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Video & Photo Story: From Monaco to Kosovo - 127 Days of Riding Across the Alps in 'Via Alpinarica'

Jun 5, 2023 at 2:20
by GAM BAS  





A journey, however extraordinary, is like a forest fire. Both are born from an insignificant spark. I had been roaming intermittently for a few years, regularly losing myself in the small French Vosges mountains which had welcomed me since childhood. I wandered along the paths on weekends, sleeping in shelters, under a tree or under the stars. I ended up crossing the whole mountain range. This experience of immersion, or rather of exfiltration from daily life was a revelation. I then arranged my first solo trip around the Mont Blanc in the Alps despite the fear in my stomach. This journey triggered my obsession for Alpine adventures.

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One winter evening while I was doing preliminary research on crossing the French Alps, I discovered the Via Alpina, a mega hiking trail which continues far beyond the classic route that I was then thinking of. It is a gigantic Ariadne's thread that crosses the whole Alpine arc from the Mediterranean Sea to the Adriatic. Rational thought was eclipsed by the shadow of the emotional; a situation conducive to achieving your dreams. The desire was born and would never leave me.

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Targeting the Via Alpina was like jumping from primary school to university. It was the beginning of several years of intense training in situations simulating the conditions I thought I would run into. I embraced all the opportunities that would move me along the path of resilience: freezing nights, rainy days, intense fatigue, or stress due to scarcity of drinking water. I am the type of person who believes that a real journey is not planned, but prepared. I wanted the surprise of discovering each landscape during the trip but having ensured that I had the technical and psychological toolbox to cross each one.

The forest fire spread one ultimate time with the discovery of the Via Dinarica which crosses the Dinaric Alps, in the heart of the Balkans. It added the impossible to the improbable - but it all looked so elegant! At the end of the day, from a mathematical point of view, infinity plus infinity still equals infinity. My plan rose in its final form, which I will name the Via Alpinarica.

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I departed from Monaco at sea level. I was nervous and terrified by the magnitude of the journey, despite my hard training. I was hoping that the thousands of hours I had spent on the trails had given me a type of superpower: that of being used to the unusual. No prepared itineraries, no marked accommodations, no scribbled calendar, I needed freedom. The same freedom that allowed me to enjoy a few hours of a water hole discovered at the foot of a waterfall or to make camp at the edge of a high-altitude lake of unexpected beauty.
My journey statistics:

• 127 days
• 12 countries
• 3890 kilometers
• 197000 meters of elevation gain
• 3750 meters (highest point)
• 10 pairs of braking pads
• 1 red Tshirt

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I was sorely tested in the first kilometers, difficult due to crushing heat and demanding rock gardens. After a few days, when I would plot my progress on the map, it seemed hopelessly negligible; almost invisible; materialized by only a few pixels on my smartphone screen. In the face of my growing anxiety, I decided to move forward by setting successive modest goals. I was reassured when I reached these recurrent finish lines, but the final one seemed unattainable.

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Liguria, Piemonte, Mercantour, Queyras, I was crossing the mountains towards the North, the Mont Blanc in sight. I had never accumulated so many days on a bike. A fact that my body pointed out in the worst way, tendinitis of the fascia lata accompanied the Achilles tendons. I thought that the adventure was close to an end. A friend who was a Doctor prescribed reduced effort and cryotherapy. From here, I threw myself with enthusiasm into the icy waters of mountain streams and lakes several times a day. The tendinopathies faded progressively over the weeks while less worrying muscular pains replaced them.

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I had been gone for 5 weeks with the impression of having lived an adventure at the edge of the world and on a longer time scale. One of the most amazing things about such an adventure is that it distorts space-time in such a way that a day seemed to last a week, and a week a month. I had a theory to explain this: the absence of reference points present in daily routines; but above all, that the density of memories was such that the brain was lured into dilating time to keep coherence.

