Industry Digest: Fox Factory Completes Marucci Sports Purchase, 'Ranger Trek' Trademark Appeals & More

Nov 17, 2023 at 6:14
by Ed Spratt  
What's going on in the cycling industry this month? Industry Digest is a peek behind the curtain and showcases articles from our sister site, Bicycle Retailer and Industry News. In each installment, you might find patents, mergers, financial reports and industry gossip.

Curious about the inner workings of the bike industry? Bicycle Retailer and Industry News publishes two weekly newsletters, one on the industry in general and one devoted to e-bike news. You can subscribe free at https://www.bicycleretailer.com/newsletter



Appeals court upholds Ranger Trek trademark over Trek Bicycle's opposition
By: Steve Frothingham // Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has upheld the registration of the Ranger Trek trademark, which Trek Bicycle had opposed.

Christina Isaacs, a Washington state woman, had first applied to register Ranger Trek in 2016, for use on products that would primarily be sold in National Park stores. Trek Bicycle said consumers could confuse Ranger Trek with its trademarks, pointing out that Trek has marketed backpacks and other bags, and even lunchboxes, in the past. It argued that its bicycles are closely associated with parks.

Trek first appealed to the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, which upheld the Ranger Trek registration. Trek asked the board to reconsider, which the TTAB declined to do. So in February 2022 Trek appealed to the Federal Circuit. Trek disputed Isaacs' registration of the mark for use on backpacks, hiking bags, sports bags, travel bags, hats, jackets, and shirts. It did not appeal its use on other products including expedition journals.
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Fox Factory completes purchase of Marucci Sports
By: Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

Fox Factory announced Wednesday morning that it had completed its acquisition of Marucci Sports, a baseball/softwall equipment brand that also owns the Lizard Skins and Oury grip and handlebar tape brands.

Fox bought Marucci from Compass Diversified (which previously owned Fox) for $572 million. The acquisition diversifies Fox outside its shock and suspension business. It also adds products that are sold to consumers, rather than to original equipment manufacturers as with most of Fox's suspension products for powered vehicles and bicycles.

"The acquisition advances Fox's position as a diversified provider of market-leading branded products with a proven ability to win over both professional athletes and passionate consumer bases, while positioning the combined company for future profitable growth," the company said. Marucci will be part of Fox's Specialty Sports Group, which includes its bike brands, Fox, Marzocchi, Easton and RaceFace.
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New partnership aims to encourage US e-bike manufacturing
By: Dean Yobbi // Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

The co-founders of Propel Bikes and Vela Bikes announced Monday the creation of Bloom, a vertical integration partner for light electric vehicles, with its first manufacturing location in the Motor City.

Leading Bloom will be Propel's Chris Nolte and Vela's Justin Kosmides, who will collaborate with micromobility strategic partners to provide domestic contract manufacturing, assembly, delivery and servicing. Propel operates three e-bike retail stores, in New York, Delaware and California. Vela is an e-bike brand that began in Brazil and relocated to Brooklyn, New York, and now manufactures in Detroit.

According to Bloom, the company will offer partner brands improved control over supply chain and shorter production windows. Bloom's partnership with Newlab in Detroit's Michigan Central innovation district will offer "flexible, specialized manufacturing capabilities and world-class prototyping equipment."

Bloom will announce additional physical expansions next year.
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Vosper: Top-ten bike brands have shifted significantly since 2010
By: Rick Vosper // Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

Make no mistake: when it comes to bikes, we are still very much a dealer-driven industry. Absent pure D2C labels like Canyon, the enormous majority of both brand prestige and sales dollars for most bike companies comes down to the strength of their dealer networks.

Of course some dealers are more desirable than others. But overall, you need a critical mass of retailers to cover all the major and minor markets in this country or you miss out. Overall brand success does not come from advertising. Not from race teams. Not from a website. Not even, solely, from how competitive your products are. At the end of the day, it's retailers that make the difference between a top-selling brand and an also-ran. Of course those other items I've listed also impact your appeal to dealers. But the bottom line is clear: Gain more dealers over time, your brand strengthens. Lose them, and you weaken. All of which makes the size of a brand's dealer network one good indicator of its overall health.

