Bike Check: Jesse Melamed's Rocky Mountain Slayer

Jun 19, 2020 at 8:30
by Ed Spratt  


In 2019 Jesse Melamed had a year of ups and downs. He had some of his best results at the EWS, with third-place finishes in Rotorua and Madeira, but during the Val Di Fassa round he crashed in practice leading to a stable fracture of his left tib/fib, multiple fractures and dislocation of his left pinky and a fractured 5th metacarpal, which lead to some time away from racing. Later in the season at the Trophy of Nations in Finale Ligure alongside Remi Gauvin and Rhys Verner he would take 3rd position. For 2020 he is back looking for more top results, and before the season was put on hold he was planning on trying out a new race bike.

For the past few seasons, Jesse has been riding Rocky Mountain Instinct, but for at least the first few races of this season he was planning on trying out the new Slayer, which has 170mm of travel front and rear. With racing now set to begin at the end of August in Zermatt, we caught up with Jesse to hear about the setup on his new bike.
Jesse Melamed only has one podium finish this season but his consistency has landed him 2nd in the overall.
Rider Name // Jesse Melamed
Hometown: Whistler, B.C
Height: 170cm / 5'7"
Weight: 68kg / 150 lb
Instagram: @jessemelamed


Frame: Rocky Mountain Slayer 29 in Ride9 position 2 and with RideWrap protection // Size: Medium
Headset: FSA
Fork: Fox 38 Factory Grip2 170mm
Shock: Fox Float X2 Factory 170mm
Handlebar: RaceFace NextR 35mm rise 740mm
Stem: RaceFace TurbineR 32mm
Storage: OneUp EDC Tool
Brakes: Shimano XTR m9120
Rotors: Shimano XT 6-bolt 203mm
Crank: Shimano XTR 170mm
Chainring: Shimano XTR 32t
Chain: Shimano XTR 12sp
Wheels: RaceFace TurbineR
Tires: Assegai 2.5 WT DD MaxxGrip / DHR2 2.5 WT DD MaxxGrip
Inserts: Cush Core(Front and Rear)
Cassette: Shimano XTR 12sp 10-45
Pedals: Crankbrothers Mallet E
Derailleur: Shimano XTR Medium Cage
Shifter: Shimano XTR 12sp
Seat/Seatpost: Fox Transfer Post 175mm / WTB Silverado Ti with Custom RM graphic
Bike Weight: 37lbs?



What will this bike be used for?


The usual, lots of smashing. I switched to this bike after the 2019 race season to see how I liked it. After a month of playing around with it, I had made the decision to bring it to the first rounds of the 2020 season but that didn’t happen.

How does the setup change from your race bike last year?


I think the spec is the exact same. I had to adjust the stack height a bit but that’s about it. It made switching over pretty easy as everything was the same and I just had to get used to the way the bike rode.


Can you run us through your suspension setup?


In the past, my friends have told me my setup was super stiff, but on this one they say it is a little more plush. That could be purely down to the increased travel and improved suspension. I try to set it up for stability and consistency. I want to be able to plow through lines, hop and skip through sections and correct mistakes. I like to know how it’s going to react before an impact happens and for it to hold me up through rough sections or missed lines.

Could you give us a few more specifics and numbers on clicks with pressures, rebound?


Fork stays around ~92psi with 1-2 volume spacers, still trying to dial it in.
HSR = LSR = 5
HSC = 6
LSC = 8

Shock is around ~165psi depending on my weight and whether I’m wearing a bag or not. 2 spacers in it right now.
HSR = 12
LSR = 16
HSC = 16
LSR = 12

For even more further analysis of Jesse's suspension setup, you can check out his recent video below where he explains his setup up choices.





What does your cockpit setup look like?


I guess the first thing people notice are my cut grips. I like to run my hands right at the edge of my bar and with normal-sized grips I can’t get my brakes far enough outboard. I run the bite point so that my levers are parallel to the bar when fully squeezed.
I like my stem straight and my bars are rolled back 16 notches on the RaceFace bar. My right brake is always angled up slightly more than my left, injuries eh.

