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Throwback Thursday: 7 Bikes Turning 20 in 2022

Feb 17, 2022 at 8:15
by Ed Spratt  
Following on from our Throwback to 2012 last week, let's now take a look back through the archives at some of the bikes turning 20 this year.

1. Nicolai Nucleon ST

2002 Nicola Nucleon ST

Designed as a downhill World Cup race bike, the Nicolai Nucleon ST featured a unique drivetrain and suspension system designed by Nicolai themselves - most notably, bike used a 14 speed Rohloff gearbox with 14 gears in the front triangle and a single ring on the rear hub. Designed to tackle a variety of World Cup tracks, the Nucleon ST features plenty of adjustments across the frame and a super wide rear end built around a 165mm spacing rear hub and 100mm bottom bracket

bigquotesSo far we are absolutely thrilled about the performance of the Nucleon; the design has proven itself time and time again around the racing scene in Europe and worldwide – it is the perfect setup for customers who are tired of dealing with the maintenance issues and wear and tear problems associated with standard derailleur based drive trains. Elmar Keineke, team manager for the 2002 world cup team



2. Balfa Belair

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Another wild looking bike from 2002 is Balfa's Belair trail bike. The Belair was built with a 6061 alloy front end and 4130 cro-mo swingarm for a frame weight of a claimed 6.25 lbs / 2.8 kg. The rear suspension featured 112mm of travel actuated with a single pivot design. Balfa says: "With the pivot located in the optimum spot the frame rides and pedals like nothing else and Balfa's customary steel rear takes out all of the small vibrations even more."

What makes the Belair stand out though, is the integrated rear shock. The bike used a Fox Float RC shock mounted partly inside the top tube, similar to the Digit Bikes we've seen more recently. When it comes to geometry the Belair was running a 70-degree head tube angle, a 65-degree seat tube angle and a wheelbase of 1113 on the biggest size.

You can find out more here.



3. Mountain Cycle ShockWave 9point5

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Newly released in 2002 was Mountain Cycle's ShockWave 9point5 frame. The 9point5 used a monocoque frame and a cantilever beam rear swingarm paired with Progressive's 5th Element shock. The suspension was designed to have a linear rate at the beginning of its stroke with a ramp-up at the end to help prevent harsh bottom outs. As its name suggests the frame offers 9.5 inches of travel and was available in three sizes. The frame included an adjustable steerer stop to protect the frame and fork. At the launch, the ShockWave 9point5 sold for an MSRP of $1,899 USD.


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Find out more here



4. Specialized Enduro

The Evolution of the Specialized Enduro

For 2002, Specialized gave the Enduro a significant overhaul with the model range changing to a semi-monocoque front triangle. The bike was distinct from the brand's other models thanks to the new "TransForm" frame and the proprietary Specialized-designed-but-Fox-built rear shock that could change from four to five inches of travel by just flicking a switch. This was matched with Fox's Talas front suspension that could also adjust its travel.

Running from 2002 to 2004, this version of the Specialized Enduro was a very competent bike for the time and in our history of the Specialized Enduro, Specialized's senior design engineer, Jason Chamberlain, said: "We wanted it to be the longest-travel trail bike going--yet as light as most XC bikes.

"We never really had another bike on our radar. We usually never do. We just build what we personally want to ride ourselves. Back then, a lot of trail riders liked to stop and session stuff on the side of the trail, so we designed this to handle big stuff (big for the day) while being light enough to get anywhere you wanted to go. It was like the Swiss Army Knife of bikes – adjustable to do it all."



5. Gary Fisher Supercaliber 29

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A huge bike to have been released in 2002 was the Gary Fisher Supercaliber 29, which was the first mass-produced 29" mountain bike. Offering 80mm of suspension from the Marzocchi Marathon 29 fork the bike also used a 9 speed XT/XTR drivetrain from Shimano. The front fork was also one of the first 29" fork made by Marzocchi and offered three different compression modes.