Christopher Georger's company, Georger Data Services, keeps track of those indicators. For more than a decade, GDS has harvested bike brands' dealer lists to see who's selling what. And periodically, he shares some of that information with BRAIN.

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Britain's Pashley Cycles investing in e-transportation market, to start crowdfunding campaign
By: Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

Pashley Cycles will invest in the sustainable transportation market by starting a crowdfunding campaign to help support product development in e-cargo delivery bikes, electric assist leisure bikes, and bike-share products.

Manufacturing bikes since 1926, Pashley has an e-cargo bike in production, the ALECS, that is in advanced trials with delivery fleets, according to the company. It already is the manufacturer behind Britain's bike-rental systems in London and the West Midlands and is planning to launch a classic consumer e-bike in next year.

Launching in November through Seedrs, the campaign will help support Pashley's overall growth strategy.

"We're a business with our eyes very much on the future as we approach our centenary," said Adrian Williams, Pashley's chairman. "In an industry where 98% of cycles sold in Britain are shipped in from overseas, Pashley is very proud to do things differently. We build every cycle by hand at our factory in the Midlands, just as we have since the 1920s. At the very heart of our business remains excellence in British design, innovation, and quality UK manufacturing."
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Continental names QBP its 'Preferred North American' distributor
By: Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

Continental Tire has named Quality Bicycle Products its "Preferred Distributor in the US and Canada," and the German tire company said QBP, which has been selling Continental products for more than a decade, will begin carrying a wider selection this fall. Continental also announced it is enacting a Minimum Advertised Pricing program this year.

Last week, California distributor Highway 2 announced that Selle Royal Group had become its sole owner; Continental had been a 50% partner in H2 before the announcement. H2 is no longer distributing Continental tires.
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Selle Royal Group becomes sole owner of Highway 2
By: Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

Selle Royal Group is now the sole owner of distributor Highway 2; the Italy-based group previously owned 50% of Highway 2 in partnership with Continental Tire.

Following the acquisition, Highway 2 will continue to distribute SRG-owned brands Fizik, Crankbrothers, Brooks England and Selle Royal. It also will distribute Knog, and offer 100% and ABUS. It will no longer distribute Continental tires.
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CPSC Commissioner: New e-bike injury data 'really concerning'
By: Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

A new federal study of micromobility injuries and deaths found that injuries associated with all micromobility devices increased nearly 21% in 2022 from 2021.

Speaking at this week's PeopleForBikes' SHIFT'23 conference here, CPSC Commissioner Mary T. Boyle said, "For e-bikes, there is some really concerning data here." She added that the CPSC coding system doesn't have a separate e-bike code. "So my guess is that's likely an undercount."

The report estimated a total of 53,200 emergency room visits from 2017 through 2022 associated with e-bike incidents — about 15% of the overall micromobility injury estimate in the same timeframe. Since the study is based directly on emergency health records, there is no way of seeing if the injuries and deaths are proportionate to usage changes for the various micromobility devices, which include e-scooters, hoverboards and e-bikes.

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Vista Outdoor sells ammunition business in $1.91 billion deal
By: Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

Vista Outdoor, which is planning on spinning off its outdoor sports business unit into a separate company this year, will sell off its shooting sports businesses first in a $1.91 billion deal with Czechoslovak Group a.s. ("CSG"). CSG is acquiring four factories and the consumer brands CCI, Federal, HEVI-Shot, Remington and Speer.

CSG is described as "a leading industrial technology holding company, operating within five strategic business segments, including defense, aerospace, ammunition, mobility and business." It is 100% owned by Czech billionaire Michal Strnad.
Vista Outdoor

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Kona Bicycles to stay in Bellingham as parent Kent Outdoors moves HQ to Utah
By: Bicycle Retailer and Industry News

Kent Outdoors, which acquired Kona Bicycles almost a year ago, is moving its corporate headquarters to Park City, Utah. Seawall Capital, the private equity owner of Kent Outdoors, announced the relocation.