What about tire setup?


This is been pretty consistent recently, I go more in-depth about tire choice and differences in the video but I love the Assegai up front and DHR2 out back. Assegai has incredible traction in all circumstances and the DHR2 has unmatched braking so I can be late on the brakes and still slow the big wheels down. Pressures are usually 19.9 psi with Cush Core and DD casing. I’ll go down a psi if running DH casing or if it’s wet and rooty. I usually only change if it’s really muddy and slick in which case I’ll go to the Shorty in the front pretty quick but it usually takes grim conditions to swap to a Shorty in the rear as well.

Jesse opts for a Maxxis Assegai at the front and a DHR2 for the rear, both sized at 2.5" and in DD casing. He also runs with Cush Core in both tyres.


Do you know the weight?


I’m guessing it’s 37lbs but I have never weighed it.

Is there anything custom on the bike?


I’d say all the cockpit setup stuff is unique to me but it isn’t necessarily a trick. I’ve always had unique on-bike storage solutions. For my last Instinct my dad made this tube wrap that bolted into my Live Valve mounts so I could carry a tube, co2 and levers. That was pretty slick. Otherwise nothing too tricky, just picky.

A custom graphic for Jesse's WTB Silverado Ti saddle.





183 Comments

  • 79 1
 Talks about the unmatched braking of the DHR2, picture of a DHF...
  • 39 0
 Keen eye! Always time for experimentation and I like to be sure of my decisions by going back and re-testing. Still feel the same, DHF has amazing cornering on those top knobs for faster corners but the I still prefer the braking of the DHR2 when things get a bit out of control.
  • 5 1
 @JesseMelamed: Would you agree that the DHF get a drifty quick durring hard braking?
  • 7 0
 @endur0tay: Maybe a little, I just think that is the difference. DHR2 has braking knobs that are designed to dig in whereas the DHF knobs are more for cornering and don't dig in as much so it drifts a bit on top of the knobs.
  • 1 0
 @JesseMelamed: how can you fit the OneUp tool in the 38 steerer tube?
  • 4 0
 @grobi666: because the fork has a tapered headtude. It's ovalized at the 1.5 end the 1 1/8 end is still round.
  • 3 2
 headtube*
  • 1 1
 @mhoshal: the 38 has a elliptical steerer tube, so in some parts it is tighter than 1 1/8 and therefore the tool does not fit. Maybe Jesse has a pre production steerer tube (as he is riding the protype fork) with no elliptical steerer.
  • 8 0
 @JesseMelamed: how cool is it that a pro gives their reasons for picking this gear or that? This is actually the second time I've commented on an article about your tire choice and you responded and I appreciate the honest insight! May have to try A DHF out back myself
  • 2 10
flag landscapeben (Jun 27, 2020 at 14:18) (Below Threshold)
 Sorry but it just doesn't have a thing on the looks of the old slayer, this bike riders nothing for me. Nice forks though...
  • 2 1
 @grobi666: like I said I believe it only affects the 1.5 portion of the steerer to stiffen it up at the crown. It would be pointless to do the whole steer because a star nut wouldn't even fit.
  • 2 0
 @grobi666: if your steerer is long enough and you don’t run the CO2 or storage, you’re good to go. I’ve seen people file down the plastic at the bottom a smidge to make it fit
  • 2 0
 @DasProfessor: As a rear tire the DHF doesn't brake as well, but I love how it corners much better than the DHR . To me, my '18 Altitude feels like it's on rails now.
  • 2 0
 Assegai front DHF back = brap town. I love it. Pick a tread-width and be a d*ck about it. To each their own.

edit: I never have money for tires but that combo works off pb buy and sell. Trying to figure out if MaxGrip id market hype or worth it...
  • 1 0
 @dglass: Maxgrip is way more grippy than maxterra, you can tell the difference right away but they also have a really high rolling resistance which makes them a tricky choice if you need to pedal a lot.
  • 2 0
 @maxgod: username checks out
  • 1 0
 @grobi666: I don't run the plastic tube. I just have the tire plug sticking out.
  • 2 0
 @maxgod: Agree, MaxxGrip is immediately noticeable. I like the way MaxxTerra pedals but I think we can all see that I build my bike for the downhill and deal with it for the climbs.
  • 1 0
 @JesseMelamed:

I might have missed it in the video, but what is the internal width of your rims?

