Galfer Release New Disc Shark Rotor With Bold Claims

Apr 10, 2022 at 19:37
by Henry Quinney  

You might have heard of thicker rotors, you might also have come across finned rotors. Well now, Galfer is offering both with their new Disc Shark concept.

It differs slightly from something like the 2.3mm TRP rotors or indeed the Ice-Tech rotors from Shimano, but could be said to have traits from both. The new rotors measure just over 2mm (2.05mm by our measurement). Rotors often used to be built to be around 1.8mm width at the braking surface, but in recent years we've seen this increase. This increase is largely to help resist heat build-up, but could also help reduce flex under heavy braking load.

The one-piece rotors place an emphasis on heat management.

Galfer's rotors go even further by extending the design to include a finned aspect. The added mass of the one-piece rotors should not only help keep the high temperatures at bay but the increased surface area should also act as a heat sink, and also help the rotors lose heat by causing more airflow disruption as the wheel spins.

The pattern of the rotors features a clearing gap that alternates with blocks of 12 smaller holes along with the rotor. These smaller holes should again increase surface area and cooling. Galfer claims this design gives a 30% reduction in operating temperature compared to other high-end discs currently on the market. They also claim that these discs, with the lower running temperatures, could help increase the life of your brake pads by 25-40%.


Galfer also says that the design of the rotor means that less pressure is required in the brake line under the most fatiguing conditions, meaning less effort is required to brake. This, they say, translates into a 5-10% increase in braking power under normal conditions, although they don't stipulate exactly how.

The rotors use a laser-cut pattern that also claimed to benefit from "optimal geometry" to achieve the best possible performance. Any level of flex at the caliper or rotor will lead to a vaguer sensation at the lever. A rotor that handles load better, and is stiffer, should give a more positive feeling and a stronger initial bite to the rider.

The discs have subtle branding and a fitting to discretely hold a magnet for a speed sensor on an e-bike.

The setup has been aided in its development by a raft of the world's fastest racers, including Myriam Nicole, Amaury Pierron, Thibaut Dapréla, and Martin Maes. Galfer says the disc has already helped win World Cups, as well as the rainbow stripes under Myriam Nicole.

Initially, the discs will be available in 180, 203, and 223mm sizes but they'll also eventually be including small rotors for XC riding, too.

The new Disc Shark will be available from June 2022 in the following sizes, weights and prices:

DB0223W2 (ø180 x 2.0mm - 127 g): €85 + VAT
DB024W (ø203 x 2.0mm - 174 g): €90 + VAT
DB027W (ø223 x 2.0mm - 237 g): €95 + VAT

For more infomation please visit Galfer.eu or GalferUSA.com


180 Comments

  • 643 11
 Are the small XC rotors called baby Shark, doo doo doo doo doo doo?
  • 108 2
 Fuck, I couldn't help laughing at work, now I'm fired, you need to be responsible for me
  • 81 0
 @Sephyx: I know a Nigerian prince that could help. Should I send his details?
  • 7 47
flag fracasnoxteam (Apr 11, 2022 at 1:49) (Below Threshold)
 Smaller rotor for xc? Why smaller? they're slower ??
  • 32 4
 Galfer needs to sign Jack Moir and release a signature model: “Daddy Shark Attack Jack”
  • 1 0
 So good
  • 1 0
 @WRCDH: That'd be the 220mm one.
  • 5 0
 @mbl77: Did his father run the freaking country?
  • 7 0
 Now that song is stuck in my head...
  • 3 1
 I had to look that up (no kids). Good one.
  • 15 0
 @kinematix: When the son of the deposed king of Nigeria emails you directly, asking for help, you help!
  • 4 0
 Darn it @mbl77, now I have that dumb song in my head.
  • 3 0
 @mudcycles: Yes, and the 203mm Rob Warner signature edition would be the “Grandpa Shark” rotor.
  • 3 1
 Winner of most upvoted comment in pinkbike history goes to…mbl77.
Congratulations.
  • 82 0
 100€ for a 203 disc? f*ck it, stick to a Magura MDRC for 30€ or my go to Formula Monolitic
  • 35 0
 5-10% increase claims, tested with a 95% confidence interval
  • 13 5
 Yup. Magura doesn’t need fancy fins to increase the surface area of their rotors. They simply don’t drill so many holes in them in the first place! And they’ve always been 2mm thick.
  • 12 0
 @sewer-rat: That's not what confidence intervals indicate, but very funny anyway.
  • 3 0
 +1 for Formula Monolitic

I´ve installed these on every bike from 160mm on my road- to the 203 on the enduro bike, be it 6hole or centerlock.

