Industry Digest: 30% Drop in Shimano Annual Bike Sales, Apple Vision Pro Shopping Apps, Brake Lever Lawsuits & More

Feb 26, 2024 at 3:51
by Ed Spratt  
What's going on in the cycling industry this month? Industry Digest is a peek behind the curtain and showcases articles from our sister site, Bicycle Retailer and Industry News. You might find patents, mergers, financial reports, and industry gossip in each instalment.

Curious about the inner workings of the bike industry? Bicycle Retailer and Industry News publishes two weekly newsletters, one on the industry in general and one devoted to e-bike news. You can subscribe free at https://www.bicycleretailer.com/newsletter



Charlie Cunningham selling unique spoke machine to support care
By: Steve Frothingham // Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

Mountain Bike Hall of Famers Charlie Cunningham and Jacquie Phelan are selling Cunningham’s customized and refurbished Phil Wood & Co. spoke threading machine to support his ongoing care following a bike accident almost nine years ago.

After a day spent welding a fork for a new road bike for Phelan, Cunningham left for a ride on Aug. 3, 2015, on Bolinas Fairfax Road, one of the most famous and scenic routes in the Marin area.

Phelan, Cunningham’s wife, said he “either hit a deer or was hit by a car,” and “crawled back up to the road and hitchhiked with the bike back home. He broke several ribs, his clavicle and lower pelvic bone, all of which healed,” she said in an email to BRAIN.
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GT returning to its roots as an IBD brand
By: Dean Yobbi // Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

GT Bicycles is amid a transformation back to its IBD and off-road roots, the company says, and longtime industry pro Jason Schiers has had a lot to say about it.

Speaking from the UK's COREbike show on Tuesday, Schiers, the brand's managing director, told BRAIN he's been spreading the word about GT's renaissance at the B2B show, held by local distributors who invite brands they service for dealer facetime.

"This year is a year of storytelling for us," said Schiers, hired in 2022 after leading R&D for Selle Royal brands and focusing on Crank Brothers product development and quality. "It's us trying to educate everybody about the changes."

Chief among them is GT's separation from Cycling Sports Group/Cannondale and to a stand-alone business under Pon Holdings. "We're making our own decisions and have our own team, designing our own products. And this is all new for GT. I don't think they've had this level of attention for over 10 years."
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Mancini asks court to schedule his sentencing hearing
By: Steve Frothingham // Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

Samuel Mancini, who pleaded guilty nearly two years ago to securities fraud in connection to a failed plan to buy up several legacy Italian cycling brands, is now asking the court to schedule his sentencing hearing.

After being charged with multiple criminal counts of fraud, as well as civil charges in a separate case filed by the Securities and Exchange Commission, Mancini pleaded guilty in April 2022 to a single count. Under a plea agreement with federal prosecutors, Mancini agreed to pay restitution to victims, although the exact terms of the restitution were not set at the plea hearing and are expected to be determined at the sentencing hearing.

The hearing has been scheduled and re-scheduled several times since; currently there is no date on the calendar. Lawyers representing victims wrote to the court last year urging it to set a hearing.

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Bell Sports recalls Soquel youth helmet for strap-anchor defect
By: Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

Bell Sports is recalling its Soquel youth helmets because the strap anchor can dislodge and fail to protect during a crash, violating the Consumer Product Safety Commission's federal helmet regulation.

About 2,425 helmets are affected in the U.S., with another approximately 2,400 sold in Canada. No incidents or injuries have been reported. Consumers are told to contact Bell Sports for a refund, which can be obtained after cutting off the straps and then uploading photos of the helmet to consumersupport-bell@bellhelmets.com to prove destruction.
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Industry Patent Watch: Mavic's minimalist motor has long patent trail
By: Alan Coté // Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

After a tumultuous few years, iconic French brand Mavic is looking to regain its footing. They recently opened and staffed a new U.S. office in Vermont – and of course, they’re looking to make inroads with the product they’re most known for: wheels. Yet Mavic’s comeback includes a foray into technology-based not around wheels, but a bottom-bracket based e-bike motor.

Wheels and bottom brackets are the two places that e-bike motors can be located, so it may be surprising where Mavic aimed its e-bike efforts. “This project was launched to show that Mavic is still very much an innovator,” Josh Saxe, Mavic’s North American Sales and Marketing Manager, told BRAIN. “The motor is a concentrate of technology which answers a demand that no other motor can satisfy.”

Mavic has named the system X-Tend, and it points towards their interest in lightweight e-bike technology that appeals to enthusiast-type road and gravel cyclists. According to the company, the vast majority of ebike sales fall into the urban/trekking category, along with MTB. But they say electric road has languished due a combination of factors: too much weight, excess mechanical drag when a bike is pedaled with the motor off, and limited range.
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Shimano annual sales down 30% in bike division
By: Steve Frothingham // Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

Shimano announced full-year 2023 sales in its bicycle division of 364,679 million yen ($2.42 billion) on Tuesday, a 29.5% decrease from the year before. Operating income in the division was down 55%, to 65,251 million yen.

“Although the booming popularity of bicycles cooled down, interest in bicycles continued to be high as a long-term trend. On the other hand, market inventories generally remained high, despite ongoing supply and demand adjustments,” the company said of the global market.

The company said sales in Germany and the Benelux countries were strong, and road bikes are selling well in China. In North America, it said “although interest in bicycles was firm, retail sales of completed bicycles remained weak partly due to a reaction from the cycling boom, and market inventories were at a consistently high level.”
autonomous forklift picking up finished parts

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Giant agrees to sell kids bikes and mountain bikes at Dick's-owned specialty stores
By: Dean Yobbi // Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

Giant Group will sell bikes through about 25 speciality stores owned by Dick's Sporting Goods, including House of Sport, Public Lands, and Moosejaw locations.

The stores will sell kids bikes, mountain bikes — including full-suspension and entry-priced E-MTBs — and gear.

Giant joins Cannondale, Intense and other brands available at Dick's specialty stores. Public Lands, which has seven locations, launched in 2021. The retail chain has been seen as Dick's challenge to REI and its locations include full-service shops and other specialty store features.