Kent has agreed with the state of Utah to add 84 new jobs there in the next five years. Under Utah's business incentives program, Kent is eligible for up to a 30% state revenue tax credit. New jobs must pay at least 100% of the county average to qualify for the incentive.

Kona Bicycles will have employees at the Utah offices, but the company's product design team will remain in Bellingham, Washington.
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Author Info:
edspratt avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2017
2,973 articles

112 Comments
  • 125 19
 Good, fuck off Trek.
  • 12 5
 this
  • 31 5
 Is Trek becoming the new Specialized?
  • 19 1
 @powaymatt: based on that bar graph, yes.
  • 15 0
 Such an insane waste of cash and billable hours. I get they have to fight to defend their trademark in a general sense, but I don't get why they bothered with the appeal.
  • 13 1
 @mrbrighteyes: not to be a trek apologist, but I have a suspicion that with a name as general as Trek they might have to defend their copyright harder than seems reasonable, or else they'll lose it. But surely trying to settle and assist Trek Rangers with rebranding or something like that would be better.
  • 2 0
 @mrbrighteyes: Sorry Ranger Trek. I can't read aparantly.
  • 2 1
 @powaymatt: At least the sue happy Sinyard is too high on mushrooms to notice...
  • 3 2
 Still looks like a SESSION of dickbaggery.
  • 4 0
 @BEERandSPOKES:

They'll be looking for a remedy
  • 3 1
 @AddisonEverett: Valid point, if you don't defend a trademark aggressively it only gets weakened. This isn't anywhere comparable to the repeated Specialized lawsuits which had absolutely no merit.
  • 61 1
 Kent: "Hey good news guys, we're moving to Utah!"
Kona: "Is weed legal there yet?"
  • 31 25
 No, but you can have multiple wives. No shortage of shuttle bitches.
[insert LMAO emoji] that's so inappropriate. Yeah, but I can't down vote myself.
But hey, I grew up there...
  • 48 0
 With a median home price of $1.97M and an median annual income of $62,028 for Summit County, UT, I wish the best to the employees of Kent as they try to reinvent math.
  • 4 0
 The move was just a way to cut marketing/sales jobs. Not sure why Kent thought moving from Ferndale to the insanely priced PC, UT was a good idea.
  • 1 2
 @Hayek: Isn't Bellingham more expensive?
  • 3 0
 @wburnes: unless groceries in Bellingham are $8,000/month, then no
  • 2 0
 @wburnes: they aren't actually in Bellingham. They are located in Ferndale (cheaper and north of Bellingham).
  • 1 0
 What do you think I said when Mavic moved there... Oh wait I didn't, I lived vicariously through SLC PUNK. Answer to 3.2 laws...Wyoming!!!
  • 10 6
 @vandall: it's not the polygamy joke that i have the issue with, but calling wives shuttle bitches. Come on man, that was old in 2011.
  • 6 0
 @j-t-g: We at least had the dignity to call then "shuttle bunnies!"
  • 5 2
 @vandall: it's 2023 - the women are riding the same trails & trains as the men, so step up gents and take your hit as the driver!
  • 42 4
 If Trek customers confuse that logo with Trek's, I can see that's where the automatic shifting, ABS, and steering stabilizer equipped E Bike market is going to come from. Hopefully they also take self driving cars to the trail because they are either legally blind or stupid or both.
  • 7 0
 My concern is that the accidents with micro mobility are related to vehicles.

Yes, yes, micromobility is dangerous, see those roller blade wheels on a plank with a mast to hold on, going 60 km/h.

But the vast majority of micromobility incidents, e-bikes and bikes included, are fueled by the massive adoption of these ways of transportation, as well as freaking 2 ton couches with cages on fire "teaching lessons" to the peasants.