Find out more here



6. Santa Cruz V10 VPP

Santa Cruz V10 Mk1

Created in a collaboration between Californian powerhouses Intense and Santa Cruz, the original V10 was one of two slightly different DH bikes with the 2003 M3 being its sibling. Whereas Intense stuck with 241mm of travel the V10 went for a full 10 inches of travel to max the bike out at 255mm, hence the name.

Alongside the new suspension layout, the V10 also featured progressive geometry for the time and a floating brake arm. The V10 had a 67-degree head angle paired to an 1199mm wheelbase on a size large and 445mm chainstays. Read more about the bike in our history of the V10, here.

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Find out more here.



7. Specialized Epic FSR

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Finally, Specialized launched another new bike with fresh technology in 2002 as the world was introduced to Brain.

The main goal of the Brain system was to offer a hardtail-efficient bike on smooth ground that would switch to the full benefits of Specialized's FSR suspension on bumpier trails. The 2002 Specialized Epic was claimed to stay completed locked out with the shock said to respond instantly and offer fully active suspension from less than 1G of trail pressure.

The Brain on the 2002 Specialized Epic used an inertia valve mounted inside a near-vertical cylinder mounted near the rear axle. The inertia valve would control the shocks ability to compress and would only react to the trail not any input from the rider.

bigquotesThe technology works because forces from the ground activate the inertia valve inside the Brain, which opens and allows the shock to compress in response to the bump. The rebound circuit is left open. With purely negative input (a dip without an accompanying bump, like a pothole in an otherwise smooth road), the shock moves in response to gravity, taking up sag initially put into the system by the rider's weight and allowing the rear wheel to track with the dip. Brain technology literally ignores rider input but detects bumps, allowing the suspension to engage whenever it's needed

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Find out more here.




Author Info:
edspratt avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2017
3,165 articles

172 Comments
  • 241 3
 Really digging that Gary Fisher aggressive gravel bike.
  • 55 0
 20 years ahead of it's time.
  • 15 0
 I saw Gary riding a similar bike at the 2000 WC race in Napa, CA. We were like those are not 26 inch wheels.
  • 32 16
 Upvote this man! Just needs a motor and its perfect. Be safe be well, Incognito Robin
  • 13 7
 @rivercitycycles Where it all went wrong... 27.5 for life
  • 2 1
 @tinbikeman: Steel is real
  • 2 1
 @SebastianApple: Truer words have never been spoken
  • 9 1
 @SebastianApple: Yeah real heavy
  • 19 16
 @tinbikeman: it was the 27.5 that was the turn in wrong direction.
  • 1 0
 I sold them for a while. I remember thinking they were the perfect one bike to do it all. Road tyres, cross tyres and MTB tyres. I don't think I'd like to ride current MTB trails on one.
  • 6 0
 I distinctly remember laughing at that bike in 2002 only to have some of my best riding on later model Procaliber’s and Rig’s.