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A few days later on a fresh afternoon, on a summit overlooking the majestic Aletsch glacier, I saw a young woman get out of a cable car. She stopped only a few minutes to take a picture and then went back down almost immediately in the next cabin. My ascent had lasted more than 6 hours, and I found myself next to this person. At the time I found the situation unfair, but if we were in the same place at the same time, we probably were not living the moment with the same intensity. That afternoon, a fabulous descent of almost 2000 meters confirmed this thought.

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I had been pedaling westwards for a few days, to my great frustration. My goal was to get further east, but I had promised myself that I would follow the path of the Via Alpina. At the gateway to Austria, I finally met Christina, with whom I had spoken on social networks. She was finishing the Via Alpina she had started two years before. Our conversation quickly focused on my backpack, whose small size surprised many long-distance hikers. I had been optimizing this for years: purchasing extra light equipment to eliminate waste, but also creating some equipment myself, like my famous toothbrush tire-lever.

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I traveled light, but on the other hand I had to find a shelter every night. It is a stress that we have forgotten in modern times, and I became obsessed. With luck, a sharp look, and thoroughly studying the maps, I only spent about ten nights under the stars. When doing so, the Milky Way was so visible that it plunged me into insomnia, helped by the cold which regularly woke up me up in the middle of the night.
All of the people I met were very nice and supportive, I rarely experienced negative behavior or comments (usually present in my local mountains), however, I did often hear this phrase:
bigquotesWith your bicycle, it will be impossible to reach the pass
I believe this was mostly said out of concern rather than negativity. Either way, experience shows that their worries were misplaced. And if necessary, I could have disassembled the bike and climbed with the separate components, but the opportunity to do this did not present itself.

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I often made camp in the depths of bunkers built on the front lines of the last great war. The insulation was obviously mediocre but thermal inertia, wind proofing effect and especially the watertightness filled me with joy. In addition, the views from the tiny bunkers windows, previously designed for machineguns, were always superb. Some would judge the atmosphere spooky, but it reminded me of pleasant memories spending evenings in my local war fortifications when I was young. I was also fond of the numerous abandoned farms along the way, even if they were sometimes leaky and required some roofing work. Finally, the limestone massifs eroded by the chemical assaults of water regularly offered me small caves, often humid but always with an unforgettable view.

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With this sort of trip, nature obviously offered many challenges, especially in the case of fauna: insects thought my face was a great resting place; mice nestled in the folds of my sleeping bag; and most worrisome were the ticks who coveted my red blood cells doped with altitude. One of these hemoglobin robbers made my ankle swell until it was almost completely blocked. Time and the cold -that old companion of mine- cured the pain and the anxiety in a few days. A hiker told me one day about his exasperation with the nightly mosquito attacks and asked me for my survival technique. When I answered “earplugs", he burst out laughing. I specified that I treat the bites the next day with pain killing leaves available on the trail.

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The famous Tre Cimes in the Dolomites could be seen in the distance, they seemed unreal emerging from the foam of clouds. A few days later, battered by a powerful thunderstorm, I was at their feet but I couldn't see their heads, drowned in the altitude mist. The winds that were taking away my calories finally took away this veil that hid a dazzling beauty, soon flooded with sun. The terrible weather that I thought was a curse turned out to be a godsend, leaving me alone in front of this usually overcrowded place.

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The Via Alpina that I had quickly nicknamed "the monster" was almost over, I was following the endless Austro-Italian ridge that would lead me to Slovenia. August was coming to an end, the weather was becoming autumnal, pleasant during the day but demanding at night. Caves had the advantage of having an almost constant temperature, but the hygrometry as well. At this stage of the journey, I had learned to appreciate the bad nights in contrast to the terrible ones.