Cheers!
  • 1 0
 @handsomedan: I just listed the rims as the TurbineR. They are 30mm internal.
  • 43 1
 People: omg that Commencal enduro bike weighs 35lbs!!

Jessie M: my enduro weighs about 37lbs
  • 23 7
 Still funny that enduro bikes weight more than a Scott Gambler..
  • 27 5
 @NotNamed: Reliability is the name of the game in enduro.
In DH you have access to spare parts and all kinds of support, there you can afford to sacrifice some durability for weight.
Breaking a part in enduro can very easily drop you out of the race completely.
  • 11 5
 Don´t think it´s 17kg... maximum 15kg. Just means he prefers not to weight it...
  • 10 4
 @Losvar: what extra weight, for reliability, do you think is added to this bike that would not be added to a downhill bike? Spare tube and a dropper post are the only additions I’m guessing. DH bikes have to get you to the bottom also.
  • 12 0
 @PauRexs: I have the same wheel set with CushCore and Assegai’s with Double Down casing on my dh wheelset and it adds around 4 lbs to my bike weight when I am using it.

I don’t doubt that his bike is 37lb/17kg. It’s amazing how much extra weight all those factors add up to.
  • 5 2
 @dtrotter: You think the gambler is run at its stock weight in WCDH? Also, DH bikes do not need to survive multiple 10 minute plus descents at full pin and 50-60 km of abuse all in single a day. They only need to make it to the bottom of a single 5 minute or less run.
  • 7 0
 @NotNamed: I doubt it weighs more than a gambler with cushcore front and rear a full water bottle, and tools and a tube strapped to it.
  • 7 0
 @Losvar: Exactly!
  • 12 0
 @dtrotter: Enduro bikes have come a long when and you look at them they are not much smaller than the DH bikes now. They have a bigger fork, we have a bigger cassette, dropper post, tire inserts, spare parts and tools. Otherwise a lot of the componentry is the exact same and the frames are similar size with as much material in them.
  • 4 1
 I think we all need to see an exact weigh in just to calm the curiosity.
  • 6 0
 @tacklingdummy: haha I think you're right, next time I have a chance with a good scale I will weigh it!
  • 9 0
 People: Wow, enduro bikes have come a long way, they’re so capable that I don’t need a dh bike anymore

Also people: what, it weighs the same as a dh bike??
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: Mines running just over 35lbs with an empty bottle. Very similar setup to Jesses.
  • 1 0
 @Natefurbee: mines 34.2lbs w/pedals only
  • 1 0
 The 38 isn’t light, Cush Core isn’t light, DD casing aren’t light and a water full of water is typically not part of most bike check weights. 37 as it’s sits wouldn’t surprise me.
  • 2 0
 @NotNamed: Yeah, hilarious *yawn*

You understand that a WC DH race is about 4 minutes at most, with multiple extra frames, wheels and parts available, while an EWS race takes the better part of a day, and racers cannot switch out parts, right?