Way better than any Shimano disc and still not expensive.
  • 1 0
 magura is better for mud for sure. more surface area, less holes
  • 4 0
 Aren't Magura rotors actually made by Galfer? All of my previous Magura rotors were....
  • 1 0
 @mnorris122: I think they meant surface area exposed to the air. Agreed that any slots or holes/vents would decrease surface area coming in contact W the pads.
  • 1 0
 @ppp9911:
Are you sure? I thought they just said "Galfer Patent" for the style of wave.
  • 2 1
 @JohSch: not as good as a freeza by any metric other than perhaps longevity.
  • 62 1
 90 f*cking quid PER ROTOR??? wheeeew lad!
  • 30 0
 Plus VAT
  • 109 2
 Plus beatings by the wife
  • 5 0
 I was interested until I read the price. £50-60 I could stomach but not £90.
  • 58 0
 90 schmackers + VAT for a solid rotor LOOOOOOOOOOL

When a steel is not a steal
  • 22 0
 Upvote for 'schmackers'
  • 43 0
 Are they manufactured in Finland?
  • 7 0
 Yes
  • 2 0
 @Braapp: really????? That’s cool!
  • 2 0
 @Braapp: If you want to win, get a Finn.
  • 40 0
 85-95€, that's fishy.
  • 5 1
 no...insane. Big Grin
  • 33 0
 My jaws dropped
  • 23 0
 Heat management and all that is all well and good but I just want them because they look cool.
  • 4 0
 Agreed that’s all that matters. Need them now.
  • 20 0
 The way roadies were getting their chamois in a twist when disks first hit their world, you'd think the shark teeth were on the outside diameter of the rotor
  • 3 0
 I used to laugh at them; these days I have a nice brand on my ankle that lines up with a 180mm Shimano disc...

I do have disc brakes on my road bike though Smile
  • 15 0
 I'm happily running the Galfer Wave rotors: decent weight, good performance and reasonable price.
When I have seen the title I was like "cool my next rotors" but after reading the article the main bold claim is for me the price which is more than double the wave model price incredible!
  • 2 0
 At least someone had a good experience with Galfer MTB products, I could only describe mine as nightmare fuel.
  • 1 0
 @Brave1i1toaster: I'd like to hear more. Just installed some wave rotors on my dh bike in anticipation of bike park season. I figured they were as good as anything else out there.
  • 3 0
 @Trudeez: they work totally fine, no worries.
  • 3 0
 @Trudeez:
1) Rotor adapters were mismachined, the face that met the hub was .025" out of spec.
2) Rotor adapters were just laughably designed, way too shallow teeth, and the pins that hold the rotor were too small.
3) I ordered MT7 pads and there was nearly .035" swing between the thickest pad and the thinnest. Zero QC.
4) After getting replacement rotor adapters, after installing everything the rotor still had a bad wobble. Upon further inspection they didn't deburr one of the 6 bolt holes.

Also; I've never had pads or rotors so susceptible to contamination. 1 drop of fluid or anything would contaminate the rotor and pads.
  • 1 0
 Picked up Galfer Rotors and pads last Spring as an alternate because they were available. They mounted right up and worked at least as well as the Shimano Factory rotors they replaced.
  • 2 0
 @Brave1i1toaster: my hope brakes came with 3 sets of various galfer pads and all were baaaad.. fully agree with you about contamination, i washed my bike with squirt bike wash and it seems like pads took it in like a sponge and no amount of brake cleaner or high temperature burning in can fix it.. also the pads rust in 2 seconds..
  • 15 0
 Stop right there, that’s to expensive...
  • 2 0
 Too indeed for many of us.
  • 13 2
 Oftentimes the biking industry justifies exorbitant prices with any variety of plausible excuses. Excessive cost for boutique materials and expensive manufacturing techniques are often the first that come up.

What could possibly justify 100+USD for a brake rotor? These are likely plain cold rolled medium carbon steel and the manufacturing technique is laser cutting. These factors are the same as the $10 rotors one can find on amazon or ebay. I've purchased several 203mm rotors new for less than $10. All have arrived flat and haven't warped over time. They are hard and don't rust readily. They outlast the Icetech rotors I replaced.

