Now THAT Was a Bike: Giant ATX One DH

Mar 6, 2022 at 18:37
by Henry Quinney  


Paul Angus - or Pang as he's known - is one of the owners of Vertigo Bikes in Queenstown, and has had many special bikes over the years. He's one of those people that hop from bike to bike, each new build more tasteful and suitable than the last. We've all got that friend who habitually buys the wrong bike, but Pang is the antidote to that. His bikes are always dialed and built with the right balance of curiosity and pragmatism. The bike we look at today is a bike very close to his heart - his 1999/2000 Giant ATX One DH. The bike is largely period correct, although sourcing parts is hard enough for current bikes, let alone bike that are two decades old so it's still a work in progress. It's a passion project for Pang about enjoying something that gave him so much, and not about getting so caught up in the details that you can't enjoy the bigger picture.

He originally had one that he raced at the beginning of his race career, a career that would eventually take him to the World Cup circuit. After falling in love with the ATX, he had Vanessa Quinn's old frame hung up in the Vertigo shop for several years before deciding to build his own, sourcing all the parts to be close to the original era's spec.

An icon.

I love the contrast of colours. It's loud, yet unobtrusive.


The linkage looks slender and fragile. Compared to the bikes of today it looks like it could snap like a chicken's wishbone, but it did deliver 150mm of rear travel. Pang says that he used to run a Goldtech rocker link on his original ATX to take the travel to a remarkable 200mm. He coyly explains, "Preserving geometry wasn't a thing back then, getting more travel was all that mattered. The links would lift the BB, steepen the head angle, and usually blow your shock up after a week due to increased leverage ratio."

The RockShox lineage lives on, still at the sharp end of racing to this day.

The Hope C2 brakes were a closed system. This meant that the temperature had a large effect on lever feel and position.

Although Hope is still a company making fantastic kit, it could be argued that the peak of their dominance was in the time of bikes like the ATX. Pang remembers having a set of C2s on his original race bike. He recalls "The Hope C2 brakes were fun on long descents. At Fort William you had to wind the silver bite point adjuster on the top of the reservoir fully out, so the brakes basically didn't work and pulled straight to the bar at the start of your run, just so the wheels didn't lock up half way down once they brakes heated up."

The bike uses a 180mm rotor on the front paired to a 160mm rotor on the back.

1999... when external routing made sense. Don't @ me.

Drivetrains have come a long way.

In the days before narrow-wide chainrings and quiet guides, things were a little different. Of the proprietary chain guide that came on the ATX Pang informs us that "It failed to do two things I like chain guides to do: Firstly, keeping the chain on and secondly make the bike quiet. The chainguide, plus the box section frame, made it sound like a spanner had been left inside the frame during manufacturing. You could fit an MRP or Mr. Dirt Gizmo with a bit of hacksawing to the frame and chainguide."

A 44t chainring, combined with adjusted geometry, must have been exciting at times.

The chain line of the bike was built around a 135mm rear hub.

"Boost who? I'm sorry, I don't know her." A classic 20mm axle spacing on the front of the ATX.

And a 135 QR rear hub.

Tire tech has come a long way, but not necessarily in terms of tread patterns. Yes, these look slightly dated, but not so much as some other parts of the bike.

660mm wide bars and a 70mm stem. In a 25.4mm clamp, naturally.

Pang used to cut the 660mm stock width down to a slender 640mm. The stem options were in either 35, 50, or 70mm. Pang would run 50mm on slower tech tracks and 70mm on faster more open ones.

Talking to Pang about this bike, and the process of building it up, I asked him just how much the ATX meant to him, and what kind of influence it had on him as a rider, as well as a racer. Did he think that his life would have worked out all that differently if he hadn't bought his first downhill race bike, his very first ATX?

bigquotesFor me, yes, I believe so and I believe it was this bike, the Giant ATX One DH that did just that.