And now you understand how ridiculous your comparison is.
  • 2 0
 @tobiusmaximum: Yeah, I don't get why people are surprised by this.
I skipped running insert in my rear wheel for a race last year, cost me a carbon rim, and I'm not sponsored, that hurt in the wallet.
  • 1 0
 @Losvar: I cracked a couple of e*13 carbon rims WITH inserts (Pepi's rokkline) and 29 psi. There doesn't need to be contact with a sharp rock edge, the foam itself will apply force directly on the rim wall past its breaking point.
  • 1 0
 @DavidGuerra: The foam dissipates the force exerted on the rim over a larger surface. This reduces the risk of damage. To assume this means you cannot break your rim is silly. Also, cushcore and Rokkline are quite different inserts. Cushcore has a very proven track record and is shaped in a way that the foam will more than likely reduce the blow on the rim. I have read the Rokklines are softer and lighter, which, IMO, would not inspire confidence.
  • 1 0
 @gnarnaimo: I read a German review that confirmed the disappointing results of PTN Race Line and Rokk Line, Tire Trooper and Marsh Guard FCK Flats.
worldofmtb.de/material/getestet/laufrad/reifen/test-durchschlag-schutzsysteme
I will try Vittoria's Air Liner next.
  • 1 0
 @gnarnaimo: Schwalbe's Procore may have an advantage in that the force goes to the inside of the rim, not the walls. So the fact that it leaves the walls more exposed may actually be a good thing.
  • 26 1
 Rocky Mountain sure do know how to make a good looking bike! ????
  • 33 20
 Previous generation looked way better...
  • 10 0
 @easyslorider: Agreed. This last version is certainly more efficient, but it doesn`t look as slatanic as V2.0 and V4.0
  • 4 0
 I agree with you!
  • 2 1
 They do, but I don’t count this model among them. Last iteration far nicer.
  • 1 0
 @easyslorider: I’m with ya but they look better in person (I’m telling myself) :/
  • 21 0
 19.9 psi
  • 1 2
 I run 20.9 rear, 20.4 front. Its easy with a digital tire pressure gauge.
  • 25 0
 My tire gauge doesn't do decimals so I decrease until it just passes below 20psi. Hence the 19.9 specificity.
  • 2 0
 I have a pump with digital gauge, but with the SV valves I find it difficult to set the pressure this accurately.
I assume you guys pump it up for more pressure and then release air whilst measuring?
  • 2 0
 @WoS: Yeah. I pump it beyond where I want it and then use the bleeder valve on the analog gauge to get it right.
  • 6 0
 SRAM has entered the chat
  • 2 0
 @WoS: yeah it's easy with presta and a schwalbe digital pressure gauge. Over inflate then reduce pressure.
  • 10 0
 When you see the pressure of the shox depends on if he is wearing a bag ... definitely we don’t do the same sport !
  • 1 0
 I change my shock pressure if I'm wearing a bag or not. Fanny packs are somewhat heavy with a full bladder.
  • 1 0
 Bladders
  • 14 10
 Just goes to show how little bike weight matters in the real world. When bikes advertise their low weight it usually means they’ve played some trick, be it tyres or a shock & fork that’s not up to the task like on the Levo SL. I also love how he never weighed his bike ????
  • 46 3
 Just goes to show how little bike weight matters in the world of uber fit professional enduro racers who ride untimed uphill liaisons and race multi stage dh worthy courses with very limited technical/spares back up if something breaks.
  • 15 7
 @watchmen: Yes, because in the world of amator riding, with unlimited times on liaisons and unlimited time on the descents it matters more...
  • 9 1
 @watchmen: no one wants something to break. That’s not unique to pro enduro racers...
  • 27 0
 As long as your riding partners have bikes that weigh the same then it doesn't matter! You'll all get to the end of the ride with no mechanicals and have more time to drink beer.
  • 1 0
 @lkubica: 99% of real world riders are not smashing down EWS caliber tracks, nor have EWS caliber fitness (watch Remy's 10,000 calories in a day challenge).