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The human presence was progressively getting scarcer with the exception of Triglav national park, mineral jewel of Slovenia. I could only confirm the rumors: turquoise waters of the Slovenian rivers are awesome, flowing in a bed of white limestone, revealing their intense color. I diverted from the Via Alpina when I met the natural park, which is strictly forbidden for bicycles. I could have carried it on my back like in Mercantour park, but this time there are plenty of kilometers. After this deviation, the return to the legit route was short-lived because I had to make an important decision: I was at the crossroads of the via Alpina and Via Dinarica.

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I saw the last marker of the path that had worn me out over the past three months. I had decided to continue to cross the Balkans from north to south through Croatia, Bosnia, Serbia and Kosovo. The trip would be different, the shelters almost non-existent and the abandoned constructions sometimes still booby-trapped from the war, I was told. So I started this new crossing with an extra bag to carry a tent and a bigger power bank. The transformation of the landscape was absolute. I abandoned the steep and arid peaks to embrace balloon-shaped mountains entirely covered with forests. The mountains had provided me with excellent vantage points, giving me visibility of the following days of cycling, however down in the forests I would be much more near-sighted. The days of total solitude were accumulating, it was a constraint that I usually accept without difficulty, but I felt a deep melancholy rising. While no living souls were around, the stigma of a tragic history multiplied around me: a farm riddled with bullet holes, a bombed house, a minefield. Intense conflicts had ravaged this area during the division of Yugoslavia, leaving no man’s lands.

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A mechanical breakdown added distress on an already cracked morale. In my head the trip was over, I had decided to finish at the next village, less than a day's walk away. There, I had already imagined myself boarding a bus that would drop me off at the nearest train station, where I would board a train that would take me home. When I arrived in the village, a woman kindly allowed me to stay in her farm for the night. I gave into a period of intense reflection, giving birth to schizophrenic discussions in my head. Surprisingly, I progressively considered continuing my journey. The next morning I pedaled south again, the bike frame tied with a piece of the neighbor's steel wire and the spare part already on the way to Sarajevo, where I would arrive about ten days later. Icing on the cake, I was escorted for more than a kilometer by the smiling daughter of my host, bare feet and raw rims without tires. I was back in the game, on a fragile repaired bicycle but with a motivation galvanized by rich and sincere encounters. The people of the Balkans had this singularity that pushed them to offer you almost more than they had for themselves.

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As I progressed in Serbia, the landscape moved from dense forest to a sort of savannah, mixing grass and trunks, sprinkled with numerous farms. Each of these farms looked self-sufficient, as if in a flashback to a largely bygone western past. But what I thought was under-development was perhaps forward-thinking after all, self-sufficiency and low carbon becoming the grail these days. If the trails had not been marked for several days, they were of remarkable quality and allowed me to double my mileage expectations. I was momentarily cut off in my momentum, literally and figuratively, by a barbed wire made invisible by its rusty camouflage. I had to organize a self-stitching workshop in the middle of the Serbian countryside, it was the first time I was on both sides of the needle. At this stage of the adventure, I was taken by an illusory feeling of invincibility that propelled me forward to the last peaks of Serbia. My addiction for mobility seemed to only have one cure : arriving.

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I had imagined this moment so many times. That moment when I would reach what I considered the end of the Alps, a ridge overlooking a plain whose horizontality betrayed the end of a journey made of verticality. I cried, once again with tears in which joy and sadness were intermingled. For the interim nomad that I was, this last summit represented the epilogue of this fabulous adventure in which space time fabric was dilated: mountains seems infinite while day seems like a week.

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The last downhill, the end of the mountains (Kosovo)]

Roaming is like a box of chocolate: you never know what will happen to you the next day or in the next hour. But surprise and wonder regularly emerge from the uncertainty. Of course, there are fears, doubts, and a lot of reasons not to go for it. But believe me, if a spark of desire springs up inside you, blow hard on it to start a forest fire.