Saying that it had 21% increase in accident is bad, but if the base usere grew from 100 to 9 milion, the rate actualy got lower.
  • 2 10
flag eae903 (Nov 17, 2023 at 9:34) (Below Threshold)
 Knowing the average Trek Customer the little sheild on Ranger Trek's logo could be confusing for them.
  • 34 1
 Going off the videos I've watched on YouTube, most of the 'micro mobility' injuries are more than likely parents being goaded into trying them crappy hoverboards.
  • 18 0
 and long may it continue
  • 2 3
 Please post links for those of us who haven't seen these videos yet. Ideally, a compilation video a la Friday Fails.
  • 6 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: nah, it's the same amount of work for either of us, and I've already seen them.
  • 1 0
 100%. One of our friends tried her son's.

Broken elbow and surgery immediately ensued.
  • 3 0
 @tkrug: yup, kids bounce, adults break. Leave the toys to the minors.
  • 30 1
 If you ride any road bike long enough, you will get hit by a car. I've been hit twice and most cyclists I know in the Bay Area have had a collision or 2 at some point. More people riding bikes without separating bike lanes from distracted driver lanes will inevitably lead to more emergency room visits. E-bikes get more people riding bikes - people who might not have spent years riding pedal bikes and understanding the danger of car doors and blind intersections. It's scary how quickly 2-wheel user groups have grown while the infrastructure needed has lagged.
  • 9 0
 Scary indeed. This country is way, way, way behind on bike infrastructure. It's more developed in major cities, but the major cities also have 500x more traffic so it's still nowhere near sufficient. Spent the summer in Netherlands a couple years ago and it was embarrassing.
  • 6 0
 It's not only that they lack the understanding for the danger of car doors and blind intersections, but also do they lack riding experience.
A regular cyclist has gradually improved his/her skills, is very aware of the speed he/she travels with (as they are self propelling) and knows from experience how that speed influences corner grip, reaction time, braking distance, maneuverability etc.
People who are new to cycling not only lack all that, but to make things worse are immediately put on a device that makes it very easy to go fast, without being very aware of that speed because that doesn't correspond with the effort they have to put in. Only the slightest need to correct their direction or speed will lead to danger.
  • 4 0
 I am from The Netherlands and spent a few years living in the Bay Area. When I explain to my friends here what it is like to bike there, I simply say: you have to ride as if you were wearing a cloaking device and you are invisible to all other road users.
And I don't think Bay Area is the worst place in the country for cyclists.
  • 1 0
 @ak-77: I'm from The Netherlands too :-)
I do shifts as a bike messenger, and to be honest, I would often like it if people didn't see mee and just minded their own business, so I can just swirl around them in a flowing manner. Now people see me, miscalculate my speed, make an abrupt, unnecessary move that I have to adapt to.

But of course I get your point, we have it good here when it comes to general, everyday cycling.
  • 1 0
 @WhateverBikes: I hear ya. This is why I usually don't use my bell when coming up behind people. Most of the time it makes them look behind and swerve left just as I am about to pass.
  • 1 0
 @ak-77: Same here. Problem is that when I pass them silently - with room to spare - they are scared by me zapping by them without notice, and anything can happen at that point. Swerving, yelling at me disgruntled… oh, well.
  • 27 1
 So my take on the e-bike upon their big brand inclusion was "people that can't quite make the trails now have the possibility to do it now" claims. Since what seems like a mass release of e-bikes, I see more young people on throttle versions in road traffic. But more disturbing, I see much older people, late 60's to early 70's riding throttle versions in conjested areas of trail at the max speed, 25-28mph. I've ridden bikes for almost 50 years, seeing the "what if's" in the positions they get in to, I couldn't stop one thise things. Also, they ride them with the seat dropped, seated and knees at a 90 degree bend climbing long climbs, that's knee issues all day on a regular bike. I was so-so when e-bikes came out, now they're kind of a red flag for me.
  • 3 0
 oh I could not agree more.. what is it with the low seat though.. that seems to be a thing.. it is so inefficient...
  • 22 0
 The Surron kids are a cancer on the trails out here in CA, they derestrict the motors and then rip around at 30+ on these e-motos destroying trails and land access.

