Field Test: 2022 YT Capra - The Speedy All-Rounder

Aug 31, 2021 at 19:02
by Henry Quinney  


PINKBIKE FIELD TEST

YT Capra 29



Words by Henry Quinney, photography by Tom Richards



The third generation of the Capra was launched earlier this year, returning to YT's lineup with updated geometry, a mixed wheel or a 29" version, and improved water bottle holding capabilities.

It's a good looking bike, with an asymmetrical frame design that gives it a clean silhouette and a striking appearance. The bike uses the brand’s V4L suspension to deliver 165mm of rear travel via a four bar layout.

The new all-new Capra takes on some adjustments over previous versions to help it keep in line with expectations of a modern enduro bike.

Capra Details

• Travel: 165mm rear / 170mm front
• Wheel size: 29" (there is a MX version also)
• Head angle: 64.2/64.5°
• Seat tube angle: 77.6/77.9°
• Reach: 467mm (lrg)
• Chainstay length: 438mm (lrg)
• Sizes: S, M, L (tested), XL, XXL
• Weight: 33.69lb / 15.28kg
• Price: $5,999 USD
yt-industries.com

The ability to hold a water bottle was accomplished by removing one of the wings that help brace the front triangle. The access is only via the left side. Us righties have had it our own way for so long with various models I think it’s about time that left-handed riders get that easy access, even if it didn’t suit me. It requires a bit of a refined technique but it’s in there. It holds water. I think we can all agree this is a good thing. It also has top tube rivets should you want to double-down on storage.

There are a lot of sensible build options to keep the masses happy - and that’s important because YT have affirmed itself to be a huge bike brand in recent years and I imagine they intend to sell a lot of these. In fact, I have no doubts they will.

There’s no-moto guided internal cable routing, a SRAM universal derailleur hanger and lots of chainslap protection. Not only that, but the bike also includes a flip chip on the shock. However, the 0.3 degrees on offer isn’t an overwhelming amount of adjustment.

The bike features updated geometry, but be sure to check the sizing. With a reach of 467mm the size large is more of an extra medium compared to most other brands sizing charts. This is no bad thing, but a buyer would be best to check for themselves. The head angle sits at 64.2-degrees in the slack setting, which is combined with a seat tube angle of 77.6 degrees. The 445mm seat tube could be a little shorter. It was fine for me but it might be a little long for somebody who is closer to size chart's target audience.

This bike, the Core 4 model, is the highest end 29” model available and comes with a very solid spec. It has a retail price of $5,999 and comes equipped with Fox Factory suspension, SRAM X01 Eagle, Code RSC brakes and carbon Descendant cranks. I would say, on paper, this bike represents the best value of all the bikes on this year’s field test. If I was nit-picking I would say 150mm drop seatpost on the size large is on the short side and that the 200mm rotor on the YT, while ample, was somewhat outgunned by the 220mm rotors on the front of some of the other enduro bikes.

With our control tires installed the bike weighed 33.69lb / 15.28kg



YT Capra 2022 review
YT Capra 2022 review

Climbing

The model name Capra is derived from the Latin word for goat. So how does this bike climb? Well, it was a tale of two halves.

In general, this bike is a good climber. When using Fox’s base settings, the YT’s suspension has a different flavour to some of the other bikes on test. It's got bucket loads of support, so it tracks well even when out of the saddle and unlocked. It’s a bike that prioritises traction under load rather than a wheel that just gets up and over obstacles. For instance, the Transition Spire is on the other end of the spectrum. Both are good climbers but go about it in very different ways. The Capra is a little punchier and less about patiently spinning up things with a high cadence. .

If it was my bike, again with the base settings, I might use the lockout lever on smooth climbs, but I think on single track or anything remotely chunky I would let the rear shock do its thing. At 33.69lb / 15.28kg it’s relatively middle of the road in terms of weight but its high level of traction and solid platform means that it is a capable climber and a bike that is very happy to tick along and get the job done.

It worked well up switchbacks and tight climbs, and the short top tube really did let me manipulate my weight on the bike. Would I trade this off for a bit more room, especially on long gravel road climbs where the extra weight in your hands isn’t always wanted? Perhaps. I think these problems would melt away though had I been on the XL though, which is not only longer but also has nearly 10mm extra in frame stack.

So, the second half? Well, I eventually ended up fully opening the compression adjustments in my pursuit of better small bump sensitivity and tracking on descents. This did help, but it did compromise climbing somewhat. A degree of bob crept in, and although there was still good support and traction, it definitely felt a little softer under power. All of that said, many people might not need to open the compression dials fully for one reason or another and can enjoy the climbing prowess this bike offers.

YT Capra 2022 review

YT Capra 2022 review
YT Capra 2022 review

Descending

So, what first? The geometry or the suspension feel? Let’s start with the former and then go from there.

This bike is going to offer something really important to a group of people that often find themselves in between sizes. If you’re 5’10” this is probably going to fit you better than many other bikes out there.

The geometry is certainly progressive but I would say compared to the GT, Norco and Transition it’s a bit more measured and is dialed back half a turn from those rather extreme machines. Is just over 64 degrees slack enough? Absolutely. It’s not that far off the numbers of the Specialized Enduro, a previous winner of the Enduro Field Test, and a bike we used as something of a benchmark.


Timed Testing

The enduro bikes were all tested on a section of trail that included a mix of everything you'd expect to find on a race track. There were tight corners, a few drops, some sidehill sections that get trickier the faster you go, along with some higher speed, open corners.

Don't forget that timing is just one of many ways to judge a bike, and fast doesn't always mean it's the best for everyone.


Henry Quinney: "Being piloted by our in-house racer, Matt Beer, the YT was actually the fastest of all the test bikes. The suspension feel, whilst not the most confidence-inspiring, certainly doesn't slow it down. On the contrary, it may help to pump and transition through turns even faster. Its time of 2:46.01 pipped even the WR1 Arrival, if only by a 0.4 of a second."
It’s a well balanced bike, although I’d be very curious to try the 5mm longer rear end of the XL or XXL sizes, even if on the 467mm reach size large.

The Capra isn't a bike that lets you just plow. It feels quite taut, and whether that's a good or a bad thing probably depends what you're riding it on. It does feel that bit more agile compared to the big bruisers, but it also feels like it gets pushed around a bit more too.

On smoother trails, the amount of pop and support it offers does come into play on the exit of turns or when picking up over small lips. However, in straight lines over rough parts of trail it lacked the planted feel of the Norco or Transition. Regarding the shorter reach numbers, there were times where that dimension got lost in the noise, but when you were hanging on through rough stuff it felt distinctly less stable.


YT Capra 2022 review

The suspension performance of the YT was on the firm-feeling side compared to some of the others on test for my personal tastes. I eventually fully opened both compression adjustments in a bid to try and help the bike track better but it never really felt like it was quite achieved. It moved it in the right direction, although never quite gave me the feeling I wanted.

Riders that have a more active or poppy style may well really enjoy this high level of support throughout the whole stroke, but for me it felt like it just bashed its way through things rather than soaked them up. I’m not averse to a supported feel, but would rather it was just more compliant off the top. To give credit to the Capra, I think the way the shock moves through the second half of its travel is great.

Who’s the ideal candidate for the Capra? I’d say it’s going to be a rider that probably sits on the edge of wanting the travel of an enduro bike while also wanting the liveliness of a trail bike. Yes, you could take it to the mountains and ride some really rough and wild trails but it’s probably happier on things that are a little smoother and the odd day going full send in the bike park. It’s an easy bike to ride, but not the easiest bike to ride very aggressively on full-blown chunder.

YT Capra 2022 review


Pros

+ Middle of the road geometry
+ Fast in the right hands
+ The best value bike on test
+ Provides a supportive and poppy feel

Cons

- Middle of the road geometry
- Long(ish) seat-tube combined with short dropper
- Its suspension is not as supple as others






The 2021 Summer Field Test was made possible with support from Dainese apparel and protection, and Sun Peaks Resort. Shout out also to Maxxis, Garmin, Freelap, and Toyota Pacific.





320 Comments

  • 215 6
 ETA for purchase: 2023
ETA for warranty: ...buffering...
  • 68 4
 As someone who went through YT's warranty service 2 times in a year, I can vouch for this.
  • 34 1
 @FloridaHasMTBToo: That is like winning the lottery twice.
  • 22 1
 @Smallbright: On my third frame, fingers crossed it holds longer than 6 months.
  • 22 0
 @FloridaHasMTBToo: Likewise. Chainstay - cracked in the same place twice in nine months. That includes a three month turnaround while the bike went back to Germany. Six month wait for a replacement after the second crack. Won't be buying YT again.
  • 15 2
 @Niseach1: that is terrible.

