Pinkbike Poll: How Long Do Bike Parts Last?

Jan 19, 2021 at 4:13
by Henry Quinney  
Adrien Dailly crushed his rim on the very last rock on track going for a big gap and coming up short. The French as a rough week with one broken hand two punctures and this dissipated wheel.

This topic of longevity was broached in a recent Pinkbike podcast. Flat pedals shoes were the item in question, but that discussion inevitably led to a debate about how long bike parts, in general, should last. There's no getting around the fact that parts and frames can break - smash anything into a pointy rock hard enough and you're going to incur some damage. So, we'd thought we'd ask you - "how long do parts last, really?". It will be interesting to see if expectations meet reality. Are you able to get a whole season out of a set of tires? Or do you find yourself scrounging up funds for another rear tire after one long weekend at the bike park?

The answers to this week's poll are in duration of time simply because not many people record the distance covered. I would suggest 'regular riding' is about three times per week. There are, of course, some people who ride more than this and others who perhaps don't. In a perfect world they'll cancel one another out, to a degree, and this way should give us an average. We're also assuming you ride your bikes and components for their intended purpose and aren't doing shuttle runs with your XC hardtail.

Specialized 2FO Roost shoe review

With your regular riding, how long does a flat pedal shoe last?


Would you trade sole grip for longevity?


How happy are you with the longevity of your flat pedal shoes?



Shimano XTR M9100 review
If you fitted a new drivetrain to your bike, how long could you ride before you had to consider replacing the chain?

How long does a chain last for you?


If you were to fit a brand new drivetrain, and replaced the chain at the recommended intervals, how long until it is completely worn out?


How happy are you with the longevity of your drivetrain componants?



You've just fitted brand-spanking-new brakes, rotors and pads to your bike. How long until you use all of the braking material?

How long do your REAR brake pads last?


Do you choose your braking compound based on wear rate?


How happy are you with the longevity of your brakepads?



8-Ball vs Levy
Bikes weighing 21.5KG will happily last. Of course, if we wanted to ride parts with a 0% failure rate we probably wouldn't enjoy such lightweight componentry.

In your experience, solely from riding and not from impacts, how old is frame before it fails, or shows signs that it could fail?


Would you take a weight penalty for your frame in exchange for durability?




A ribbon of brown gold near the top of stage three could be a river of brown gold come tomorrow.
Dropper posts are directly in the firing line of mud, grit and grime.

How long do you ride your dropper post before it needs to be serviced?


Do you think service intervals on suspension units are reasonable?



When wheels break they can do so in spectacular fashion but not all failures are such blockbuster events. Dings, cracks, flat spots and spokes pulling through the eyelet can also damage a wheel beyond use. I have seen enough rim failures to feel as though they are a consumable, but this isn't a view often shared outside of racing.

How long does a REAR rim last for you?


How happy are you with the strength and quality of mountain bike rims?




n a
Many brands offer a huge range of compounds and tread patterns to offer tires to suit any purpose.

Solely from wear, how long does a REAR tyre last you?



Carson had an incredible run but ended abruptly when his tire bead blew off.
Our expectations don't always coincide with reality.

In general, do parts last as long as you expect them to?



The thick forest here in West Virgina may look peaceful but today it was anything but as racfers battled it out for World Cup titles
Increasingly, people's concerns aren't solely about bang for their buck.

What is the cause for your concern about the longevity of parts?




352 Comments

  • 599 2
 For the suspension questions my answer would be: "make the dampers easily user serviceable and the parts widely available" .

Lower leg services are quick and easy, but dampers are a mixed bag of needing special tools, not being able to find service kits and having to try and hunt out instructions on random German forums.
  • 26 2
 Cannot upvote more, especially with pandemic, it is became more actual to service at home;
  • 24 1
 Fox’s GRIP2 damper is surprisingly easy to service. Just did mine and the rebuild kit was easy to find and cheap. The needed vice block was only $20 on ebay and I had the fluid for lower services already.
Now my X2, that’s a different story, PITA!

But yes, 100 percent agreed!
  • 36 1
 Oil started leaking out the top of the damper on my lyriks. The seal is not included in any seal kit sold by Rockshox. In the end I followed a video someone had made on youtube and found the seal somewhere else with a bit of hassle.

Why not just make it available?!

No-one wants to ditch a fork/damper for a seal costing pennies, and not everyone has a warranty (e.g. on 2nd hand bits)
  • 10 0
 @joedave: I think I read that the Grip2 was based on the old Marzocchi DBC? The semi open bath is so easy to bleed and the damper unit just unscrews so replacing seals is easy.
  • 6 0
 @kiksy: you got it! It’s as easy as servicing lowers, just different lol
  • 18 1
 Dvo
  • 34 5
 DVO. Parts for sale and step by step instructions on their website, for forks AND shocks. Have a question, you can call and talk to someone without a computer answering and transferring you around endlessly.