Normally I'm not in favor of more regulations but in the case of these things, something needs to be done.
  • 12 0
 It's not a MTB thing, it's a pavement bike thing. As someone who's ridden quite a lot in the city it just freaks me out seeing all the inexperienced riders on ebikes ripping along a sidewalk or those death traps called bike lanes. They're blasting past driveways and little cross streets with no idea that they're essentially invisible and about to get t-boned. They have no idea that getting doored is even a thing. Scares the shit out of me seeing how they ride. You need to make yourself visible, but know that you're actually invisible, be predictable, and understand that every car is basically trying to kill you. The ebike noobs have no idea about any of this, they're just ripping along totally oblivious.
  • 8 0
 @JustinVP: Ebikes in the hands of cyclists: Not an issue, generally fine with little conflict.

Ebikes in the hands of non-cyclists or your average joe: Dear God, I'm going to get run over.
  • 3 0
 @saladdodger: Low seat is because older and newer riders want to be able to flat foot at a stop with their butt on the saddle. They don't have the balance to trackstand or even to lean the bike over.

@JustinVP: Absolutely. When I was at a shop selling eBikes it would always amaze me when the average dude on the street would want to come and buy the fastest eBike they could. I'd normally try to filter a bit by asking them what their bicycle experience is at 28mph or faster. Zero handling skills + powerful and speedy eBikes is a recipe for wrecks.
  • 1 0
 @saladdodger: I like low seating my e bike sometimes when I'm not climbing. You aren't doing much work so efficiency doesn't matter.
  • 1 0
 "people that can't quite make the trails now have the possibility to do it now" It’s so funny to me that people bring this up for eBikes that cost an inexperienced person at least $5k to get into but not for a $60 bike park pass.
  • 4 0
 @antrunner: 100% then after tearing up the lips at your favorite line, they rip up the street or sidewalk generally on the wrong side. Tell them to go build their own trails and get a bunch of attitude. I hate those things.
  • 33 9
 Trek can suck a dick
  • 1 1
 agreed meanwhile - top brand by dealers.
  • 15 1
 Do the notebooks come with a proprietary spine, an extra device to stop the front and back cover from contacting each other, and a new design of pen that leaks like crazy, has no spare parts, and requires custom hardware to allow for a regular, working, non piece of shit pen, to replace it? If so, I can see where consumers may experience confusion.
  • 1 0
 I wasn't aware that Trek had a reputation for proprietary/custom parts. Any specifics?
  • 6 1
 @wburnes: lol he's taking a pot shot at the knock block

true story: a friend of my took a minor spill on his trek rail. the fork spun around and the knock block failed, and it essentially gouged the carbon fiber frame on the down tube. trek refused to warranty the frame. kinda an open and shut case for me. i will never buy trek simply for this and this little frivolous lawsuit they have with a company that has nothing to do with what they do kinda guarantees i'll never buy a single thing from trek ever.