In a letter to retailers Giant said Dick's has pursued the brand for five years and emphasized it remains "100%" committed to retailers.Giant said its bikes most likely will be available online from those stores' online sites.
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Belgium e-bike brand Cowboy starts mobile service for its riders
By: Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

Belgium e-bike brand Cowboy has started an at-home mobile service to support its European riders.

On-Demand services include maintenance, bike set-up, flat repair, and rear rack and child seat installation. All appointments are booked through Cowboy's mobile app. On-Demand services start at 69 euros ($74).

"As part of our strategic focus this year, across the business we are prioritizing post-sales support," Cowboy co-founder and chief technical officer Tanguy Goretti told BRAIN. "Our goal is to simplify the process of getting started and maintaining their bikes so that our customers can seamlessly integrate cycling into their lives. By offering On-Demand services, we aim to elevate the overall brand experience, reinforcing our commitment to accessibility, customer satisfaction, and ensuring that owning a Cowboy e-bike is a thoroughly enjoyable and stress-free journey."
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Man sues Shimano and Trek after brake lever allegedly impales thigh
By: BRAIN Staff // Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

A man is suing Shimano North America and Trek Bicycle for $2 million in damages after his bike's Shimano V-brake lever impaled his thigh during a fall on a bike path.

The lawsuit filed Jan. 29 by Timothy Lynch in U.S. District Court for the District of Rhode Island asks for a jury trial, alleging Shimano improperly designed the lever, described as "metallic with a thin end" and should have designed it so that it "would have lessened or eliminated the danger of impalement and laceration injuries to bike riders."

Trek Bicycle, the lawsuit alleges, also should have known the lever design was faulty and could cause impalement during a fall and "failed to inspect and assess the safety of the V-brake for end users before installing it on the subject bike."

In addition to alleging negligent design, the lawsuit cites both defendants for failure to warn, and breach of warranty.

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Vista Outdoor’s Revelyst closes some offices, makes layoffs, and may sell some brands
By: Steve Frothingham // Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

Revelyst, the division of Vista Outdoor that contains its bicycle-related brands, is closing offices in four communities as it consolidates its related brands into three groups. Revelyst — which is expected to be spun off into a separate company soon — also said it would reduce its headcount as it eliminates "duplicative roles," but did not specify how many employees are being laid off. The company also said it will sell some "non-core" brands and is already talking to potential buyers.

Revelyst is closing offices in Petaluma, California; Overland Park, Kansas; Eagle, Colorado; and Madison, Mississippi. QuietKat, the e-bike brand that Vista Outdoor acquired in 2021, is based in Eagle; CamelBak is based in Petaluma; Bushnell is based in Overland Park; and Primos Hunting is based in Madison, Mississippi.

The company filed a WARN notice with California officials indicating that 43 jobs would be eliminated in Petaluma. A company spokesman said it would not release further information on the number of jobs affected.
Vista Outdoor

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Decathlon one of first retailers to offer an Apple Vision Pro shopping app
By: BRAIN Staff // Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

Early adopters of Apple's Vision Pro headset — which went on sale Friday starting at $3,499 — will be able to browse bikes and other sports gear on a special Decathlon shopping app.

Decathlon claims to be the world's largest sporting goods retailer. While it has closed its brick-and-mortar stores in the U.S., it continues to operate an e-commerce site while also selling some bike products wholesale to U.S. retailers.

The company said its updated app offers "a seamless and immersive shopping adventure and will help users view, choose and buy new Decathlon products and even discover the stories behind their favorite gear."
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SRAM and CPSC issue recall notice on shift levers — 20,000 units already fixed
By: Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

The Consumer Product Safety Commission on Thursday issued a recall notice for some SRAM 12-speed shift/brake levers. The lever bolt was assembled with excess threadlock, which can make it appear to reach torque spec before it is fully tightened. SRAM notified dealers and other industry members of the issue in October. A company spokesman told BRAIN that SRAM has already replaced about 20,000 bolts globally.

According to the CPSC recall notice, the recall affects 61,300 units in the U.S. and 2,940 in Canada. Consumers with the levers are being told to contact SRAM at 800-346-2928 between 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, or visit sram.com/en/service/recalls and click on “Recall Notice” for more information or visit sram.com and click on “Recalls” under “Service/Support.”

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Amer Sports comes up short in IPO offering
By: Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

Enve Composites owner Amer Sports did not meet pricing expectations for its initial public offering over analysts' concerns with its Chinese parent company Anta Sports Products.

Amer Sports shares begin trading Thursday on the New York Stock Exchange under the "AS" symbol. The IPO sold 105 million ordinary shares at $13, less than the expected $16 to $18. Previously traded publicly on the Helsinki stock exchange, Amer Sports was delisted in 2020 after it was acquired by a group led by Anta Sports Products.

Amer Sports did sell five million more shares than expected but the $1.37 billion for the IPO did not meet the $1.6 billion to $2 billion expected. The IPO values Amer Sports at about $6.3 billion.

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Accell intends to combine its 2 Netherlands' factories
By: Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

Accell Group plans to combine its two manufacturing facilities here and move a portion of production to other European sites, leading to a workforce reduction of 100 to 150 jobs.

According to Accell, the manufacturing change will "better leverage its strong European manufacturing footprint, decrease operational complexity, and improve its competitive position."

Plans are to transfer high-volume models to factories in Hungary and Turkey. The combined Heerenveen factory will focus on R&D and innovation. It will produce specialist brands and models, including Babboe and Carqon, which were moved to Heerenveen last year. Accell plans to further modernize it to allow for more customization and to respond to premium bike market demand.
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Author Info:
edspratt avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2017
3,050 articles