It was the bike I saw in the magazines, at races, in videos. It was the first bike I truly coveted and scrimped and saved to buy. It was the bike I did my first downhill race on. It was the bike that took me to my first podium as a junior. It was the bike that took me to my first win as a senior. It reliably navigated me through my progression as a racer and eventually allowed me to be promoted to the pro-elite ranks in the UK.

Over the four years of owning the ATX it made me realise there was nothing else I wanted to do with my life but ride and race bikes and it carved out the start of a ten-year race career which took me all over the world eventually leading me to New Zealand where I now call home. I have never stopped riding and racing and I have made this industry my career, now owning a bike shop and running grassroots DH races in Queenstown, NZ. Would I have got here without owning the Giant ATX One? Who knows, I like to think not and because of that it will always be a very special bike for me. What a bike.
Paul Angus




You can see another of bike of the Vertigo Bike museum that we covered last year - the Lahar M8 gearbox bike - as well as countless others either in the store or at Veritgobikes.co.nz


135 Comments

  • 62 2
 So now that we’re getting a throwback article, is Giant (finally) ready to release the Glory 29?!

And maybe (just maybe) a new Reign 29 that’s a legit enduro bike?????
  • 14 0
 "new Reign 29"

With mullet option, in-frame storage, redesigned lower down-tube eyelets for shock mounting,...
  • 11 1
 @ka81: and more than 146mm travel out back...
  • 7 2
 @ka81: Personally don’t care about/want a mullet option, would like better frame storage, a little slacker front end, and (most importantly) bump the rear wheel travel to around 160mm and more progressive. Current leverage rate is so low only an aircan all ate up with spacers works.

And make the main lower pivot (front of lower link) bearings bigger-those wear out at 2-3 times the rate of the other frame bearings.
  • 3 0
 @wyorider: yes, of course - rear travel - the most needed. And yes, those bearings situation is just ...
As for mullet - me, personally, would like to have that option from manufacturer.. )
I own Reign Advanced 1 2016 and as soon as finances will let me - will definitely buy 29 fork just to get "mullet". )
  • 3 1
 @ka81: Those eyelets suck. It makes it very hard to fit different shocks or run a coil with a lockout with the piggyback near the bottom bracket.
  • 1 0
 @healthy-not-sick-biker: but first of all - those eyelets may easily crack (
  • 2 1
 @healthy-not-sick-biker: current Reign fits an X2, which is as beefy as an air shock gets.

I’ve seen (or broken) a few recent (last 10 years) Giant frames. Top tube will develop a lengthwise crack from stresses on the front of the bike. Chainstay brace can fail on the rear subframe. Haven’t seen or heard of an eyelet failure.
  • 3 0
 @wyorider: Cascade Components link, perhaps? I'm loving mine on my Reign Smile
  • 1 1
 @TurboDonuts: they make UPPER link ..
  • 3 0
 @TurboDonuts: They don't make one for the 29 version, or I'd already have it. Not sure why Giant has no (and I mean ZERO) ramp up for the shock. Means coil is a no-go and their stock tune means clanging off the bottom out bumper all day.