Oh how I was wrong.
  • 3 0
 haha nice try it doesn't have enough water bottle mounting points on the frame .. oh dammit.
  • 9 2
 I test rode one of these about 4km's before bending the front wheel beyond fixing, going off a small drop! I swore I'd never ride or own a 29er, EVER! 20 years later, and I own two now lololol
  • 1 3
 Possibly the best comment on Pinkbike this year. Kudos.
  • 3 0
 If that bike is going to be entered in a gravel race it would be wise to install bar ends, a bullhorn version.
  • 1 0
 The main difference on these XC bikes is the brakes, imagine trying to stop in a hurry with those v brakes
  • 2 0
 @Altron5000: The bike will stop. Definetly.
  • 2 0
 This is my daily commuter. I've added a rigid carbon fork and it's still a great bike.
  • 3 0
 I broke at least four of these frames in the early 2000s. They really did ride pretty well, and still aren't terrible. The head angle was slightly more relaxed and had the large offset fork, the top tube was long for the time, and they had a lot of BB drop. I remember my first ride when I did a warranty upgrade from a 26" Big Sur to the 29" Procal and was blown away with the speed it carried. I was a couple years past when this bike was built and had a 100mm Fox 32 on it which was my first really good (new) fork. I eventually ended up with a Supercal 9.8SL frame when I did paid upgrades through the warranty process, that thing was around 10.1kg with heavy wheels.
  • 1 0
 @rivercitycycles:
He was fast on that non 26 bike.
  • 1 0
 @Bottleride: Gary was very fast. I think he was racing expert class or elite. I got a chance to speak with him before the race and he was very personable.
  • 1 0
 Sorry to hear about your experience with V-brakes. A V-brake can be very powerful. I stuck with them until 2014, when disc brakes finally started to match the power of rim brakes. I recently built a bike with v-brakes and avid levers with adjustable leverage, and it's got lovely braking power and feel. Of course, if the leverage is poor and the pads are poor, the braking won't be great.
  • 1 0
 my dad has one similar, I think its a tusscazara. its all original, including shifter cable, chain, and brakes. its kinda nice idk y i went to a 29" fuse expert.
  • 53 0
 Let us not forget Progressive 5th Element shocks.
  • 11 0
 Yeah indeed. They were 2002's ohlins
  • 8 1
 They were WAY better with the pedaling platform removed.
  • 5 70
flag joshslewis1 (Feb 17, 2022 at 12:50) (Below Threshold)
 Bro this is not my problem. Stop ranting about useless stuff
  • 14 2
 @mammal:

They were TERRIBLE shocks. I remember my SC Bullit came with one and it felt like riding a 2X4.
  • 24 2
 @joshslewis1: your shtick is lame. Drop it
  • 7 1
 @dirtdiggler: Yep, stock 5th element shocks felt pretty bad, due to the valving for the pedaling platform (the "feature" of that shock). With that valving removed, it kicked ass, especially for DH.
  • 7 1
 Haha - we were all convinced that the 5TH was must-have equipment and SC spec'd them as an upgrade. Had one on my 2003 Bullit. I'll never know if it was a crappy shock or I am just a crappy rider. Probably the latter.
  • 2 14
flag Spencermon (Feb 17, 2022 at 13:29) (Below Threshold)
 @joshslewis1: hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha

Funny running into you again.