Silver lining i guess is at least they did not pull a Dorel (Cannondale, GT) or Evil and accuse you of crashing the bike, refuse warranty, and offer you a 5% off msrp "crash replacement"

On a COVID supply related note, I wonder how many brands are cutting corners on frame quality/standards right now given the limited frame and part supply........
  • 13 1
 @ppp9911: RaceFace and Fox have both had massive quality control issues in the last few months, according to my LBS. Cranks and rear shocks of such poor quality, they never made it onto bikes and were warrantied right from the box. Which suggests other manufacturers likely are having the same issues.
  • 9 0
 @ratedgg13: interesting, I strongly suspect that products that would have not met QA standards previously are shipping out. Maybe another reason to love the ride you currently have for the time being.
  • 20 23
 @Niseach1: i also have my issues with yt, and wont buy one again. But 2 frames in 9 months sounds like you should look out for a big bike, instead of abusing these poor little enduros...

Sorry guys, but what do you think a low weight frame is capable of? Try not casing every 2. jump, and you will not have to go through warranty hell...
  • 4 0
 @Smallbright: More like getting the "free ticket" scratch and win. Yay! You get to play again!
  • 1 0
 Not the greatest timing with the carbon factory shutdowns.
  • 7 0
 @FloridaHasMTBToo: warranty went fast enough to fit two claims in during one year? You’re lying!
  • 2 0
 @ppp9911: >I wonder how many brands are cutting corners on frame quality/standards right now given the limited frame and part supply........

Aluminum SC are outrageous lately
  • 1 1
 @Niseach1: I cracked my Norco Sight sent an email and went to the official store, no reply a month ago. Did the same thing for Scott, they gave me an answer the day after. Plus they have stocks for my frame.

I had a GT Fury in Europe and the customer service is a joke, they didn't even have I drive parts. The Fury was a piece of junk. Even brand new the frame / I drive bolt were not tight enough and the big bolts snapped when I was riding.

I would stay away from GT, Norco. Anyway good luck with your claim, at least they replied
  • 1 0
 @FloridaHasMTBToo: Curious which year/model??
  • 1 0
 @neimbc: 2020 Jeffsy Base. Cracked the chainstay at the weld, and cracked the downtube around the cable ports.
  • 3 0
 @FloridaHasMTBToo: Wow! I'm surprised it's a newer bike. I have a 2016 Capra still going strong.
  • 7 5
 @ppp9911: I gotta defend Evil a bit here because in my experience they were fair. I bought a new but second hand frame and cracked a seat stay on the first ride. I laid the bike down twice but super slow and gentle but I did have one landing that wasn’t smooth. You could see there wasn’t an impact. Anyways I explained the situation to them and they offered me a crash replacement priced rear end. Of course I would have like a free replacement but I was satisfied given they had no warranty responsibility towards me.
  • 5 1
 @FredFurious: To be fair it is my son's bike and he is so light that there is nothing on him. Every so often he does ride bikeparks on it and huge jumps, but the bike is supposed to stand up to this. He's also an exceptional rider, so very rarely will anything be cased. As I can only afford one bike for him, it has to be a one fit for all occasions.
  • 3 0
 @Ba1rog: My son has the Capra, I have a Canyon Spectral. The chainstay also went on that, but I reported it on the Sunday and had the replacement in my hand on the Wednesday. Canyon UK were absolutely fantastic.
  • 1 0
 Word. I snapped three, with one having a defect they knew would fail but supplied anyway.
  • 4 1
 I got burned on one of those YT Tues DH bike delays back in the early days, ended up having to cancel it and very nearly not having a bike in time for a summer in Morzine (and even worse nearly accidentally buying one of Sam Dale's old frames..!).

YT apologised when I met them out in Morzine at PDS and promised me a good discount if I wanted to buy another bike off them in future. When I was in the market for a trail bike I fancied a YT, tried to get that good discount and what do you know they denied all knowledge and refused to honour their promise.

That combined with the horrendous warranty stories have taken them permanently off my list. If you make a promise as a company you should honour it.
  • 4 3
 @FloridaHasMTBToo: so you got warrantied twice in one year? That sounds like pretty reasonable service in all honesty.
  • 1 0
 @ppp9911: Isn't that what all cie do?
  • 5 0
 @ratedgg13: race face has had quality control issues for 20 years
  • 6 0
 @Lloydmeister: I don't know man. If I had two frames crack in a year from the same company, regardless of them acting on their warranty I would be very skeptical buying another one because their QC is obviously way off the mark.
  • 2 0
 @neimbc: I still ride a 2015 Capra CF Comp 1 non-stop (DH, DS, Enduro, trails) - can't kill it and never needed warranty service. Would've considered another Capra but not with water bottle-appeasing asymmetry. Maybe I'll pick up a used aluminum 2018/19 in a couple years or move on to a Forbidden. I got a 2018 TUES for a song and that'll last a decade since DH bikes get ridden hard maybe a dozen times a year if I'm lucky.....
  • 2 0
 @meathooker: lol truth. Those carbon cranks of theirs are a joke.
  • 2 0
 @Lloydmeister: just as a bit of a barometer here, I recently had issues with a Banshee frame and had a new one in six days. I used to work in the Nukeproof warranty department and customer retention was always the priority and we usually got things sorted within 3 weeks (max).
  • 5 0
 @suspended-flesh:

Same here, 2017 Jeffsy CF1, Been all over Moab, St George, Salt Lake City area trails. Can’t seem to kill it.

I just upgraded parts as I wore them out, but the frame is solid as a rock and still extremely capable.

It’s actually a great bike, I’ve no real desire or drive to replace it with something else right now.
  • 1 1
 @Dr-YTMTB: if you guys aren’t snapping them and they’re bullet proof that makes not having warranty stock and service less acceptable, not more.
  • 6 0
 Ive had a good experience with YT as well. 2017 jeffsy, The only parts warrantied have been E13 and service was great. Everyone knows you need to put a coil on a YT bike to get the best out of the progressive suspension. Would be interested to see this review with a coil setup....
  • 2 0
 @lifeofloon: Thats my exact Problem with my Specialized Enduro. Cracked my Frame about 4 Weeks ago, have yet to get a answere from Specialized. Problem is: from my Group of Friends we are 4 Guys on the Enduro, 3 of us have cracked Frames at the Headsetcup.. but the Bike is still the best one I've ridden
  • 2 0
 @AlanMck: Banshee guys really care about their brand. If the Titan fit what I was looking for I'd defo go for it. I'm sad to be selling my legend but I need to get an enduro bike instead
  • 4 0
 @74NZ: Yes it sounds like YT should have spec'ed this with a coil shock
  • 2 0
 @RockCrawler: I feel your pain. I've got on older (aluminum) Orbea Rallon and the weld on the chainstay has broke on two so far and dealing with them for the warranty was horrible. The bike is one of the best I've ridden but I'm definitely soured on the company.
  • 1 0
 @suspended-flesh: Seems the pre 2018 models were much better.
  • 2 0
 @pnwille: Same thing for me with Banshee. They were so awesome with my sons 2013 Spitfire. We got it used, and when it cracked, they went above and beyond for us. They did not have to do anything and I would have been good with that, but they chose to help us out. Made us lifelong Banshee customers.
  • 1 0
 @spaced: Titan + coil is really great.
  • 1 0
 @Ba1rog: It's so frustrating when companies don't respond or back up their products. Drives me crazy. But I'm on my second Norco, know a few other owners, and see tons on the Shore and I've never heard complaints like yours. I'm sure some exist, but I don't think it's a pattern. My only service complaint was trying to get touch-up paint for my AL frame, which they don't offer either through samples or paint code.
  • 1 0
 @AlanMck: banshee came through for me as well, they definitely went above and beyond.
  • 1 0
 @ppp9911: look at moto chains...failing alot of late due to qc.
  • 2 0
 @ratedgg13: I think RaceFace's QC issues go back quite a bit further than a few months....
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: Yes i see a lot of them in Whistler and Vancouver too. I know at least 5 ppl who cracked their frame in Europe but not at the same spot, it was on the top tube near the seat post on a 2016 Norco Sight. I cracked it in Whistler on creekside while I was riding with beginners. My frame was green and good luck to find the exact colour too. Got a used Xprezo Ad Hoc frame, and was able to recycle all my parts. The bike is way way better than the Sight and lighter/stronger, so at the end, I am quite happy!
  • 2 0
 @Woody25: If they didn't promise you in print, with a date, and a signature, it never happened. That's what their lawyers would say, for starters........
  • 2 0
 @RayDolor: Totally! They did me a favour making it clear what sort of company they were before I handed over any cash!
  • 1 0
 @ppp9911: do Evil have a rep for not fulfilling warranties? If so, guess I should cancel that Insurgent order then.
  • 1 0
 @FloridaHasMTBToo: bet you're almost missing that steel hardtail you had?
  • 108 0
 How can it be fast without high pivots and idlers though?
  • 16 0
 German magic
  • 6 0
 @Donley2004: Danny Hart didn't aproved your coment.
  • 19 0
 @Donley2004: horst macht schnell
  • 13 0
 The Reach and sizing fit the 5’10 tester best compared to the larger bikes. Which could be why Henry doesn’t like the bike due to it being too small for him
  • 22 2
 Its fast because it has pragmatic geo. 470ish large is better than 480 regardless of what the marketing machine wants you to thing. Longer is not always better
  • 3 0
 and not being the longest, slackest, and even feeling 'taut'... hmmm,
  • 41 0
 It’s amazing how many people do not get that longer/slacker, steeper sta, coil and now high pivot are just ways of the industry to justify increased pricing and sell them another new bike they do not need.