Hopefully a new model is coming, and they're reading this.
  • 1 0
 @wyorider: coil no ?
But, what about SX ?..
  • 2 0
 I’ve put Öhlins TTX22m on mine with increased shock travel but obviously same eye to eye. Bumps the travel to 158mm. Plenty specially with the amount of damping this shock offers. Much better than dhx2 that came on the bike.
  • 2 0
 @wyorider: Same here, or even better bring back the faith as a 170mm front and back 29er.
Girlfriend and I are still riding our 2016 Reigns and are looking to buy something new after this year. Been really happy with our Reigns and if they don't making any changes to the new ones we will be getting Transition Spires.
  • 2 0
 @Kamperk87: I'd bet on Giant bringing back the Faith since there seems to be a resurgence of freeride (ish) bikes.
  • 1 0
 @ka81: Don't mullet it, please, it's really not designed for it. I've mulleted a few bikes, and the Reign will just feel like a total bag of shite mulleted. You'd want a 150mm fork on there, and it would STILL be making the head and seat angles slacker/too slack, and the BB higher. Let alone with a 160/170mm fork - it'll just feel floppy and terrible
  • 2 0
 @2d-cutout:
1. As I said - "as an option from manufacturer", so the customer will have an opportunity to decide what ti buy (to do) .
2. I've "mulleted" my Reign Advanced 27.5 1 2016 (installed 29' fork with 170 mm of travel). And I definitely got what I desired, I liked it. Fork wasn't mine, some after half of a month I gave it away but - mulleting is for me, for sure. Well, maybe 170 a little bit much but 160 would be perfect.
  • 1 0
 My reign SX is an absolute dream. Perfect enduro bike
  • 32 2
 I kinda liked sports back when a person had to struggle with non-optimal gear & machines, it wasn't always just a battle between athletes but also a battle with your equipment......overheating brakes, tires that had to be over-inflated to keep from getting flats, weak wheels, engines that had to be babied a bit, etc....

Seems like now, full speed, full throttle & bikes / cars are SO dang good it's hard to break them.....not complaining, but riding with a sense of mechanical sympathy was always a kind of an interesting part of racing we don't see much anymore.
  • 12 1
 I sort of get this, and I think a lot of mountain bikers do, that's why SS and rigid bikes are still so semi-popular. They're completely obsolete good fun... I've got a big trail bike, but I also ride a rigid SS fatbike on the same trails sometimes. It's a slower, more painful, more frustrating, different way to have fun.

Modern bikes are so good, a phrase every generation utters, that I do get the sense we're well into diminishing returns for most technology from a performance perspective. You can hold on and grit your teeth through anything now, and you and your bike will survive. The bigger horizon is the continued push of the tech and quality to lower price points, though I think the way the modern performance bike market is structured that isn't happening - it's at least perceived as easier and more profitable to push yourself up the price curve/down the supply curve vs. go the other way and make more bikes better. A $2000 bike today is still better than a $2000 bike of a decade ago, but represents a different position in the bike market, relatively.
  • 6 0
 Isnt this the average hard non dentist rider just trying to get through a weekend session during inflation and shipping delays?
  • 4 0
 Is that maybe where Enduro still holds up - trying to keep the wheels and parts going through multiple stages?
  • 7 1
 Bikes just get ridden harder-on the limit, stuff still fails.

Only in (rose tinted) retrospective could flimsy tires, lousy suspension, poor frame design, unreliable drivetrains and the predominance of pretty but lousy machined parts that defined mountain biking for so long be looked at as anything but bad.

But hey, I’m sure you can go on eBay and buy a bunch of used, old high-end parts and be gripped every time you hit a drop or roll into a rock garden. Relive those glory days-and make sure there’s video for Friday Fails!!!
  • 1 0
 I like not crashing because some minute error threw me to the ground. An Error that any modern geometry bike would have shrugged off like it wasn’t there.

Things like 26” wheels getting caught on a root where you didn’t have perfect body positioning to the more slack geometry helping you with that slightly heavier landing.
  • 1 0
 @wyorider: it was bad, but it was also something we all talked about over beers and was part of the 'fun' (at the time). Vintage racing is HUGE in motorsports so a fair number of folks kinda agree with me, doubt MTB's will ever be there though.