I love how people will pay 3-10 times more for a pattern that costs roughly the same to manufacture, and one that only claims a 5-10% benefit on a part that wears over time.
  • 2 1
 it comes down to volumes I think. MTB specific sales are low for say Galfer so between distribution, overhead, setting up booths at events, manufacturing, etc, they have to price them high to create say 20% EBIT margins. Those amazon knock-off brands do a lot of volume because they sell a lot of different things across different categories and don't have a brand name to ruin. No way I'm paying $100 for these rotors. I'd rather roll the dice on a handful of $10-20 rotors and see which one holds up and go buy 10 more of those.
  • 10 1
 looks ace but £$£$£!! I'm running the Hope 2.3mm rotors and having zero issues at half that price. No need for these especially being thinner too. Sorry Galfer. Loving your pads though!!
  • 10 0
 Didn’t see in the article what material they are made of but obviously “unobtanium” at that price !!
  • 36 0
 These rotors are made from a new hybrid alloy. Once only available to NASA, F1 Teams, and Elon Musk. It's called "cantaffordium".
  • 5 0
 Made from actual shark fins
  • 10 0
 Moto Master rotors for MX Bikes are cheaper...
  • 4 0
 ive never seen that flag till now and didnt know about your partcular country
  • 2 0
 @Kimura: Me too, and now it's squirreled away for Worldle too.
  • 4 1
 Wow those are more than 2 times the cost of a normal Galfer ebike rotor. I got a 2mm 203 for 36€ and the 223 for 38€.
Very happy with the Galfer rotor and green pads,they made my Code R brakes decent from being totally crap,no brake power at all with the sram stock rotor and metal pads.
It looks really good,but too expensive for a brake rotor.
  • 4 2
 Try MTX next change. They’re even better. Gold if you’re a heavier guy or just hard on your brakes, red for most people. After switching to 220mm rotors, and taller bars, they’re the first change I make to any bike.
  • 2 0
 After trick stuff power pads stock sram and shimano pads out perform every other aftermarket pad manufacturer in both organic and metallic compounds. Might have been enduro mag or one of the other German sites have tested it. Well worth checking out.
  • 2 0
 @Afterschoolsports: another person who gets it. MTX is the way to go! I was seriously impressed with them and after trying others such as the Galfer Pros. MTX was noticeably better
  • 3 1
 @thenotoriousmic: I bought trick stuff power pads after that test. They work well only in dry conditions. No power when wet, and if riding in mud, they'll wear out in 10 hours. I stick with oem metallic now.
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: Haha I know, you could easily burn through a set of pads in a day at a bike park and maybe a few runs in the wet. Unreal performance while they last though, couldn’t get them to fade, overheat etc they were just perfect other than how long they last obviously. Currently trying uber bike race matrix pads and they melt to the rotor when hot. Just going to stick with sram and shimano metallics from now on.
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: Definitely. I have tried them just on other peoples bikes. Need to try them properly but I’ll probably need some new rotors first if they’re ceramic. Gold or Red?
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: probably a light sand on the rotor and I’d imagine you’d be good. I swapped them straight onto my wife’s DH bike as well and no issues

I enjoy the Gold. According to the owner, they market them so distinctly different with the whole ‘ebike/heavier riders’ for gold and red for the rest because they got a million emails a day asking so they figured they’d try to make an easier line to differentiate with shopping. But anyways, he mentioned to me, gold is the way to go for power and handling heat. I’ve been using them and it’s actually pretty wild how much more incredible they are and noticeable compared to others such as green Galfer pros.
I’m a big fan. I’d recommend Gold
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: Metallic pads score the breaking surface, they’re quite abrasive so when you try to bed in organics it deposits too much material into the rotor and burns through your pads. I’ll need new rotors with ceramics I think?

Yeah gold would have been my bet too. I’ll get some ordered.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: makes sense. yeah might as well to be safe! The current Galfer waves have been sweet with the MTX

Right on! Hope you enjoy them
  • 3 0
 Lol the normal 20-30€ price bracket for a disc rotor is very probably coming with a nice Profit margin, and they are shooting at a hundred?? Yeah little Brand and low Volumes and maybe a lot of testing etc but this is nuts for a normal wear item.
  • 4 0
 Are they compatible with Hayes dominion? Hayes says theirs are 1.95 mm so I suspect they would be. Never tried off brand rotors with them though.
  • 5 2
 I think you meant Aftermarket. Galfers are top tier
  • 4 0
 @suspended-flesh: off brand means a different brand than the original brand to me. Nothing implied about quality. I believe you about the quality.
  • 2 0
 Would have been sweet if Hayes made a D-series 223mm rotor… Smile
  • 2 0
 I have 2.0mm Galfer rotors with my Hayes Dominions. They had a very slight rub when first installed with new pads (very slight) but once bedded properly, etc. they have been stellar.
  • 6 0
 Here is a round pancake of steel with some holes. That’ll be 100 oiros.
  • 3 1
 let me get this straight: this rotor is just as thick as my Magura storm hc, costs more than 3x the Magura rotor and regardless willl get trashed for just 1 season. Why on earth would I spend so much money on a consumable piece of steel with no remarkable performance increase instead of spending this money for much much more important or needed stuff?????
  • 3 0
 Why would it get trashed in 1 year? And 30-40% cooler rotors are a great upgrade for enduro/dh - speaking of experience! Wink
  • 2 0
 @hitarpotar: I've tried many rotor brands in various sizes. I ride so much that the always last max 1 season. thus, I need the best ratio between cheap and reliable.
  • 1 0
 @Uchwmdr: lucky you (in riding so much Smile ). What Maguras are you running now that you’re happy with them? Storms or the Mrdp (or whatever their abbreviation is)?
  • 3 0
 @hitarpotar: just storm hc. they are cheap and thick.
  • 1 0
 Because it's Shark Week @ Galfer HQ
  • 2 0
 Just another disc rotor with shark in the title to match the little shapes,
this will hoover up the suckers of there cash no doubt, might have taken more interest
if they'd added teeth, if only to make the disc maintanace threads more gory : )

