Spotted: A Closer Look at the New Intense Prototype DH Bike

Mar 13, 2022 at 9:55
by Ed Spratt  

After securing its first win at the 2022 Tennessee National DH under Dakotah Norton (finals were cancelled due to a snow and wind storm) we now have a clearer look at the new Intense prototype.

We're three years into Intense's latest design phase and have seen multiple different designs being raced on the World Cup circuit since 2019. However, no design seems to have stuck for the team, with rolling updates and frame shapes becoming a regular feature underneath its racers. At the start of February, we got a peek at the newest design as Jeff Steber teased a high pivot Intense downhill bike and now we have a clear look at the new frame design.


The new prototype marks a big departure from the previous few Intense DH prototypes that have all focused around the lower link suspension design. This time around, we have a high pivot, four bar design, with a massive rocker link driving the shock, which partially sits in a recess in the downtube.

Intense's M series of bikes started back in 1995 with the bike that Shaun Palmer rode to a silver medal at the 1996 World Championships, so it's cool to see that go full circle nearly 30 years later, albeit with a Horst Link layout instead of a link-driven single pivot this time around. While the new design hasn't seen much racing so far, it does seem to be competitive after Dakotah Norton's huge six-second win at the 2022 Tennessee National DH.


Aaron Gwin Prototype 279
Previous Intense mullet prototypes built for Aaron Gwin (left) and Neko Mulally (right)

So, is this a finalised design? Well, it's probably too early to tell at the moment. The bikes we saw in Windrock this weekend were all carrying telemetry systems, which leads us to believe that the team is still tweaking and perfecting the platform. With the 2022 World Cup kicking off in just over a week it shouldn't be long before we should be able to get some more details on the new bike, and see how it performs on the world stage.


146 Comments

  • 284 25
 They should cover it up again...
  • 96 10
 I think it's beautiful! Mainly because they clearly didn't care how it looked, gives off strong function over form vibes.
  • 86 7
 It may not be fast but at least it's ugly.

Well if this Jekyll dh doesn't work then next season I recommend they 'prototype' a Tues.

edit - despite all the flack Intense gets, like many others I'm always gunning for Gwin, so hope he's fit/healthy/dialed and feeling good on the new whip. wishing the Intense crew + Neko much fastness against the Frenchies and their dialedAF HP bikes.
  • 34 8
 It looks like a trek session and an elsworth dare had a baby.
  • 7 17
flag bakewell (Mar 14, 2022 at 9:49) (Below Threshold)
 Cover up the Trek again? As that bike wasn't this bike covered up.
  • 47 1
 I am sure they forgot to consult the PB comment industry experts prior to approving a prototype frame...
  • 2 0
 @WasatchEnduro: hey we agree on something
  • 1 1
 We can still Tracer!
  • 6 0
 They should just name the bike Protoype at this point. Not sure any off these ever see production...
Separate from my funny joke, does this shock look like it has a ton of rotation? Does it rotate down and into the frames shock channel? I guess they'll spec trunnion at one end and bearing at the other end?
  • 11 2
 Have to say, I'm LOVING the 1999 Kona Stab Deluxe vibes and that bike outdates the Treksworth.

@jomacba:
  • 6 1
 Just wait until they paint it! At least this version is raw aluminum...
  • 3 1
 Cube be like: hey that's our thing!
  • 5 0
 @drewm: OHHHHH YEEEEAAAHHHH!!!! I had a 1999 Stab Primo back in the day. Your 100% correct! Definitely getting stab vibes from it.
  • 3 0
 @jomacba: the ellsworth bikes are downright fugly
  • 3 0
 @bishopsmike: You're not wrong.

I'm eagerly awaiting the Miami Vice font & colorway. wallpapercave.com/miami-vice-wallpapers
  • 1 0
 @mattmatthew: They sure are!!
  • 5 0
 @jomacba:
Jekyll: "oh how cute, it has its Daddies linkage"
Stab Primo and Dare: *blankly stares*

Jeff always makes good looking bikes but have to ask, how much moonshine was consumed designing and welding this?
  • 3 2
 @constantly-broken: That rocker link definitely looks like a f*ck up!
  • 5 1
 The orange fork...gross
  • 1 0
 Back to the future
  • 2 1
 Looking less and less like a Santa Cruz V10.
  • 1 1
 Keep it aluminum.
  • 4 1
 @drewm: this bike looks nothing like the single pivot Kona Stab other than it has rocker links like 90% of bikes out there. The shock sat way more vertical and didn't sit in the downtube. Not to mention the frames on the old konas looked like a bent mess of tubing.
  • 6 2
 @mhoshal: Jeff?? Is that you???
  • 5 0
 @mhoshal: you aren’t picking up the Dee Lux vibes from the looooooong-beam link and show-stealing down tube?!

