Throwback Thursday: 7 Bikes Turning 30 in 2022

Feb 24, 2022 at 9:23
by Ed Spratt  
As we make our way through 2022 and await all of the exciting new product developments let's take a look back through the archives at some of the bikes turning 30 this year.

1. Cannondale Delta V 1000


1992 saw Cannondale launch one of its first proper full suspension mountain bikes with the Delta V 1000. Using Cannondale's Delta V fork this bike offered 2"/50mm of travel with an enlarged headtube to house the inner components for the forks.



2. IRD FS

Photo: MOMBAT

Another early full suspension bike released in 1992 was the IRD FS. With a more conventional front fork, the IRD used an elastomer stack attached to the bottom bracket by a braided cable. Coming before its time, the IRD also featured adjustable geometry. IRD's product catalog said: "Adjustment is accomplished by elastomer durometer and threaded ends of the cable which terminate in the swing arm cavity. By tightening the cable ends several interesting things happen. The chain stay dimension shortens, the bottom bracket raises, and the head angle gets steeper. Of course, the opposite happens when the cable in lengthened, permitting you to fine tune the handling to your own preference."

Photo: MOMBAT



3. Mountain Goat Whiskeytown Racer FS

Photo: MOMBAT

Touted as a rear suspension version of Mountain Goat's Whiskeytown Racer, this bike could put some recent bikes to shame with its very high pivot design. The rear suspension was made using a stack of elastomers and by changing the type and strength of these you could adjust the ride feel.



4. Trek 9000

Photo: MOMBAT

One of Trek's first-generation full suspension bikes, the 9000 was running a Trek DDS3 fork made by Showa in Japan. Trek only made these forks for a few years before they started using third-party brands of suspension.



5. Mountain Cycles San Andreas

Mountain Cycle San Andreas from the collection of Sky Boyer Velo Cult

After working with the Kawasaki motorcycle racing team as a test rider, Robert Reisinger decided he wanted to start working on his own mountain bike and with that came the Mountain Cycles San Andreas. Available in just one size it was possible to adjust the seat tube angle using the built-in adjustable assembly. Just like other bikes at the time, the suspension used elastomers and by swapping these out you could make the shock stiffer or more supple.

bigquotesI started Mountain Cycle right after I graduated. I had a good idea of what I wanted, but before I got started, I went to bike shows, checked out prototypes, and asked questions. Brent Trimble's carbon X-bike, the Kestral Nitro and the Mantis Flying V were very influential.Robert Reisinger

You can read our 'Now That Was a Bike' on the San Andreas here



6. Schwinn Paramount S.A.S.S.


While most bikes of this period had around 2" of rear travel, the Schwinn Paramount S.A.S.S. had a massive 4" of bounce. The S.A.S.S. (Schwinn Active Suspension System) was even piloted by Glen Adams to a bronze medal at the 1991 World Champs in Italy before it was revised slightly and publicly released in 1992. For just the frame, fork and rear brake you would be set back $1800 or $3,607 in todays money.

ringle



7. MBS Clark-Kent Fatbike

Early 90s Clark-Kent fat bike. Yes perhaps the very first fat bike Only two were ever made and it is believed this is the only surviving frame.

With riders wanting to go on rides and take part in events on more extreme terrain there became a need for something slightly different to a normal mountain bike. Fatbikes were born. While bikes similar to what we imagine when thinking of Fatbikes were a while in 1992 that didn't stop frame makers from improvising. Enter the MBS Clark-Kent Fatbike.

Clark-Kent's fatbike used two rims welded together front and rear with both laced to a single hub. Four tires were mounted to the bike with each tire having its own inner tube. One bike, four rims, four tires, and four tubes.

You can read our 'Now That Was a Bike' on the MBS Clark-Kent Fat Bike here





205 Comments

  • 143 3
 That MC San Andreas still makes me smileSmile
  • 97 1
 Which country made it? Can't quite tell...
  • 114 61
 @bishopsmike: the greatest one, son. The greatest one.
  • 58 53
 @Bro-LanDog: typical american
  • 54 27
 @Saucycheese: you can boo me all you'd like, I've seen what makes you cheer.
  • 29 3
 @bishopsmike: made in asia probably
  • 11 57
flag Ade5 (Feb 24, 2022 at 12:54) (Below Threshold)
 It makes me puke.
  • 16 57
flag Saucycheese (Feb 24, 2022 at 12:58) (Below Threshold)
 @Bro-LanDog: Two middle fingers pointed at you make me cheer
  • 7 0
 The stem suspension lol
  • 31 0
 yep, back in the day the only thing faster than this bike was your body as you flew past it after going over the bars
  • 30 21
 @Bro-LanDog: Lol! Love it and love the bike. The world's never needed the US flag more than now.
  • 24 1
 @bishopsmike: downcountry.