If Jack Moir winning EWS on a bike that does not follow any of those trends does not make you think twice I don’t know what else to say
  • 4 2
 @MikeyMT: does that not depend on how tall you are?
  • 9 4
 @stefkrger: some of it is just down to the style of European ews tracks, Jack himself said if he would have gone up a size for his tracks back home.
It does seem that shorter bikes are in general better for pros, longer bikes better for average riders. The trick is figuring out which end of the scale you are closer to.
  • 12 0
 @jaame: Sure. To quote Sam Hill...medium man, medium bike.

If you're riding a large you're historically in the 5'10" ish camp...no need for you to have a 500 reach...its probably making you worse actually.
  • 1 2
 @stefkrger: yeah, none of the industry changes since the 90's have had any effect on performance. for all you know, jack would have won by 5 more seconds if he was on a different bike.
  • 3 0
 @vanillarice19: Yes, but also the seat tubes are quite long which would prevent Henry from sizing up, or running a longer dropper post. I think the fundamental issue (for some people) is the reach numbers are short relative to the seat tubes, which is a problem almost every other enduro bike has moved away from these days.
  • 3 1
 YT CAPRA'S SHOULD ONLY BE RIDDEN WITH COIL
  • 2 0
 @stefkrger: Not only him, Rude is also on a M sized, when a L would serve him well too.

Ninja Edit: Forgot Troy Brosnam going with a stock link, size, reach and head angle on his canyon earlier this year.
  • 4 1
 @MikeyMT: we finally have bikes to fit people over 5'10" is the important part here. 500 reach at 5'10" is indeed a bad idea in 99.9% of cases, but as a very long armed 6'2" dude, I am so very happy we have 490+ bikes now. I got a ton faster and more capable the second I jumped on that XL Patrol way back in 2016. Now I ride a Large mondraker with the exact same reach.

I think people routinely get in there head that they ride a size X, and just keep riding that size even though the industry has started to make the size range cover more heights. Like, bro....It doesn't make your peepee smaller to ride a medium instead of a large. LMAO
  • 80 1
 I feel like Henry’s presenting style is half David Attenborough, half Ricky Gervais. Quick wit and edgy jokes combined with smooth dulcet tones.
  • 24 0
 i do enjoy his input, but sometimes i wanna yell at the screen like an old man: "whats that? huh? speak up sonny!"
  • 22 0
 His burn at Levy being a noisy idler around the office in the previous video was quality.
  • 2 0
 @deepstrut: Exactly what I thought. Whatever audio setup GMBN used for Henry is what PB should figure out.
  • 8 0
 @TwoNGlenn: “Really suited for those tinder six footers out there, who actually come in around 5’10”
  • 65 6
 Fast in the right hands... you could literally say that about any bike.
  • 79 3
 This one is the fastest in the same hands, which is what we're implying from our timed testing. I was surprised!
  • 5 0
 @mikelevy: was this also the shortest in terms of reach and / or wheelbase?
  • 21 1
 @bikefuturist: Yup, I think so, and with what sounds like the least forgiving suspension of the bunch.
  • 29 0
 @mikelevy: would be interesting to read a think piece on this whole "pro fit is fastest" vs "long reach is fastest" debacle. Maybe even have beginner, intermediate and pro rider do bunch of back to back rides on medium vs large on a few types of tracks?
  • 21 1
 @bikefuturist: The Enduro mag article where they discuss how compact pro EWS bikes are was really interesting. Like Richie Rude is on a medium sb150 (160mm reach) with 760mm bars at 5'11" or something like that.
  • 20 0
 I’m starting to think smaller reach bikes are generally faster than longer reach bikes.
  • 6 0
 @bikefuturist: it's an interesting discussion (considering both fit & suspension platforms in relation to skill level). methinks the "fastest bike" rankings in this series might be quite different between matt & your average pinker. extra cush & stability may benefit mortals more than pros hunting for 10ths.
  • 15 1
 @sspiff: 160mm reach eh?
  • 10 1
 I think the real takeaway is that WeAreOne's first bike ever is almost the fastest, with the lightest build, best climbing, and least rear travel.... Maybe a bit premature until that specific review comes out, but I'm in the flexier is better camp. Lateral compliance noticeably increases cornering grip. I'm guessing that WAO can easily tune the carbon stiffness to be like a titanium or steel frame, since they do everything in house. The other brands have to outsource their carbon manufacturing, so they overbuild everything to account for the more variability in quality control.
  • 20 1
 @sspiff: And those guys weren't pros like Rude or even Matt here. More interesting in that article is that they also had more fun on the shorter bikes, which is what we are all looking for. Jack Moir is running even less reach and he's like 6-1...but he gets the room on the bike via handlebar height. A lot of it harkens to Lee McCormicks RAD measurements. He has a way of measuring from your knuckles at your sides to the ground. It represents the ability to "deadlift" a bike with somewhat full range of motion. You can gain that distance via...reach, stem length or like Jack by gaining handlebar height. It makes sense to a degree but its a decent starting point I think.

Frustrating part is that if Moir, Rude, Remi etc were all winning on super long bikes, people would say "OH that's the ideal geometry", but now people just say "well its because they are pros". I think there's a bit of truth there and a bit of BS too. The EnduroMag guys certainly weren't pros. It'll be interesting to see if Bike geometry stabilizes. I'm guessing manuf's don't want it too for obvious marketing reasons (your last gen bike sucks!) but we've def hit the limit on bike length.
  • 6 0
 @sspiff: 160mm reach is really short.
  • 1 0
 @sspiff: You mean 460mm on that Yeti for Rude. Similar to Matt's 467mm on this large Capra.
  • 2 0
 @mikaeljc: I was gonna say something about that...
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: Is there anything fancy about their suspension setup? I always find the boutique brands suspension to be a draw for me beyond just a special horst link etc. Ibis' DWLink is freaking magic for how much squish that bike has. Is there any of that awesomeness in WAO's new bike? Its certainly freaking beautiful looking.
  • 31 2
 @bedell99: "I’m starting to think smaller reach bikes are generally faster than longer reach bikes."

Not only that, they're just more fun.

When the author of this article says, "If you’re 5’10” this is probably going to fit you better than many other bikes out there," I'm wondering, How? With 467mm reach? Maybe for someone else. Being 5'10" I've ridden reaches this long and have gravitated back towards 440-455 (455 being the max I would ever ride anymore). This movement towards making bikes super long has run its course. Look at the number of racers in this height range that have gone back to mediums from larges. The ability to maneuver the bike around, rather than driving a bus, is not only more fun but it is faster (if you care about such things). Also, neck pain. Being that far forward in the attack position puts more stress on your neck (and shoulders). With a shorter reach you can still properly weight the front wheel while also adjusting body position to a more upright position to relieve stress on the neck and shoulders. With long reaches you're locked into the more forward position with little room for adjustment. I've personally experienced this difference and am glad I went back to mediums. Several different manufacturers urged me onto larges and I listened, only to regret it later. Never again.
  • 6 0
 @Svinyard: This is all speculation, I haven't ridden the bike, I haven't seen the suspension charts, nor have I read an in depth review.