I mean it as a compliment. I like my bikes like I like my art, unique onto itself and offensive to half the people who look at it. This thing’s a masterpiece.

@jomacba:
  • 3 0
 has classic intense aluminum looks. hope to see intense making bikes in the US again.
  • 1 1
 @adrennan: Won't happen. They shut down their US manufacturing to do carbon exclusively
  • 2 0
 Salad fingers called, he wants his rocker link back
  • 3 0
 @mhoshal: The thing is, if you’ve seen enough bikes, just about every bike looks like a bit of one existing bike with a bit of another, so it’s mindless, pointless convo.. even if it’s accurate, who cares? And the comparisons are usually only vaguely accurate so then it’s like a double scoop of lame. Comparing this to a stab because it has linkage driven shock and a downtube that isn’t straight. How perceptive
  • 1 0
 @WasatchEnduro: i hope gwin healthy again and win atleast 1 world champs before he retire
  • 1 0
 @nofu: Yeah i agree with out on that one it truly looks like t built to perform and to perform only which makes it seem like a real race bike for sure.
  • 95 4
 “A closer look!” Here’s two terrible photos.
Go to Vital if you want to see detailed pics….
  • 9 1
 I just reloaded my page thinking photos hadn’t loaded properly…WTF???
  • 21 1
 @unrooted: PB doesn't have the in with USDH, gotta go to Vital and photos from Jack Rice for those details.
  • 28 7
 Fair point, we didn't get the shots we wanted on this one. We do have a more in depth analysis coming soon to make up for it!
  • 11 0
 @jamessmurthwaite: There are plenty of East Coast USDH photogs out there. Would not be too tough to get some shots. The Outside photo use policy might scare them off though...
  • 4 0
 @jmhills: not if you offer enough money. Most photos will sell their photos if the price is enough. PB coverage of the east coast stuff is pretty weak sauce.
  • 6 13
flag Mntneer (Mar 14, 2022 at 16:05) (Below Threshold)
 @jmhills: pinkbike really won’t benefit from US downhill coverage. It’s not part of their brand and they don’t care about it. On the other hand, vital loves downhill and supports it. Even the silly WC team with Cathro is a marketing ploy and has nothing to do with love of the sport.
  • 1 0
 @sunringlerider: This is true. Enough money can solve ownership issues.
  • 4 2
 @Mntneer: Possibly the dumbest take of the year so far.
  • 7 1
 @jmhills: Or maybe do like I've been doin and slowly weening myself off Pinkbike content and going to the privately ran VitalMTB. The site where the owner shows up at the National, supports @jackiericecakes & others in the US.

Oh...and you can correct, clarify or delete your comments so that you can learn, repair relationships or simply not have to see your mistakes on screen for infinity.
  • 4 0
 @blowmyfuse: I am, as I am sure many are as well.

I know that it is possible to edit but I am not too sure why I would want to. Nothing that I have said is in any way damaging any relationships. There are plenty of people out there who would love the opportunity to become a 'squid' and have been putting in real work to do so. Jack is an example of that. For PB to not have anyone at major events, especially close to home, should be embarrassing.
  • 4 0
 @jmhills: Jake has put in the time and work and the last 3-4 years has elevated his game. I really hope he is being paid what he should be for his work.

There are many og eastern area photogs and it wouldn’t take PB much effort to get some coverage. I assume the Outside group has a different priority set. I find it a rather hard pill to swallow that bike company’s are having record profits and if Outside invested in PB their must be some money in it. Yet mtb Photography is not a lucrative avenue.
  • 1 0
 God damn it. *Jack.
  • 3 0
 @jmhills: referring to things I've typed in the past that I'd rather delete or correct due to spelling or misinterpreting things or even being corrected when making an assumption.

PB doesn't let you edit your comments. You can do it for maybe a minute or two after you've submitted a comment, but after that, the comment locks and you're forever known for something you typed, whether you're relaying incorrect information or said something in jest that was interpreted wrong and wish the clarify.