202 Comments
  • 184 1
 How old was this bike to have V brakes? If Shimano failed and Trek failed to notice it was pointy then so did the rider?
I should be a judge. Next case please.
  • 48 0
 I once skewered my hand on the end of a Shimano disc brake lever.... while it was in the workstand! I just turned round and clipped it with my hand and it went straight through the skin and into my hand . It wasn't all that pointy either. Lots of blood, left a scar, no one got sued.
  • 34 1
 Meanwhile, Cannondale quietly ceases spec’ing V-brakes on their Scalpel model.
  • 37 2
 wait till he realises if he buys an apple vision thingamajiggy he could impale his leg virtually
  • 74 1
 The real crime here is carrying a brain so smooth you think you have a case.
  • 8 0
 I have a really old Shimano brake levers on a bike from the early 90s and the end of lever is shaped like a ball!
  • 53 1
 I've been trying to figure out who to sue for an OTB last season. Anyone know a good lawyer, the rock I hit needs to pay.
  • 7 1
 @scrawnydog: Can i be a judge and a Lawyer? Justice is my middle name.
  • 26 1
 @scrawnydog: “Landmark ruling in Cyclist v. Geology”
  • 7 6
 @VWsurfbum: Three cheers for millennials naming their children!
  • 22 1
 IIRC it was a 5 year old bike at the time of incident, so unless he has proof that he had never crashed, nor leant his bike against a brick wall in the 5 years since he bought it, and there wasn't so much as a scratch on the lever prior to the injury, it's going to get thrown out if there's a sensible judge presiding. It is the US, so sense it not guaranteed and the judge might claim it's god's will either way.
  • 2 9
flag thevoiceofchaos (Feb 26, 2024 at 7:35) (Below Threshold)
 @MidwestMountains: I'm pretty sure the guy suing is an attorney, so it's costing him time but not money. I could see why you might as well try to sue in that situation.
  • 6 0
 @MidwestMountains: Modern juries will almost always side with the injured party against firms or companies regardless of any liability or fault.
In trucking a faulty driver can run into a law abiding commercial truck, then sue and win millions. It literally happens daily and there is an entire industry based around suing commercial trucking companies, regardless of fault.
  • 2 1
 @mtnrush666: I was thinking the same thing about a bike I bought in 2002. Round ends in the brake lever.
  • 23 1
 He will get skewered by the defense as he has no leg to stand on Wink
  • 15 1
 @thevoiceofchaos: Might as well try to sue? Why not just acknowledge shit happens, it’s not really anyone’s fault and move on? I’m about 98% sure the guy is just an a-hole looking for a payday. Although I’d put the odds at 2 percent that maybe, possibly, he’s a hero saving us from a product that we’ve all been blissfully unaware was so dangerous. But despite comments to the contrary about it being a cut and dry case, I can all but guarantee the guy will walk away with some money for his trouble through a settlement of some sort.
  • 15 5
 Many folks assuming the lawsuit is motivated by personal greed and not
A: His insurance company suing Shimano on his behalf to recover their costs.
B: One of the millions of uninsured or underinsured victims of the shitty American healthcare system trying to avoid a life sentence of crippling medical debt.
  • 11 17
flag vinay FL (Feb 26, 2024 at 9:50) (Below Threshold)
 North Americans should know that their cherished suing culture is being made of ever since a lady dropped her McDonalds coffee, burned herself and sued McDonalds for not having made her aware that the contents of the coffee cup were hot. Ever since, brands like Sandvik etc make the routers and other cutting tools blunt before they're being shipped to the US as if a customer sharpens it before use, it is their own choice and risk.
  • 1 1
 @sfarnum: Good point.
  • 42 6
 @vinay: There’s always more to the click-bait story than we’re told.

Did you know McDonald’s served coffee much hotter than any other restaurant, in order to mask the taste of sub-par beans (can’t taste with a burnt tongue)?

Did you know the woman suffered horrific burns on and between her legs, requiring large skin grafts?

Did you know she originally only sued for medical bills after McD’s refused to pay when she asked nicely? The jury saw the facts and gave her the larger judgement.

Corporate propaganda boiled all this down to a story of “lady claims she didn’t know coffee was hot”, when it’s really about corporate cost-cutting endangering customers.
  • 5 15
flag vinay FL (Feb 26, 2024 at 10:27) (Below Threshold)
 @sfarnum: You meant to say that at the temperature coffee is supposed to be served you're safe to spill it over your skin as you won't get burned? Along similar lines, the man in the article could claim that the brake levers on his unassisted bicycle are much sharper than the ball-end levers he has on his assisted bike or on the bike he had as a kid.
  • 9 1
 @vinay: most coffee purchased is not kept at just below boiling point, poured, and then handed to customers in a matter of seconds. The coffee she got was significantly hotter than standard.
  • 2 1
 @SunsPSD: well shit. I guess I should start pricing out all my scars and chronic pains from MTB.
  • 4 9
flag vinay FL (Feb 26, 2024 at 10:53) (Below Threshold)
 @pmhobson: Yeah, that's what you already told in your previous post. It is not an answer to my question.
  • 6 0
 @vinay: You really need to look into the details of that case a little more.
  • 3 1
 @TheR: your third sentence answers your second question. Welcome to murica. I had to sign waivers to use my buddies mini ramps back in the day because of clowns that "may as well sue"
  • 11 0
 @vinay: and not to put too fine a point on this, but all of the negative media attention and misleading spin that gets put on cases like that comes from Americans for Tort Reform, which is an astroturf activist group bankrolled by the Koch brothers, with the ultimate goal of capping legal rulings against corporations, but keeping personal ruling unlimited.
  • 7 1
 @vinay: OK, then no: normal temperature coffee will not burn you as badly as she was burned, especially through clothes.

Will you get burned? Maybe. Will you require extensive skin grafts? No.
  • 11 0
 Time for a class action lawsuit against companies purposely selling flat pedals with sharp objects sticking out to shred my shins! Who's with me?
  • 8 0
 @SunsPSD: as a commercial truck driver, the American culture of litigation costs me $25g per year. My truck is registered in Canada, so to get cargo/liability coverage within Canada it is a reasonable $2000 annually. To get the same level of coverage that allows me to operate in America and Canada it is $27,000 annually. The reason I was given for the difference is because every single claim against the insurance company where the incident was in America resulted in a civil suit costing the insurance company millions of dollars. That type of lawsuit rarely happens within Canada, therefore lower insurance premiums.
  • 3 1
 @jrbrandon: me, me. I was just riding along...
  • 2 2
 @Tambo: From what I understand, JRA is the most horrible thing you can do, will most likely cause failure that won't be covered under warranty.
  • 6 7
 @pmhobson: Not being a coffee expert either, so I just did some random search and found this source: coffeeaffection.com/how-hot-is-coffee-supposed-to-be which in turn quotes The National Coffee Association, sounds like the authority on the matter. They suggest coffee to be served between 180 and 185degF to customers and add that coffee temperatures between 160 and 185degF can cause severe scald and burns. Doesn't sound to me like one would "maybe get burned". Basically, if you spill a hot beverage, you'll get burned. How severe the damage eventually turns out depends on how it was treated. Did indeed immediately keep herself under lukewarm running water (possibly in the restaurant kitchen or they may have their own facilities for one of the staff gets burned)? Not cooling it or instead ditching an ice-cold beverage on it (which is counterproductive as well as it closes the pores and locks the heat inside) gives much worse injury than one would have after the recommended procedure.
  • 8 1
 @sfarnum: And they had been warned to turn the commercial coffee maker temp down several times as it was way above the safety standard and the lid was not attached to the cup when handed to her.
Yes, she requested something like $18K only for medical bills and they refused to pay that which lead to the lawsuit.
  • 3 0
 @scrawnydog: In my neck of the woods there is an attorney called the “Texas Hammer”. He sounds like the perfect guy to sue a rock.
  • 2 0
 look at "moist" instagram page... its there.... eesh
  • 1 0
 Happened w/disc levers too.