  • 3 0
 Yes my new bike weights approximately 3 kg more than my previous, but it is faster everywhere once up to speed. It turns far better and it’s only when I carry it the weight is negative. Apparently, a lot of riders plan on carrying their bike.
  • 4 2
 @roma258: Well, I am sure that there a lot of people who abuse their bikes, even when not at EWS speed.
When it comes to fitness, a 2kg of bike weight is typically a 2-3% increase in overall bike + rider weight and you need exactly this 2-3% more power OR you come 2-3% slower. So if you say you are fit enough to pedal 14kg bike, but not fit enough to pedal 17kg bike ... It sounds funny, especially when you have 10-50 cassettes.
I think that people desperately need one uber-measure of bike awesomeness and currently it is weight. I understand that, we all need excuses to spend money on bikes. Buy carbon bar, carbon cranks, carbon wheels. But it is mostly in our minds really.
There are less burly bikes out there, you always have a choice.
  • 6 0
 @watchmen: Just do more squats if you find climbing hard. Or take up chess.
  • 3 0
 @lkubica: but that's not all all how it works. If I safely put on 5lb of body weight while maintaining my current body fat percentage, I would perform better. If my bike gained 5lb of weight, it would without a doubt decrease my performance on the bike. Saying that rider weight and bike weight have equal impact on performance is completely false.
  • 12 2
 @RelapsedMandalorian: The national xc champs jersey hanging in my closet probably means I can climb okish.....and I'm more of a Hungry Hungry Hippos guy than chess.
But thanks for you insightful input.
  • 3 13
flag RelapsedMandalorian (Jun 27, 2020 at 12:37) (Below Threshold)
 @watchmen: Oooh, you're hard. Then stick to XC bikes dude, you weight weenies are such party poopers.
  • 4 0
 @RelapsedMandalorian: squats are the last thing anybody needs to climb fast, have you ever watched the TdF? Just playin around a bit, but seriously, squats have their place for sure, bit do limit muscular endurance when it comes to pedallin'.
  • 2 0
 @pnwpedal: wouldn't necessarily perform better with more muscle...
  • 5 8
 @RadBartTaylor: Yeah dude. I know. Always the weight weenies bitching in the comments. They're the vegans of mountain biking.
  • 2 1
 @RadBartTaylor: I would venture a guess that at least 80% of serious MTB riders would absolutely benefit from 5lb of lean muscle gain. Strength, especially core strength, will keep you riding harder for longer, as well as minimize injuries in a crash. Flexibility is also key, I'm not talking about getting body builder jacked here but being a stronger athlete
  • 3 0
 @RelapsedMandalorian: ....bet they do CrossFit too
  • 1 0
 @lkubica: 100kg powerlifter checking in. I dust most people on climbs as long as they aren't crazy long. I out sprint a majority of people I race flat, and am faster than most on downhills. The most taxing part about my size is when I put on real miles. I'd happily take my power over weight, and I race XC.
  • 1 0
 @RelapsedMandalorian: I'm not a weight weenie nor a vegan but know the basics of training FWIW
  • 1 0
 @pnwpedal: fair, generally agree, it's why I keep up with Yoga
  • 1 3
 @pnwpedal: too bad "putting on 5lbs of lean muscle" is basically impossible without peds.
  • 1 0
 Agreed, but still I would never want to have to pedal that beast around the mountain during the liasons. Ugh.
  • 6 0
 Why stuff a tube near the linkage when it is equally out of the way but easier to access tucked in the frame opening by the head tube?
  • 1 0
 Well for one this has a benefit. Mud and such may not stay in that spot because of the tube. Buuuut I dont know if thats all that much of a big deal on this frame. Looks cleaner. But also looks like a huge pain in the ass to take out. Maybe its there because he wont lose it?
  • 4 0
 I have my OneUp tool there so it wouldn't fit unfortunately.
  • 1 0
 orange thing is a spare inner tube?