Lots of reasons to edit comments or DELETE. One really shlt thing PB changed a while back was the ability to delete a comment so you'd stop getting notifications on your dashboard of additonal comments or if you just want out of a shltshow of Waki diatribes.
  • 1 0
 @sunringlerider: No doubt that is true. He is omnipresent and putting out some awesome images. Super nice guy. I have met and spoken with him at a past DHSE event. Really glad to see that he has been picked up to go to Europe for a race. He deserves it.

There are a few others out there that would gladly contribute if they were asked. Hell, I would make an effort to attend more than the 3 or so races (mostly DHSE) I attend. A site, like PB, that gained notoriety from its photo coverage not being able to find a solid, drive side photo of a new bike at a race, again, should be embarrassing.
  • 1 0
 Normally PB shots from the pits here are quite good, but I agree this time the article did not live up to expectations with for photos.
  • 58 0
 Gwin actually using telemetry for the first time, moving away from SoCal, going back to his roots of a horst link with predictable leverage curves, is this the sign of a comeback???

(probably not, but a fan can dream)
  • 23 5
 I am hoping Neko eats them up with his frame though.
  • 7 1
 @jmhills: Hell yea, and neko is doing it on his own. They should have a weld off between Bob the welder and Jeff steber to see who is best!!
  • 17 0
 I'm worried Outside is going to buy Vital and pay wall it, I've been clicking so many links to them from the comments.
  • 2 0
 @Genewich: Pretty soon they will have monopoly.
  • 2 0
 Not sure why Intense saw the need to hide this....maybe the hiding itself generates buzz and then leads to sales in theory. They seem to do more prototyping than other builders.
  • 3 5
 @Snowytrail: Cause the first prototype was a Trek Session
  • 2 2
 @benr33der: you can tell you're a tart if you think the session was the first bike to look like that. KONA, Giant and banshee ALL had similar designs way before trek ever did. It's sad that you just keep regurgitating the same line as everyone else. Learn how to be original already.
  • 4 1
 @mhoshal: I’m not saying the first bike LOOKED like a session, or a giant, or a Kona. I’m saying the bike he was riding that was all covered up was literally a 2022 Trek Session frame… while he was waiting for Jeff to finish this new frame.
  • 17 1
 Dont say it. Dont you fucking say it.
  • 29 0
 Looks like a... Cannondale Jekyll?
  • 6 0
 @theg-man: exactly what i was thinking
  • 1 0
 Even a stopped clock...
  • 2 0
 Looks like Cannondale + YT had booze and much fun on a Saturday night.
  • 2 0
 Looks like a trophy truck center mount arm...
  • 12 3
 Hey Pinkbike, this coverage is not good enough and the random BETA spam on the news feed sucks too. We see the frequency of articles growing and its not acceptable. Grow some balls or casual readers like me will be off to Vital for good.
  • 8 0
 I’m sure he was whipping away from the camera to avoid sneaky photos! Very clever…
  • 7 2
 "Intense's M series of bikes started with a four bar design back in 1995 ... full circle nearly 30 years later, albeit with a Horst Link layout instead of a link-driven single pivot this time around"

So, the first one wasn't a "four bar". The four bars refer to the things that locate the rear wheel. Single pivots, linkage driven or not, have one single thing that locates the rear wheel. There could be any number of "bars" as part of the linkage, still doesn't make it a four- or six- or whatever-bar.

Not being picky to harsh on single pivots, but to harsh on using terminology incorrectly. We have a ton of specific terminology in the bike industry, and people already fight over which is better or worse (neither, they're just different, most of the time) even when the correct terms are used. So maybe one of the biggest media players in the mountain bike world could use the correct terms, to keep things unambiguous, and just to demonstrate some actual expert knowledge in the industry they represent.
  • 3 1
 I disagree, speaking from an engineering standpoint it is a four bar linkage, there are 4 constituent parts that make up the linkage assembly. The number of bars within the linkage system has no relationship to wether it is single pivot, or Horst link. That’s bike terminology, not engineering.

So for me, early M1’s were 4 bar, single pivot. Later M1’s 4 bar, with Horst link.
  • 2 1
 @Cord1: by that (flawed) logic, we should just call pretty much everything a 4 bar linkage. All the dual-short-links are actually four bars, should we call them "4 bar, with giant dropout". Since in that case all 4 bars to play a role in locating the axle.