Would I go back, no...but I'll say, it's a bit less interesting when any of us can bike at the shop with 0 mods that is EWS worthy out the door.
  • 1 0
 @dirtbiker100: 1005%, adds another aspect to the racing....same with the ISDE, where the 'enduro' MTB format came from, it's a big reliability ask. But guys were racing ISDE's back in the 60's with air cooled bikes, 7" of suspension and drum brakes, it was surprising any of them made it...period!
  • 3 0
 I remember when F1 drivers were their own mechanics and walked from the hotel to the paddocks. Or when an average guy could afford to go see his local team play once a week. I think there was something more relatable and dare I say social about those days of sports.
  • 2 0
 @HardtailHerold: I think you nailed it, "relatable"
  • 2 0
 @Glenngineer: I took my hardtail back out to the trails yesterday because the dropper cable snapped on my FS. It was a huge reminder just how good modern FS bikes are. I rode that hardtail for years and it always felt amazing. But going back out on it after I've been sticking to the FS, I felt every bump, the geo felt off, handlebars too short, had to constantly stand up haha. It's a great reminder to go out on a "non optimal" bike every so often just so you appreciate how good modern bikes are.
  • 2 0
 @DylanH93: Yeah I definitely agree with you on this. When I bought my Reign in 2016 I was planning on keeping my old dh bike with the thoughts it would eventually be like similar to having an old muscle car in the garage. After a few years of forcing myself to ride it for shuttle only days I sold it. Have not regretted that decision at all.
  • 15 0
 No mention that it was the bike that the last US DH champ Myles Rockwell gunned to victory in Spain in 2000?
  • 8 0
 I think Rob Warner used to race this bike too.
  • 1 0
 Yes ! The Giant ATX DH was a World Champion in the hands of Myles Rockwell at Sierra Nevada, Spain
  • 1 0
 @anonimous666: does anybody know what happened to myles rockwell?
  • 13 0
 I hate being that guy, I truly am sorry. Fantastic article!

...But originally 20mm axles were naturally 110mm spacing. Correct me if Im wrong?
  • 4 0
 Haha great shout! Yes, you are indeed correct. I'll amend that now.
  • 10 0
 If you’re taking about a Giant ATX I feel like you need to mention Ben Reid on a modified linkage at rampage 2004 (and kept riding it for a few years after I think)…

images.app.goo.gl/RjFRLWNtXmtGT4738
  • 10 0
 External routing still makes sense. Well, maybe for only those of that that prefer function to form.
  • 3 2
 Externally routed dropper posts are the best.
  • 5 0
 I think the Tioga bars had 28.6 mm and not 25.4mm. I still have an old ATX dh bike myself in the basement with FOX Vanilla damper, Tioga stem and bar and tyres, Boxxer 151 etc. I guess almost 20 kg. I never had the heart to sell it.
  • 1 0
 You are right. I came here to say just that. They were actually named 286 bars because of that diameter and the Cube stem was only available in that size.

@henryquinney
  • 1 0
 @Maxipedia: that explains the old Cube I had that would never fit any of my bars! I always wondered why.
  • 4 0
 One of my riding buddies up in Banff had one of these in '99, it was so high tech back then, and burly as hell, the guy even appeared on a Bike magazine cover, I don't think on that particular bike but I will never forget that big DH rig!
  • 1 0
 That's exactly who came to mind when I saw this as well! Those were good days.
  • 7 0
 New Glory releasing tomorrow ? Wink
  • 3 0
 Hope Rotors would be 185mm Front and 165 on the Rear, Hope never made C2 or O2 rotors in 180/160mm sizes back then - you had 155 / 165/ 185 / 205 on the later 4 pots and it was the Minis before you got the 00 ending rotors....

I have a 5 bolt 195mm Hope proto rotor that never made production.....
  • 3 0
 2022... when external routing still makes sense!

And the marketeers should never have downgraded us from 20x110mm axles...

But yeah, what an iconic bike. One of the classic DH racers that most of us who are old enough lusted after but probably couldn't afford - I had to settle for a '99 Giant Box 1 instead which was unbelievably s***! (URTs, got to love 'em - not!) Had a bounce on an ATX though and just felt so plush for it's time.
  • 3 0
 Never parting with my 2000 atx team. My dream bike too and the first dh bike I ever laid eyes on when I was 10.i finally bought the bike after it went through a few others when I was 16. I'm 31 now and the bike has got a restoration and still seeing the occasional ride.
  • 2 0
 "The links would lift the BB"

Did they come with a frigging step stool to help you mount up, like one might have for a big horse?