You crack me up.
  • 5 0
 @suspended-flesh: @suspended-flesh: I had a then-new Banshee Scream with a 5thE mounted up stock. I thought it was so cool, til I jumped on friends' bikes with active suspension. Sad trombone.
  • 3 0
 @sngltrkmnd: Yep! Going from a 5th element to a Fox Vanilla coil was quite an eye opener for me. I also had a Banshee Scream. Such a sick bike!
  • 8 1
 @suspended-flesh: Unfortunately I bought 2 brand new bikes in 2004 and they BOTH had 5th coil shocks on them. the SC Heckler felt SO much better when I eventually threw a Float RP3 on there. My Norco Team DH was ridden for a season and sold with the 5th, and the 2005 version had the DHX, which was miles (light years actually) ahead of the 5th. Then, about 10 years later, I tried my buddies M6 with a 5th that had the platform valving "detuned", and it was unbelievable. They were so close to having an amazing product, but killed themselves with their "feature".
  • 5 1
 @joshslewis1: not funny, didnt live, laugh, OR love
  • 2 0
 @mammal: It depended heavily on the bike. A lot of frames back then had digressive/regressive spring curves, which 5th element worked wonders for. I remember it making my Cannondale Prophet ride much better.
  • 2 0
 The first thing I removed from my Mountain Cycle 9.5 was the 5th Element shock. Made the bike ride so much better..
  • 5 0
 I was looking to buy a new bike back in the day and the guy in the bike shop was really pushing the 5th Element shocks. I wasn't really interested and told him that the maker - Progressive - was from the motorcycle industry and that they mostly made rather average replacement shocks for Harleys and other cruiser bikes. He seemed surprised by that but continued to defend them. I said they were just a bit of (bad) trend at the moment and wouldn't be surprised if they were gone from the mtb scene in not too long. He said I was totally wrong and asked if I wanted to put some money on that. I should of.
  • 1 0
 @lumpy873: Me too. That thing weighed as much as a baby. Ditched it and then put on a Fox DHX Air with a slightly shorter eye to eye and stroke. Less travel, lower BB, less weight, slacker HA. Much better. I really loved that bike!
  • 1 0
 @lumpy873: I never fitted the spare 5th Element shock that I got with my 9.5, now I understand why the previous owner swapped it out
  • 33 0
 That Nicolai is so awesome! Love to older bikes
  • 3 0
 I miss my M-pire that was such a good bike !
  • 5 0
 Raced 2 seasons in the US for team Nicolai on the Nucleon ST, such a fun bike and such fun time for the downhill racer community.
  • 2 0
 @rayprovencio: Too bad that since they introduced the Ion ST (I had the first batch, great bike !) if feels that they kinda lost their way. From building very elaborate bikes with gearboxes or very distinctive designs, it feels all is Ion now, just different travel. I guess they still do weird stuff but nowadays it's more the eBike/City/Travel segment that have their main focus :/
  • 29 0
 " it is the perfect setup for customers who are tired of dealing with the maintenance issues and wear and tear problems associated with standard derailleur based drive trains" so we gave them 4000 pivot points to worry about instead
  • 11 0
 Also looks perfect for customers who are tired of having to do mountain biking and weight training in separate sessions - buy this bike and you can combine the two
  • 6 0
 Nicolai of this era (maybe still) used needle bearings that were super reliable, especially since integrated in a proper frame design, built to last and to allow bearings to work as intended. No bolt backing-up, no cantilever load to the bearings, proper sealing, etc etc.
  • 1 1
 It is less than 4000 pivots but you there are just more parts. See, they need something adjustable to tension those chains coming from the Rohloff hub. If you consider those pivots too, have you also considered the number of pivots a regular rear mech has? Also, some other parts you may take for a link is the brace between the top and downtube. It is to distribute the loads the shock introduces into the frame. Adding such a thin member loaded by pure tension is a much lighter solution than to dimension the downtube such that it can deal with the (by the shock) introduced bending loads all by it self. The still use such members on their current bikes and I'm actually surprised not more brands do the same.
  • 21 1