Should ABP/SplitPivot be called "4 bar, with single-pivot and concentric pivot"? What about the Delta System on Evil bikes? That's got at least 4 "constituent parts", should that "4 bar, with dog bone links pulling on counter rotating bell crank?

Answer: No. They are single pivots, because a single pivot locates the rear wheel. And again, this doesn't mean they're any less good of a design, it's just a matter of not diluting the terminology.

"The number of bars within the linkage system has no relationship to whether it is single pivot..."

Yes, I said that previously (and again just above) The single pivot naming refers to the _single_ pivot that does all the work of locating the rear axle.

".... or Horst link."

Well, that part is wrong. A horst link suspension is a (true) four bar system, applied to bikes, with specific locations for a couple of the pivots: main pivot above the BB, and secondary pivot (chainstay pivot) below the rear axle, with rear axle on a floating link (seatstay). So the number of parts (4: the upper link also plays a part but its location is not part of the old patent) that locate the axle actually is a huge part of the horst link definition.
  • 1 1
 @Cord1: by that logic, a linkage driven single pivot is also a 4bar.lll

not that it matters to normies though, those people think they can outargue laws of physics
  • 1 0
 @Cord1: ok, i got a bit of brain burn, it's a "3bar". but it ain't a single pivot, right?
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: You may think the logic is flawed, that will never change how many bars make up a linkage. If there are 4 bars within a closed chain linkage, then it is a 4 bar link, that is an irefutable fact, just the same as if there were 6 bars involved. No matter which of these bars the rear axle is located on will ever have an iffluence on how many bars are within the system.

So yes, an ABP is a 4 bar, a VPP is a 4 bar, horst link is a 4 bar etc,,,, My take from all this is that companies (or journalists) shouldn't try and use engineering terminology and bike terminology, the 2 overlap in ways that lead to poitnless conversations like this.

Stick to Horst link, single pivot, vpp single pivot with linkage driven shock. etc,,,
  • 3 0
 @justinfoil: As far as engineering, as the engineer stated, on a linkage you’d call a“faux” bar (like most linkage driven single pivot) the 4th bar is between the 2 front fixed pivots which is the front triangle. While horst link is considered the only true 4 bar in the bike industry (for some reason) I’m pretty sure engineers invented 4 bar linkage and know what it is because they’re engineers and it’s a very common linkage in plenty of industry predating rear suspension bikes by eons.
  • 1 1
 @Cord1: You're missing the point. It's not the total number of bars, it's the number of bars that affect the axle. The term "four-bar" has always been used to describe how the axle is located through the travel. Single-pivots have an axle path that can be described given a single bar (main pivot to axle), and the axle path will not change even if you put 12 f*cking bars in the linkage. A "four-bar" system, no matter if the links are short or long or medium, needs the entire four bars to describe the axle path.

ABP is not four-bar, it only needs one bar to describe the axle path.

Why shouldn't we use engineering terminology? If it's technically correct, use it, since it's almost always the least ambiguous terminology. It's the mixing and matching that confuses things.

BTW, Horst-link actually refers to a very specific four-bar layout, VPP is also a specific four-bar layout, and single pivot with linkage is a subset of single pivot. So your list is already overlapping, broke your own rule.

And remember, none of this implies one or the other is better. It's all about trying to be unambiguous and specific.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil:

From the engineers handbook.

"A four-bar linkage, also called a planar four-bar, is the simplest movable closed-chain linkage. It consists of four bodies, called bars or links, connected in a loop by four revolute joints"

This linkage was discovered and used many many years before bicyles were even invented. It has absoluely nothing at all to do with axle paths. It is purely and simply the number of bars and pivots within a closed chain linkage. What the bars or pivots are connected to, or doing, makes zero change on how many there are.

I guess we (me and the engineering world) will just have to agree to disgree with you.

Incidentally a single pivot is 2 bar (not 1). 1 bar being the main frame, the 2nd bar being the swingarm.
  • 2 0
 @Cord1: we used to call Kona’s and the like “faux bars” because they were linkage activated single pivots rather than horst’s with the pivot location variation. It’s just common cycling vernacular, it’s not trying to be engineering. And I’m also speaking as an engineer btw.
  • 1 0
 @pimpin-gimp: nailed it.
  • 9 2
 April online deals. “Intense prototype dh, all sizes available”
  • 6 2
 10 years ago i was blasted away as an "armchair engineer" for claiming the higher the pivot the better the bike plows and now everyone and their grandmother are making high pivot bikes.