Maybe that's what the lower 50 should be renamed.
  • 22 0
 Great bike, way ahead of it’s time and still a blast to ride today.
Definitely made in the USA, definitely a great story behind it, and I still vividly remember my jaw hitting the floor when I opened up a issue of MBA and got smacked in the face by the full page ad for this thing. Full suspension, disc brakes, inverted fork, the memory still gives me goosebumps.
  • 2 23
flag Saucycheese (Feb 24, 2022 at 15:17) (Below Threshold)
 @jaznomore: probably should move there then
  • 2 0
 @fredddbg: Wrong. That's like saying frites come from France. We both know that couldn't be further from the truth.
  • 13 0
 @brassinne: correct. They come from Belgium.
  • 5 0
 I still have one with pro stop brakes, and a DC Shiver mounted on it.
  • 7 0
 @VwHarman: indeed ! Never quite understood why english speaking people call them French Fries when we, French people all recognize the fact it's Belgian. You could argue that Belgians were French at some point and half of it speaks French but that would be far fetched imo.
  • 7 1
 @Balgaroth: Well to be more precise the "pommes frites" were probably invented more or less at the same time in France and what is now Belgium. Potates were introduced in those countries in the early 17th century only to be prohibed for a while because people suspected they brought disease. They started to be allowed back a little bit before the french revolution. Frying thing was something known and is not rocket science but was still something expensive, anyway there are traces of the idea of frying fries in culinary books in Paris way before Belgium as a country existed and some belgian historians admit it probably origins from Paris.

So I don't think it is historically so bad to call them french fries even though Belgium and the northest part of France are the two places where frites are so culturally big and Belgium might be more easily defined by its consumption of "frites".
  • 3 0
 Talking about elastomer shocks when the pictured bike clearly has an air shock. LOL.
  • 5 0
 @fredddbg: nope san luis obispo , all hand made over a rubber forming press from cnc cut blanks i spent some time there
  • 2 0
 @Compositepro: they were manufactured in Portland Oregon for a while as well.
  • 2 0
 @scotttherider: aye iir this was when Robert sold the company to kinesis
  • 4 0
 Bought mine in 1994; my wife was still using it until last week...now it got its place on the wall of fame next to the Lawwill Leader fork ;-)
  • 5 0
 @Compositepro: you forgot the part about being painstakingly "hand shaped" to remove all the wrinkles! I spent 2 years beating those things smooth while in college.

Everything except paint was done in house, even had a heat treat oven out back. The oven was actually sold to Intense when Kinesis bought Mountain Cycle.

Fun place to work, except in the summer as it was an old paint factory with a steel roof and no insulation!
  • 3 0
 @bikebasher: i remember a guy called chris who liked bleeding brakes (a really nice kid he was)and a beadroller for doing the return edge , i do remember a lot of guys came from cal poly just up the road
  • 2 0
 @Balgaroth: Just call them freedom fries, problem solved!
  • 2 0
 I remember picking my MC San Andreas DNA up at the factory in Portland, Oregon back in ‘06. Got the full factory tour and all. They were making the legendary Ironhorse Sunday there at the same time and they were lined up on the racks. Such a cool place.

Built it up with a 170mm Mz 66SL and 1x9 drivetrain with megadrive cassette and a chain device to be able to climb up and ride like a DH bike down. Sounds familiar?
  • 2 0
 @o1inc: The San Andreas might have looked outrageous, but it rode great back in the day.
I thought it looked pretty cool. Still does.....
  • 1 0
 @Compositepro: Chris was actually the production manager near the end and that rolled bead was key to the frame's design.
When Intense first started doing monocoque frames, they would just line up the edges and butt weld them, no rolled bead. And they would crack like crazy! I think they got some MC frames and cut them apart to see what we were doing...Smile
  • 1 0
 Looks like a mountain cheerleader...
  • 1 0
 @Balgaroth: Check the real history camarade. Fries are actually french, with all the respect I have for the Belgians. Some historians have proven it very clearly; check on internet Wink
  • 1 0
 @brassinne: It's like saying that hamburgers come from the US. They come from Hamburg, Germany.
  • 3 0
 @danstonQ:
The internet also says I can fit 73 hot dogs in my rectal cavity. There are even pictures of it. I can tell you for a fact that it is not happening.
  • 1 0
 @brassinne: OMG, you’re killing me! So much win Big Grin
  • 75 1
 30 years later and they’re still sexier than an Ellsworth
  • 13 1
 Well yeah, but you're setting the bar pretty low there mate.
  • 55 1
 These are gravel bikes right?
  • 20 1
 The future of gravel…
  • 7 0
 yeah haha 2026 gravel bikes
  • 18 0
 Oh yes- elastomer suspension will have a second coming!
  • 1 0
 It has with BMC URS @chrsei:
  • 1 0
 Arrgo gravel
  • 39 2
 we'd see a Trek 9000 parked on our campus and be like "Oh this dude either deals weed or is a Drs kid"....
  • 30 1
 Hey Brian how about a Pro-Flex.