That being said....

it has two short links, with the top link being longer. Often this creates a progressive/regressive suspension curve, very much like the DW link. When paired with an air shock this is arguably the best compression curve to have. This puts the progression earlier in the travel than most purely progressive designs, giving mid stroke support without having a wall of progression, allowing you to more easily use all your suspension.


The rear axle path of a DW link is initially very rearward, but then the instant center drops and the axle path changes to be more forward, to keep chaingrowth under control. With the WAO, since the top link is longer, and the lower link is more vertical, I'm guessing that it will be different than a DW link and instead be more like the Canefield design, where the rear axle path stays rearward throughout the travel, sacrificing less chaingrowth deep in the travel for more chassis stability.

If I'm right, then these changes aren't dramatic. They are small, but many small bricks build a large house, so to speak.
  • 3 1
 @Lotusoperandi: Great response. I’m also 5’10” All I know is my next bike will be a medium after running larges the past 10 years.
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: We'll that makes it certainly more appealing (thank you btw). So its not just a horst link (I admittedly haven't looked deep into it). Seems like it could be in the territory for one of the best bikes ever made. I love WAO and what they do. Man...if only stuff got cheaper lol.
  • 2 0
 @Svinyard: Pick two....
  • 4 0
 @Lotusoperandi: I'm 5'10" and my two main bikes are a YT Jeffsy L (475 reach) and Specialized Levo SL (455 reach), so I've been able to see the differences between the two and here's how I see it (pretty standard trail rider skill level with occasional enduro/park day).

The YT is more comfy in the attack position, and just rolling down steeper stuff. But anything that requires dynamic movement, it feels too stretched imo. Wanna push the bike infront of you on a bigger drop/pop it over a decent sized rock/pull a manual on off a smaller drop, etc- I feel almost too stretched out and in less control.

Meanwhile, the Levo SL is significantly easier to ride dynamically even though it weighs 15 pounds more. But it does feel a little cramped just in the attack position and you're a bit over the back in the steeps. Methinks something around 465 mm reach would be a perfect compromise. Really wanna try this Capra tbh.
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez: I bad at phone typing
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez:

I'd love an Arrival vs Sentinel v2 comparison.
  • 5 0
 @sspiff: There is the old saying that races are won in the corners. I'm not sure that is entirely true for Enduro, but it seems plausible. Pro racers are so skilled that they can all ride ridiculously fast in straight sections but a shorter bike might give them an edge when cornering.
  • 1 0
 It's true though. Even if you take the world cup downhill race on a commencal supreme as the standard, there is often almost a 30 second time spread difference between riders. Incredible riders can truly pull time from nothing.
  • 4 0
 @Svinyard: it's especially frustrating when it's brought up and the bro gods just scoff and make snide "well it's almost like pros need different bikes, hur hur hur" a la pb podcast.

Thing is, the long camp have never brought any evidence to support their own assertion, it's just all in the feels yo.
  • 5 0
 @sspiff: Yup I'm just under 6ft and up until a year ago had been on a Knolly Fugitive size large with from memory around 477mm reach. Demoed the Specialized Enduro in both the S3 (med) size 464mm reach and S4(Large) 487mm reach and the S3 which I ended up buying is the best sized bike I have owned for my body shape anyway (long legs short torso) although the wheelbase and chainstays are what I put the main reason for the fit being so much better for me. I could easily have gone with the S4 which on the Specialized chart I was better aligned with but after riding both the long wheelbase of the S3 being so good you have the stability and the smaller reach just made it feel a lot more nimble. I have since read numerous articles where testers have all been similar height to myself and opted for S4 sizing only to say they felt slightly stretched out and wandered if the bike would have been more lively in the smaller size....Pretty sure going with smaller frame size when close between sizing is not uncommon with a lot of the EWS enduro riders. I seem to remember both Eddie Masters and Matt Walker both opting for the medium frame in the Firebird. I feel that the slacker head angle of modern bikes combined with size specific chainstays gives the added wheelbase for stability without needing to stretch out the reach too much which can make you feel lost in the cockpit.
  • 6 0
 I’m surprised I haven’t heard the “firm is fast” adage. A more active, plusher suspension is slower.
  • 4 0
 @Svinyard: the enduromag guys also spoke about balance in a bike and how the long reach short chainstay bikes suck in terms of balance and ride quality. That the medium was faster because of the balance in the bike. I think a lot of pros are after that too. And check all the bikes being ridden by the winning dudes and look at how balanced they are…
  • 5 0
 I am 167 cm and the small sized bikes don't really fit me anymore. I had a 2018 orbea rallon with 430 reach and it always felt too big. I moved to a 2020 nukeproof mega with 405 reach and it feels much better and manuevarable. I think with the industry moving to 29er only they won't be able to produce bikes "small enough" for people my height. A few still do like the S1 sized SJ Evo. I hope they keep 275 around for small sized bikes.
  • 9 0
 @Svinyard:

Interesting, my main takeaway from that same enduro-mtb article, was that balanced bikes were best, not necessarily that “short bikes” are best.

Most of the bikes in the test had fairly short rear centers. So the bikes that were easy to ride fast with short rear centers were also short in reach (like Richie Rudes Medium SB150).

The “worst” bikes had super short rear centers and really long reaches (Commencal Meta AM iirc), and were pretty unbalanced.

Which personally makes me happy to see that more bikes with scaling/adjustable rear centers, so there is more than one size with an ideal balance.
  • 2 0
 @ocnlogan: EXACTLY my takeaway from it all too
  • 3 2
 @Svinyard: I'm a believer of McCormick's RAD.

My new(ish) bike: Medium Ripmo AF. Reach 455. The reach and front center feel annoyingly long. Calculate the bike's RAD -> way too long for my height 5'8" (and yes I did all the adjustments w stems, spacers and bars)

My old medium 2016 Kona Process felt perfect. Calculate the RAD and it's perfect for my height. Reach 435mm. Check my roadbike, fatbike, and dirtjumper and they all have the perfect RAD.

Today's bikes - as far as the reach measurement - are 1 size larger than bikes from 3 years ago. To me, the "longer" part of "longer, lower, slacker" means longer wheelbase through a slacker headtube angle while maintaining the same reach. DH bikes' HTA's are usually ~63.5 and I don't think we'll be able to go much slacker than that as DH bikes haven't really slackened at all over the years. Curious what PB thinks of that super slack Transition! Grim donut is an extreme example of "too slack".
  • 2 0
 I agree, I’m 6’1 and anything bigger than 475 reach is too much for me. I tried a few bigger bikes and I never felt comfortable. The cycle for me was kind of funny and expensive. I ended up with more travel, smaller wheels and a smaller frame. Live and learn. @Lotusoperandi:
  • 2 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity:

I noticed that with my Jeffsy (reach a bit long) so I cut down to a shorter stem (35mm, from 50mm stock). It makes a big difference and I much prefer it.
  • 3 0
 @Ttimer:
When doing a corner correctly it will give you higher exit speed, and therefore more speed on the straights.
If you follow a friend and miss a little obstacle in a straight line, you lose a little time, if you mess ut a corner, hes gone!
  • 3 0
 @Prh: Exactly! I am the same height as you, and ride the same bike and agree 100 %. Also specialized team rider Charles Murray is the same height and rides an S3
  • 3 0
 @bikefuturist: Imho looking at reach without looking at stack is a problem. Also the stock cockpit matters. I've been renting a few bikes in 2020 to see what fits me and despite the Scott Enduro bike having similar reach to a few others I tried it felt almost unrideable on the steeps since it didn't alow me to move back enough.
  • 3 0
 @bedell99: Steve from Vorsprung has a video on the sweet spot of length on Youtube. Got the Pole guy quite mad if I remember correctly
  • 1 0
 @WasatchEnduro: Sorry my friend Sentnel is one league higher Smile
  • 1 0
 @Lotusoperandi: you get it.
  • 4 0
 @Svinyard: This is called RAD and it's true that for some riders more stack is better than more reach. That's why not talking about stack is a huge eversimplification. Also we should be talking about mass distribution on the axles, not reach, stack, ha and cs separately...
  • 1 0
 @gticket: more traction through
  • 1 0
 @B335d: yeah, but their skill sets are on another lvl. As I got older, I found the strectched position on the bike more and more annoying. That is why, my next bike will be a normal M, after 4.5 years or Ls or stretched Ms. In fact, in the ETT, it will be shorter than my bike from 5 years ago but, the only way the head-set reach extender goes in is if I smack my knees into the handlebar; if I'm not, stock bike ftw.
to put it otherway:
on my trail bike, there is no reason to go big as the terrain does not requires it and it would be mostly a drag.
on my big bike, for the rough, steep and fast stuff.. yeah.. big wb, big reach. Then again, I'm not the most confident dh-er so maybe that's why.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: I'm intrigued by this metric. Maybe the others just blow more travel than needed for small rocks while this uses a little bit less?
Slow motion through rock garden with tires inflated to 50 psi? This should be a thing...
  • 1 0
 @Lotusoperandi: I'm also 5 10 and on a 475 reach large patrol, but ordered a medium spire which is 460. The 475 reach patrol feels too big and my 450 hardtail is great. I've been second guessing myself on switching to medium but your comment helped me relax
  • 1 0
 @sspiff: In which issue or where can this article be found?