prevents the rear shock from bottoming out?
  • 1 1
 @chillrider199: Maybe helps with rattling and vibration? Cush Core spare tubes must be pretty light. Typo should read 27 pounds!!??.
  • 1 0
 @whistlerbound: Yep! Spare inner tube. Ill link it below. One of the pictures actually shows the valve stem sticking out just a wee bit on the side.

Heres the orange tube for yah! www.tubolito.com/en
  • 5 0
 That’s a stiff fork! Similar PSI and more compression than what I run in a 38 and I outweigh him by almost 40lbs. Good reminder that fast suspension and comfortable/plush suspension are not the same thing...
  • 12 0
 It's true, I've tried to go lower but I just need that feeling of support in the front end rather than comfort. Keep doing what feels good for you!
  • 7 0
 @JesseMelamed: are we talking about forks or underwear choices here?
  • 2 0
 @JesseMelamed: riding style too. Riding off the front, more support a la Sam hill..more neutral or off the back and you can run a softer fork. Down the rabbit hole takes you to frame size and cockpit etc.
  • 3 0
 @rickybobby18: Advice is advice, use it however you like!
  • 2 0
 @makripper: Oh don't worry, I fret about all of that.
  • 1 0
 @JesseMelamed: fun part of the sport isn't it?
  • 2 0
 @makripper: Frustratingly fun maybe?
  • 1 0
 @JesseMelamed: I enjoy it but I don't race and nowhere the same level as you obviously but for me it's fun to do random tests like reduce preload or change my bar roll or add/remove a couple psi in the front or the back and see what the results are. Timed on the same trail and Strava helps haha. Bike nerd for life!
  • 2 0
 @makripper: It's all fun and games until you have to go racing and your results depend on it!
  • 7 1
 I’d say this is one of the most ridden bikes on the shore/squam and haven’t heard of a single problem
  • 5 1
 FACTS
  • 3 0
 Well, besides the one...
  • 1 0
 @zanda23: Wasn't an issue with the bike though.
  • 3 0
 That was awesome Jesse, you have become a natural presenter. question for you, Why dont you stock the tube, CO2, lever on the small front triangle? Believe you can get a small bag to fit there, it will keep this away from the elements.
  • 1 0
 I do actually have a little bag there for easier access, but for the races I prefer the sleek look of it being mostly hidden.
  • 3 0
 I have a soft spot for Rocky Mountain as i grew up riding them. From the original RM6, ETSX Team, Instinct, 2nd-gen Slayer. The new Slayer looks great, and this example is no exception. But I have to admit, it saddens me to see a decal for a headtube badge. Aside from my RM6, all my Rocky's have had proper fabricated badges. A small detail I know. But not insignificant IMHO - it's a small detail representing craftsmanship that a company can demonstrate. While I am guessing most of the Rocky's are made in Taiwan now, it would have been nice if they still keep the traditional manufactred headtube badge.
  • 2 0
 I agree with you. You may be in for a pleasant surprise in the near future.
  • 3 0
 @JesseMelamed --> 740mm handlebar length... YESSS..! For years I've been teased about running my bars at that length against the current trend of supa wide - but I avoid snagging them on tree's etc. and can def. move faster than if they were 760+..
  • 2 0
 There was a time when wide bars were cooler than narrow bars. But that was when bars were less than 700mm. Unless you're a giant 800mm is likely too wide.
  • 6 1
 Meanwhile all of us lowly snails obsess about our bike weight down to the gram...
  • 13 0
 I mean I do that too, but only so I can run heavier duty parts else wear.
  • 8 2
 "Weight is sign of reliability"
  • 5 16
flag dtrotter (Jun 27, 2020 at 5:33) (Below Threshold)
 I guess you’re unfamiliar with the history of this bike...
  • 2 4
 @dtrotter: I'm sure they remedied that.. But I can't deny that it puts me off buying one, even though I think it's the most attractive frame design out there
  • 3 0
 "If it does not work, you can hit him with it"?
  • 41 1
 @dtrotter:
@nordland071285
Thomas Vanderham has some of the biggest and sickest whips out there, but even he doesn't always bring them back. No problem there.
Carson Storch is 3'ing some massive drops on his Slayer and it hasn't skipped a beat.
Me and Remi The Semi have been pounding it all winter/spring with no issues.
Rocky's internal testing has shown no issues.
I love Pinkbike and the quality content it produces, but it isn't the holy grail of what is right and wrong in the bike industry.
  • 1 0
 @JesseMelamed: that's cool to hear. We mortals always assume guys like are Carson are snapping frames every other week doing insane stuff...and just get a new one from their sponsor. It sucked that the PB bike broke/crashed on a fairly small (relative to you guys) huck. I wonder what was the root cause?
  • 1 0
 @dtrotter: annnnddd I guess you are unfamiliar with Boris the Blade! Wink
  • 6 0
 @Svinyard: I'd hope not! I may not be dropping 30ft cliffs regularly but I am putting my bike through it's paces, I would be too scared to ride a bike I didn't trust!
It is unfortunate they had a failure, ideally that would never happen! Rocky's internal testing was only able to recreate the issue with the axle being loose. And now pb is claiming a bike test in France had the same issue, except the testers in France admitted that their axle was not tightened properly.
  • 1 0
 @JesseMelamed: Why the decision to go to the Slayer over the Altitude?
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: 29 inch wheels.
  • 1 0
 @JesseMelamed: exactly. The amount of talent in house is insane. If Ken doesn't break it I'm sure it's fine hahah
  • 1 0
 @makripper: Haha he definitely does some good test hucks.
  • 2 0
 @JesseMelamed: I think there might be some miscommunication happening somewhere. I just followed up with the French journalist who broke his Slayer, and he says his axle was tight. His axle also didn't break like ours did, but the pivot did pull apart in the same way.