 I'm 15 years old and fortunate enough to live in a time of big wheels and bikes that can descend AND climb!!! My dad tells me horror stories about life before tubeless tires, lift-access bike parks, and silver fork stanchions. It's borderline child abuse!
  • 11 1
 Your dad speaks the truth. I raced DH in the '90s. And the bikes were FAR more expensive in today's money. Notice the DH bikes above were sold frame only making the entire bike so much more expensive. Strong. Light. Cheap. Pick none. That was DH racing.
  • 6 0
 @iamamodel: you are right ... i have bought my Giant ATX One DH in December '99 and it was 8.300.000 italian lira ... that was 8 times my month salary !!!
  • 1 0
 @blacktea: I raced an over-shocked bullit ($900 frame) in the 90’s and didn’t have more than $2500 into the entire bike. Real DH frames were boutique brand stuff back then but prices have easily doubled since. Sounds like you were heavily taxed?
  • 1 0
 @emptybe-er: at the time in Italy it was not imported but the price was 10,800,000 lire ... I bought the bike that Giant Italia exhibited during the shows for 8,800,000 lire
  • 1 0
 @emptybe-er: like 8.000 euro today
  • 19 0
 @edspratt why do you insist on making me feel old?
  • 3 0
 I came to comment the exact same thing! Though the fact that we've been biking long enough to feel nostalgic about these bikes is kind of nice. I'm going to focus on that part.
  • 17 1
 The funniest thing is looking at these 20+ year old bikes and realizing this is what Gravel Bike people are doing without realizing it.
  • 2 0
 So the gravel and old mountain bike thing ban be very easily explained. The original mountain bikes took the bike they knew well, a road bike, and modified it to work on trails and jeep roads. This modification has been further modified many, many times to make the modern mountain bike. Gravel on the other hand has taken the bike they knew well, a road bike, and modified it to work on dirt roads and jeep roads. The reason they are so similar is because they are both modifications of a road bike.
  • 1 0
 It just happens that there is a terrain and a market for fully rigid bikes that can ride off-road. And this is actually the closer thing to a do-everything bike (considering the full biking universe), and the one I would be forced to keep if I had to make the devastating choice of only having one bike. My fully rigid, touring-geared mountain bike, which is faster than a gravel bike both off-road and in asphalt.
  • 1 0
 That was a thing of beauty and aggression. Had an 02 Slayer. Rocky was the raddest then….even their interweb address
  • 1 0
 2002 was my favorite year for Rocky's colors and graphics. I still have my 2002 RM7DH, they are still sexy IMO.
  • 1 0
 That thrust link tho..
  • 12 0
 That Nikolai is the coolest bike I have ever seen..
  • 1 0
 Buyer beware - Radrider takes your money and ghosts you without shipping the item
  • 8 0
 That's a great trip down memory lane! Interestingly the geo on the Nicolai wouldn't look too out of place today, while everything else looks jarringly short and steep now.
  • 3 0
 Yeah, surprised to see mentioned in the article that the V10 had progressive geometry. Nicolai was way more ahead and so was Orange. Then if you consider the race-only bikes from the likes of Commencal and Kona (for Fabien), there'd be a good few more back then. I think Santa Cruz has always been a bit conventional until recently.
  • 7 0
 I remember really lusting after that shockwave 9.5, glad bikes have evolved... That first gen epic is sweet too, it used to be revolutionary when it came out and still used v-brakes haha
  • 1 0
 Low stand over, high-ish pivot, linkage driven single pivot.. ahead of their time other than the geo.
  • 7 0
 I owned not one, but two of the bikes on this list. And back in those days they were expensive and terrible and they broke all the time and they tried to kill us at every turn AND WE LIKED IT. I feel old.
  • 10 0
 How dare you put Steve Smith behind a paywall
  • 5 0
 It's sad that Pinkbike feel his legacy is for-profit-only.
  • 8 0
 Seems everyone lusted over a Mountain Cycle. They really still look good today!
  • 5 0
 The Enduro "Itch Switch"... l remember a bike shop employee telling me how it did NOT change the travel, (said it was the platform) and then because there were a couple other customers near us he doubled down and made some joke at my expense to show his superior bike knowledge.