"The Enduro mag article where they discuss how compact pro EWS bikes are was really interesting. Like Richie Rude is on a medium sb150 (160mm reach) with 760mm bars at 5'11" or something like that."
  • 46 0
 I know speed isn’t everything.. but it’s still funny to see the least expensive bike with a relatively simple suspension layout, no high pivot and whatnot, take fastest downhill time
  • 14 3
 seeing that this bike is the fastest, and the shorter travel WAO took a close second, I'm guessing the test track wasn't the best to showcase the gnarability of the Norco and GT
  • 5 0
 From what I've gathered, if the track is the same as the one the Canadian Enduro Series has raced on Sugar to Sweet One in the past, it's extremely trail bike oriented and not that steep. Lots of high speed corners, few berms, and lots of roots and a couple rock gardens - but it's nothing like the absolutely gnarly trails hiding a few runs across the mountain. If they were racing the DH race course or Honey Drop, the results may vary. But even if you were to host a one-off DH race on the track, I bet most racers would not be reaching for their longer travel machines.
  • 6 1
 @j-t-g: I feel you on this one. How fast a bike is really track dependent, even section dependent. I got a great lesson in this following one of my friends down a local track on my Norco Sight while he was on a Nicolai Geometron. Every straightaway he pulled a massive gap on me, and I reeled him right back in every time there was a set of tight-ish corners. I love the addition of timed tests, but it is important everyone takes them with a major grain of salt. We ride our enduro bikes on such a wide variety of terrain there is nothing we can remotely consider to be the 'fastest bike'. For example, I wouldn't be surprised if a really supportive bike like the YT that excels on a shorter track of moderate technicality, where rider fatigue and suspension suppleness is less important. But that bike might get blown out of the water if it was tested on a long, rough track by bikes like the Range or the GT, which probably transfer less force to the rider, allowing them to push hard for longer. TLDR, it's complicated...
  • 6 0
 Yeah you would think they would be a bit more positive about the cheapest bike on test, fastest on test (they chose the track to test...), Looks really nice, lighter than many other options. It seems hard to recommend any of the other options above this one?
  • 3 1
 You don’t want the test track to be too gnarly and risk Injury to the testers. It needs to be a relatively easy trail so the testers can get consistent lap times safely.
  • 36 0
 Review was funny to me, it felt like they wanted to hate it, but didn't really have a good reason to hate it.
  • 3 0
 Is Norco a title sponsor? "Oh, if the track was just this much longer *indicates small distance with fingers*, then the Norco would totally be faster for sure."
  • 26 0
 Is it just me or is the audio mixing always WAY off on these? Increase the volume when the presenters speak, but then have it too loud for the transition music. It seems like this on most field test videos.
  • 8 1
 yes the voices could use more compression
  • 7 0
 Second this. Also, as mentioned in the comments from the Norco Range, Henry is so soft spoken it can at times be hard to hear what he's saying.
  • 2 0
 @SimbaandHiggins: his voice is too bassy that’s why
  • 1 0
 @Snowrdr01 indeed, that is an annoying issue in so many videos.
  • 2 0
 Some dynamic eq'ing would go a long way, or even just making some presets for when each person talks. I've got a DAW and a paypal account. Hmu Big Grin
  • 2 0
 100x this. The balance is terrible, and the voices need work. New group, so I can understand they're still working on it. But it has got to improve, Henry is borderline inaudible. I wanna hear what he has to say!
  • 27 0
 Reads like the new Capra is a Jeffsy with just a bit more travel and an awkward water bottle location?
  • 22 0
 Not a terrible way to put it...
  • 25 0
 Would it be a yt without an awkward water bottle solution?
  • 5 1
 Ive ridden both and thats miles off. They ride very very differently.
  • 7 0
 @bombdabass: you've ridden the new Capra already?
  • 2 0
 @bombdabass @FloImSchnee

Rode the 2020 capra 29 recently and have ridden the current version of the jeffsy 29 a couple times. They feel like very different bikes but the capra didn't feel as unwieldy or wallowy as I thought it would, even though the one I rode was alu, coiled (rear), and about 35.5 pounds. I can see how this version with the lighter frame and steeper sta and same supportive suspension could easily be setup as more of an all arounder or enduroAF with a coil rear and maybe even 180 up front.
  • 2 0
 Sad, indeed. I'd just as soon ride an undersized Izzo for DS and trail spracking. Even a 130mm bike of today is better than any DH bike of 20 years ago.
  • 23 0
 And just like the Altitude in the last field test, the shortest and most „middle of the road“ bike is the fastest.

Might be that non-pro riders benefit from the increased confidence a longer and slacker bike gives while fast riders who don’t need the extra mental boost are faster on a more nimble and manageable bike. Might also be that I have no idea and am just talking shit, but would be interesting to get some in depth testing done with different sizes and riders.
  • 10 0
 It blows my mind that people are still going the longer and longer and longer and slacker to infinity when timed empirical testing and pro's bike choice clearly shows that we have hit diminishing returns when it comes to speed. Watch Kaz try to diminish the timed results of this like he did on the altitude. lol
  • 7 0
 "Might also be that I have no idea "

I'm starting to think thats the whole bike industry....
  • 3 0
 It could also be that since its a “middle of the road” bike, its easy to adapt to. You dont have to adjust to the long reach, a long wheelbase and/or a super slack headtube. You just get on and go.
  • 9 0
 Might also be that Pro riders (and probably all riders) are fastest on what feels comfortable and predictable. A well rounded bike without any extremes or unusual features might be boring but fast.

It will probably be a bike that bike reviewers dislike because they are drowning in bikes and prefer exciting unicorns.
  • 2 0
 @lefthandohvhater: Not everyone's looking for maximum speed right on the limit. For example, I'm not a pro, or anywhere near as experienced or talented as a pro, so I look for something that's more stable and forgiving.
  • 2 0
 @boozed: I don't think that long bikes do average riders any favors either. There is a small percentage of riders that can both handle and longer bike and actually benefit from it in the middle of the ability spectrum.
  • 26 0
 Cue DoubleCrownAddict in 3...2...1...
  • 3 0
 Happy i saw no comment yet xD
  • 2 0
 where's he at? this is his day!
  • 3 0
 Scrolled straight to downvote jail and was shocked not to find him there.
  • 27 1
 He's too busy working on his autobiography. It's title will be: "My life, below the threshold"
  • 2 0
 shhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • 4 0
 In his absence let me try YT bad downvotes plz
  • 1 0
 He's getting the message from the Villagers and the Landlords.
  • 19 0
 Looks dope, Rides Dope, water bottle on board, price ~ ok, what else riders can willing to want?
'In Stock' maybe ?