I cleaned a buddy of mine out a few years ago... His brake lever when in/out of his knee joint, and he had surgery that night to clean it out.

Nice lil GoPro video of the clenaout below.

I sent the article to him, to see if he wants to join the lawsuit. haahahahah.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fbq8ZMx9CGc
  • 3 0
 @vinay: if you actually click the link in that article that they are citing the national coffee association, nowhere on that page does it give that temperature range for serving. Instead it states this.

“When serving hot beverages, especially in retail or clinical care settings which present risks for burning or scalding, lower temperatures should be considered. Coffee drinkers often desire to add cold milk or cream, or just allow the hot beverage to cool to reach a comfortable temperature for drinking. One study has shown that coffee drinkers typically drink their coffee at 140 degrees Fahrenheit or below.”
  • 2 0
 I wonder who Cedric Garcia should sue. There was video evidence of him severing an artery on his leg in a crash.
  • 3 2
 @Austink: Interesting, would the website be geo-blocked for you? Allow me to quote from what it looks like my end of the internet:

"
The National Coffee Association suggests that coffee be 180 to 185 degrees Fahrenheit when served to people, especially customers. This is standard practice at most places that sell coffee and for many of us at home, but it’s important to note that there’s more to it than that.
"
  • 1 0
 @VWsurfbum Many city and hybrid/fitness bikes are still sold with v-brakes in the lowest price ranges. The Trek FX1 is one of these and is still in the catalog.
  • 2 0
 @sfarnum: I burnt my own foot with hot soup a few weeks ago so bad I will likely keep a scar all my life. Did I sue myself? No. If you are using a regular moka pot to make your coffee it will end up ready in the upper chamber smoking hot. No italian ever sued Bialetti.
  • 3 0
 @vinay: I see that. I am saying click the link within that page where they are linking to the national coffee association as their source. Nowhere does the nation coffee association actually say that on the linked page.

Their reference is in direct opposition of what they are claiming. So it is either an incorrect citation or they just made up that number and provided a link thinking most people would never look into it.
  • 4 0
 Only winner in these cases are the lawyers.
  • 2 2
 @Austink: Ah thanks, didn't even realize those were hyperlinks, just a different color to draw attention. You're correct, the range is not given on the linked website (www.ncausa.org/About-Coffee/How-to-Brew-Coffee). What I could find there was that the ideal brewing temperature is 200degF. For convenience I just referred to this website (www.omnicalculator.com/food/water-cooling) to see how long it takes for the fresh brew to cool down. For one cup it takes about 2:46 to cool down from 200degF to 185degF. In a typical cafe where I can actually see them make my cup, I don't think I've seen it take longer than that between the brewing and the serving of my coffee. If it should be served at 140degF (the recommended drinking temperature), it should take 14:14. I don't think I've ever waited that long for my coffee to be served (anywhere) and I'm surprised to see people expect a fastfood restaurant like McDonalds to wait that long between ordering and receiving their coffee.
  • 2 4
 @thevoiceofchaos: typical American!
  • 1 1
 @Stmachreth: those medical bills aren't going to pay themselves.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: you obviously don't know any attorneys.
  • 2 0
 @Austink: another option is that the linked page has changed since the article was written.
  • 1 0
 @benpinnick: But you're not 'murican mate.
  • 86 1
 People like Timothy Lynch is the reason everything in America is so expensive. There needs to be a common sense panel that keeps frivolous lawsuits like this from ever going to court. Lawyers that bring frivolous lawsuits to fruition should be disbarred.
  • 57 0
 There's a weird culture of suing in the US. Every time I go across the border I notice the hwy is littered with billboards advertising for lawyers and nearly every commercial on TV there is for a medication or a lawyer lol.
  • 12 1
 @Tmackstab: Juries tend to rule hard against insurance companies in the USA, injury claims are extremely lucrative for lawyers and citizens alike.
  • 68 9
 @Tmackstab: probably because a minor injury is ruinously expensive in the USA so you’d be mad not to try and find someone else accountable. Rest of the world would go to hospital and have a couple of stitches put in for free
  • 5 0
 As things go, consumer goods in America are inexpensive compared to most parts of the rest of the world. Where they might be cheaper, look at the average salaries there. Now healthcare on the other hand...
  • 19 1
 @Tmackstab: I thought that Better Call Saul was an exaggerated take on lawyer advertising in America.

And then I visited Chicago...
  • 9 2
 @Peskycoots: In Canada we go get stitches for fun even when we don't need them. Everybody's doing it. That's the only reason I can think of to explain our ridiculously long wait times for medical service.
  • 15 4
 @rrolly: What takes longer, waiting 6 hours for stitches or paying off $100,000 for stitches?
  • 5 2
 @rrolly: the reason Canada has long wait times is that you have the most utilized emergency rooms in the world, mostly due to access block and a lack of primary care availability.
  • 27 3
 @rrolly: What have you waited for, and how long?
I've never waited more than 4 hours in an emergency room, for any reason. From Nova Scotia, Ontario, Alberta and BC, Ive visited my fair share over the years. I find our medical system absolutly outstanding, with incredible service, by exceptional staff all around.