(I know the BB _looks_ extra high because of 26 inch wheels, but it's still pretty damn high)
  • 2 0
 December 20, 1999 I picked up the only Giant ATX One DH sold in Italy (Because the DH model was not imported to Italy and so they gave me the bike they used at the shows) in Vicenza Smile I was so excited that I felt like I was floating off the ground Smile
  • 4 0
 It is funny how big the bike looks despite the 26" wheels. We used to ride on tiny frames.
  • 2 0
 I always wanted 3 DH bikes of the "vintage" era that i could keep and ride as long as still can... Already have 2 of them, the GT DHI and a 1st gen Sintesi Bazooka. The Giant is the one that still missing...
  • 2 0
 That sentesi Bazooka was awesome.
  • 2 0
 Oh man, this and the square-tubed Turner DHR (www.pinkbike.com/news/article1965.html) probably top my list of DH bikes I wish I had gotten to ride. Thanks for the article!
  • 2 0
 Other than bars and stem the only two other differences between this and the ATX I had was I ran Middleburn cranks and PACE RC150 forks. They were buggers for the bridge between the chain stays snapping.
  • 3 0
 www.pinkbike.com/photo/22233414

Found this pic of me from a Midland super series race which I think was 2000.
Just had the ATX frame and was running RST HI5 forks and silver 521 wheels with some tan wall tyres
  • 1 0
 @cypher74: must have been one of the few out there not running the disc only 321’s!
  • 2 0
 What bike from today are we going to gush over in 20 years? probably the regular ebike while we’re all riding hover bikes with virtual wheels that never break but still feel like you’re riding a normal bike.
  • 2 0
 My first DH bike... I must've been 20? It would've been 2000 or 2001. I bought the frame only second hand and built it up over winter. Raced my first few seasons to countless injuries and lots of smiles. Good times.
  • 1 0
 Surprised they were using the Hope C2 for DH racing. There were open brakes available too at the time, like the Magura Gustav. I can imagine a Hope C2 could have been great for XC racing as you could always adjust the pads such that they just didn't rub whereas the floating caliper of the Gustav would always rub slightly. But yeah, having the bite point change that much over the course of a DH run couldn't have helped either. Not sure what other strong open brake systems were available at the time. I recall Grimeca used to have some mean looking 4 and 6pot red brakes too and didn't they make the four pot brake for SRAM too (when they didn't own Avid yet)? I only started mountainbiking in 2001 so a lot could have changed in those few years (between 1999 and 2001) but I recall the four pot Deore XT brake wasn't even fancy and new by then.
  • 1 0
 My first MTB was a Giant Terrago in '98 and '00 I got my first full sus which was a Giant XtC ... always loved those colors for the team bikes and to this day I am sucker for those classic RF Forged cranks. And yes nothing sexier than anodized AL frames. Plastic from the oven can kma. Have a nice weekend everyone
  • 4 0
 Does not look like a Session. I like
  • 1 3
 does too...
  • 3 0
 That was A BIKE indeed! It has inspired many many riders for many years to come. It's one of my all time favourites bikes.
  • 5 0
 That stem.
  • 2 0
 Had one of those, probably still in a box somewhere, it would still be there if WW3 happens infact, a stem for life.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, I think they used to start with a 110mm stem and design geometry around that and try to package it inside the maximum 900mm wheelbase.
  • 1 0
 Love it. It looks like a freaking brick. I like to think the machinist for some reason did all the holes and clamp points first, then the CNC broke before he could add any pockets om the side so they just called it good.
  • 1 0
 @greener1: one of Pauls team mates used to run a 0 length stem on one of these. Think it was ringlé?
  • 3 0
 One of my all time favourites and during such an awesome time in mountain biking!
  • 4 0
 Imagine showing those designers what modern bikes look like
  • 2 0
 20mm hubs have always had 110mm spacing, not 100mm as stated in the article. The new 20mm boost just moves the rotor mount out 5mm.
  • 1 0
 Pretty sure that must have been a typo in the article. I doubt he didn't know that. Heck, I don't have boost forks but I've got two forks with the regular 20x110 hub mount. Wouldn't be surprised if there were still more regular 20x110 forks around than the boost variation.
  • 2 0
 Funny that the Goldtec links did not give you anymore travel, softer feel only?
As was only clearance for 6 1/2" travel, check it out if do not believe me?
  • 2 0
 @aljoburr Oh yes! Giant ATX DH! It's still my favorite and I was once a proud owner!!!