Those were a game changer back in the day for us BC kids. The "Beast" even had early Ohlins on it I think. The original red one with the Girvin Vector fork was wild at the time. I even have one hanging in my rafters.
  • 2 0
 Agree.

Weren't they a little later than 92? I think the last number was the year i.e. 856 - 1996. Could be massively wrong there.
  • 2 0
 @Dononemaccaboy: You're right, I had a Proflex 856 in 1996.
  • 1 0
 @hpman83: Yeah, me too. Then I had a Zaskar in 97 because the Proflex was really terrible.
  • 4 0
 Bob Girvin's company re-branded to Pro-Flex in 1994, but he started producing full suspension frames under the previous 'Offroad' brand in 1990.
  • 1 0
 I had a Pro-Flex back in the day. I do remember how scary those underdamped elastomeric forks and rear suspension could be in some situations. It is amazing how much better oil dampers are these days!
  • 2 0
 Pro-flex. My first fully. It had some k2 branding on it and sent me over the bars nearly every ride, but I still rode it a lot.
  • 2 0
 @jonemyers: the 856 had a oil cartridge. It was not only elastomer only.
  • 2 0
 @shawndashf1: Im still amazed people forget this.
  • 1 0
 @shawndashf1:
Available in the UK from 91.
  • 1 0
 I had a Proflex 953, bought right off the wall at Bike Cellar in New West. $2500 is 1993 dollars. I ditched the GripShift in favour of XT thumbies. Had a 600 Ultegra short cage RD stock.
I've started a rebuild project on it, but want to get a bit more rear wheel travel than the 1.5" I had. It was the small (14") frame, so only a half-elastomer in the back.
  • 27 0
 Back when full suspension was more dangerous than a hardtail, but we didn't know it because we were too busy tuning our v-brakes.
  • 33 0
 V-brakes were another five or six years away. The alphabet only went up to U in those days.
  • 1 0
 @Bob-Agg: Actually looks like an early v-brake on the back of that IRD!
  • 1 2
 @Rich-Izinia: Yes...one of several MADE IN AMERICA original designs which shimano ripped off when developing the V-brakes.
  • 1 0
 @deeeight: Shimano greatly improved on these MADE IN AMERICA v-brakes by creating MADE IN JAPAN parallel push XTR and then XT V-brakes. No one has a patent on a Class 2 lever (I think it's a class 2 lever, some engineer will chime in soon enough)
  • 20 0
 That Fat bike is double fat?
  • 27 0
 The mountain bike equivalent to a double stuffed oreo
  • 7 0
 I believe the kids these days would call it “skinny thicc” (adjust suspenders, spectacles and raises socks and saunters off to take a nap).
  • 4 0
 I thought I had drank too many beers! Thankfully it actually is, 4 tires
  • 1 0
 Without my reading glasses on, looks like one tire front & back.
  • 17 0
 I'd like to thank all the folks who took the chance and bought these things so that we can have the bikes we have today.
  • 2 0
 Well said sir! That is so true.
  • 17 0
 Mountain Goat Whiskeytown Racer is a fantastic name for a mountain bike.
  • 2 0
 that Softride stem on there really takes me back
  • 2 0
 @SATN-XC: My friend had one of those things.
  • 1 0
 The OG hardtail was a beauty. I always thought it was the best named bike too (:
  • 1 0
 Great climber - check
Likes a stiff drink- check
Goes to races- check
I’ll be using the MGWtR handle from now on.
  • 1 0
 They had a paint job called 'wiggle wire' and I wanted it soooooo bad
  • 1 0
 For anyone who doesn’t know the Whiskeytown Downhill was a race in Redding CA. It was a point to point XC race with a lot of downhill fire roads and some single track. I actually raced in it while in high school.
  • 15 0
 Wow I'm old! I remember watching a guy ride by me on a that Trek. I was a punk kid thinking rich a$$hole doesn't need that bike? He's fat and slow! Now I'm fat and slow Frown
  • 13 0
 MC San Andres. My dream bike. Constantly adorning the cover of MBUK as a school kid. Never seen in real until about 97 and then it was like seeing Elvis. I mean the double disk version…..just wow.
  • 2 0
 Yep. That San Andreas will remain a very special bike for mountain biking for loads of reasons. Someone casually brought one in to the bike shop I worked in when I was 16 and everyone dropped everything. Amazing ambition and problem solving
  • 1 0
 I had three of these, two mohos and a shockwave - they were fun bikes at the time. This was my first - www.pinkbike.com/photo/5342970
  • 1 0
 @somemorestuff: well played sir. And a thingy on the mech. Forgot the name. Not a Daves Chain Device…. I had a blue one. Early clutch mech right there.
But look in the mirror and challenge yourself over that post reflector!
  • 1 0
 @ilovedust: it's not a reflector - it's a rear light, hence the BLT lights on the front. The rear mech thingy was a Bullet Bros chain tensioner.
  • 13 0
 Lol, that Trek 9000 looks like Bob the Builder took some 2x4s and a lag bolt to a main triangle.
  • 15 0
 It rode about that well too. Should have been called the Catapult 9000.
  • 12 0
 Delta V was the Cannondale frame, not the fork. The fork was of course the Headshok
  • 9 0
 I remember my sponsor getting one of those treks. First ride, little bimble on some local heath. Jumped down a little 10inch lump, got rebounded straight OTB to broken collar bone!
:'D
That bike was the definition of 'pogo stick'
  • 3 0
 I remember them being touted as one of the worst suspension bikes ever made.
  • 1 0
 @Bob-Agg:

I’ve ridden one.

They should all be burned with fire.
  • 1 0
 I remember they didn't make em for very long :'D
Was there a coil damper upgrade or is my memory playing tricks?
  • 1 0
 If you came from a MX background they were fine to ride as you were likely already faimilar with single-pivot bikes which topped out if the shock wasn't sorted. If however you'd come from nothing but road bikes or bmx, or only hardtail mountain bikes and had never experienced motorcycles with rear suspension, you likely hadn't yet learned how to cope with a diving fork and extending swingarm yet. PLUS making matters worse back then were all the bicycle magazines telling owners to adjust their forks and shocks so there was absolutely zero sag under rider weight. So they ended up overly stiff and even more likely to rocket you off the bike.
  • 9 0
 I'm actually sort of impressed at how bad many of the early Trek FS bikes were. The 9000 was just a pogo-stick catapult of doom. The VRX was bad at being either a DH or trail bike. The 98 Trek DH had a hilariously high top tube perfect for smashing your bits into. Honorable mention is owed to the only other bike under their umbrella that might be more dangerous than the 9000, the Klein Mantra. Looked great, rode extra-dangerously. Given how well Trek got stuff sorted after the introduction of ABP, it's amazing that they made it through the entire MTB boom era with no really good FS bikes, save for maybe the Carbon Ys.
  • 3 0
 Spot on... I was going to buy one if the 9000's back then. Until I rode it. It. Was. Terrible. The definition of rebound on this bike was that it would kick back with twice as much force than was put into it...
  • 2 2
 Those Y bikes were pretty terrible but the URT made it so as long as you were standing they rode acceptable. I think it was mid/2000s merger of Fisher/Trek is was pushed them in the right direction. The Supercaliber and Procalibers were brought over and basically the whole off-road line came from Fisher including CX. Trek has owned Fisher since the 90s but didn’t take the MTB line over until 2008ish and by 2010 they were Fisher Signature Treks. His Genesis geometry and Genesis 2 were longer slacker lower (seat tubes were a bit relaxed and they climbed a bit awkwardly) and Trek adopted his geometry across the line and soon after dropped the Genesis marketing.
  • 3 0
 I laughed at the promo vid that was on loop in the LBS for that Trek. It showed the incessant un-damped bouncing in slow-mo. Like that's a selling point! LOL
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: I had a 2013 Superfly 100. It was so terrible (3 blown shocks, horrendous paint damage from the terrible cable routing, the abp pivot kept coming loose, and knocking fork bushings - all in under a year) that I haven’t bought a Trek since. Such a disappointing first “real” mountain bike.
  • 3 0
 The VRX wasn't too bad, ugly as hell. Swapping the rear shock helped tremendously, Fox Vanilla. I finally retired mine this past fall.
  • 2 0
 @DHhack: After I broke my first carbon Superfly HT they offered to upgrade me to a Superfly 100. It arrived at my shop and I opened the box, took one look at it and put it back and returned it opting for a Superfly 9.8SL since I figured I could sell that easier. Every indication I had from looking at that frame was that I was going to destroy it in short order. It seemed like a MTB for a roadie. The Top Fuel from that era was a pretty solid bike, but still a little steep.
I haven't seen a huge number of issues with their current offerings aside from the thru-shaft damper.
  • 2 0
 @mchartier3: We kept a VRX frame around the shop for years. It was a fun platform for all kinds of bike shop experiments.
  • 1 0
 @bigtim: To be fair, only the first year experienced the awful pogoing as the second year added an oil-dampener to the shock and by the third year of production they'd gotten the shock sorted to an gas/oil unit made by Risse under contract, both of which tamed the pogo quite a bit, but really its an enormously high pivot cantilever beam. There's only so much you can do when most riders couldn't spin a smooth circle with the pedals even if you held a gun to their head, and the chainline was so far below the pivot point.
  • 1 0
 @deeeight: It also helped the last ones had a carbon swing arm. Those where stiffer than the aluminum swing arms. I sold the last ones and rode a few of them ...they were much better, but like most FS of the era, punished poor pedaling.
  • 8 1
 I always wonder why FS bikes took so long to evolve to what they are today. Maybe the computer-modeling that became more widely used/available? Seems like things took a big turn about 6 years ago for the better. What was holding back the engineers in the 90s from making bikes like they are today? Would be a good article about the evolution of engineering in the mtb world.
  • 3 1
 I think it's very incremental with little improvements every year. I don't think you could find a specific year that things changed more than other years.
  • 8 0
 The realization that standing up makes descending better was a huge advancement in suspension design
  • 3 0
 @VtVolk: @VtVolk: WHAT!?? you're saying you DON"T want the rear to lock-out when you stand out of the saddle?!?
  • 9 0
 It took years for the industry to move on from the fat-tired-road bike mentality, some brands still haven’t.
  • 3 1
 It took a long time to separate the road bike influence on mountain bikes. The introduction of XC Racing in the Olympics in 1996 pushed the sport further in that direction: light weight, pedaling performance, the importance of climbing over descending.