Happily content with my Hope rotors, they do me.
  • 1 0
 Would these thicker rotors improve in any notable way, the free-throw lever travel in brakes? i.e. the distance the lever has to travel before significant braking occurs?

Presumably they're compatible with all braking systems?
  • 8 0
 if you directly replaced a 1.8mm rotor then yes, a bit as the pistons on the brake would be advanced for a 1.8mm rotor. If you reset the pistons on the brake then no, as they would retract by the same distance from the braking surface. If you are looking to reduce free stroke then a good bleed is a better place to start, then look at potentially overfilling the system or advancing the pistons by pumping the brake with the disk removed, the pads will then rest closer to the disk. beware of the pads rubbing however.
  • 2 0
 @melonhead1145: thanks! I struggle getting my Hope's to feel right, seems like it's a constant fight between rubbing pads and too much lever free-throw. I've never over-filled them though, perhaps i'll try that next time.
  • 3 0
 I got some Hope 2.3mm thick rotors (whoopin 220 size). I was told that it wouldn't alter free stroke as the pistons would simply adjust to fit. However, I think it has improved it. For me, it feels like less dead travel (perhaps the piston position displaces more fluid?). On a side note, go for 220 if you can, it's mental
  • 3 0
 I have some Galfer discs with my code R brakes: massive improvement in lever feel, way less free-throw! But, almost impossible not to have significant brake rub when you put new pads in...
  • 4 0
 @Mayzei: Hi, genuine question, how do you overfill them? I've been through the bleed process recently and the recommended fil level is right to the top of the reservoir. When you put the rubber seal and the top cap back on this then forces excess fluid out over the top of the reservoir. I don't see how you could fill the brake any more than that.

On a side note, i did a couple of things that got the brakes feeling spot on with very little free throw:
Bought a caliper alignment block and aligned them properly. on hope brakes it's very difficult to do this properly by eye;
Also i couldn't quite get the last bit of air out of them no matter how much i bled the system, but i read somewhere that putting the bike vertical on its back wheel or in a workstand and cable tying the lever toward the bar as if you were squeezing the brake lever really hard, then leaving for a few hours at least, this forrces any trapped air to migrate up to the reservoir, then you whip the top cap off, wipe away any air bubbles, refill to the top and the brake feels perfect.

It worked for me, maybe give it a try?
  • 3 0
 @Mayzei: One other thing - if the pads are always rubbing the pistons might need cleaning and lubricating, or they won't retract properly. Hope have a support video for that on their website.

And if you do the cable tie thing, make sure to do it with the wheel on the bike! Sounds obvious, but it's the kind of thing i screw up on. That, and stripping threads.
  • 3 0
 If you bleed the brakes leaving the pads in and pumping them until they contact each other (meaning the pistons are further out than usual) this increases the overall volume of the system, so when filled with fluid the pistons wont be able to retreat as far as usual, resulting in less free stroke at the lever.

Obviously got to be careful not get oil on the pads, but it will make a difference to lever feel, particularly if your pads are significantly worn

Often times I will do a quick lever bleed with the wheel in as this serves the same purpose, ‘overfilling’ the system resulting in consistent lever feel even with old pads.@IamDave:
  • 1 0
 @Gabe001: Thanks, that makes sense. For hope brakes this is the recommended bleed process anyway, so turns out i've been overfilling without knowing it.