My SIL was air lifted from the ski hill, taken to hospital, was assessed, treated, casted and home inside 6 hours. No bill, and the hill is a 1.5 hr drive from the hospital. She was seen and in treatment before we got there, and it wasnt a life threatening issue.

I crashed in Valemont, rural BC, crashed hard, lost a friggin shoe and my glasses. Hospital was closed, walked in the next morning, was seen in 15 mins, 18 stitches, casted arm, out the door in 2 hours. cost me nothing....
I was lucky to have an emerg nurse in the campground, who cleaned me up, and splinted my arm. Pain killers and lots of scotch got me through the night.

We have it so good, and I hate to hear people complain
  • 10 2
 Its the lawyers in this country who keep pushing for lawsuits ( work ) because there are so many of them they struggle to get work. They are the reason for such high insurance rates. They ruined America in all courts even the family courts. Making litigants fight each other constantly to create litigation with equals more billable hours for them. And the kids are usually the ones to suffer from it. Ive heard lawyers say its not about me taking all your money away from your kids its about me taking your money for my kids. I believe most lawyers will end up burning in hell.
  • 1 1
 @Tmackstab: 100% ! Read my other comment here.
  • 4 0
 @onawalk: We wait longer where in there USA for ER or regular doc appointments. Then we have to fight with insurance companies to pay the bill.
  • 4 1
 @onawalk: I agree, we really do have it good. If you go to Emergency with a runny nose or stubbed toe you will wait if there are more serious cases ahead of you. If you’re in trouble the medical staff has your back. They are friendly, caring and efficient - on top of tired and overworked. It saddens me when people complain when they really have no reason to.
  • 3 0
 @Tmackstab: $100,000 for stitches may be a bit hyperbolic lmao. Unless you're dying, we go to urgent care for stitches which is more like $150-200 without insurance or free-$20 with. And you're typically seen pretty quickly.
  • 2 0
 @onawalk: I have multiple family members working in Healthcare in BC. If you were in and out in 4 hours, you got lucky. Multiple friends and family have been over eight hours in the last couple of years. Quality of care has also been very poor (no fault of the practitioners, they're overloaded and overworked).
  • 1 1
 @Tmackstab: We have very limited consumer protection laws, so lawsuits are the most viable option when a product is unsafe.
  • 6 0
 I am not saying it is the case here, but one thing that isn't made clear in the media stories about lawsuits, is that it might not be the personal choice of individual to sue... if you made an insurance claim of any sort, the insurance company reserves the right to sue on your behalf... guess what, they file the lawsuit in your name.

A friend had a faucet burst and flood his house. He made an insurance claim, and the insurance company paid for repairs, and thinks the faucet was faulty. Fast forward a few months and he gets a call from his buddy who was the plumber who installed the faucet during a reno asking, "dude, why are you suing ME?" Insurance company doing the shotgun approach, and he has no say in who they pursue and didn't even know they were filing.
  • 1 1
 @onawalk: 4hr wait for ER says it all.
  • 2 1
 @DylanH93: Yeah Ive been in and out of urgent care from a few bad MTB crashes with pretty serious dislocation and separation injuries, with xrays and braces for like 400 bucks maybe. Even with GP checkups and additional xrays it's typically under 1000... Hospital visits for serious injuries and extended stays would be financially ruinious without insurance, or sometimes even with... but general healthcare here isn't as expensive as people make it out to be.
  • 2 0
 @ShawMac: And then they use the increased litigation costs as a reasons they need to raise premiums each year. The insurance industry is a very, very fine hair above organized crime in my books.
  • 1 0
 This is why bike brands and component brands have to have so many warning labels on their products. Also why bikes have to be sold with dork discs and reflectors. Someone rides their mountain bike at night and it didn't ship or was sold with reflectors, it's the manufacturers fault.
  • 2 1
 @rrolly: 48 years I’ve been using the Canadian medical system.
I have raced motorcycles since I was7, mountain bikes since the 90’s, I work in trades, I’ve been to the hospital loads, every year for one reason or another. My wife works in the medical system, I can say with full confidence, 8 hr waits for a serious injury doesn’t happen often.
we have it so good, we take it for granted
  • 1 2
 @MidwestMountains: yeah, it says it’s a fantastic friggin service, that works very efficiently.
I wasn’t waiting for a life threatening injury, I broke a thumb and a couple fingers.
In pain, but not dying
  • 1 2
 @onawalk: I've never waited hours to visit the ER. I'm not here to argue what's better or worse but your system has pros and cons just like every other system out there. No one in America is calling a 4hr ER wait "fantastic" but many, myself included would trade 4 hours for $5k.
  • 1 1
 @MidwestMountains: that’s the stupidest shit I ever heard. Hope you don’t mind me
Saying
  • 1 0
 @Peskycoots: what? $5k is stupid just to enter an emergency room. I would rather wait 4 hours. Still, a 4 hour wait is not "efficient". But neither of these are my systems so I don't mind you saying it. You're good.
  • 1 0
 @MidwestMountains: oh wait I understood you the other way round sorry geez, I’m the stupid in this conversation. You’re right. Have a good weekend
  • 33 1
 "Shimano annual sales down 30% in bike division" sounds very dramatic until you realize they climbed hundreds of percent during covid so they just soft land to "normal" values of pre-covid. Them having crazy amounts of inventory they are trying to get rid of with insane discounts is another matter.
  • 14 20
flag KJP1230 (Feb 26, 2024 at 6:46) (Below Threshold)
 Also, consider that Shimano has failed to innovate any new products at the higher end of the market for years and you might expect that they'd also be losing market share to their competitors.
  • 8 0
 @KJP1230: It’s just mid to high end mountain bikes Shimano doesn’t really care about anymore. They’re a massive corporation and mountain bikes are such a small part of the business they’re not really interested. When it comes to entry level bikes / commuters, road, fishing and now e bikes they’re the same old Shimano we used to know and love.
  • 9 2
 @thenotoriousmic: Fair enough - I totally understand the notion of chasing volume over higher-end.

Not exactly sure why I am getting downvoted. I don't dislike Shimano - quite to the contrary. I actually run an XT drivetrain with SRAM AXS derailleur setup because I liked shimano's durability and hyperglide+ when it was first released.