A correct way for more travel was to replace the old shock mount below and drill a new one a little further down, this you fitted a damper with more stroke at the same geo!
  • 1 0
 @dh-corn: But the chain stays only has clearance to move 6 1/2" at dropout unless you remove the chain guide
Or at least the ATX one that I used to have did?
  • 2 0
 @aljoburr: the atx one had a different rear end to the team
  • 4 0
 This article is a single mention of “The Clan” away from perfection!
  • 1 0
 I was wondering the same thing too!
  • 1 1
 I love how freaky this thing looks but it was pretty behind the times in 99-2000. It was probably availed to a lot of riders though.

Karpiel and Intense had 200 mm travel bikes and Foes was at 180 or more. Guess that’s why so many were around at that time- at least in the USA. Rebuilding my Disco Volante with a hammer in the campsite after one wet run was good times

Perhaps in Europe sintise B1 and Sunn didn’t have quite that much travel but they had high pivot linkage driven bikes and Formula Disc brakes.
  • 2 0
 In 2000 they ran 8in you can check mine out on my profile
  • 1 0
 I knew Paul back when he was riding one of these, funnily enough I knew Vox when she had one too. MTB circles were smaller back then I guess. Was probably the bike I most wanted to own ever but never did.
  • 3 0
 This bike needs a modern revamp by giant id say
  • 3 0
 This was a groundbreaking rig back in the day. Same with the balfa bb7
  • 1 1
 It really wasn't groundbreaking. It's a 6" travel single pivot frame, of which there was no shortage in 99/00
  • 6 0
 @lacuna: are you on meth? This bike was stock ready to race WC at the time and influenced the advancement of frame geometry and long travel bikes
  • 2 1
 @Saucycheese: that’s before you remember that the predecessor was the ATX990 with 4” Z1s and a “long travel”plates that meant shock life could be measured in minutes
  • 2 1
 @Saucycheese: I'm not saying it was useless but it certainly wasn't special. If you wanted a 6" - 8" travel DH bike around the same time you could have a Stab Dee Lux, SC Super 8, M1, GT Lobo, Yeti/Schwinn Straight 8, Tomac 204, Orange Mr O/222, Sintesi Bazooka, Foes DHS, Marin Team DH, Rocky Mountain RM9, Specialized FSR DH, Turner Burner, Sunn Radical and that's before you get to the more leftfield options from Pace, Rotwild, Hot Chilli, Ancilotti and Raleigh. There was no shortage of good options and if anything the ATX was a bit late to the party.
  • 3 0
 The old DH24's - loved that tire!
  • 2 0
 Only thing that is really off is the tyres, they are the new model of that range. Comp 16 was always the best tyre!
  • 3 0
 Seen on the frame: "Renault Sport". What did it have to do with this???
  • 3 0
 Just a sponsor for the team at that point iirc, however the F1 team apparently had a hand in designing the suspension of the DH Team that came after
  • 2 0
 Renault had a partnership with Giant for bikes, the Tangara back in the day was a rebranded Giant. I miss my Renault Megane 3 RS such a weapon on the Nurburgring, Ohlins suspensions, Brembo brakes and Michelin super sport. I was even able to put my Gambler inside.
  • 3 0
 my favourite bike on No fear downhill mountain biking on PS1
  • 3 0
 I wanted one of these SO BAD because of Corey Leclerc in SHIFT.
  • 1 0