I never thought to do this with the wheel in and old pads - i'll give that a try.
  • 2 1
 @Smokey79: exactly! I run 220 rotors on all my MTB’s these days. Even my GF who weighs literally half my weight, loves using them on her spectral. Honestly they’re one of the best things I’ve changed on my bikes ever. I’m really keen to try 246mm galfer rotors but can’t stomach the price. I plan on cutting my own (or even larger, for laughs) when we have some spare time on the laser cutter, and spare material to cut from.
  • 1 0
 @Mayzei: Do not need to overfill for Hopes. The main key to getting those to feel and ride right is caliper and piston alignment. 1. Push pistons out a little bit so you can see the body 2. Clean piston body with alcohol and Q-tip 3. Lube piston body with brake fluid 4. Push pistons back in 4. Align caliper to *straight* disk using the caliper build lines 5. Advance pistons with pads 5. MOST IMPORTANTLY while advancing pistons make sure they come out evenly. When they don't use a long thin flat blade screwdriver to push back any piston (at the pad) that does comes out faster. The point is to get them to make contact with the disk evenly. **If you do this, which is a PIA, the brakes will feel significantly better.
  • 1 0
 @Abacall: Thanks, I do do all this, and yet it's still never quite right and requires ongoing tinkering! After doing all this, they're super super sensitive to a not-perfectly-straight rotor (serves me right for buying cheap Shimano rotors), I can barely see a wobble in mine but it still rubs. Frown I like everything else about them, but they do drive me crazy with how sensitive to setup they are.
  • 1 0
 @Mayzei: I've been running hopes for a while and really love them. I've found that if you can get the rotor reasonably centered with a little bit of the rotors hitting the pads it just bends in after a couple rides. V4 calipers are trickier to get dialed than the e4.
  • 1 0
 @IamDave: fill them to the top with the pistons slightly advanced
  • 1 0
 @Abacall: I was gonna say, I wouldn’t clean pistons with alcohol as it’s harsh on seals but I suppose if you lube it with brake fluid after.. I just use brake fluid to clean and it works fine
  • 1 0
 good advice
  • 1 0
 @Gabe001: I have 4-piston XT brakes and need rotors. The RT-86 203mm are only 1.8mm thick at best, and impossible to find. Any suggestions on a good rotor for Shimano XT brakes (6 bolt) that is reasonably priced? Thanks.
  • 1 0
 @SvenNorske: rt76 - same as the 86, but without the alu-middle of the braking surface (all steel). Problem-free model, cheaper, beatiful.
  • 1 0
 @hitarpotar: too thin though?
  • 1 0
 @SvenNorske: oem sram 220mm rotors. Ask your lbs or keep an eye out at online retailers. I bought a few last year and don’t recall how much they cost, but it was very very reasonable.
  • 6 5
 Claims are dubious at best. Out of most hydraulic, closed loop braking systems, rotors are the least likely to have any effect on outright braking power, if you're only replacing a rotor of the same size. Especially since on an MTB, your previous rotors will have laser cut patterns and holes on the braking surface anyway. If Galfer really wanted to make a rotor with actual, tangible increased braking power, the braking surface should have been solid with no holes. More surface are = more friction = more braking power. But then there's the heat management issue of solid rotors. I like Galfer, but they don't need to spin this rotor like it's going to be a replacement for a good set of levers and calipers and/or brake pads.
  • 1 0
 Solid rotor would need something to seriously cool it. Something like Shimano’s fins, but even better… significantly better. Or go Hope’s way in making them vented. But then the weight issue arrises…
  • 2 2
 But these will wear your pads by 30% less than their other rotors, because ummm, they have 30% less contact area due to those big cutouts. Galfer parts are great but these scream of woo.
  • 4 3
 Offroad application is the #1 reason for holes on the braking surface, to clear dirt.
  • 4 6
 @SickEdit: yep, you don't see race cars with drilled rotors for "heat management". More mass equals more heat capacity and less need for cooling, not more.
  • 9 2
 I think we are misunderstanding idea of increased surface area, and whats on offer here with these rotors.
The drilled holes in the rotor increases the cooling surface area of the rotors, like the finned head on an air cooled engine. A solid rotor would increase the pad contact area, which leads to heat build up quickly, and glazing pads/rotors.

Increase mass as @jeremy3220 noted does help to slow heat build up, but once heated you have a heavy thermal mass that also cools slowly, which is not advantageous in moderate long DH sections. I cant tell if @jeremy3220 is being sarcastic or not, but modern race car discs are incredibly complex, being made of carbon and ceramic composites that are vented and cooled.

The holes also help to clear debris, and gas buildup from the wearing pads, which actually helps the pads bite harder, I’d expect a very positive initial bite with these rotors, time after time after time, as they should effectively reduce any build up on the rotors.