  • 2 0
 You'd be surprised just how long it took for magazine writers and bicycle dealers to STOP telling people to setup their suspension with ZERO sag under rider weight (so they all rode nearly fully topped out constantly and every bump or jump or dip trying to shoot them back to full extension constantly).
  • 2 0
 @deeeight: Amen, we still get bikes in for service with the shocks and forks pumped up to ridiculous pressures and the damping set as slow as possible. I did a full 200hr service the other week and pulled all the pressures/settings before i started. Somehow in the two weeks to took for the proper parts to be delivered, my settings got misplaced and I had to ask the customer for his weight so I could get base settings prior to fine tuning. So I inflate everything and set the clickers, meanwhile I find the post-it with the settings I pulled off. This guy had, according the the setup guide about 40psi too much in the shock and 20 or so over on the fork. Plus he was basically locked out. I don't think he's going to go hit Audi Nines, so I just think he took his $9k Specialized Epic, and turned it into a full rigid for no good reason. What a waste of a rebuild, he's not using the suspension, why bother spending $300 on a full 200hr service.
  • 9 0
 They are all high pivots, are you trying to send a subtle message here about HP fever?
  • 8 0
 I saw that too - you could go back in time with an idler pulley, an electric drill and a drywall screw and set the future of mountainbiking 30 years forward. (that and write boost on the rear hub)
  • 2 0
 that's why the first one has clips - to keep you on the pedals from the massive kickback it must have had
  • 1 0
 @SickEdit: oh yes, those all pedaled like shit. If you weren't pogoing (because no one can pedal smooth enough for those beasts), you were getting your ankles broken by kickback.
  • 1 0
 @zeedre: Been there, done that (on that very model year of Trek 9000). The swingarm is hollow and you need to stick an insert into it to thread on the idler pulley. Wink
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: THe kickback was largely to do with the idiocy of the bike industry at the time that people should never adjust their shocks/forks for any sort of sag under rider weight. So the bikes were always trying to return to full extension on every pedal stroke, bump, impact, etc.
  • 5 0
 As an older rider who has been riding since before any of these bikes came out, I love all the smart ass comments about these bikes. The truth is, they’ve were all pieces of shit compared to current bikes. This is a great time to be a bike rider.
  • 4 0
 As an even older rider I say any time is a great time to be a bike rider... but it is getting better all the time. I'm just greatful that I didn't have the disposable income at the time to waste on early adaption.
  • 5 0
 MBS Clark-Kent Fatbike......HOW AM I JUST NOW LEARNING ABOUT THIS?! Those wheels ...following the spokes out from the center hub to the rim is like staring at an MC Escher painting.
  • 3 0
 @SATN-XC--those 'fat-bikes' were specifically built for racing the Iditabike in AK back in the day.
  • 3 0
 Just imagine if you did that with today’s tech. You could have a 10” wide tire
  • 3 0
 As I recall, one of the bicycling magazine staff writers carried a Colt M1911A1 .45ACP in his pack during one year of the Iditabike, because their had been large brown bears on course the year before.
  • 4 0
 Full suspension bikes back then were pretty sketchy but definitely loved the out of the box thinking behind some of the designs. Makes you appreciate modern bikes when you ride one of these.
Here’s my old San Andreas www.pinkbike.com/u/jakeguthrie/album/1993-Mountain-Cycle-San-Andreas
And my old Trek pogo stick www.pinkbike.com/photo/13482353
  • 2 0
 Ah the 1993 Trek 9000, the one that had the oil-damper inside the elastomer spring.
  • 1 0
 @deeeight: so they kind of fixed it Smile
  • 5 1
 Would be great to know if any of these suspension designs would work better now with modern shock technology and geometry. Would love to see a retromod GT RTS1 with long and slack treatment.
  • 16 0
 Easy and quick answer here: nope.
  • 1 0
 I think the closest to the RTS platform by Jim Busby would be Peter Denk's AOS platform that was seen on GT's 2014-18 Sensor and Force bikes with the bottom bracket moved from the frame to the pathlink or in RTS speak, the cam rocker.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZhSLXAUtRI
  • 2 0
 @yfrnaks: I had a 2015 Sensor and....it was pretty sweet. IDrive!
  • 1 0
 Only chainless, or maybe like a 45-degree O-Chain.
  • 1 0
 @yfrnaks: closest to rts would probably be the devinci Wilson design
  • 1 0
 The RTS1 was my first FS bike and I loved it. Curious how much I'd hate it now. It too was high pivot but it didn't pogo like most of the bikes here.
  • 1 0
 @IamZOSO: I own one to date and yes, it'll pogo, but only if the shock lost its rebound dampening. Normally the shock keeps the pogoing in check quite well.
  • 1 0
 And most importantly an idler pulley at the main pivot, to finally remove the drawback of this otherwise great design.
  • 5 0
 We've come a long way. Hands up if anyone on here purchased one of these new and survived LOL
  • 7 0
 Former Delta V owner here. Mine had the 200mm negative rise stem with the super long xyz bar ends as well.
  • 5 0
 www.pinkbike.com/photo/20493340