i'll also never forgive trek for buying out a company that made beautiful steel frames, and now that company's name is relegated to trek's in-house component brand. i'm sure keith probably made a pretty penny with that sale but i wonder how he feels about his name being used in that way.
  • 2 0
 @mattmatthew: See also: Gary Fisher
  • 3 0
 @mattmatthew: And the ThruShaft shock, I hated servicing those things. The design was terrible and the tools and parts support was poor so you were set up to fail from the beginning. Companies like ShockCraft did the lords work with the Deaktiv kit that helped people get out of that cesspit of an ecosystem.
  • 16 2
 This article seems like a reminder that we need to start enforcing anti-trust laws again. Everything is a soulless conglomerate and a subsidiary of a subsidiary—PinkBike included.
  • 1 0
 Mergers are almost always bad for BOTH businesses for the near and mid-term future. Always mind boggling to me.
  • 17 3
 If dealers are key to the success for bike brands, then why does specialized continue to screw their dealers time and time again?
  • 7 2
 Stockholm syndrome!!
  • 2 0
 @sofakingwetarded: thanks for that...... =)
  • 14 2
 What a scummy move from trek. This is similar to Backcountry.com sending Backcountry Roasters and Backcountry Babes (a female-empowerment Backcountry skiing org) a few years ago. They named their company after the word "Trek" just like Backcountry named theirs after the "Backcountry". What world do we live in where people think they can monopolize a well-used word that is part of the outdoor cultural lexicon. Just shows you that once these companies are owned by "investment groups" they lose any actual care or thought for people and the bottom line is the only relevant thing. Let's support companies that care and use our dollars to help guide the outdoor industry towards a more positive place.
  • 15 0
 First it was Marzocchi.. Now Marruci.. Next Maserati?
  • 9 0
 As a Utahn, I’m stoked that Kent/Kona is moving to Utah BUT why Park City?? As a business move this is real dumb. The costs of living is much higher there than SLC or a better spot would be Ogden, which is even more affordable. Access is still amazing and both cities have better culture, simply due to the fact that they are not tourist traps. I highly doubt the pay will be good enough to actually afford rent/mortgage in P.C. So they will be commuting 30+ mins that’s a quality of life hit. Just a few thoughts. Kent Save a shit ton of money and relocate your HC to SLC or Ogden.
  • 4 0
 Enve and TRP are already in Ogden too.
  • 3 0
 Maybe the CEO has a spread in PC already
  • 4 0
 @EVILWEST I will say that as a former SLC resident myself, it could be kinda nice for those employees that cycle. I found myself driving up from SLC to PC like 4+ times per week in bike season anyway to avoid the 90+ Fahrenheit temps from mid-June to mid Sept. At least they'll be able to get off work and get to riding and some amazing trails to boot!

But yeah employees definitely going to have to live in SLC. I think something like 60% of housing in PC is second/third homes making renting/owning nearly impossible for the average (or even above average) person. Maybe they'll offer some sort of employee housing option?
  • 1 0
 @mtnjamscott: You see it quite a bit in Utah.

PC workers live in outer reaches of Summit County, or in SLC.
Hotels in Moab have to outsource front desk people to remotely operated Kiosks because you can't afford to live in town.
St George is 90% timeshare or retirement community.
People in Provo live in a bubble and never actually leave, but that's a separate issue.
  • 7 0
 Rich folks accumulate wealth. Rich guy contemplates accumulating more wealth. Wack company thinks they own a god damned verb. Companies that can't figure out if they want to manufacture or wholesale distribute decide they will do both but the greedy way. Weapons dealers also can't figure out wtf they want to be or why they are mentioned in an mtb post.