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The end of the journey in Prishtina (Kosovo)





Last point I wanted to share with you, because it always raised a lot of questions:
bigquotesHow did you take all these framed pictures? You weren't alone?
Yes I was alone all the time, I took high resolution videos from my camera and extracted snapshots from them. And yes, these trip back and forth added a few kilometers and elevation gain not counted in the final figures. To get best camera points of view I had to find tricks and to do so best accessories were wood sticks, stones and elastics.

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• Breathtaking landscapes
• Magic hidden trails
• Balkan peoples are awesome
• Very quiet

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• A little bit long
• Areas without food and water
• Bears wake you at night
• Very quiet




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About the Rider
Age: 43 • Height: 6'3" • Weight: 176lb • Transition Smuggler custom built: 29lb • no sponsor

Thirty years deep into a two wheels addiction that began on asphalt with 20 inches diameter. Enduro enthusiast in the small but pretty french Vosges mountains.


Author Info:
gambas90 avatar

Member since Jan 6, 2015
1 articles

96 Comments
  • 55 0
 Fantastic, its another one of those stories on PB which make me feel like I should try this. Maybe not exactly that trail on a beginning , don't think I'm preapared , experienced or ready yet. But definitely a different level of mountain biking. After years on trails and bikeparks its time for adventure... Thanks for sharing amazing story and fantastic photos.
  • 21 0
 Thanks @allbiker .

You will not be disappointed, this is for me the true essence of MTB : adventure for an afternoon at the end of your street or for a week to turn around a mountain chain. Do it progressively to understand your body response, to test / improve your gears and evaluate your mental resistance. I'm not a superman at all, it's all about extensive training and profound desire.
  • 30 1
 What a phenomenal adventure.

Amazing route. Great photos. Amazing endurance and mental fortitude to get it done.

I can't believe how light you packed, that you fixed the dropout with steel wire, or that you stitched your own leg Eek
  • 7 0
 Thank you @tom666 .

My backpack amazed all the hikers I passed. Every gram is an enemy with such elevation to perform, I preferred the comfort of a light packing compared to the comfort of many gears. On the other hand, almost every of my gears were useful and mandatory, no loss was allowed. Retrospectively, I have only one regret regarding my backpack content : I would add a slightly warmer sleeping bag.
  • 2 0
 What did you do for food? I don't see any food in the pack (or space), not to mention no stove, pots, or cutlery? Sounds like you weren't stopping by huts for shelter, but maybe for food?
  • 14 0
 @trillot: I had some space to store 3 days max of food autonomy(1:3 of my bag volume), usually high calories density food: nuts, dried fruits, chocolate, cakes, sweets, tuna... bought in small village groceries. I knocked at almost all crossed farmhouse to buy cheese, I ate tens of kilograms of cheese! I also slept at least once a week in some huts to charge my power bank, eat something warm and do the laundry. A few times I also beg to some very nice and supportive hikers. I was feared by deficiencies because my nutrition was not very healthy, so I ate a lot of plants I had learned to recognize.
No stove, no pots, no knife but a titanium spork Wink

Foods was the third concern, first was water, second was shelter, especially when the weather was bad.
  • 1 0
 @gambas90: impressive!
  • 26 0
 Wow. This is real mountain biking. In every sense.

"A real journey is not planned but prepared." This resonated with me. Well said.

No sponsors. Purely for the love of MTB.
  • 2 0
 Thank you @pinkbert.

I should add a quotation from a French famous author, "Organized trip : oxymoron!" (Sylvain Tesson).
  • 19 0
 I usually skip adventure stories on here, because they are typically just advertisements or social media self promotion. This was real... And unreal. Congrats and huge respect!!
  • 6 0
 Thank you. Sponsoring imposes you obligations at the very moment when you desire freedom... I had no pressure to finish my trip, to comment on gears or to regularly connect on different social networks. If you manage to have the timeframe to do such a journey closed from home, the cost is surprisingly very limited.
  • 13 0
 no sponsor self stitching ... Savage, and fantastic.
  • 11 0
 Incredible. Congratulations. Great writing too.
  • 4 0
 Thank you, I wrote it myself but I must confess with smalls corrections from a native English speaker.
  • 9 0
 This is what mountain bike dreams are made from! Thanks for sharing such an incredible journey.
  • 6 0
 Been following him during this insane preparation and trip and still share some ride and digging days with @gambas90

Thank you a lot for sharing your adventure and your journey
You made travel a shit tons of people around and keeping doing it!

