Block user
Fantasy
Points: 3627          Rank: 8107
PLAY NOW

Recent

gabriel-mission9 paulaston's article
Oct 8, 2018 at 14:19
Oct 8, 2018
Review: Trek Session 9.9 29
@cuban-b: yeah, and as a Scott Gambler and Commencal V4 are also "linkage driven single pivots", while Santa Cruz V10s and Mondraker Summums are "short link 4 bar" everything gets a bit confusing.
gabriel-mission9 paulaston's article
Oct 8, 2018 at 14:15
Oct 8, 2018
Review: Trek Session 9.9 29
@ninjatarian: Kinda. ABP has the axle path of a single pivot but the brake mounted to the seatstay as found on an FSR. Given that the axle path of an FSR varies so insignificantly to that of a single pivot, I'd say ABP is closer to FSR than single pivot.
gabriel-mission9 Whipperman's article
Oct 2, 2018 at 5:14
Oct 2, 2018
Bigger=Stronger ? Calling BS on Super Boost
I disagree. Even spoke tension is the holy grail. It is possible to build a perfectly straight wheel with very uneven tensions. However it won't stay straight for long, a few weeks of little more than riding to the shops and back is usually enough for them to get a wobble on. An evenly tensioned wheel will likely stay straight through many months of abuse, bad line choices and sideways landings.
gabriel-mission9 danielsapp's article
Oct 1, 2018 at 12:17
Oct 1, 2018
gabriel-mission9 Whipperman's article
Oct 1, 2018 at 12:16
Oct 1, 2018
Bigger=Stronger ? Calling BS on Super Boost
Good blog. I agree with pretty much everything here. :) It's cool to see someone else who likes to think about these things. Going back to the original discussion where you directed me to this blog, I'd be interested to hear your views on the bit where you state "My hypothesis is : you want to approach the maximum tension allowed by the rim on the drive side (F2) to reach maximum strength." You seem like a smart guy, and you have the maths. I'm sadly ill equipped in that dept
gabriel-mission9 RichardCunningham's article
Oct 1, 2018 at 12:06
Oct 1, 2018
Bike Check: Katy Winton's Trek Slash - Finale Ligure EWS 2018
@ka-brap: Nope I wear rears faster. As you say, this does kinda go against the idea that the front brake gets pulled harder. However I've always assumed that the rears wear faster cos: a) while the front brake gets used much harder and does the majority of the work in any hard deceleration, the rear brake gets used more often, for small speed checks/bike attitude adjustment etc. and on steeper trails is often dragged gently for long durations, causing a lot of heat build up and accelerated wear. Not very hard work for the hand, but a bit abusive to the brake pads. b) your rear wheel gets a lot more dirt and shit thrown at it than the front, so the brake pads get worn faster by the resulting grinding paste on them.
gabriel-mission9 danielsapp's article
Oct 1, 2018 at 11:52
Oct 1, 2018
First Ride: Crankbrothers Carbon Synthesis Wheels
Spoke Tension. Does it really effect wheel stiffness? I know it's almost become accepted lore in the past few years, with manufacturers even apparently getting on board now, but I'm not convinced it's anything more than myth. I totally get it, I even believed it myself at first. It seems logical that tighter spokes should create a stiffer wheel, but the more I think about it, the more I start to doubt my initial gut feeling. There are so many variables involved that it's incredibly hard to work out in my head what goes on in a wheel when it is impacted, but I find it very hard to ignore the fact that according to very well accepted and understood physics, the amount of tension on a spoke should not affect spoke stretch during an impact at all. This implies that spoke tension should have absolutely no effect on wheel stiffness, however a full wheel is a much more complicated system than a single spoke, and as I say there are too many variables for me to confidently get my head round. I'd love to see an article on it by PB. With real life timed runs vs. lab tests vs. theory etc. I think it would be really interesting to see this idea really explored properly, rather than just kinda passed down through rumours and fokelore.
gabriel-mission9 RichardCunningham's article
Oct 1, 2018 at 11:29
Oct 1, 2018
Bike Check: Katy Winton's Trek Slash - Finale Ligure EWS 2018
@RedRedRe: @RedRedRe: IMO the rear brake does not get pulled harder. During normal riding it takes very little lever force to lock up the rear wheel as the wheel naturally unweights when braking, reducing grip on that wheel. BMX/trials style tyre taps are the only situation I can think of where you would need to grab a good hand-full of rear brake, as these maneuvers focus all your weight and momentum through the back wheel. The front brake on the other hand, normally requires a reasonably hard pull to lock the wheel. This is because the weight of the bike/rider naturally pushes through the front wheel when braking, meaning the tyre gets better grip. So while I don't think that hand strength is a big concern when using modern brakes, if it got to the point where I did need to choose my lever position based on which hand was stronger, it would seem sensible to put the front brake in my strong hand. The same goes for fine motor control. Your dominant hand should have better motor control, and it would seem sensible to use this hand for the front brake, where having the control to brake just enough to slow down without locking the wheel is very important. Lock the front wheel at high speed and you will likely crash. Lock the rear wheel at high speed and you'll do a cool skid. To be fair though, I think both hands are usually strong and dexterous enough that it doesn't really matter which you use for which brake. Whatever you are used to is fine. But front/right is better. ;)
gabriel-mission9 RichardCunningham's article
Sep 30, 2018 at 15:24
Sep 30, 2018
Bike Check: Katy Winton's Trek Slash - Finale Ligure EWS 2018
It is normal. For all you guys who run your brakes the wrong way round ;)
gabriel-mission9 mikelevy's article
Sep 18, 2018 at 3:30
Sep 18, 2018
Wren's Inverted Fork - Interbike 2018
Keyway? Really? Cos thats not going to cause binding as soon as the fork receives any torsional load whatsoever?
Load more...
You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2018. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.062980
Mobile Version of Website