Thank god the internet came along so now we can sit in our arm chairs and know everything... Smile
  • 8 0
 Similar experiences. Bike shop employees were some of the worst barriers of entry into mountain biking...maybe some of them still are!
  • 4 0
 Thanks Pinkbike for reminding me 22yrs have gone by since I started my carreer, 18yrs of serious riding has gone by, and my son is almost 15 and progressing while I am degressing. ...And dam, I remember lusting after that Enduro. That was such a cool looking bike. That frame was 2nd only to the Honda dh bike IMO
  • 7 0
 The Shockwave was dream bike material at the time, great nostalgia trip.
  • 7 0
 Karpiel Disco Volante was the bike we wanted out west!
  • 1 0
 Yep. Eccentric pivots everywhere something bolts on...and just plain badass overbuilt utilitarian shred machine. I reckon they are all probably still functional besides their Hayes brakes...
  • 2 0
 I still have a Mountain Cycle Shockwave 9.5 in my shed. I rode it for a few years, and it was a decent bike for the time. The main issue was it had a tall BB and steep head angle. I put on a 8.75 shock and a 170mm fork, lowering it down and slackening it out. Fun.
  • 1 0
 Post photos!
  • 5 0
 Are we not going to talk about how Interbike was a thing!!! It's even one of the pictures
  • 2 0
 I used to own one of those Specialized Epic FSR, in fact, the frame of that S-works Epic still hangs in my basement. Rode it for something like 10 years. Did everything with it, things that it was not made for, including the actual North shore and Swiss bike parks. I loved that thing. Still own an Epic (next to an Intense Primer). Still really like and 'believe in' the idea behind the brain suspension, the inertia valve, like an automatic mechanic lock-out. (I know people hate the fact that it is not instantaneous, but I don't mind the first bump being a bit rougher.) I was thinking the modern electronic lock-outs, like the RockShow flight attendant and the Fox live-valve are actually very similar, but more instantaneous and with an intermediate mode. Also -much- more expensive and complicated. Who also thinks it's a pity inertia valves were never more widely used??
  • 3 0
 I had the 2004 Epic FSR and also enjoyed it it's a shame the drop out pivot bushings lasted about 8 weeks of regular alpine riding before the wheel had enough wobble to almost hit the frame. Fast bike, partially made of cheese.
  • 2 0
 I feel the same about inertial valves. I had a Fox F100x Terralogic fork and really loved it because I could stand up and mash the pedals without any fork bob. It was great for XC racing, but not sure how well it'd work for today's bikes with longer, plusher suspension.
  • 2 0
 @kylenetkyleo: My epic had the Terralogic fork as well, that felt a bit more on off than the brain on the rear. Where I think the system was weak was on constantly bumpy terrain that involved pedalling, when the shock was open there was no platform so it felt like it could bog down in the travel, with longer travel bikes that feeling would be more pronounced.