That said, I've been so surprised to watch SRAM come out with multiple generations of brakes and 6-7 years of e-shifting with zero response from Shimano. Seems crazy to give up on the MTB demographic entirely.
  • 7 1
 @KJP1230: Not sure why you got downvoted either. I think that was a fair comment.
In terms of profit the high end probably isn't worth chasing, but in terms of marketing it might be.
Look at SRAM making droppers, wireless drivetrains, more powerful brakes, killer suspension products, new ebike motor, sure you might not love them all, but they are innovating hard.
Shimano stuff on the other hand is good and solid, but not exciting, which I don't think puts them in a great place going forward.
  • 4 0
 @rojo-1: I agree 100%. I don't necessarily expect Shimano to be the innovation leader - but I am completely shocked that they've seemingly given up on e-shifting and braking over the last 8ish years.

And that is not to hate on their products per se. While I don't prefer the on/off feel of Shimano brakes, the Saints work well and produce good power. Their drivetrains are durable, reliable and reasonably priced. Still, it feels like they would have had some response to AXS by now, meanwhile SRAM is selling down-market versions and have introduced the Transmission generation before Shimano has done anything.
  • 2 0
 Considering their sales in the Benelux and Germany were strong as they mention in the article, I suppose it isn't necessarily the recreation/sports end of the market where they're making their money. Living in the Benelux, I got myself an Alfine rear hub equipped in December, my girlfriend got herself a Nexus rear hub equipped on this month. And I think it is in this commuter end where they sell most. Makes sense too. People can have many different hobbies and cycling is only one of them. But everyone needs to go places and in the market of internal geared hubs for these kinds of bikes, they're super dominant.
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230: Shimano cassette with AXS derailleur?... I feel like I'm missing something here.

I'm super curious how that works, because I've definitely thought of GX AXS but can't afford a full drivetrain swap.
  • 2 0
 @intelligent-goldfish: Yep. I run a Shimano XT Hyperglide+ chain, cassette and crank/chainring, but shifted by a SRAM AXS derailleur/shifter. Works perfectly. The shop that set it up for me was willing to give it a try, and their mechanic took a little extra time to dial in the setup, but its been flawless for 4 seasons now.

I wanted to try it after reading a Bike Mag article about the combo.
  • 1 0
 @rojo-1: I'm perfectly happy to put a 11speed 30€ deore mech on a brand new bike and will continue to do so until available. I dont really see what sram is doing as serious inovation, its more marketing and people willing to fall for it. Bike is beautiful as it functions perfectly without any electronics, no need to spoil that
  • 1 0
 @intelligent-goldfish: I think the confusion comes from the AXS T-type stuff. I do think the transmission mechs really need the matching SRAM mechs for them to work well (or at all). For anything prior to that, I think it can be a happy mix and match. That said, the shifting-under-load feature of those 12sp Shimano drivetrain supposed also works best with matched Shimano mech, cassette and chain (and shifter, obviously).
  • 35 0
 The lever should be covered by "biking is inherently dangerous"
  • 31 0
 Hey GT, first order of business with your own team: Re-design that terrible discount store logo please!
  • 6 0
 @cheezario: my first thought was how did they get Irritable Bowel Disease?
  • 28 0
 Mavic failed to notice that the biggest problem with e-road is not drag nor weight (those are offset by the motor), but simply 25km/h assist limit, no one sane will use a road bike to ride with the max speed of 25km/h ...
  • 2 0
 Can’t I keep accelerating under my own power?
  • 13 1
 @sfarnum: sure, but then why use an e-bike?
  • 11 0
 @sfarnum: You can try, but it's harder than on a normal road bike, which is what masochistic roadies want?
  • 18 4
 Outside of a health issue or a physical impairment, I cannot imagine why anyone would buy an e-road or gravel bike. Isn't the entire point of road biking to see how fast/far a human can power a bike without assistance? Using a motor and batteries ruins both of these aspects. Modern life is shit.
  • 2 1
 @lkubica yep, never seen the point of road-eebs. On the flat, I'm not working hard to keep above 25kph on my road bike, and while it's fairly hilly round here, there's no way someone very unfit, lung damage etc could keep up on the same ride (the original arguments for mountain-eebs). Commuting, yup. Self shuttling, I can see why you would. Roadie, nope
  • 3 1
 right ! When you can do higher speeds on a road bike with no assistance. There really isn't any point for assistance on a road bike unless all you do is climb stupidly steep hills all the time.
  • 1 0
 at least mavic have now found a market where their business model fits, just remove it throw it away and fit a new one, they tried it with wheels but it never took off at least this is the defacto standard for in warranty e bike motors
  • 3 1
 @Froday: How about if you have to commute 65+km every day? If I didn't ride my e-commuter I would be driving my car. I do not have the time or energy to ride my pedal bike that far every day. I do try to pedal one day a week, but more than that is not sustainable for me.
  • 4 3
 @Skooks: Doing that everyday at 25kph sounds like fun... buy a real moped at that point.
  • 3 0
 @ultimatist: Nope. I average 30kph on a very hilly route. That's fast enough for me. Way more fun than being stuck in traffic in my car.
  • 4 4
 @Froday: Literally the exact same thing goes for mountainbikes though. The whole point is that you enjoy challenging youself with a physical effort while riding. If you don't, you're missing the point.
  • 2 0
 For elderly people I guess.
  • 1 0
 @Skooks: over this side of the Atlantic, all eebs are legally limited to 25kph before motor assistance cutout (Obvs you can go faster, but the motor won't help). Which, given I average 30kph without a motor makes it pointless. If higher assist speeds are allowed (or modded) I'd go for a more comfy riding position like a hybrid bike, as aero is less relevant
  • 1 0
 @nateb: Yes my father has one bike with a motor. He is a volunteer in his cycling club. He don't use the motor in the flats as he can follow kids when riding at pace and has better endurance but when it comes to climbs, the youngling just drop him at ease every time the gradient reaches 6% or more so he turns on the motor so they don't have to wait for him too much at the top.