With so many athletes not reporting any problems, it does seem like an either-or thing, with the vast majority of bikes being fine. Unfortunate situation all around.
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: I think we can both agree that no more issues would be a great thing.
  • 2 0
 Do you ride with those pressures when you're riding hard pack terrain too? Cause I'm a just couple of kgs heavier than you, much slower and I keep burping my DD casing tires with much higher pressures than you (1.9/2.0 bars in the rear). Do tire inserts make that much of a difference?
  • 5 0
 Tire inserts make all the difference! I can run those pressures with disadvantage anywhere!
  • 6 1
 ‘I’m guessing 37lbs ‘ flipping heck
  • 1 0
 @JesseMelamed, being a bit taller than you (175cm) and always thinking about trying a L size bike, i have to ask you if you tried racing a Large size bike. With the way you charge at gnarly stuff i always thinked you would like that extra stability
  • 1 0
 I think the Medium is already on the large size for me. Remi is 178cm and rides the large and likes it.
  • 1 0
 "I'm just gonna do what I do. And nothing is gonna break" more than likely, is also my approach to my bike builds. I just wanna ride and not think about what damage I may potentially cause to my body OR my bike. Burly bike and decent pads/helmet has been my approach for better than a decade now.
  • 1 0
 It's the way to do it! Then all you have to do is focus on having fun on the trail!
  • 2 0
 Pulls brake lever in the video @2.10 goes straight to bar, couple of pumps and it’s where he likes it. Good to see pro’s shimano levers are as predictable as the rest of us...
  • 1 0
 Great bike,the settings are only good if you ride the same bike (not my case ),I agree with the handlebar mesure (maybe more 10mm),but the dhf in the rear I’m not really see why cause in the front it is my favorite tire (never tested the assegai ),and I think that the wt minion dhf it’s worst that the regular one ,maybe that’s why ? but the dhr2 for real pushing it’s the best rear tyre (l like the dhf ,but not enough breaking control (mistakes ),I think that the hr2 is the best traction rear tire and it is a very good breaker it holds very well when it comes to break ,but it looses control when you really push them ,but the hr2 just have that small edge in rocks ,and straight line braking,and translates in control)the rest of the bike is just personal issues :-)))))
  • 1 0
 Do you prefer the outgoing X2 or did this photo session happen before you got a hold of the 2021? Just curious because I just did the swap and the new X2 is roughly 40g heavier (ha not that you care) than the old one but feels less wallowy to me. Also we are gonna have to know your click count on the new one so we can dream it will make us that fast! Thanks for the awesome Youtube content btw!
  • 1 0
 I don't have the 2021 X2 in the right size for this bike as I wasn't planning on riding this bike for the season. Shock orders happen long before the season starts. I'll get it soon and let you know!
  • 1 0
 "Cassette: Shimano XTR 12sp 10-45"