To quote the guy I talked to yesterday, “you can buy any 7.5wt fork oil, doesn’t have to be the Gucci stuff, just don’t buy the cheap Maxima or Rockshox stuff” as they swell the seals.
  • 31 9
 @DHhack: it kills me that they have that green on everything... I know it’s probably just me but I HATE that green on it all. Lol I guess I’m just shallow enough to not buy them for that reason. If it weren’t for the green I’d dive right in.
  • 9 1
 @DHhack: thnx for advise, next components will be def DVO
  • 2 0
 @kiksy: I read similar when looking to upgrade from Grip to Grip2
  • 8 0
 @DHhack: Second you thoughts. DVO on all my bikes (DH & Trail) front and rear. Nothing but good things to say about the forks/shocks themselves and service.
  • 1 0
 @kiksy: Hmm, my son has a Marzocchi with the DBC damper is it's quite good. I'd like to know too if the Grip2 is based on it.
  • 36 5
 *FOX* (cough, cough!) Here's calling you out on not publishing comprehensive service manuals! My next bike will be RockShox front and rear, because they don't insult competent mechanics w/ a cartoonish "manual" that merely labels the clickers and tells consumers that servicing internals will lead to injury and death!
  • 3 0
 @NWBasser: I'm only referring to servicing here rather than performance of the damper. Vorsprung did a little video on Grip1 youtu.be/0AQm98NI7Fo . You can see how it self bleeds via the port similar to the DBC.
  • 4 0
 @joedave: I just did my X2, wasn't all that crazy. I needed the vice blocks and two tools, which I bought off ebay for like $65 total, and the service wasn't that bad, just tedious. And make sure you don't forget to put the dust wiper back on, I forgot and had to take it apart again, rebleed, etc.
  • 2 1
 @Veloscente: Have you seen this? Used it to service my X2, just some mods for an at-home setup.
  • 1 0
 @kiksy: Got it. Thanks for the info.
  • 5 23
flag mcmtb2 (Jan 29, 2021 at 14:02) (Below Threshold)
 In my experience once the damper is blown on rockshox it is time to buy fox.
  • 8 1
 @Veloscente: Being a brand based in California, I'm surprised there are no warning labels everywhere saying "this product may cause cancer".
  • 12 2
 SR Suntour has great high end, easily serviceable parts.
  • 17 0
 I think Rockshox has done a pretty god job compared with FOX. Manuals are available and they are easy to read. But it's true, maybe they could design stuff in a way you would need less special tools for the job although you need that many.
  • 10 1
 @moduwave: SR Suntour forks are designed for easy service. They make good stuff, but don't have the advertising budgets that RS and Fox do.
  • 2 0
 @nickmalysh: If you're a skinny/lighter weight person (150lbs riding weight) I've found their products to be really overdamped, but all my friends of more normal weights love their DVO squish bits
  • 4 1
 @Veloscente: whoops....https://www.ridefox.com/fox17/help.php?m=bike&id=978
  • 2 0
 @mrguzzo: you can buy direct and have it tuned for your weight/frame etc. Or you can send in what you already bought if you’re not comfortable tuning it yourself.
  • 3 0
 @DHhack: word! I've called for help with installs, service, ordering mistakes (which was on me yet they sent the right spring out before I returned the wrong one) and they've always been responsive and walked me through the processes. Love their products and the service is unmatched.
  • 3 2
 Grip2 is the only trully easy serviceable damper. A couple pumps and it feels perfectly bled, no more bleed machines and service tutorials are greatly details and filmed. While Rockshox has great products just as good as Fox ie is terrible about instructions and no media about it.
  • 4 0
 @joedave: they have green black and blue options
  • 1 0
 @rustyglaze5: sounds like the dvo damper.
  • 2 0
 DVO
  • 2 0
 @send-it-bro: haha yeah I looked at buying the tools and the time it’s take me and said meh, I’ll just mail it to Fox and have them do it for their fee.
Good info tho. Maybe next time.
  • 2 0
 @nickmalysh: yeah I’ve seen them, the blue is just as haggard as the green to me and the black looks good but all their dials and caps etc. are that green. Just can’t do it.
I know, I’m lame.
I’ve even emailed them asking if I could get them raw, before they ano green them and they said they get them from their supplier that way so they can’t accommodate, I was bummed... but life goes on.
  • 4 0
 @joedave: imagining ability to buy raw parts..... mmm that would be superb option
  • 3 0
 dvo doesnt have this issue COUGH fox COUGH
  • 3 2
 @joedave: I'm right there with you. I bought a bike with a dvo shock and pulled all the green ano shit and polished or painter them. That green is polarizing and I hate it too. Same reason I don't buy maxxis tires.... Yellow sucks.
  • 1 1
 @ribena1234: The companies want you to buy new forks and not have custumer to fix them easily. Duh.. its all about money.
  • 1 0
 @garrisond5: haha well, good to know I’m not alone or loony... well maybe undiagnosed, but who isn’t with this insanity for the past 10 months.
  • 9 0
 Take the ano parts and soak them in Easy-Off oven cleaner for 15 min. Now you have raw aluminum.
  • 3 0
 I answered none of the questions because I don't want any bike industry insiders thinking that any already crap made products aren't crap.
  • 2 1
 Become a engineer than. Apparently they know how to do everything. Especially bike related.
  • 8 0