Glad to be your friend.

Regarding your bag I keep in mind what you shared to me a while ago about what we put in our bags (for whatever trip or destination)

The size of your bag is equivalent of the size of your fear !

Thanks again for this lesson

Let’s do some laps together soon
  • 2 0
 Thank @nobrain. Best rides are with our friends on our trails!

I remember when you called me the first week, I was still terrified, thank you to be my friend.
  • 7 0
 Nice!!! Excellent d'être aller explorer jusqu'au Kosovo, un grand bravo pour ta détermination et ton engagement!!! magnifique et merci pour le partage #vivelavie
  • 1 0
 @TitoTomasi Merci Monsieur Tito! Doublement merci car tu as été une de mes sources d'inspiration, j'adore tes aventures, ne t'arrête surtout pas.
  • 5 0
 Salvaje! Bestial! No tengo palabras! Envidia, ganas, admiración, respeto... Muchas sensaciones. Terrible. Mi más sincera felicitación para un auténtico guerrero de la montaña y el silencio.
  • 5 0
 Note to the never-ending gear acquisition addiction that many of us chase - dude did this on an old Transition Smuggler, which was neither new or very efficient when it was. Cheers to the adventure.
  • 6 0
 Since this trip I freshly bought a brand new Spur but my good old Smuggler accompanied me for 5 years performing more than 1 million meters of muscular elevation. Still using it for "SUV" purpose : commuting to work and shaping sessions. Definitely a good purchase and amortized cost.
  • 4 0
 Now this is real life adventure. What people don’t know until they get in this part of Europe is the fact that all these places are very safe. We see on TV only bad things about balkans but people from these countries will go above and beyond for their guests. Food is very good and prices are very low. For all those who are interested in this kind of riding take a look at Via Transilvanica. Crossing the Carpathian Mountains from north to south west this trail will take to some breathtaking places. Lot of cool places to camp and enjoy some great food. Pay attention to sheep dogs and bears. Fauna is very rich in this part of Europe.
  • 4 0
 Dingue, impressionnant, magnifique. Énorme bravo pour l'exploit, grand merci du partage, j'imagine le temps passé à chaque prise de vue pour choisir le cadre, caler la caméra, remonter (ou redescendre) la trace... Monsieur Tomasi en commentaire élogieux, ça pose! Avec un tel goût pour les hauteurs, le dépassement de soi, et une telle technique du nose-turne, je dis "à quand un trip à trois avec Tito et Monsieur Righetti?". Est-ce que le retour à la vie normale s'est passé correctement après une telle aventure? Ça ne doit pas être évident...
  • 1 0
 @Zarma Merci pour ton commentaire. Le retour est quelque chose de très particulier, chaque journée qui était un challenge devient fade et ennuyeuse. Il faut se raccrocher aux gens que l'on aime et que l'on retrouve avec grand plaisir. Quant aux grandes aventures, pour l'instant je préfère rider local avec mes amis dans les belles Vosges.
  • 6 0
 pure inspiration and big respect for this trip!!!
  • 6 0
 that's absolutely crazy. Awesome!
  • 7 0
 Wow
  • 6 0
 We all need to bow to u.incredible.true passion.thank u great story..
  • 5 0
 That was a wonderful article. Bravo and congratulations on such an achievement!
  • 1 0
 Merci beaucoup.
  • 2 0
 « Thirty years deep into a two wheels addiction that began on asphalt with 20 inches diameter. » … and the bmx background strikes again. I knew I should have started there.
Impressive journey, strongest body and mind required!
  • 1 0
 For sure the origin of my flat pedals bunny up fluency Wink
  • 2 0
 the whole thing nearly ruined by the old transition mech hanger issue that transition wont admit to being an issue Smile I've been through several myself .you can see in the picture it sheared off on the internal because the synatace axle ends to short and creates a stress point .
  • 2 0
 It waited five long years of abuse before breaking this part in the middle of nowhere... If I had known about this issue, I would have changed it for a new part before starting. For sure a design mistake.
  • 2 0
 Impressionnant ! Bravo mec.
J'avais fait une transAlpes française en 2019 et j'avais trouvé ça dur ! En voyant ta carte, ça équivaut à 6 fois ça ! Juste Waouh ! Merci du partage, gros boulot aussi de documenter ça.
  • 3 0
 Wow! Talk about an adventure... I bet despite all the hardships along the way, it can be a bit hard not to turn back and do it again other way round.
  • 6 1
 wow?
  • 4 0
 Superbe. nice shot and great article that push you to do such trip
  • 4 0
 Great pictures! Great video! Great riding!
  • 4 0
 Amazingly epic!! More of this kind of content please!
  • 4 0
 This would make a great coffee table book
  • 9 0
 Thank you for the motivation boost. I'm trying to write a book of my journey... in French.
  • 2 0
 Amazing, but it looks like a very long hike rather than a bike ride, after checking out the detailled map www.visugpx.com/6x2sIyNERz
  • 7 0
 Not MTB friendly in some area for sure. At the end, I would say half of the ascents were performed on "hike a bike" mode but a strong 90% of the downhills were rideable. But I can understand that theses kind of statistics are unacceptable for some.
  • 2 0
 @gambas90: I can speak only for the Swiss part in Ticino, and I can tell you that those trails are definetely not biker friendly. Nonetheless chapeu to your great trip, strength and minimalistic approach.
  • 1 0
 @cashew: Thank you @cashew .