I’m not sure the article explained the benefits well, whether their claims of actual numbers of increases is legit is another thing as it’s difficult to substantiate in the real world.
  • 1 2
 @onawalk: Another big reason for holes in car application is for wet performance. The holes help expel water faster so the first bite is stronger and more consistent in the wet.
  • 3 0
 @onawalk: modern race cars have vented rotors and sometimes slotted rotors but none that I know of use cross drilled rotors.
  • 2 1
 @jeremy3220: a very quick Google search tells another story
  • 2 1
 I mean sports cars come with drilled rotors because customers think it's better but name any race car with drilled rotors.
  • 3 0
 @jeremy3220: again, modern “race cars” have moved to much more exotic materials for use in their brake discs. They aren’t using steel discs anymore, and they’re using the the discs they do have in ways bicycles don’t (heat sink, and thermal mass to keep wheels and tires in optimal range)
Car wheels, and bicycle wheels share little differences, other the basic names of the components in these cases.
A dirt bike would be a more apt example, taking a look at hard enduro bikes, they still use the cross drilled rotors to aid in all the benefits previously mentioned. No one uses a solid rotor, as it has too many drawbacks, heat build up being one, glazing, warping, etc being the unfortunate outcome.
  • 3 0
 @onawalk: I can 100% assure that most rotors for car racing applications are cast iron with molybdenum/ high copper additions. Yes carbon ceramic does appear on Formula 1 / Formula E but the majority of track cars and rally still use iron. We actually manufacture a lot of these discs for the premium race market and there’s little talk of it going away
  • 1 0
 @sewer-rat: And how many are cross drilled for racing applications?
  • 1 0
 @sewer-rat: thats fair,
I guess I was thinking of race cars at that level.
My limited experience with some endurance racers, had also made the shift to more exotic materials, as well as at the GT level. Different horses for different courses as they say.

For the discs you manufacture, are they vented, and drilled?

My father used to wrench on some get class Porches back in the day, and they all used vented, and drilled rotors, but that’s going back 40 years or more
  • 1 1
 @jeremy3220: here’s a cool info graphic that kinda illustrates the use of cross drilled rotors on steel discs, prior to more exotic options. Nearly every performance motorcycle out there uses a drilled/cut away style rotor due to the performance benefits.

The added material is there as a heat sink/strength/stability once you make those holes.

Why do you think motorcycles at the mid to high performance level would use a drilled/cutaway rotor?

www.brembo.com/en/bike/motogp-and-sbk/motogp-infographics
  • 3 0
 @jeremy3220: not many actually, you’re correct, most have grooves or scallops in the face. Cross drilled holes lead to craze cracking when the disc is subjected to super heats and goes through a structural phase transformation- circa 720C
  • 2 0
 @onawalk: our discs for NASCAR and all performance are ventilated, most have face grooves. Look at AP Racing / Brembo / TMD Performance and Alcon, they’re mostly grooves and use our rotors. Unfortunately drilled tend to crack, especially towards the outer edge when they get super heat applied to them.
I also run our ECER90 test program, which is quite demanding on discs. Plain rotors ALWAYS pass, most the time cross drilled crack (same rotor just drilled) and that’s deemed a failure. SBS patented dimples in the outer diameter of their discs for this exact reason, you still get the look but they don’t crack as much
  • 1 0
 @onawalk:

Here’s a typical race rotor we produce

m.pinkbike.com/photo/8996905
  • 2 1
 The highest performance BMWs also have cross drilled wheels. I've seen them brand new. They are definitely high performance cars but they are not setup for racing on the racetrack permanently. They come with street tires as well which are not ideal on the racetrack.

I've debated with coworkers why they are cross drilled when race cars are not and our conclusion seems to be looks. Brakes look way cooler cross drilled.

This was an interesting article a few years back where they analyze why the high performance brakes on a nissan failed in a really bad crash. After a fair bit of testing, their main conclusion is that insufficient air flow to the brakes is a major contributor to the failure.

Note that it had nothing to do with cross drilled cooling or flat rotors in this case. In this case, you have to consider the whole system, not just the rotor shape.

www.caranddriver.com/features/a15129918/z-meets-wall-we-investigate-why-the-nismo-zs-brakes-failed-at-lightning-lap
  • 1 0
 @mdinger: I find it perplexing that they never compared the microstructure of the failed disc against a known good sample in that report, it's the go to number 1 when ruling failures out of the system. Higher carbon content 3.7-3.8% helps in these thermal fatigue applications as does higher alloying elements such as molybdenum, copper and chrome. You are correct in considering the whole system, especially the pad which can sometimes glaze if not bedded correctly but the disc material and ventilation design are key factors in preventing these kind of failures.
  • 3 0
 @onawalk: "The drilled holes in the rotor increases the cooling surface area of the rotors"

The holes have to be pretty small when you're talking about rotors that are about 2mm thick. The radius of the hole can't be bigger than the rotor thickness to break even on surface area. You're talking about relatively small gains in surface area.

Also, you misunderstand what the effect heat capacity has. A higher heat capacity doesn't need more cooling because it won't be as hot in the first place. Ultimately it's about finding the right balance between cooling and capacity. On a mountain bike rotor the holes are primarily for clearing debris and saving weight, the gains in cooling are minimal at best.
  • 1 0
 @sewer-rat: I don't think they are experts at diagnosing brake problems. They just had a spectacular failure and we're testing elements based on what the Nissan stated was the problem.