Back in the days I would just finish the climb in sprint mode, then ride hard for 2 to 3 minutes the turn back to find my parents and that is what made me a great road racer as I would smash everyone right after the climbs when everybody was gasping for air.
  • 22 0
 Didn't realize Giant made kids.
  • 20 0
 They just sell them, they're made in Taiwan.
  • 27 1
 Are you joking, they’re one of the largest children manufacturers in the world. Most people’s kids are made by Giant.
  • 17 1
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: Seriously? If there were so many Giant kids running around, I think I would have noticed.
  • 2 0
 @trillot: Giant is just a tag to improve their self-esteem. Something nobody ever called me, so maybe it all makes sense now.
  • 6 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: I heard Giant made kids for other brands.
  • 1 0
 @dcaf: If you were @caf people would've called you Giant.
  • 2 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: Well that explains the shape of my top tube
  • 1 0
 @heyj: In Giant's own factory
  • 8 0
 Giant Dick's make kids? Showing myself out now..
  • 1 0
 Nephilim.
  • 21 2
 "GT returning to its roots as an IBD brand."

Can someone tell me what an IBD brand is?

Google tells me it's International Beauty Design. Hmmmm....
  • 5 0
 It’s a independent bike shop
  • 4 1
 Its a bold strategy Cotton, lets see if it pays off for 'em.
  • 5 1
 Google tells me that it is "Independent Bicycle Dealer".
  • 20 1
 i got Inflammatory Bowel Disease in google not sure which is worst
  • 3 0
 irritable bowel disease?
  • 2 0
 @vemegen: i thought thats what IBD stood for
  • 4 0
 I have this vague feeling that years ago when I subscribed to Bicycle Retailer and Industry News, the generally accepted acronym was IBS or Independent Bike Shop. But that might be the ghosts talking and anyway, you can't live in the past. As I was saying to my nephew last night at the North Shore Indoor bike park, while they were playing ZZ Top's Greatest Hits, "It's good we're here now, because in those days the music was good but the bike kind of sucked, and today, that music is still good but the bikes are way better". Besides, in those days, that bike park was a Sears.
  • 3 0
 If you or a loved had been diagnosed with IBD you may be entitled to compensation…
  • 2 0
 @The-Foiling-Optimist: that's funny because IBS is Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Maybe they were changing the term to avoid the crummy tummy Syndrome only for it to become a disease.
  • 1 0
 @Sscottt: Upon reflection, people have always talked about your LBS, i.e. local bike shop for a long time but I can't recall that was ever official nomenclature.
  • 2 0
 I was also wondering this… found like 4 industry sites reporting this guy saying they’re going back to an IBD model and not a single one of them clarified what that meant. So IBD is an independent bike shop? Distributor I’m guessing is where that D comes into play? I still don’t know what this means for GT?
  • 3 0
 @gmiller720: Independent Bicycle Dealer
  • 1 0
 @krka73: I'll Be Damned

see also: www.acronymfinder.com/IBD.html
  • 16 0
 Its a damn shame that long term care is such an afterthought considering most will need at least some support at the end of life. My father has numerous aliments, fortunately for us his time in the service allow him to receive VA benefits, but still his care has substantial costs due to his memory issues. I recommend anyone with elderly parents (in the USA at least) in decent health look into long term care insurance. I’ve seen several friends struggle to cover the cost of a parents’ care. I wish for the best for Jackie and Charlie. True innovators of the sport, without them the landscape and development of our sport may be significantly different!
  • 11 0
 Considering the bulk of Shimano sales are probably OEM for future model years their performance doesn't bode well for 2025 sales either. It's like marketers in nearly every category of consumable products forgot their first economics class on elasticity.
  • 6 1
 Anyone selling "things will be better by Q3" in the bike industry is just trying to keep themselves sane. I'd gather this year is going to be worse than last and that things don't start looking up until early '26. It's bad - like catastrophically bad.
  • 6 1
 @scrawnydog: on the brighter side, in a full worldwide economic collapse its not like bikes will become non-existent. Maybe some of the $14,000.00 ebike will fall off the face of the earth, but biking will still be there.
  • 2 0
 @scrawnydog: We're just getting into the correction.

Shimano first half revenue was reportedly down 17%, so to end with 30% declines on the year points to a horrendous Q3 and Q4 for shipments.
  • 2 8
flag s100 (Feb 26, 2024 at 8:46) (Below Threshold)
 I would rather use my GX axs than my xtr. Is that part of the problem?
  • 1 0
 @s100: Not being willing to update or innovate their product line is one part, but the scope of what you're saying is too narrow.
  • 15 0
 Nothing about Fox Factory Holdings share price dropping 26% on Friday?
  • 2 0
 They dropped 25% last earnings release too. I would expect another 25% next Q. Maybe worth buying at that point.
  • 4 1
 You mean fox's performance has dropped 26%? Are they due a 50hr service?
  • 5 0
 Honestly was a bit surprised to not see this as well. The numbers on the bike side of the business are a very good example of the state of the bike industry right now. Pairing that up with Shimano you start to see that a lot of OE suppliers are having massive turn downs because those companies aren't selling or building as many bikes so they don't need to order as many parts. I think we're going to see a lot of this over the 12-18 months. The industry has got to get honest with itself. Realize that record profits every quarter are not sustainable. That any profit during downturns is positive. My opinion, all businesses in all segments need to do this. You can't have every business trying to create record profits every quarter when the world can't sustain it. People eventually have to decide... food or toys. But if everyone is reasonable in their expectations then the money can be spread around better and everyone still eats.
  • 9 3
 I read somewhere that 9% of the US GDP is litigation. It's a broken country but I also see this mentality that I can blame somebody else for my woes has been increasing in Canada as well.....
  • 9 1
 Bold thing to state without knowing where you read that lol
  • 3 1
 I dunno about that stat but it will happen more and more in Canada as we shift more to private insurers who are far more likely to litigate to recover their losses and continue to undermine arbitration bodies like tenancy boards intended to settle disputes outside of courts.

And as much as I'd like to complain about the infiltration of American culture north of the border, I do get a good laugh out of these idiotic "sovereign citizens" on youtube... that stuff is comedy gold.
  • 2 2
 As much as I have been involved with courts and serving as my own attorney for years and have worked with legislation for more commonsense laws in our court system, I can totally agree with your statement . Actually im surprised it isn't higher. The family court system alone in this country brings in several billion dollars a year. Its second to injury lawyers for " big business " .
  • 6 0
 There is no way litigation is 9% of GDP. That would be more than two TRILLION dollars.
  • 3 0
 @gtill9000: it seems its 1.6 percent at 245 billion dollars from the us govt website
  • 7 0
 My understanding is that most kids are made in the giant factory, just different assembly lines.
  • 5 0
 Sounds like a trap, Chris Hansen.
“Giant agrees to sell kids AND mountain bikes.”
  • 2 0
 I know they aren't mtb's BUT (don't kill me) one of the leading cargo bike companies front he Netherlands, Babboe, has launched a recall ON ALL BIKES due to safety defects. Multiple reported broken frames were ignored and now they can not sell any new bikes until they prove they have fixed whatever issue was causing it's bikes to fail.