wake me up in 10 years, eh?
  • 3 1
 Serious question. Why didn't they just build off the M16 design? That bike had an immaculate look. And it had good results on the world cup, and really only needed a geo and wheelsize update.
  • 5 0
 lots of riders on the M29 as well. Fantastic looking bikes that have ridden fairly well over the last few years. But Intense is looking into creating the next evolutionary step (like many other brands at this time). Leaving what was essentially VPP suspension behind and getting behind designs that are even more apt for big travel bikes. Smile
  • 5 2
 @Phaethon85: you mean the design used in one of the winningest bikes around and that also had more travel than many of it's peers? If VPP isn't "apt" for big travel, explain the V10...
  • 5 1
 It think one of the requirements for VPP is a low lower link. I don't think you can make a high pivot VPP bike.
  • 3 0
 @justinfoil: I meant it in no way as a slight to VPP performance. And you are right to bring up the victories riders have had on the system. My interest is in what is next for the tech and sport, not to degrade good designs Smile
  • 2 1
 @DHRAW: Not talking about pivot location, talking about a design being "apt for big travel bikes". I think the V10's record speaks for itself that VPP is quite "apt for big travel bikes". Also, VPP has a virtual pivot location, it's right there in the name, and that virtual pivot can be almost anywhere, including "high".
  • 1 0
 @Phaethon85: Well, you said it's not "apt" for big travel. That is a slight to VPP, since it implies any long-travel bikes using it are using a bad system for their intentions.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: I was referring to the top question, asking why they just didn't build the the M16 (VPP) again. I think you are wrong about VPP working with the pivot anywhere though. I spoke with an older buddy of mine. He was employed aby the original patent owner of VPP. I asked him if it was possible to make a high pivot VPP bike. First he emphatically said NO. Then he went into great detail about why the lower link (sorry to mix with pivot) needs to be low. In fact the lower the better.
  • 1 0
 @DHRAW: The lower link being low doesn't mean it can't have a higher _virtual pivot_. Commencal's Virtual High Pivot also has a low link right at the BB level, but this doesn't magically mean it's not high pivot (read: rearward axle path) because some of the pivots themselves are "low". The effective pivot point is not dictated by the height of the lowest pivot/link alone.
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: Well, like I said, I spoke with a buddy that was an original designer of VPP. A friend of mine. I have owned 15 intense frames and along the ways have read up and talked to people from the companies that make VPP and I think you are incorrect.
  • 4 0
 @DHRAW: think you boys are talking about the same thing but different.
VPP stands for virtual pivot point, and in reality Horst link bikes, DW link bikes, Giants Maestro, JS link, are all a]have a “virtual pivot”, meaning the “main pivot” that dictates axle path is out in space, and varies as the bike goes through its suspension travel. However they are not all VPP bikes, that would be you Santa Cruzes, and the Intense bikes (the JS tune is just a variation on the VPP axle path essentially)
Essentially anything other than a single pivot sus design is a variable virtual pivot when the suspension goes through extremes.

Words can be tough

You’re both right, f*ck yeah
  • 2 0
 FB post from guy inside Intense said they just wanted to focus on the absolute best bike they could make, and not be married to a suspension platform. So, they moved off of VPP for their DH rig.
  • 3 2
 Are DH still a market, or just "A Thing"?
Seriously, with people dooching a few grand on Ebikes,same people that would pay good money for 2...3... bikes, is there a REAL market for DH bikes?