The bar ends that came with that Delta V
  • 4 0
 I went over the bars of several inferior bikes in this era, but sadly never had the cash for one of these beauties
  • 6 0
 Didn't have any of these, but my first bike had the RockShox Mag21 that's shown on that Schwinn. 48mm of overly-linear, stiction-tastic travel. You pumped air into each leg using a basketball needle and you had a choice of so much air that it wouldn't move or just enough air to actually get it to dive into the travel but with constant bottom-outs. The latter actually worked out alright for tracking the trail, but you just had to accept the regular bottom-out clunks that went along with it.
  • 2 0
 @big-red: or the Vprocess / Sunn radical which wasn’t far off an RTS and was developed by Nico someone or other who started out on an S-Bike then RTS
  • 2 0
 @earache: My buddy had a local shop sponsorship and was racing the Delta V. I remember him showing up for a ride on that spaceship with X-Ray gripshift 1:1 and early Speed Play pedals.
  • 1 0
 Not any of these, but I raced an Offroad Proflx for two years and survived
  • 9 3
 I'm really glad I wasn't born ten years earlier.
  • 1 0
 it's all just progression. old, unforgiving bikes were better at creating a scene where better riders were easier to spot. It also gave those riders more skills as they had to work harder without the bike taking the effort out.
  • 3 0
 Erik Buell worked with Schwinn on the SASS design. It was based off the pull shock design he used on his motorcycles at the time. If you look closely you can even see it says Buell on the "seat stay" or swingarm.
  • 2 0
 Well I owned 2 of the 7 featured (Trek and Mountain Cycles) and I will mention the Trek while sold as a 3" travel rear end was actually capable of more. The shock had a hard plastic bottom-out stop on the shaft under the elastomer spring, and if you cut it out you ended up with more wheel travel (about 4.7 inches if I remember correctly) without any consequences besides a greater risk of a pedal smack if you didn't land drops/jumps with your cranks level.