Here in Ireland they are primarily used for moving around with the kids, so it's extremely scummy to have ignored something that puts kids and their parents in danger

Babboe are owned by Accell, both are mentioned in the article above so I just thought it worth mentioning. They are likely f*cked
  • 2 0
 Why do we even bother writing about the difference in sales compared to pandemic years. Shouldn't we all just be looking at numbers compared to 2019? I think this will cause even more panic and anxiety and lead to the bike industry doing way worse than it should.
  • 5 0
 Anything about the future of Nukeproof?
  • 1 0
 I heard (yup, a rumor for sure) there was a perspective buyer but, after looking at the state of the industry, backed out. Sadly, I don't think there's going to be a lot of buying in this industry for some time. Just a lot of doors closing. Sad to see. Wish I had the money to buy them.
  • 2 0
 Nukeproof bike shaped object coming soon to a SportsDirect near you!
  • 11 0
 @theboypanda: man sues nukeproof for radiation exposure while riding bike.
  • 1 0
 @theboypanda: I wish I had the confidence and ignorance of the guy suing Trek and Shimano to level a similarly sized frivolous lawsuit at Mike Ashley
  • 2 0
 @bushbush: man sues nukeproof for bike not protecting him from radiation exposure
  • 1 0
 I love how easily people forget Nukeproof was originally an American company that did not make bikes. The name will most likely be bought for the third version of a company called Nukeproof.
  • 1 0
 Criminal cases are brought by a grand jury. There should be a grand jury style panel that analyzes these lawsuits before they are allowed to move forward. Lawyers shouldn't be allowed on the panels. On a side note: Lawyers have the only job i know of that is a "protected class".
  • 3 0
 No matter what happens to bike brands. You can still go ride your bike! Turn off the news. Hit the trail. That's why we are all here.
  • 6 3
 Bike companies won’t exist soon anyway when we all ride virtual bikes in the ‘metaverse’ - I get to go riding with cougars then too.
  • 9 0
 i just googled riding cougars....hmmmmm
  • 5 0
 I liked the part about the Giant Dick
  • 1 0
 I had no idea GT was so marginalized that they were sharing the Cannondale offices in Connecticut. The office is already in a nondescript office park with a tiny Cannondale sign. They didn’t even bother with a “GT” sign.
  • 2 0
 Good news to see GT returning to its roots. I love the verbal mud flinging in the retro ads where Warnie says "Mongoose is a Mongoose and GT is a GT - I'm not joking, a GT is not a Mongoose and a Mongoose is not a GT!"
  • 2 0
 I have an old friend who lost the tip of their finger mid-ride a few years ago. He OTB'd and stuck his finger in the moving brake rotor. Must be Shimano's fault too...
  • 4 0
 That's why the rotors come with the little orange tag showing you not to put your finger in the rotor.
  • 3 0
 Not sure about the most rediculous thing in this article…
The American lawsuit or the Belgian bike’s design.
  • 3 0
 That shimano robot is the most famous robot on pinkbike
  • 3 0
 There is a brand called "Public Lands"? What a stupid name.
  • 1 3
 Simple solution on lawsuits...if you sue and lose, you owe the people you sued whatever you were asking for. It gets split 50/50 between you and your lawyer. That way everyone has a little skin in the game. May need a little tweaking but (if you don't have the money then community time, etc)
  • 2 1
 If you sue and lose then you muat cover your and their attorney fees. This alone should cut out all petty lawsuits. Especially as corporate lawyers charge high$$$.
  • 1 0
 GT under new ownership… a perennial bicycle industry headline that comes around every few years.
  • 1 0
 GT is owned by PON.bike. PON owns Schwinn, Moongoose, Roadmaster, Cannondale, Cervelo, Santa Cruz, Focus plus many more. Pon bought the Dorel sports (Schwinn, Moongoose, GT, Cannodale, Roadmaster, etc) in 2021. GT was attached to Schwinn since the late 1990's and has been sold with them each time. At first it was Schwinn/GT. Then Pacific Cycles which was bought by Dorel. Dorel then bought Cannondale. Cannondale and GT "teamed up" and Schwinn/Moongoose teamed up. When Pon.bike bought Dorel they moved GT back to CA. I understand they work next door to Cervelo.
  • 3 2
 @Hpbike: pon.bike? More like pos.bike am I right folks
  • 1 0
 @browner: happy with my Santa Cruz carbon bikes so far
  • 1 0
 There is a Giant selling bikes at a store? This is kinda cool, never seen one before!
  • 1 0
 So glad to see GT now calling their own shots. Their own designs. Viva GT!
  • 3 5
 Shimano is just in the corner with its dick in its hand while SRAM is just being a badass innovating left and right. Yo basic Shimano! Get you ass going with a truly innovative electronic drivetrain and make XTR lust worthy again.
  • 1 0
 I think a cork on the end of the brake lever will solve Shimano's problem:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=9eJ0iGZ7Ms8
  • 5 7
 The economies around the world are not doing very good. Japan and UK are in recessions and the US is likely to follow shortly. The US economy is not as peachy as the news and may people are saying.
  • 2 0
 I don't think anyone believes the economy is doing well for working class people. Last few years have been a complete disaster in the US.
  • 2 0
 @DylanH93: Yeah... when "raises" are 1-3% and inflation is running over 10%... things will start to fall apart sooner or later.
  • 1 0
 @DylanH93: More like the last few decades have been bad for working people in the US.
  • 1 0
 Mavic employing the same marketing folks as Trojan or Durex?
  • 1 0
 They keep spelling Brian wrong!
  • 1 0
 Giant bikes are gonna be everywhere now they gonna take over hahahaha
  • 1 1
 Imagine buying shimano
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