Also PB nice review's, always enjoy reading and watching your field test's
  • 2 1
 rode my capra for 2 months, waited 13 months for them to accidentally send me a carbon frame instead of AL. my shore feels better than the capra did and already survived over double the time and abuse. so personally, i'd avoid YT, even if their bikes feel amazing.
  • 2 1
 @etownrider3: i will not buy YT by any means, all of my riding buddies have issues with frame during riding season, it looks for kids who want to cut cost upfront, however, however
  • 20 0
 0.3 of adjustment with the flip chip? Why even bother? But a nice looking whip, regardless.
  • 7 0
 Make it a full one degree. I think many of the PB staff would concur.
  • 18 1
 Yup, exactly. So many bikes have geo adjustments that do almost nothing... except look good on a sell sheet. Useless in the real world, though.
  • 4 0
 @mikelevy: We need timed testing on bikes with flip chips. Both settings. Don't tell the rider which setting its in. For science.. or something
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: Do people really care though? I couldn't care if my bike has adjustable geo or not. I'll just run it in low/slack anyway
  • 1 0
 I'm going to go against the grain and say that having a fine adjustment is better than a large one. A steeper STA is better for steeper climbs and winch and plummet type riding...the same terrain a slack HTA is suited for. So unless you're flipping the chip at the top of the climb I don't see where having a 1° change would be useful. I don't need my STA steeper if I'm riding a flat trail (where I might want a steeper HTA and higher BB).

A .3° chip allows for slightly tweaking the bike to your needs (maybe you want a slightly higher BB or steeper HTA). The STA changing .3° isn't that important since that's less that what can be compensated for by saddle adjustment. I run my Tallboy in the high position because I use it on mostly XC trails.
  • 1 0
 @jeremy3220: If you can pass a blindfold test and tell me which setting you're in (+/-0.3'), I will buy you the keg of beer of your choosing.
  • 1 0
 @sngltrkmnd: it never occurred to me that someone wouldn't be able to tell the difference. It's noticeable if you have a chance to try both settings.
  • 18 1
 Wait so the 2018 gen geometry bike wins the fastest times on...DH? Better than the Norco boat and everything else?

@Mattbeer I don't think its a surprise that you are faster on about the same reach bike as Rude, Remi, etc. When those hacks at EnduroMag are quicker, and the pros are quicker...and you are quicker. At what point do we just say...welp the smaller (or appropriate sized bikes if you will) are...quicker.

It's not a surprise that Enduro-mag found the same thing in their time tests:
enduro-mtb.com/en/enduro-race-bike-mtb-review

"If you check out the race bikes on test, you’ll probably be asking yourself how Richie Rude, who is 180 cm tall, can be so fast on a bike with a reach of only 460 mm. Jack Moir is 1.91 m tall and rides a size L Strive, which, due to the extremely tall cockpit, is guaranteed to have a reach under 460 mm. The mullet conversion on the GT Force Carbon that Martin Maes rides has also shrunk the bike down to less than 460 mm in length. The reason for this became clear during the course of our test. Not only did the shorter bikes record faster times, they also allowed our test riders to change direction more quickly and position themselves better before corners to carry their speed through them. On top of that, the agile handling of compact bikes is usually more fun. Anyone who thinks that these bikes aren’t composed at high speeds can rest assured: handling stability is heavily determined by the suspension and all the bikes on test performed brilliantly in this regard."
  • 10 1
 I think the test trail segment chosen was just biased to more nimble bikes. If they chose a rougher, gnarlier trail then the Norco and GT would have shined.

Which is more typical of an EWS stage? IDK.

Which is more typical of the trails you ride? Thats only what you can answer.
  • 6 1
 @hamncheez: That's an interesting hypothesis but I'd want to see evidence of that. After seeing two formal tests from PB and Enduromag and finding the same thing, I'd want to see something more before believe the length is worthy. The enduromag test was done on an EWS course for that year and by mortal riders. How steep and straight does a trail have to be to where the Norco becomes faster? I dunno, but there's a pretty small percentage of trails that are harder than EWS courses and straight enough still. I think it'd be silly to buy a bike that excels on only those and is slower on the rest.
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez @Svinyard

And then there's individual physiology to take into account. Maybe everything is normalized if you looked at enough pros, but I recall reading that Moir's arms are shorter than average for his height, hence the need for shorter reach / higher stack.

Anyways if I'm on the Grim Donut and racing Moir and his Strive straight down a mountain on Mars he still wins by enough margin to catch a few waves on Europa before I even get to the bottom.

BTW awesome racing and I hope Hill can move up the board a bit in these last few races.
  • 6 0
 @Svinyard: I mean on the other end, Grim Donut was a good bit faster under Yoann then his conservative commencal meta. Of course that was just one test, but I do think its going to be very dependent on the track and rider. Would love more articles and testing on sizing for sure.
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: In the Norco review, did they not say that the Norco isn't that long? That the chainstay length is reasonable?
  • 6 2
 @WasatchEnduro: I think that's where Lee McCormicks RAD measurement comes into play.

Nothings perfect but this has to be better than the marketing departments telling you what works or not: (or our post-purchase justification)
www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHagRovHSYs&t=303s

If the media would slow their roll a bit in pushing the "looonnnnggger" bikes, I think this quote goes away and manufacturers start focusing on innovations that matter.

"We are making our bikes longer because that’s what the market demands, but the people who work here, and the people we size at demos, and our elite racers, are going down a size. If a top pro can’t control a longer bike, a normal rider can’t."

– Chris Cocalis - Owner of Pivot Cycles

fwiw I think Bernard Kerr (5' 10") just won Hardline on a size Large Pivot bike with 460mm of reach and a shorter wheelbase\reach than the Norco Range. Is it a coincidence that Matt here (5' 10") just laid down the fastest speed with similar reach/fitment as Berndard, Rude, Moir, Remi etc. over real long bikes...maybe not.
  • 4 1
 @hamncheez: Quote from reviewer Matt Beer: "I put down my third fastest timed lap on the Range. Although it carries speed well on flatter tracks, I think its weight and long wheelbase held it back on our timed laps."

Remember its longer than the bike that won...Hardline. Yet its meant for less rowdy terrain.
  • 6 1
 @Svinyard: is any bike actually meant for Hardline?
  • 4 0
 @Svinyard Check the Range's "Timed Testing" blurb again for further clarification.

EWS pros have amazing fitness and skills that allow them to handle shorter bikes, which in the right hands, has advantages. Average riders may find that longer bikes inspire confidence and are less fatiguing. As PB members have discussed, the size of bike you ride will depend on the flavour of trails and style of riding you prefer.
  • 4 1
 @mattbeer: That's an interesting thought for sure. The EnduroMag guys did dispel a bit of that with their tests (larger sample size) on an EWS course with more typical riders. I think that quote by Chris Cocalis isn't one to dismiss quickly.

EnduroMag guys on why they thought the Meta AM was so slow for them. Note that the longer bike was MORE fatiguing. It makes sense in that you have to work harder wrestle the big bike.

"The main reason is its long front centre with a reach of 495 mm in combination with a short 433 mm rear end and slack 63.6° head angle. This combination means that you have to ride the bike very actively to generate enough grip on the front wheel when cornering. In tight sections, the META AM tends to understeer a lot and if you don’t reduce your speed, you’ll simply slide through the apex of the turn. Besides costing you a lot of time, it’s exhausting. The bike’s length also comes at the cost of precision through rough sections."
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: thank you! Balance in a bike is everything
  • 2 0
 @mattbeer: I think a lot has to do with the balance in the bike. Taller dudes on these bikes with long reach and stupid short chainstays just ride like crap. Jain stays need for grow with reach and reach needs to not be so ridiculously huge. The bikes with balance are always the best riding bikes. Enduromag did a great write up about it and it can be seen when looking at the balance of all the top race bikes no matter who is on them. Especially the bikes of the tall guys and what they choose to ride. All of them end up choosing the most balanced rides
  • 1 3
 These longer and slacker trucks are made for the noodly armed segment of riders who feel endangered when the trail requires them to use some upper body strength.
  • 2 1
 As much as I agree with everything you guys are saying (6'2" on a large that would probably be considered a medium today), keep in mind each bike in this test got one (1) timed lap on the track. That is hardly a test.
  • 21 6
 "The Capra isn't a bike that lets you just plow. It feels quite taught, and whether that's a good or a bad thing probably depends what you're riding it on."