The first mention of "Nissan's official opinion" was "the brake pads are not designed for racing" so they started by testing brake pads. Further things were later tested with the motive if being thorough.
  • 1 0
 @mdinger: we’ll that’s worrying if the OEM didn’t recognise it. Our customers on occasion have discs fail, that’s the thing with cast iron , there can be sub surface imperfections not identified during machining that can cause issues in high demanding applications. Micro / macro porosity, gas defects and poor graphite nucleation / structure can all lead to brake failures. Essentially these rotors are made from recycled rotors, steel, carbon and alloying additions, poured into a mould at high temperatures whilst trying to ensure laminar flow rates to give a homogeneous structure on materials that are not virgin material, believe me when I say it’s difficult. We x-ray a % each batch we make but not 100% as time and cost constraints won’t allow. It’s a known / acceptance in our industry with machinists that less than 5% scrap at the machinist shows a stable casting process (we aren’t even at 2.5%), however you can never be 100% sure that every casting in every batch is free from defects hence the case of a micro structural check
  • 1 0
 @sewer-rat: that's pretty interesting. I appreciate the insight you provide.

The OEM probably thought that the car is not being used as intended so it is not out problem. It is designed to look like a race car but not designed to race like one. Not worth the effort to resolve.
  • 1 0
 @jeremy3220: on your first point,
Now maybe I’m incorrect, but I’m cool with that, as I’m learning. If we are discussing increased surface area by drilling holes.
If said hole drilled is 2mm, (I’m just picking random numbers here, as I don’t know the actual hole size)
A= 3.14 x r squared
3.14 x 1 squared
3.14 x 1
=3.14 x 2 (rotor has two sides)
=6.24

Now the new surface area after hole drilled is essentially a rectangle that is the circumference of the circle x the 2mm rotor thickness
Circumference is 6.28 (2 x 3.14 x r)
Area of rectangle = l x w
6.28 (l) x 2 (w- rotor thickness)
12.56.

Now subtract the original 6.24 (original surface area of both sides of the hole you drilled, and your left with 6.32.
By drilling the 2mm hole, have you effectively doubled the cooling surface area (not contact area), while clearing, water, dirt, etc?

I’m just taking a stab at this, I’m not standing on a milk crate professing I right. I’m sure I’ve missed something, so I’m open to learning, so go easy if I’ve fooked it up.
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: "By drilling the 2mm hole, have you effectively doubled the cooling surface area (not contact area), while clearing, water, dirt, etc?"

Your calculation looks correct but what is that increased area as a percentage of the total rotor surface area? You also have to include the lost heat capacity. I don't know what size holes they drilled. Some are obviously much bigger than 2mm.

You need something to clear debris and I'm not sure how feasible slotting mtb rotors would be.
  • 1 0
 @jeremy3220: looks to be 336 small holes, I had originally guessed at 2mm dia.
If that’s the case they have increased cooling surface area from 4200ish mm from 2100ism mm.
I’m not sure on the total surface area, but if that’s the case, they have effectively doubled the area by drilling the holes.
True there are several larger holes, not sure on the size, but I’m making the assumption they’re accounted for.

So if we are debating the effectiveness of “adding” drilling holes, then I think they have made a good choice.

The capacity of the rotor to absorb heat has, as you mentioned been diminished by drilling the holes, but the bump in thickness might account for that.

Realistically, for heavier, fast riders, these might make a significant difference in heat management as a whole, and potentially much more durable.

I might buy one, just to check it out now.