Oh Ticino... you're right! It was a nightmare! Definitely the hardest part of my trip, up and downhill. I would not recommend this area for biking even if it is beautiful. Not so far away from you, national park del Stelvio area is damn nice and 100% rideable, I fully recommend.
  • 2 0
 @gambas90: you passed very close to supernice trails actually, like this: training.camp/en/route/311/dalla-val-bedretto-alla-val-formazza-con-salita-su-trail
  • 3 0
 @cashew: I note for the future, grazie!

No regrets at the end, the goal was to follow Via Alpina for better or for worse. I have souvenirs for sure.
  • 2 0
 Dang! Well done!! The alps have fantastic trails! I can’t believe I didn’t take more advantage of them as I grew up so close to them…
  • 3 0
 all the ladders and steep hike a bikes in the video: he did to do it twice for the camera...
fantastic, really fantastic!!
  • 1 0
 Good point @Steppenwolf83. Because of this and wrong ways, I think I was above 200 000m of elevation, but it was not recorded to save battery. The GPX route displayed is a "cleaned" one drawn when I were in electrified refuges.
  • 3 0
 Amazing adventure and spirit! Digging deep but the reward must be fullfilling Thanks for sharing @gambas90 #vosgesrepresent
  • 1 0
 Thank you @loizorider

Nothing more pleasant than Vosges! This is at home where we feel best.
  • 2 0
 Absolutely incredible! The minimalism amazes me. Do you have a complete packing list you may be willing to share? I can feel the spark...
  • 7 0
 @Shiiken Here it is if Pinkbike allows such amount of lines :