Been looking for this for quite a while now. I'm currently on an e*thirteen 9-46 and I would certainly prefer a Shimano cassette. I hope we get this in my part of the planet late this year. I had actually thought the 10-45 was going to get discontinued. I'm also using the same RD, btw.
  • 2 0
 They make it in an XT version as well!
  • 1 0
 @JesseMelamed: thanks for the heads up! I'll definitely be in the lookout.
  • 2 0
 @JesseMelamed hey man, always cool to see you on here. How is it going going from the Instinct to the Slayer? What are the pros and cons (short version)?
  • 5 0
 Immediately, it felt really good and I felt comfortable. First time I rode a Slayer was actually in a stage race in Mexico last fall and it was someone else's bike. 3 days of riding brand new trails and I loved it! But to get up to speed it was definitely an adjustment. The geo is quite a bit different, longer rear end, longer front end, slacker and lower. It took me a good week or two to dial in my cockpit and start to feel like I could push it faster and faster.
  • 2 0
 @JesseMelamed:

Was this when all your kit got stolen? If so, great introductory story!
  • 1 0
 @JesseMelamed:
Thanks for sharing that with us ! I was one who was asking for all that the other day.

Will be sitting on a test bike Tue if all goes to plan. Looking foward to it.
Stay safe and healthy !
  • 2 0
 Nice! Hopefully it goes well!
  • 1 1
 Why not the Ùber high tech shimano rotors vs the XT? The cooling fins are for real in my experience. Is it because center lock VS 6 bolt i.s.? I'm not familiar with the race face hubs but do they not offer a Center Lock option? @jessemelamed ?
  • 2 0
 Correct, the hubs we use don't come in center lock.
  • 4 1
 RIde4 on the Slayer, no Ride9. Killer bike; slaying it on my 29"!
  • 2 0
 Check out the full in-depth bike check here!
www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBkdYyEPApY&feature=youtu.be
  • 1 0
 Glad I'm not the only one that rides on the very end of grips! I feels like it gives me another dimension of lateral control. But the grip cutting now that's genius.
  • 3 0
 @Nwilkes: Glad to hear! It allows your arms to be in a more natural angle as well.
If you lived closer I'd offer some of my pre-cut grips so you didn't have to cut brand new grips..
  • 1 0
 @JesseMelamed: appreciate it. But that pesky border closure too Frown
  • 3 0
 37lbs is a beast of a bike to be pedaling all day.
  • 1 0
 Rocky Mountain Bikes have been the funniest trail, park, pedaling Bikes I’ve had. Solid. Thanks for all your help getting mine setup @JesseMelamed !!!
  • 1 0
 You're welcome! Enjoy!
  • 3 0
 32-45 gearing on a 37lb bike = beast
  • 1 0
 =poor knees
  • 1 0
 @JesseMelamed : a delicate question, what's you current weight? Just to put these settings a bit in perspective.... Big Grin cheers
  • 1 0
 It's listed in the article AND in the video!
  • 2 0
 I've always wondered why the shade of kashima is darker on the shock shafts than on the fork legs and dropper shafts...
  • 1 0
 Why is it that no dropper post company can get the housing exit angle right?
  • 1 1
 What do you mean Matt?
  • 1 0
 My bike is 37lbs but it is full coil with an alloy frame... Dual tire inserts too, but lighter tires.
  • 1 0
 Jesse Melamed always strikes me as a good egg. Best of luck for the the season and beyond !
  • 1 0
 @JesseMelamed How’s the Slayer for techy and smooth climbs? It looks like you’re running it pretty heavy duty!
  • 2 0
 Honestly pedals way better than I would expect. I know everyone says that these days but it's true. I have no problem pedalling this thing all day.
  • 1 0
 DHF rear on all my bikes, got that tip from Mike Curiak, long lasting, decent braking, great handling.
  • 1 0
 Think the whole team have that saddle. ALN def had it last year.
  • 1 0
 you can buy it too i think
  • 1 0
 Yup! It was a team special!
  • 1 0
 @JesseMelamed Nice ride BTW. Sick build. Smile
  • 1 0
 Keep em coming Jesse. Really enjoying yoiur insight
  • 1 0
 But where are the linkage plates??
  • 1 0
 SLAAAAYYYEEERRRRR
  • 2 0
 Raining blood through a lacerated sky!
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