Also do note the rear brake on the IRD... that's one of the designs shimano ripped off three years later when they "invented" V-brakes.
  • 2 0
 I had the cannondale. At the time it was a hell of a bike. But now I remember…..
XYZ bar ends were freekn enormous (I still have then somewhere).
The Gripshifter 1:1 X-ray shifters were fantastic only with fresh cables.
The cantilever brakes were so weak (unless you put coke on your rims) and wore through the rims.
The cables were always filling up with grit so things got sooooo hard at the end of a long ride.
Servicing the fork was a freekn nightmare.
Big 1.5 head sets!
  • 2 0
 Great list of early suspension bikes (they look as bad as I remember). But how about adding the first (AFAIK) production 29er - the '92 Diamond Back Overdrive with 700c wheels.
  • 2 0
 Or GT's 650 B range just a year before.
  • 2 0
 @Vindiu: I never knew GT did a 650b. Just looked it up and it looks like it was the Tachyon with GT's 700D rims. Those sliding fork dropouts would have been trick for the day. It it certainly the first big name gravel bike!
  • 2 0
 @defconfour: Yes, that's the one. Maybe I was wrong and it's just that 650b wheels could be used on these. I thought 650 b was mentioned in the catalogue, probably bad memory on my side. Got tol love the SunTour groupset and Command Shifters too. Yes, first gravel from a big one.
  • 2 0
 @defconfour: Ok, Scans of the 1991 GT catalogue: sfcyclotouring.blogspot.com/2008/05/gt-tachyon-great-idea-that-happened-too.html

I was simply making stuff out in my mind Smile
  • 2 0
 @Vindiu: while searching it looked like you could run certain 650b tires but good luck getting them off Big Grin lol with GT coming out with a 3mm taller hoop (700d vs 650b). But trying things is part of mtn biking and we wouldn't have the amazing bikes we have now without companies and riders looking for something better. I've loved seeing the changes over the years.
  • 4 0
 No list of bikes from this era is complete without a Klein. Still the most beautiful paint jobs to ever appear on a bike.
  • 4 0
 Me in '92: Nobody will ever need more than 50mm fork travel.
Me in '22: 140mm or 160mm for general trail riding?
  • 1 0
 Makes me question why mountain bike engineers thought they could do better than dirtbike engineers, when a lot of mtb tech (and head angles) is now shared between both. When was the last time you saw elastomer suspensionon a dirtbike? never, but let's try it on this mountain bike!
  • 1 0
 It still hurts after 30 years to see the Cannodale V 1000 and the Paramount S.A.S.S. sporting SunTour XC Pro MD groupsets. It was teh last chance of the company under Mori Seiki control... next year Sakae took control and the groupset development was all but gone, Soon after the Japanese branch was shut down. I wonder if any Product Manager ever realized how stupid a move was to put the whole industry in the hands of a single company.
  • 5 0
 Some gems there.
  • 2 0
 It was a couple of years after that Cannondale debuted that first learned what the “Delta V” nomenclature was about when I first enrolled in high school physics.
  • 4 0
 Holy smokes! Those dinner plate rotors, tho!
  • 4 0
 Oh yeah. I had a set of the hydraulic versions (cable version up there). There was only one piston squeezing each rotor, and when I say one piston, I don't mean two pistons, one either side, I mean one piston on one side. The other brake pad was fixed in place.

"So, what about brake rub if one of the piston is completely still?" I hear you ask. Well, the rotor was 'floating'. It was mounted on bushing that allowed lateral play (a small cylinder with a washer on the end that stopped the rotor coming off. When you squeezed the brakes, the rotor would self-centre.