Industry digest: no innovation (not what capitalism is about anyway) just some ol' rich boys scrambling around for money.
  • 9 0
 Fox should buy TRP so they can sell complete OEM build kits with drivetrain and brakes.
  • 2 0
 We've seen how well that worked for the Hayes group brands. Then again a wise man said to be the Fox not the Manitou.
  • 2 0
 @GTscoob: The difference is brands obviously want to spec Fox, and while TRP may not have great brand recognition, they do make pretty good stuff. Manitou and Hayes make some good parts now, but they ruined their reputation making junk for many years, plus they never had a drivetrain, so I understand why OEMs don't want to spec them.
  • 6 0
 Grampa's prediction for this month (after guessing Yoann Barelli's Devinci deal a few weeks before it was announced), in March of 2026 Fox will be selling Marucci Sports at a loss with the headline being, "Fox selling non-bike subsidiary to concentrate on its core offerings".
I ain't no business expert but jeez, how many times have we seen these "diversification" moves fail over the last 40 years.
  • 20 14
 Still don't understand people who buy Treks in 2023. There are 50 other brands selling bikes that are more interesting, less expensive, less proprietary, and also don't take people to court for random bullshit.
  • 7 2
 I was of this opinion too, till I actually rode one. Company is still fucking bs, but their bikes ride really well.
  • 9 0
 For large swaths of America the only bike shop they have sells Trek. Like the article says dealers sell bikes. So when little Timmy wants a new bike for Christmas mom’s choices are Walmart or the bike shop downtown that sells primarily Trek because that’s the only brand most folks know. Maybe they’ll have a Jamis or other brand that can come in at a cheaper price point too, but still mostly Trek.
  • 10 3
 Pinkbike reviewers just got done field testing those more “interesting” bikes and Slash still came out on top.
  • 2 0
 @dthomp325: Those were some truly oddball boutique bikes. I'm talking stuff like Forbidden, Deviate, Zerode, RAAW, Bird, Airdrop, Cotic, Zoceli, Production Privee, Ra Bike, Coal, Curtis, Canfield, Fezzari, Propain, etc. The list goes on forever.
  • 2 1
 @A1990ToyotaHilux: I said the same thing before I bought a Specialized and a Transition for much less than a Trek. There’s amazing bikes up and down the stack, so the original commenter’s remark still stands. What tf is the appeal of Trek?
  • 1 0
 @mkul7r4: You'd be hard pressed to find a single one of those brands in your average LBS in the US
  • 8 0
 Im glad fox is diversifying into "softwall"
  • 5 1
 Ranger Trek is good stuff. My two kids did it last time we visited Mt Rainier. They do a little scavenger hunt and fill out some stuff in a book. They take the book back to the friendly (good-looking) Park Ranger and answered some questions. She gave them Junior Ranger badges and they were stoked.
  • 4 0
 I think Trek forgot that they chose a real word for their brand name lol
  • 1 0
 I believe it counts as two words because if you have a Australian or New Zealand accident or British not sure exactly which one it is at the moment because I'm American but I have heard Trek pronounced as Track which would also mean Trail so their brand name means, Trek as in explore/adventure/expedition and also trail/course/track.
  • 2 0
 @devinkalt: it comes from the Dutch/Afrikaner word that also means pull and historically was from a long arduous cross country journey, usually by ox wagon, hence the 'pull' reference
  • 1 0
 @solephaedrus: It's a Dutch word indeed, which can also be translated as 'migration'.
  • 4 0
 WTF is Electra?
  • 12 0
 A cruiser/eeb brand owned by trek
  • 1 0
 @rowdycash: thanks!
  • 2 1
 Good riddance for Conti. H2 sucked. I never got any of my warranty claims fulfilled. Stopped running conti tires thanks to H2.
  • 1 0
 I have a friend who's an ER nurse, and she reports a sh!tloat of people showing up after hurting themselves riding their ebikes.
  • 3 2
 might as well burn the dictionary if we start banning words from getting used, anyway fuck trek
  • 2 0
 As a billionaire, you'd think he'd spring for some vowels.
  • 1 0
 Blb vlk pln žbrnd zdrhl hrd z mlh Brd skrz vrch Smrk v čtvrť srn Krč.
  • 2 0
 Fox buying Ride Concept shoes sure flew under the radar...
  • 2 0
 Are we going to talk about the concept of Fox's other recent purchase?
  • 2 0
 my trek lunchbox looks like a session
  • 4 2
 Fuktrek (tm)
  • 1 1
 Is continental planning on delivering any tires to north america? They are impossible to find.
  • 1 0
 Is this a joke? They’re like the only tire that’s consistently on Amazon Prime.
  • 1 0
 @succulentsausage: not if you want Kryptotal 29 DH casing. And elsewhere they are completely out of stock in anything but the hard compound trail casing with no back order date. I’d prefer not to buy from Amazon if I don’t have to.
  • 1 0
 Considering that QBP is the dominant wholesaler to LBSs in the USA, I think your tires should be easy enough to get after the product hit's Q's warehouses.
  • 3 4
 Man fuck Trek! Sure. they make bikes that ride awesome, but the attitude of the company is just awful!
  • 1 1
 Trek does not actually, substantially sell backpacks. Fek you, Trek.
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