Really appreciate your polite, educated responses.
  • 2 0
 I always struggle to not just buy the cheapest rotors I can find. Currently running a 203 Reverse Components, and I could buy 4 of them for the price of these. Do high end rotors really make a noticeable difference?
  • 1 0
 Reverse Components rebrands rotors from IIIPro in Taiwan, i was told that they stopped producing those ICE like rotors. Mine died After developing play in the rivets. But i love the look.
  • 3 0
 If they outlast Ice-Tec's I'd be interested. Might save a bit on changing rotors so often.
  • 3 0
 I used to replace worn out Ice Tecs once a year. Unbelievable shitty durability for a not very special performance. Not to mention the price tags. Now I am happily using Magura's centerlock with zero issues, same preformance, looooonger lasting, half the price. Cannot fathom, why would anyone ever want to pay 100 bucks for a rotor? Because of shark fins? I'd rather watch the Jaws.
  • 1 1
 Touchwood, we’ve only had good luck with ice tech’s in our household, 18 months and about 2,000km with no issues. They’ve been relegated to the spare wheelset since a rim and rotor upgrade.
  • 3 0
 Use Formula Monolitic
  • 1 0
 I seem to remember the prototype getting a lot of positive interest, but it seems like Galfer took that to heart a little too much with the luxury pricing. I'd like to try them but not for that kind of money
  • 1 0
 Galfer fabrica muy buenos productos, las pastillas son una maravilla y creo que es razonable pagar un ligero sobrecoste por la ingenieria, pero lo de este producto me parece obsceno
  • 2 0
 Need to do a Pinkbike field test just for brakes. Some power measurements, stopping times and distances across the various options on the market now.
  • 3 0
 I will wait for titanium version to put on my steel hardtail.
  • 2 0
 The only innovation I want in rotors is shipping them flat so they don't randomly rub as soon as I install them.
  • 2 0
 The fins also make it a lot easier to stand up the rotors against each other like that. Nice!
  • 3 0
 I'll only buy these if they're at a 70% discount during Shark Week
  • 2 0
 I think I'd have a mental brake-down before I spent that much on a rotor for an MTB. I've spent that much on car rotors.
  • 1 0
 if they would be 2.3mm thick and 24xmm large maybe interesting but there are very good 2mm thick rotors on the market that only cost half.
  • 1 0
 Hideous price...but they looks like laser-cut so half of the price is for laser machine. Still, TRP,Magura,Hope 2,3mm are for half or less.
  • 2 0
 Just here to jump the shark (rotor)
  • 2 0
 Ther current rotors are very good and cost €35, I'll pass.
  • 1 0
 They are, right? How is it possible to charge so much more than the Wave model !?
  • 1 0
 @Brodybro29: Because some a-hole at marketing thought people would buy the product for that price considering his top notch bro science pseudo-technical marketing shenanigans.
  • 2 0
 These are an inside-out version of a Planet X rotor from about 2002...
  • 2 0
 Pair of rotors for a price of pair of brakes, crazy
  • 1 0
 oh and btw I never ever ever had fading or overheating issues with the storms. 95 kg aggressive rider.
  • 1 0
 Does "shark" refer to what they're doing to customers, sharking them out of £200 for a pair of rotors?!
  • 2 0
 I just want a rotor that guaranteed to never squeal.
  • 1 0
 Because all you want when bike parts are scarce is a new rotor that requires proprietary brake pads.
  • 2 0
 hope rotors with annodized centers are cheaper
  • 2 0
 I can get set of rotors for mycar at that price.
  • 1 0
 Funny enough, I've ordered two new Magura MDR-P rotors and they were both 1.8mm thick brand new.
  • 2 0
 At those prices, they require real-world test data, not "claims".
  • 3 6
 Increase mass then reduce it by putting loads of holes in it, this does not work and is just marketing (from someone that makes and tests brake rotors for vehicles). Either way they look good and I'll probably buy some Facepalm
  • 3 4
 Just FYI: These sweet ass rotors are made from a new hybrid alloy. Once only available to NASA, F1 Teams, and Elon Musk. It's called "cantaffordium".
  • 1 0
 We have a very high inflation here in Spain...hence the price ...lol
  • 2 1
 Garbage pads and Horrible customer service and warranty. Steer clear
  • 13 15
 Pinkbike, using CTC, cheaper than china, calipers to measure. Fawk, like those things are accurate. Maybe measure Levy's penis while your at it.
  • 2 3
 LOL. the battery cover is open too!

a set of verniers should probably cost £40-50 to be trustworthy. these look to be the £8 variety.
  • 4 1
 @conoat: I bought a 50€ set from the hardware store and it's a piece of crap, I doubt that the cheapest ones from Aliexpress are worse. It also looks exactly the same.
  • 2 0
 That's most likely a Park Tool Big Grin
  • 6 0
 How much do you think they’re out by? +-0.01mm? So long as an excessive amount of pressure isn’t being applied (and bending them as a result), even the cheapest digital callipers will do the job for the purpose of this article.
  • 4 0
 @Afterschoolsports: Indeed. "even the cheapest digital callipers will do the job for the purpose of"...just about anything bike related, not just this article. We all know the seatpost won't actually measure 31.6 with these but but 31.55 is good enough. Only place it would matter is SRAM spindle but they do us the favour of plastering id all over the parts.
  • 3 0
 I have cheap chinese calipers in my machine shop and they are fine for most uses. I also have Expensive starrets and their is next to no difference except for the battery life. The good thing about cheap calipers is you don't have to worry about dropping them and other abuse like using them as marking gauges. If I really need accuracy and repeatability I have some mitutoyo micrometers. Haven't used them in years and that was for measuring mylar sheets for electrostatic speakers.
  • 3 0
 @iammarkstewart: maybe measuring suspension parts or other hydraulic stuff needs higher accuracy, but micrometers would be the right tool for that job anyway.

We use a lot of mitutoyo at work because they don’t bend or get mangled as much as cheap callipers, but that’s the main reason. The other reason is the quality of the battery compartments and screw holes is shit and often gets damaged replacing batteries. Our in house metrologist is a big fan of the cheap callipers and micrometers you get from big box stores and eBay/AliExpress.
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