No offense on the questions, or negative karma, btw!
Just asking...
  • 4 0
 Of course. Long travel single crown bikes have taken some of the market share and most new riders aren’t on DH bikes, but people still buy them.
  • 7 0
 I only ride downhill bikes. So yes.
  • 1 0
 I think now yo can see more DH bikes than a few years ago in the bike park. It was hard to find a DH bike like 5-4 years ago in some bike parks. I only have 1 bike to rule the trails,so no DH bike for me...
  • 1 0
 I think DH bikes make for a very low market segment. A large percentage of them get sold at discount to downhill parts too, so the profit margin is fairly low. :-/
  • 2 0
 I've given intense some sh*t for their designs but in the end I don't care. If dak can win a world cup on one then I don't care if its a pink reeb or a lime green canyon or a tribal tattoo intense.
  • 1 0
 I never pass up an opportunity to drop a fresh steaming turd on an Intense post, but I agree, I'm rooting for Dak no matter what he's on.
  • 1 1
 Gwin's back on T-Rek!? Neko spilled the beans while on tour, not knowing Gwin was taking notes! Haha! All good, as long as your equipment works well enough to get up to speed and whatever royalties are paid for the influenced sus design.
  • 3 0
 Remind me my Intense 951!
  • 2 0
 Its just Jeff making stuff for his team these days. I wonder if they will ever release a bike again....
  • 6 1
 Maybe once they've sold through all their rebranded old stock via Costco?
  • 2 0
 Once it has a fresh paint job it will look amaz....................err nah, it'll look like a pig with lipstick on.
  • 3 0
 PB very late to the party, Vital had the pics ling long ago, step it up PB
  • 2 1
 Internal memo: All bikes designed for downhill must now be future proof for the addition of a battery and motor! What a great time to be alive.
  • 1 0
 Lmao how you gunna call this close look and you got some flip phone photo from across the Lot and vital has hdr pics up and like 15 lmao
  • 2 0
 Now just sling some 24s on there and we’ve come full circle.
  • 1 0
 Wow, Intense is putting out their first new remodel in a decade and a half!
  • 1 0
 "A closer look", and then you see 2 old bikes and half of the new bike! - what am I not getting?
  • 1 0
 "what am I not getting?"
A link to Vital?
Here you go, scroll around two thirds of the page.

www.vitalmtb.com/forums/The-Hub,2/2020-MTB-Tech-rumors-and-innovation,10797?exclusive_forum_user=false&page=206
  • 1 0
 Revolutionary - a 4 bar, high-pivot. Next thing it will have a floating rear brake.
  • 1 0
 Looks a bit fragile...maybe about the same as my 99 UZZI sl that i cracked and welded 3 times,
  • 2 0
 bye bye VPP, and now Santa Cruz
  • 1 0
 Eyelet movement to the moon? That's crazy. cover it up!
  • 1 0
 MAKE IT ALLOY, like you use to do Frown
  • 1 0
 The rocker link was obviously sourced from old Ellsworth Dares
  • 1 0
 I'm just here for the obligatory high pivot bandwagon comments...
  • 3 2
 We don't really want a closer look, it's ulgy enough from afar.
  • 1 0
 Looks like Kona Stab 2008
  • 1 0
 Kona Stab making a come back.
  • 1 0
 Anti rise looks low! Awesome
  • 1 1
 This is the moment when the investors take away from Jeff the CEO position... kind a Steve Jobs move
  • 1 0
 it reminds me of my old m3 ,must be the gray
  • 2 2
 They should not have outsourced that rocker to ellsworth…
  • 1 0
 Purposely complex?
  • 1 0
 Gorgeous
  • 1 0
 where can I buy
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Fury
  • 1 0
 The frame say "snap"
  • 1 1
 So Steber basically built the same bike Neko and Frank built!?
  • 2 1
 No....looks fairly different in design. And to think this wasn't started far before early January (when Neko announced his project) is pretty silly.
  • 1 0
 no more VPP Frown
  • 1 1
 Gross. Get f*cked will ya?
  • 1 1
 Wouldn't it have been easier to buy a commencal supreme?
  • 1 1
 Hah, those guys are still making bikes?!
  • 1 1
 Still looks like a session.
  • 1 0
 Socom 2.0
  • 2 3
 That X2 looks like its mounted upside down in the first pic
  • 3 0
 What is "upside down"? Resi at the bottom? Air can seal upward? Dials at the bottom (which dials, some have them on both ends)?

Hint: there is no "top" or "bottom" for bike shocks. More than a few bikes have flipped their shocks from the traditional layout, for various reasons: ease of connecting lockout remotes, ease of fitment around a reservoir or thru a seat-tube tunnel, various claims of better air-can lubrication or reducing unsprung weight.
  • 1 6
flag mariomtblt (Mar 14, 2022 at 11:06) (Below Threshold)
 @justinfoil: yeah there is, you don't want the can being the unsprung weight. I'd bet its right-side-up by the next iteration
  • 3 0
 @mariomtblt: The air can is lighter than the damper end with the reservoir.
  • 1 0
 @Joecx: ah I see, my mistake, thanks
  • 1 1
 Yeah! Downhill e-bike!
  • 1 2
 Insert misaligned rear triangle comments here:
  • 1 0
 Nice flag
  • 1 0
 agreed, that rear end looks like it would be a wet noodle





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