T-shirt
Cycling short
Pair of socks (day)
Pair of socks (night)
Mini short (night)
Wind proof trousers
Wind proof jacket
Puffy jacket
Warm gloves
Cap
Inflatable mattress
Sleeping bag
Blanket
Shimano flat shoes
Climbing irons (first month only)
Helmet
2 water bottles (2 x 750ml)
Covid mask
Sunglasses
Minimalist lock (Hiplock)
Smartphone
Elastics
Braking pads (two pairs)
Pump
Air tube
4 air tube patches
Tire patch
3 shortened Allen keys
Toothbrush/tire lever
Quick chain link
Power bank (10000 mAh)
Charging adapter
Ear plugs
Patches for mattress and clothes
Scissors
SD cards
Aspirin pills
Diarrhea pills
Water purifier pills
Disinfectants wipes
Stitching kit
A spork
Lighter
A lot of cash
ID card
Credit card
A good old Smuggler
  • 2 0
 Between all these sad news of Greg leaving Santa Cruz and Levy off Pinkbike, this was such a pleasure to read and watch! Well done!
  • 1 0
 Danke!
  • 2 0
 Hé ben... c'est du trip. Je sais pas quelle suture est plus impressionnante entre celle du tibia ou du vélo ! Big Grin
  • 2 0
 C'est assurément la suture de mon vélo qui m'a le plus inquiété, j'ai du rouler comme cela pendant 10 jours jusqu'à Sarajevo. Mon tibia, j'étais sur le vélo une heure après, comme neuf Smile .
  • 2 0
 Can I be your apprentice when the apocolypse comes? You may need some patience with me
  • 2 0
 Haha, I still need to learn to hunt more than chocolate bars and tuna cans ^^
  • 2 0
 woooow amazing story and trully pushing Mountain biking to next level. Love the minimalistic gear setup! so impresive!
  • 2 0
 Great story, and pics. This one was among the best articles I have seen in PB this year. Thanks for sharing.
  • 1 0
 Thank you very much. Your feedback is a valuable reward for my work Smile
  • 2 0
 @gambas90 what an incredible adventure. You sir are a true inspiration. Bravo.
  • 1 0
 Merci!
  • 3 0
 Best selfie ever.
  • 3 0
 A lesson in life
  • 3 0
 Wow indeed. Respect!
  • 2 0
 Gambas on Pinkbike ! La classe!! ;-)
  • 1 0
 Merci Gilles Wink
  • 2 0
 Next time you plan a trip like that you gotta let me tag along
  • 2 0
 Badass. Grueling adventure
  • 2 0
 What an adventure! Thank you for sharing it.
  • 2 0
 Awesome trip! I’d love to hear more about that spartan tool kit!
  • 2 0
 Thanks @wamedic. My tool and repair kit was quite limited, based on my experience feedback : 3 shortened Allen keys, a tire lever, a pump, an air tube, 4 air tube patches and one patch to repair a tire tear and 2 pairs of braking pads. My father sent me by mail two packets along my route with braking pads, tire sealant, a spare chain and grease.
  • 1 0
 Un sacré trip! Ultra minimaliste...pour la bouffe tu faisais comment? Tu trouvais tout au long du chemin...?
  • 1 0
 J'ai répondu à la même question un peu plus haut dans les commentaires Wink
  • 2 0
 Wow! That was quite simply amazing!
  • 2 0
 That's quite a route! Good job! Until the next adventure
  • 2 0
 Congrat!!! Curious on the bike setup....what fork is that????
  • 2 0
 Thanks! It is an inverted fork from a small German brand : Intend. Some advantages and drawbacks, but a high reliability.
  • 2 0
 Impresionante! Muchas felicidades!!!
  • 2 0
 Absolutely savage. Wonderful trip, big congrats from the states!
  • 1 0
 Big gratitude from France!
  • 2 0
 What an adventure! Impressive!! Thank you for sharing your story with us.
  • 1 0
 Maybe I'll start with just an over nighter.....dang!
  • 2 0
 Wonderful!
  • 2 0
 Fantastic!
  • 2 0
 Fantastico! Complimenti!
  • 2 0
 insane
  • 2 0
 respect!!! amazing!
  • 1 0
 Amazing, how do you avoid wildlife?







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