After that I had a few bikes with standard brainless Fox shocks, not so good for climbing stood up but on balance they were faster on varied terrain. It was a bad era for suspension pivots, after the Epic I had a Trek Fuel with glued in main bearings, these lasted no more than 8 hours before the glue fell out. After 2 failed rebuilds that bike went back to Trek and was replaced with a Marin Mount Vision, that was utterly dependable, 44 days racing in 1 year, zero mechanicals.
  • 2 0
 As for the Specialized Enduro, it would actually have been more fitting to mention the Enduro SX of that same generation. As that one (the one where the frame bridges around the shock) is the one what the next (and pretty popular) generation of Enduro and Enduro SX bikes evolved from.
  • 5 0
 That's a lot of chain rings.
  • 1 0
 My DH in '99 had 46 teeth Big Grin
  • 2 0
 In 2002 I was a young teen going to the public library to read Mountain Bike Action. The Brain shock was really intriguing to me at the time, but in hindsight it's probably not as exotic as I imagined.
  • 1 0
 Just a hunk of brass bouncing around in there
  • 1 0
 I got my shop job in 2002, and I bought one of those Enduros. Broke the seat stay about 6 weeks later, but I still loved that bike. I also spent a lot of time on our demo Supercaliber, which sold me on 29" wheels a long time before you could buy a bike that actually made them work in a more rowdy context. I also remember when we got our first Epic at the shop... I'm surprised we didn't break it with all the torture testing we put the Brain through
  • 1 0
 A riding partner of mine at the time had the Shockwave, and the pedal tug was terrible; so much so he sold the bike after only a month (and it was the only one in Vancouver for sure at the time). Well made though; and to think the high pivot with some "adjustments" is making a comeback....
  • 1 0
 I had a mountain Cycle Shockwave. The 5th element blew up right away then I switched to a Fox Vanilla. Good memories on this bike, I discovered Whistler for the first time with this bike. I kept it for 2 seasons, the swingarm cracked after 2 seasons.
  • 1 0
 For a dozen years my only mountain bike was a 130/130 26er similar to that Enduro. I kept waiting and waiting for new bikes to be different enough to be worth upgrading. Then I finally upgraded to a 2016 Stumpy 29 that was both dramatically different, and effectively outdated the day I bought it. I'm glad the Geometry Wars are starting to taper off so I can feel safe buying a bike again.
  • 1 0
 Yup, rode an fsr link intense tazer as a trail bike forever, good lower travel for pedaling but could stand up to aggressive trail riding, bought a bronson in 2016 and was so stoked about it, then immediately it was completely outdated with no dropper and a non boost front wheel. Industry’s been moving fast.
  • 1 0
 The bullit came out in 98-99 with 6” of travel. I remember getting off work and watching the Superheroes (where’s Garreth?), and Plush (Shaums) to get me pumped to go send it. Then Bender came along and redefined “sending it” and poof, we had redbull rampage. Thanks, boys!
  • 3 0
 Guess you youngsters forgot about the 2000 Giant ATX DH that Myles Rockwell won the 2000 championship in Spain on.
  • 1 0
 Got that poster on my garage wall with his upside down number plate.
  • 2 0
 That bike's too old for this article though lol. Take me out back with a shotgun
  • 2 0
 I was a proud rider of a Giant ATX DH back in the day , beautiful bike , great performance , the only issue was the size frame being kinda short making us play a bit with the stem size , but all in all , amazing bike ! I still miss her to this day....
  • 2 0
 I’m pretty sure 100% of all Mountain-cycle’s swingarms cracked, and maybe about 50% of all seatstay welds on the hardtails - speaking from personal observations.
  • 1 0
 My swingarm dropouts were off-centre. Solution - custom my dish wheels. I cracked the shock mount on the frame. All along the weld.
  • 1 1
 @iamamodel: Wasn't it supposed to be off centre? Specialized dropouts have been 6mm to the right for as long as I can remember so that you could make a stronger wheel with less dish. When boost spacing came around, more brands did it and started calling it names (Syntace EVO6 etc) but it's pre-boost too. My 2006 Specialized P1 even had it, even though it was singlespeed (yet spec'd with a HG freewheel body indeed).
  • 1 0
 Yeah, totally. I broke 2 swing arms and a main frame. One of my friends snapped a main frame in half off a 3 foot drop and it almost impaled him as it came apart on the landing.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: I do remember off-centre design, but that definitely wasn't it. There were a bunch of Shockwaves in my city and no others were off centre. Bike shop confirmed.
  • 2 1
 I had one of those monoframe Enduros in grad school, paid $500 for it new and although it was a horrendous bike I had so much fun on it and it's what really sparked my love for riding. I almost miss it, almost...
  • 2 0
 It was horrendous and it was my 1st FS bike and nearly turned me off to FS bikes entirely. I still won't look at specialized although I do know the new ones only share a name in similarity.
  • 1 0
 Out of curiosity, what was so bad about it? Never ridden one but at first glace there's nothing weird... Normal geo for its time, standard Horst Link, the usual components. Did they fall apart or something?
  • 1 0