 Great segment/movie, but for me it was Thomas Vanderham riding one of these in Ride to the Hills. I think he was also riding a Giant in some of the early North Shore Extreme movies prior to him riding for Rocky.
  • 1 0
 That front hub. Leading and trailing spokes pass through the flange in the same direction, but at different diameters. Was there a good reason to make them like that?
  • 1 0
 They were called Hope Big’N and we’re cool to look at. 5hole disk mount ffs.
I have a 40h set in a tandem and they are great, feck they are heavy!
Hope we’re innovative all the time and I think they were just experimenting
  • 2 0
 my first DH bike. loved it. even better with the BETD Goldtec linkage plates for extra travel :-)
  • 1 0
 I remember riding down my first flight of steps on one of these - it felt amazing! And it's owner encouraged me give it another go. Great bike, fond memories.
  • 1 0
 Iv still got one hanging on my wall in the garage.thinking back it was utter garbage but some how stands out from all my bikes over 25years of racing
  • 2 0
 The foreshadowing of the "raked out" geometry is strong with this one...
  • 1 0
 Seems strange that people were seemingtrying to figure out geometry around a
  • 1 3
 I was never really into the ATX1. Hardly anyone bought one full price and they all seemed to go to shop sponsored riders. At the time, anything other than an Intense M1 was a bit of an odd choice if you were spending your own money. Most DH bikes then had 6" travel and the Intense had 8" so it was an easy decision really.
  • 3 0
 ATX990 was the privateer bike of choice for UK DH racing IMO. A Z1 on the front and you were set.
  • 1 0
 @nouseforaname: not by Y2K, they’d all broken by then. Largely due to the 5” goldtec travel plates that were used.
  • 1 0
 @pimpin-gimp: Were BETD/Goldtec responsible for more broken frames/blown shocks than any other component manuf?
  • 1 0
 @nouseforaname: I dunno man, we broke a lot of shit running triple clamp forks on Xc frames!
  • 2 0
 I love the look of aged un anodized aluminum
  • 2 0
 Great bike even though the chainstay was made of cheese!
  • 2 0
 I still have those tires and a mud set hanging in the garage....I'm old.
  • 3 0
 Sex On Wheels
  • 2 0
 Rob Warner called and he wants his bike back.
  • 2 0
 Pretty sure that Tioga stem has been used as a murder weapon.
  • 2 0
 Love those Giants, awesome.
  • 2 0
 That old school BoXXer logo is dope.
  • 1 0
 The old sram logo is cool too. I had grip shifts around that time I think. It was 30ish years ago. It was a couple of years before sram bought out rockshox in 2002
  • 1 0
 i remember buying an 1998 Giant Boulder Duo and that was the dream bike back then...
  • 1 0
 Cannot look at that bike and think of other than drugs. Miles and miles of drugs.... and frigin love it!!
  • 1 0
 that thing weights more than my car
  • 2 0
 41lbs
  • 2 0
 Warner Disco Maschine
  • 1 0
 doesn't even have new school geo tho so it wouldn't be fit for me to ride
  • 1 0
 This bike really went over rock well, and did so for miles.
  • 1 0
 Yow yow yow bring dat to me.
  • 1 0
 Why do I think of Warner everytime I see it....
  • 1 0
 This the bike Miles Rockwell rode to victory at World Champs in 2000?
  • 1 0
 Is that a brick holding the handlebars to the fork steerer?
  • 1 0
 such a great bike in it s day..
  • 1 0
 The BRT!
  • 1 4
 It looks like an Intense lol





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