Do you mean "taut" or have YT been teaching it some tricks...
  • 88 0
 Toight, like a toiger.
  • 3 1
 Hey man, don't assume it's education.
  • 4 0
 @MtbSince84: Because of the toight pants?
  • 3 0
 @JohanG: don't assume what is education?
  • 3 0
 @BenPea: Damn you got me their.
  • 11 0
 A bike that actually fits a 5'10" person instead of making him/her choose between sizing up or sizing down? Can't be! The geo seems bang on for me, and this is probably the bike that makes sense for most people buying enduro bikes that they end up trail riding anyway. Also, this seems like an idea candidate for coil?
  • 2 0
 The geo may be right, but that seat height issue is a major flaw if you ask me....what's worse than having a seat in your way as you're hitting warp 9 on the descents?!
  • 4 0
 @freeinpg: 445 seat tube height is not that bad. Just needs to get a longer dropper (assuming there are no insertion issues), which is annoying but not the end of the world (like a $200 part).
  • 16 1
 Nice Yeti
  • 18 1
 YeTy
  • 7 0
 @santos619: Why wouldn't you just say YeTi
  • 3 0
 @stumphumper92: That is how they are pronouncing these days. Or maybe that's how they said it all along and finally just started using YETI's paint colors so the people would finally get a clue. YT (Yeh-Tee).
  • 1 0
 Wink
  • 13 0
 I consider this review to be +1 to the "bikes are getting too f*cking big" camp
  • 11 0
 Levy just seems happy that he gets to work with people that aren’t his bosses. Smile
  • 87 2
 Every other Pinkbike employee is Levy's boss.
  • 9 1
 @brianpark: especially Kazimer. It's clear who's wearing the pants in that bromance.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Levy downgraded yet again
  • 5 0
 Canadian Power-Bottom dynamic
  • 8 0
 165/170 with a fox 38 is the new trail bike... what a time to be alive

170/170 is enduro
  • 5 0
 It funny hearing about everyone's grips with warranty and problems. My experience has been the complete opposite, they rush ordered an pivot axel to me over Christmas and was at my door in 48 hours. My experience has been really positive and the cost savings just make sense, but maybe its my location for the good service.(BC)
  • 3 0
 Same here. I've owned two Capra's over the last 4 years and YT has always gone above and beyond to make things right when I had a warranty issue. YT even got E-thirteen to replace a few spokes and axel on my rear wheel (for free) when the bike was 3 years old and out of warranty.
  • 3 1
 They happy customers are probably the silent majority.
  • 10 6
 The YT was the fastest, possibly because the shorter front center allows the rider to pressure front wheel more for traction. The problem with progressives is that they define themselves by the act of changing itself, not by the fulfillment any objective metric.
  • 7 0
 This reminds me of a test that a German magazine did last year that found that the bikes with slightly shorter reach and slightly shorter wheelbase were actually faster that the long and slack ones because they were more maneuverable and easier to place where needed. Seems like the top tier guys at least go faster on "granny" geo.
  • 13 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: There's something to that. I'm not nearly as quick as Matt but I know I'm faster on a longer bike (480r, 450cs) than a shorter one because of the confidence it gives me. I don't think Matt needs that confidence / stability in the same way I do, though.
  • 3 1
 @mikelevy: Have you done a time test on that Mike? I think that'd be a great article. Do it blind. Get some timed DH lap on two/three different trails with one lap on the normal size (the big long one, not this capra), and the other downsized. I do think adding a bit of bar height is often needed when downsizing.

I think the Endurmag guys showed hints that its not just the studs like Matt, Remi, Rude etc that benefit from less extreme reaches/length. And perhaps their more fun.
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: cue the GrimDonut
  • 2 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: MTB-News, another german mag, built a custom bike with longer slacker geo and liked the results. It's a long read but worth it. Of note, they mention it takes time to adjust your riding style to a longer bike.

www.mtb-news.de/news/forschungsprojekt-mountainbike-geometrie-teil-1

Did everyone suddenly forget when the ultra slack and long Grim Donut smoked the Commencal Meta in a timed race? @mikelevy I think the GD should have made a guest appearance in this test!
  • 9 6
 Anyone care to enlighten me on why these companies engineer these enduro bikes' suspension to have a "pedaling platform" if it comes at the expense of downhill performance and shocks have climb switches anyways? I must be missing something...
  • 15 1
 For the one-bike quiver section of the market who want to ride their bikes on pedaly trails.
  • 2 1
 In reality the shock has too firm compression tune and that's it, the same with meta am. Assuming that PK disappears above certain speed.
  • 15 0
 Because in most enduro races there's actually a lot of pedaling.
  • 11 1
 Same reason why sport cars don't have rock hard suspensions and air conditioning. Because most people aren't buying these exclusively for racing purposes and they will probably spend at least 90% of their lives on local trails, not downhill bike parks or enduro races.
  • 5 0
 Many enduro race stages have pedally sections and uphills. They don’t make the highlight reel but they are there and they matter for time. So, ya need something that can be efficient enough to save energy there. You can’t use that climb switch in the middle of a stage unless you have a handlebar lockout.
  • 3 0
 Should be self evident if you go on rides with 3-6k ft of climbing and descending and push hard on the descents. It is on the last few descents where you will start to feel the cumulative fatigue on the less efficient bike and the descending performance gains can become moot.
  • 1 0
 @ppp9911: If you mostly go for rides with a ton of elevation gain and a climb switch wouldn't suffice, you'd probably be better with an all mountain bike in the 140-160mm travel range. An engineered pedaling platform makes more sense there.
  • 1 2
 @jasdo: Right but most of the stages have no pedaling involved. A harsher suspension platform makes your legs and arms work harder on the descents. Why not worry about efficiency there?
  • 1 1
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: Isn't a more capable bike on the descents, while still 'getting you to the top of the hill' what people buy enduro bikes for? If climbing and pedaling efficiency are important enough to sacrifice downhill plushness and capability, get an AM bike...
  • 7 0
 @spendtimebehindbars: I mean, it literally got the fastest time in the test so seems plenty capable. Different people like different bike characteristic, not every bike needs to be a barge, some would prefer the all-rounder that shreds, but doesn't suck on their local trails.
  • 2 2
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: Capable was a bad choice of word in this context - meant more plush and forgiving. Matt did say if the track was longer (like multi-stage enduro races are), fatigue would likely become an issue vs. the other bikes due to the harshness of the YT's suspension. If that's what certain people want, it still begs the question why not target that balance of pedaling efficiency and decent descending at the AM category?
  • 6 0
 @spendtimebehindbars:
Because the tracks they ride aren't 100% rock gardens. Linear suspension is great for plowing chunder, but it's slow on anything flowy and less technical. Too little anti-squat and it becomes a lot harder to pre-jump over a small crest at high speed for example. Linear suspension is better for plowing the gnar, and progressive suspension is better for man made jumps, and less-steep sections.

Also keep in mind that pro riders have different linkages and whatnot that they can change to alter these progression curves to match different track conditions.
  • 3 0
 Re the bike feel: the Capra has a really progressive rear. As such, there is tons of bottom out resistance built into the design. This also makes for a ride where you kinda have to fight the bike a bit riding in terrain that you do not know so well. Jack Moir explains this really, really well in his video where he explains why he went with a Strive over a Torque. What YT high progression rear ends do not lack though is small bump sensitivity. So if that is how it felt then either the shock settings or possibly sag are way off or the progressive nature of a highly progresseive system where you have to really push the bike to get deep into the travel. I kinda had the same feeling with my Jeffsy29er - albeit built up as a mini-enduro bike with 160mm up front and an ElevenSix coil in the rear - where you have this feeling that there is less travel out back, yet you can go fast as hell and the rear end somehow manages to keep up with all but the largest of hits (150mm of high progressive travel feels a lot different than say Yeti's way less progressive approach with the same amount of travel).
  • 2 0
 Yeah, I totally suck at this bicking thing, but gotta say when that I had a Capra 2019, it never felt better than when I got the right coil spring on it. And I generally prefer an air shock on most bikes.
  • 3 0
 Their opinion of Capra is basically spot on to even my 2015 model I had. It's fast because it is responsive like an XC bike with long legs, but you need to kind of manage it / watch your back when it gets rough.