 @bananowy: those early horst links bobbed like you were riding a horse. My roommates/riding buddies call it the "bucking bronco" because that's what it looked like riding behind me uphill. My dad, who has only ridden road and tri-bikes, bought a used Stumpjumper of similar vintage and kept on telling me it was broken only to have me tell him "nope that's just how those ride".
  • 1 0
 @briceps: I remember them being one of the best pedaling bikes, but shocks had little damping and were often mis-tuned for the suspension. They were extremely successful for a reason.. Multiple chainrings made just about everything pedal like crap.
  • 4 0
 I never thought about how "steampunk" Nicolai was.
  • 3 0
 You know Pivot are looking at that Nicolai and thinking “Super Duper Boost anyone?”
  • 2 0
 Oh man... my first bike was an 03 Cannondale Jekyll with the awesome 80mm headshock... Can't believe that bad boy is going to be 20 next year. Time flies!
  • 1 0
 I had both that Nicolai ST AND the first gen V10. Aside from the weight, the Nicolai was awesome. The V10 had serious issues with those pivot bushings—mine failed after a few races.
  • 1 0
 First gen v10... I miss mine. Ditched the Dorado for a 888 later in its life, I really do miss that bike. Also, literally had some teenage kid roll up to the shop I wrench at on one of those Epics yesterday...
  • 3 0
 Balfa needs to bring the bb7 back
  • 2 0
 More so bring balfa back
  • 1 0
 Or the 2-step..that bike was awesome!
  • 1 0
 I had 4 of them! A modern version would be great
  • 1 0
 Yes!
  • 1 0
 The Mountain cycle shockwave you see any similarities to its linkage I.E Specialized Enduro and Canyon sender. Just saying. Oh what about ROMIC shocks so cal peeps.
  • 2 0
 I put a Romic on my 9.5.. With that shock and the floating brake kit, that bike was so plush...
  • 2 0
 @lumpy873: Ditto! I even found a Romic that was 9x2.75 so I had more "modern" geo.
  • 1 0
 @psyfi: mone was the first shock Romic made for that bike.. I wish MC could have stuck around.. That bike with modern geo numbers would be sock..
  • 2 0
 I had that exact Spec Enduro - kept breaking the seat tube weld - but Spec gave a new frame each time (4).
  • 2 0
 V 10 in candy apple green was outstanding. There was a time you could order like 8 different colors on SC bikes.
  • 1 0
 Sly Park still has an Enduro, We rode with him last summer and we had a great time making jokes about his freeride bike with 80 mm of travel.
  • 1 0
 I can see myself racing back to Blockbuster with a copy of Super Mario 3 cuz my mom said if I returned it late I couldn't go to the water park on one of these bad bois!
  • 1 0
 When your dream bikes are the same age you were when you drooled over them, yet still look like perfectly fine droolworthy modern mtbs to you... You may be getting old.
  • 1 0
 The Mountain Cycle Shockwave 9point5... man, i saw so many broken frames in the head tube back in the back in the day . Good looking bike, but the frame was shit .
  • 2 1
 Would still pay too much for a shockwave. Or a modern version with ebike battery in that downtube, perfect for it.
  • 1 0
 Had a specialized epic expert for a while. Was an awesome bike. Ridiculously light as well
  • 1 0
 I had one, too. I used all the part from a 2001 Enduro which I disliked for the pedal bop and build from a frame. Back then no-one cared about XC or trail bike categories. Sold it 2 years ago, it was still a rocket on the flats but the suspension gave a good shake down. The XL frame was very wobbly, though.
  • 2 0
 Thanks for making me feel old..
  • 2 0
 I can hear frames flexing from here.
  • 1 0
 I had a 9.5 and it was a fun bike for the time. Never could get the 5th element tuned right though!
  • 2 0
 For once an article that makes me feel young
  • 1 0
 Thanks pinkbike for remebering me that I'm old, and that those bikes where the ones that I used to dream of.
  • 2 0
 2002 was just a few years ago right? shit....im getting old.
  • 1 0
 I owned two of those V10’s. One of which was one of the first prototypes before it went to market
  • 1 0
 I lusted after every bike above, 'cept the Fisher. 29 inch wheels back then? gethefugouttahere!
  • 2 0
 I had a 2003 Nucleon ST. Heavy as hell but also fun as hell.
  • 1 0
 Oh, how I hate those “now we’re gonna make you feel really old” features…
  • 1 0
 specialized enduro most practical out of all those rigs and made the biggest impact on the sport IMO
  • 1 0
 No Kona Bear? For shame. Precursor to the Dawg and Process lines. Rad bike.
  • 1 0
 They should have posted the prices too?! Anyone know what the enduro went for?
  • 1 0
 That Gary Fisher supercaliber doesnt look that old geometry wise to be fair
  • 1 0
 Who didnt want a mountain cycle still a looker!
  • 1 0
 I had one with a floating brake, the bike loved the chunky stuff because it made mashed potatoes out of it, lol!
  • 1 0
 more of a "where are they now"
  • 1 0
 Is it selfish to ask for 15 year old bikes?
  • 2 0
 Nope! I bought a 2002 V10 from eBay. It's going to be a PinkBike...
  • 1 0
 What about my 2002 intense Uzzi?
  • 1 0
 Nice.
  • 1 0
 Loved my Mountain Cycle San Andreas (well the looks at least)!
  • 1 0
 I loved those Intense 909 2.6 tires! Undestroyable!
  • 1 0
 and 1600 grams!
  • 1 0
 That Nicolai inspired the Starling design ethos!
  • 1 0
 Santa Cruz really needs to rename the V10
  • 1 0
 Was 2002 the first year of the 24" rear Big Hit?
  • 1 0
 I have that specialized bike and maybe even all the same parts pictured..
  • 1 0
 The Balfa Marital Aid.
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