high gear. Actually, a better solution might be to put a second chain ring in front! What an idea!!!!!!
duzzi paulaston's article
Jan 27, 2018 at 11:14
Jan 27, 2018
Pinkbike Poll: Does Bike Weight Matter?
@YouHadMeAtDrugs: the weight of a bike has little to do with its "twitchyness" or other have said "stability". If you could, by magic, increase or decrease the weight of every single part of a bike by the same % you will discover that when it comes to "twitchyness" a 2 Kg bike would ride the same of a 16 kg one. And that is because their center of mass would remain constant, and the center of mass is the only thing that matters for a bike "stability".
duzzi paulaston's article
Jan 27, 2018 at 11:04
Jan 27, 2018
Pinkbike Poll: Does Bike Weight Matter?
@adrennan: A bike frame is like the housing of an engine, and there is no benefit adding weight to a housing. Call it a bike, a pair of shoes, the hull of a sailboat: the ideal weight is zero because the housing serves no other function other than delivering power to the medium (ground, or water). Now, it is a different story if the housing center of mass somehow hinders performance. Then yes, adding mass somewhere might help. Obvious case is for displacement sailboats, where you must add ballast to avoid capsizing (but look at hydrofoils!). And less obviously so in a downhill bike, where ballast will change the center of mass and might make the bike work better because it feels more ... balanced ... But otherwise weight of the housing (the bike) is always bad for the engine (you). There is no way out of it: it takes more power to move if you and your bike are heavier.
duzzi paulaston's article
Jan 26, 2018 at 14:07
Jan 26, 2018
Pinkbike Poll: Does Bike Weight Matter?
@adrennan: no it does not ...
duzzi RichardCunningham's article
Jan 25, 2018 at 12:04
Jan 25, 2018
The Short, Turbulent Life of URT Suspension
It took you just a short spin on asphalt to realize how scary the concept was. Imagine a bike that on a downhill, when you need the suspension the most, does the opposite of what you'd like it to do: it stiffens up and if you touch the brake cordially attempts to through you out of the saddle. Not only but the behavior of the bike is completely different depending on how much weight you put on the saddle. The lest you put on the worst it gets. But not only that: you end up riding two completely different bikes if you are on or off the saddle. Lovely. It sort of works if you can stay seated on a downhill. So ... find flat trails and you'd be fine! Funny thing is that UST was praised by a lot of the MTB "press" back in the time ... not sure how they managed to do that.
duzzi RichardCunningham's article
Jan 25, 2018 at 11:58
Jan 25, 2018
The Short, Turbulent Life of URT Suspension
@Flowcheckers: Remember that at Mountain Bike Fiction they never really tested the bikes! They took a photo shot and then used their imagination!
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