"That sounds like a shitty set of brakes." Oh yes, but about the best you could get until Magura Gustav and Hayes came along with the first disc brakes. Edit: Sachs? No.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: High performance motorcycles still use floating rotors. I’ve seen them on some types of race cars as well.
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: Is that to accommodate flex?
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: What @deeeight said and to accommodate for fixed calipers.
  • 2 0
 Mountain Goat Whiskeytown Racer... that's the name of an Americana roots folk band playing at an outdoor venue near you this summer.
  • 2 0
 It does sound an awful lot like some random hipster band
  • 3 0
 I have memory’s of looking at the 9000 in a catalogue in my closet like it was my first playboy. Kinda.
  • 1 1
 "For just the frame, fork and rear brake you would be set back $1800 or $3,607 in todays money."
Since the influx of dirt dentists manufacturers are happy to ream our wallets of far more than that now and that does not include a fork or brakes, admittedly shit works now, which is nice I guess.
  • 2 0
 Delta V wasnt Dales first full suspension nike. That was the EST series. Arguably they used a flex stem for front suspension, but worth mentioning.
  • 3 0
 The death straps on the pedals!
  • 1 0
 Still have my delta V and Klein attitude hanging in the rafters. Recall nitemare on the integrated front fork. Never rode a cannondale again
  • 2 0
 Vintage MTB Fest next 14 August in south of Belgium www.vintagemtb.org Will update the website soon.
  • 2 0
 Missing the AMP B3, the One that started the FSR, after being sold to Specialized.
  • 2 0
 Hey babe, how do you like my big bar ends?
  • 2 0
 High Pivot all the rage back then.
  • 2 0
 The stem suspension tho lol
  • 1 0
 I want to see modern fat bike tires fit into the axles of that Clark-Kent fat bike!
  • 1 0
 The top comment on the MBS Clark-Kent Fat Bike 'Now that was a bike' article is incredible
  • 2 0
 Incredibly stupid.
  • 1 0
 I can't even describe how truly AWFUL the rear suspension on Trek's first boing-bike......it bobs just looking at it.
  • 1 0
 BIkes really did suck as much as how bad they looked. Bikes are light years better than they were.
  • 1 0
 I have #1,4,5, and 6 in my collection.. looking for that / any IRD or mnt Goat if anyones got one..
  • 1 0
 Love how Trek built flex into that swing arm...ahead of its time MotoGP take note...
  • 2 0
 Crazy how good bikes from the 70’s look.
  • 1 0
 I remember as a kid pressing my nose flat against the bike store window while looking at the San Andreas for hours.
  • 1 0
 Nice goat! I've got an 87 mountain goat "deluxe" waiting for a new paint job.
  • 1 0
 Delta V 1000 looks a lot newer than 1992....great design
  • 1 0
 Yeah. Most of the old Cannondales look pretty clean.
  • 1 0
 That's Mountain Cycle as in singular. Not Mountain Cycles plural.
  • 1 0
 I am sorry, but they should still make FAT BIKES this way...brilliant
  • 1 0
 Why do they all look like POLE!?
  • 1 0
 2 more years and we can celebrate? 30th?
  • 1 0
 It's the Polygon family tree.
  • 1 0
 Outland VPP.. Built in Lynden WA. TRansition ? Kona ? .. C' mon
  • 1 0
 The Outland was really about four or five years later.
  • 1 0
 I am missing that flex that only a 130mm stem can provide!
  • 1 0
 Missing the Cadex CFM2, arguably the first carbon mountain bike.
  • 2 0
 Missing a LOT of bikes if you're using 1992 as the sole criteria as there were thousands of models of mountain bikes that year... but the Cadex wasn't even remotely close to being the first carbon mountain bike. Trek had beaten Giant to that market by several years as had Specialized. The first carbon mountain bike was actually the Mountain Bik, circa 1986. Bik was the carbon company which split up and became Aegis and Kestrel. They produced road frames and mountain frames, as well as did all the OEM frame construction for Trek. This was my Mountain Bik...

www.mtbr.com/attachments/uglybik2-jpg.677
  • 2 0
 @deeeight: wrong, that looks like a gravel bike to me
  • 1 0
 @letsgoridebikes18:

I don't like road bike frame geometry, so i always built my pavement bikes using mountain bike frames. Of course fast forward twenty years and now gravel bikes use the geometry that XC mountain bikes were using thirty plus years ago. Same that a lot of urban/jump frames went to using in the early 2000s. Even this year's Norco Rampage Team DJ frame isn't that far removed from many XC trail hardtails of the early 90s.
  • 2 0
 No Sintesi Bazooka?
  • 1 0
 Well then. Looks like hi pivot has been done in the past .
  • 5 5
 They all look like sessions.
  • 5 0
 Thankfully, they do not.
  • 1 3
 ..Came here for the YT Return of the Goat II chat, nothing yet - new video is funny as... guess i will wait...
  • 1 1
 What no hideous Mullets?





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