In contrast, my 2020 Transition Patrol feels much more planted when it gets gnarly like an old school DH bike and I think would let most riders go faster without feeling nervous, but it will likely be a little less engaging and playful then Capra on easier trails (which is why they have the Scout!).
  • 3 0
 And the YT Capra upholds the insight that firmer less active suspension makes for a faster ride at the expense of rider comfort and fatigue. Race versions of DH bikes have always been stiffer and less active, but they are darn fast. It all depends on what you want out of your rig. Plush or fast, can't have'm both.
  • 3 1
 Finally a YT that can hold a water bottle. Might sound stupid but that was one of the reasons I was against YT. So stupid you have to buy their $40 propriety water bottle that is half the size of a normal one that can be had for $10...
  • 1 0
 I had the opposite reaction. RIP CAPRA.
  • 5 0
 "So many terms" ... from the guy who coined "downcountry" :-D

Made me laugh (in a good way).
  • 1 2
 Not to steal any thunder, but downcountry was used back in the day to describe bikes that weren’t xc or dh (like way back when resorts weren’t letting dual crown bikes on lifts in CO).
  • 1 0
 @emptybe-er: Truly? I'm not sure if I'm relieved or disappointed. I thought we were witness to the creation of a whole new, arguably unnecessary category, but apparently it has existed for a long time.
  • 3 1
 Finally tired about hearing about climb switches in a review. They're on basically every air shock now and it's amazing. I use them a tonne and some don't at all but it's obvious on which climbs / trails where you would use them. So if they're positioned in a way that's easy to flick why not? I feel like it's less and less a testament of a bike's climbing ability when you have a hack that is meant to be there regardless of how a bike is built.
  • 4 0
 Only the non-native english speakers will understand: Henry Quenny's voice is 100% similar to the ones that was in school in english listening comprehension tasks on tapes.
  • 2 0
 Long wheelbase and slack head angle for the average rider means a calmer, more stable ride at higher speeds. There is less temptation to comfort brake. I don't think the pros do comfort braking. Their main concern with sizing seems to be having a bike that's easy to ride fast when fatigued.
  • 3 0
 It's funny how the bike with the most moderate geometry and arguably the most basic suspension is once again the fastest in timed testing. Really makes you question the validity of all that hype.
  • 1 0
 Seems, the track wasn't that steep.
  • 9 4
 Would you say...'upcountry'? (I'll see myself out)
  • 5 0
 Sounds more like Upduro
  • 5 0
 Firm is Fast - isn't that how it goes?
  • 4 0
 I'm not sure how many more times I can take Levy raising his eyebrows at me
  • 1 0
 I quite like it and I am still waiting for his autographed feet pics...
  • 2 1
 No homo
  • 4 0
 Viewing the huck to flat tests from the non-drive side, especially on the bikes with the idlers, is maddening
  • 3 0
 I sense a wee bit of friction between Henry and levy. I’m really stoked that Mike is back and that Henry made it over to PB
  • 3 0
 Levy has found his match in the banter department and it's messing with his brain.
  • 5 0
 So the fastest bike is not a good race bike??
  • 1 0
 So reading comments, I have a question. I'm 5'10-11" and both bikes I'm looking at have a 45mm stem, one has 450 reach other has 475.

Do I go with smaller size at 450 and use higher rise bars, or get longer bike and put shorter stem on it to bring reach down to 465?
  • 1 0
 choose the latter
  • 1 0
 I am the same as you. I bought a 2020 Capra XL (475 Reach) because I couldnt pass up the deal I got. I kept it stock at first and quickly found that it was putting too much pressure on my hands and low back during long climbs. I started off by going to a 35mm stem, 25mm bars and 2mm spacer, that helped but not enough. Finally went to 33mm stem, 50mm bars and 5mm spacer...happy camper now. I am fairly upright on climbs now and on downhills I feel like I am more "in the bike" rather than "on", similar to riding a dirt bike.
  • 4 1
 I don't think I was properly welcomed to this field test... did I miss something? Is that allowed?
  • 2 0
 I agree! No intro video and no hype
  • 2 0
 @Jibofo: yeah exactly, how can I check pinkbike obsessively everyday for two weeks waiting for a review if I don’t know what’s coming?!!
  • 2 0
 Kudos to the person(s) who has to put on all these tubeless control tires. Having just struggled to install one myself, seems a particularly thankless and unattractive task.
  • 3 0
 Weight, I really think its more important then people are leading themself to believe!
  • 3 0
 When every single pro EWS rider is sizing down, bikes have become too big. Not surprising at all that this was the fastest.
  • 1 0
 @jwdenver not true. Some of them are sizing down, e.g. Moir and Ed Masters,
others run long bikes indeed: bikeboard.at/Board/attachment.php?attachmentid=223094&d=1631179808
  • 3 1
 Thank you for writing a bike article without any panic-inducing subterfuge.
  • 3 2
 Geo is borderline granny panties..... but the spec is top. The crankbrothers synthesis wheels are a nice upgrade from what previously came on YT's. Nice bike over all though
  • 1 0
 Is it possible to adjust or revalve the shock to have less high-speed compression to compensate for the lack of small-bump sensitivity?
  • 1 0
 Will there come a test for Propain Spindrift in comparison to these bikes ? This bike seems to be really really hot and seen a lot of them around.
  • 3 0
 that’s an interesting looking YeTi
  • 1 0
 Mmm this bike kinda sounds like my 2019 Firebird 29. Not as plowable as an spec enduro but more at home on a variety if trails.
  • 2 1
 I know, that you can get from YT best value for those prices...but they are definitely year by year further from young talents.
  • 2 0
 Did everyone forget about the Grim Donut test or something? Reach doesn't equate for speed, it's how the bike fits.
  • 2 0
 Couldn't the minor deficiencies in the suspension "feel" be compensated with a shock tune?
  • 2 0
 But customers can't easily change the shock tune - how they get the bike is how it gets ridden the large majority of the time. But yes, that's a feasible road to go down in this case.
  • 3 0
 YT CAPRA'S SHOULD BE USED WITH COIL ONLY. 10 X BETTER
  • 2 0
 But they sell this model with air-sprung shocks, so that's how it gets tested. Just like how someone might get this very bike themselves.
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy: Well I'll be writing a strongly worded email to YT as I want this bike
  • 1 0
 If PB can list the price as a PRO, then known issues with warranty turnaround should certainly be mentioned in the CON column.
  • 6 2
 Judging by the comment section under almost every review, it seems like everything breaks and every company is ignoring everyone's emails and phone calls. That's not the case, of course, but when it comes to warranty issues, your best bet is to scour the forums and see what you can find. We are not in a position to test their warranty claims or to call brands out because some riders say that have had issues - I don't think the picture is that clear Smile
  • 1 0
 Great review! Can the large fit a regular size water bottle or only a smaller one like the Jeffsy?
  • 2 0
 Speak up, henry! We can't hear you
  • 2 0
 The YeTi Capra, now in "troll teal."
  • 1 0
 Sorry if I didn't catch this, but are you testing each bike with the same tires and rims?
  • 4 0
 Control tires are DHR2 front and Dissector rear. No control rims/wheels.
  • 1 3
 Looks good but the suspension design is dated and notorious for pedal bob. Do we need to be concerned about the headtube snapping off if we go off a drop...I do think anyone forgot about that broken headtube in Rampage the other year. Of course most of us aren't hucking 75ft gaps hence impacts are not as large.
  • 2 0
 "but the suspension design is dated and notorious for pedal bob." No, it's not per se -- it's all about how it is designed. You can as well have four-bar-kinematics with high anti-squat.

And listening to the reviewers, this seems to be the case with the Mk3 Capra.

(the Mk2 Capra indeed doesn't stiffen-up that much under chain-pull -- at the same time it seems to have been plusher)
  • 3 0
 I think it's pretty
  • 2 0
 all-rounder at 165mm/170mm?
  • 1 0
 "Fast in the right hands" screams "...but slow in your hands" to me and doesn't seem like a pro.
  • 2 0
 It's middle of the road geo is a negative but it's the fastest...
  • 2 1
 So glad they finally got rid of the infinity link.
  • 1 0
 Is this also a downhill bike?
  • 1 0
 Tender six footers...that's hilarious!
  • 1 0
 5.10 and about 470 reach is good for me.
  • 1 0
 I really like the bugs on the frame in the last photo
  • 2 3
 6000 bucks and it is still 33 lbs and breaks easy what on earth are you paying for
  • 1 7
flag DoubleCrownAddict (Sep 8, 2021 at 16:12) (Below Threshold)
 I'm working on a blog about how direct sales bike companies hurt local bike shops and they local bike scene.
  • 5 0
 @DoubleCrownAddict: ah yes, simp for pushy/douchey middlemen that talk down to customers. Really helps out the local scene.

DTC and ecommerce is the future. If local bike shops can't provide exceptional, competitive service, let them fail.
  • 1 0
 @DoubleCrownAddict: lol you're like 13 years too late
  • 1 1
 No, 6000 usd for a YT bike , you just can’t put the price in the pros
  • 1 2
 Haha, that helmet is so ugly. The bike is ugly too.
  • 2 3
 Capras suck, new or old, they’re garbage.
  • 2 3
 Crackcrack...buy quality
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv42 0.032591
Mobile Version of Website