 @rustyglaze5: Rockshox actually has great service manuals for just about anything they put out. Blows fox tech manuals out of the water, and requires hardly any tools the average bike enthusiast doesn't have. You can rebuild a charger with a few adjustable wrenches if you have to.
Not comparing performance or anything here, just the service alone, and it's not that it is hard on a Fox, it's just a lot easier and straightforward on RS.
  • 1 0
 Dito
  • 3 0
 @ribena1234: I feel this way about derailleur hangers. I had a 4 year old european brand bike and I couldn't find a hanger for it anywhere. For my current bike, I make sure I have a few extras before I need them. I can't wait until the universal hangers become more common.
  • 5 0
 Fox is doing an absolutely awful job in terms of service part pricing and availability, especially here in Europe. If I could choose, I would always go with RockShox or DVO. RockShox has also the advantage of you being able to continuously upgrade your suspension once a slightly improved version of your product is out/ you bought the cheaper version of a product and now can just switch out the internals.
Well ok let's maybe exclude the Reverb. The Reverb is piece of garbage, with a stupid design premise. I'll gladly take most cheap droppers over the Reverb.
  • 1 0
 Because how crazy things have been lately I've had my Fox X2 out for 2 months because it badly needed service and self maintenance for that shock is just isn't practical. I'm pretty confident doing my own service in general, and the savings that wins me makes keeping parts longer definitely worth it.
  • 3 0
 @A1990ToyotaHilux: Definitely agree with the service part pricing. If I wouldn't have ordered my tools off ebay, the vice clamps alone would have been like 150 bucks for the FOX brand, absolutely insane pricing for a block of metal. Same with all the other tools needed.
  • 4 0
 @PabloMoll: I think Rockshox have better serviceability compared with Fox but Fox seems to be a smidge better in the performance sector. Still, Rockshox forks I've ridden have performed superb, set and forget
  • 2 0
 @DHhack: Your're right, I've always just gotten stuff secondhand and, as a college kid, not had the budget to get stuff retuned. Especially when I can get a Rockshox fork and have it work right outta the box
  • 1 0
 Ah, forget serviceability, just make the shocks last as long as the ones in my motorbike, or even the ones in my car. I’d be entirely fine to replace them every few hundred thousand kilometers...
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL: if they made bikes suspension components to last that long, they wouldn't be lightweight at all
  • 1 0
 same
  • 1 0
 @mrguzzo: yeah it honestly depends on two things, are you a super picky rider or are you an outlier in weight/aggression. At just over 200 ready to ride and moderately aggressive buying something I can tune, if needed, is very important.
  • 2 1
 @FuzzyL: who wants to ride a road bike with suspension?
  • 2 0
 @ribena1234: Was it a leaking Charger 2 damper? Did you follow the German guys video (Dieter) If so, where did you manage to get the X-Ring oil seal? Cheers.
  • 1 0
 @joedave: It really is PITA having the green bits. I know someone who takes them off, strips them, then re-anodises them (they annoy him that much)!
  • 1 0
 @nickmalysh: cool we can't wait to fix all the stuff you broke in 2020
  • 2 0
 Don't hear much about SR Suntour forks but they are VERY EASY to service. Their website has videos for every type of fork and service, you can order the parts you need off of it, and if you call their phone number a real person will pick up and help answer your questions.
  • 1 0
 @NWBasser: agreed, they make some nice forks, too!
  • 1 0
 @moduwave: they make some nice forks, too. wish they would get more recognition
  • 2 1
 @SeanC1: From my experience with the coil sr suntour forks like the xcm and xcr and all those you would find on a typical "walmart" bike, I've assumed that their suspension products were just garbage. They actually make decent air forks?
  • 1 0
 @send-it-bro: they actually do the lower castings for a large number of "Major" fortk manufacturers out there bike and moto. They have more experience than RockShox or Fox in many ways.
  • 2 0
 What grungy no good fool down voted this?
  • 3 0
 @send-it-bro: More than decent. Their bottom end fork are crap, but their top end ones are quite nice. They shouldn't be judged by their low-end offerings. I put an Auron on my wife's bike and it's excellent. Look up the new Durolux review on NSMB.com.
  • 1 0
 double upvote from me.
  • 3 0
 I just did a full rebuild on my Pike. Manual was really well written and the only special tool required was a bleed kit. Ordered parts and kit through my LBS... arrived in 4 days. Not sure what the big deal is on this forum!
  • 2 1
 "Toyota should make their engines more user serviceable. When I want to replace piston rings I need a ton of special tools, and I can't find service kits on the shelf at my local shop"
  • 4 0
 @pdarragh: do you replace your car engine piston rings every 100 hours of use?
  • 1 0
 @kiksy: If it was a mountain bike, he surely would have to.
  • 2 0
 @kiksy: just speaking for a Pike... lower leg service (which is really easy) is 50 hrs and damper is 200 hrs. 50 is a bit on the short side but 200 seems reasonable. Damper service Once maybe twice a year unless you’re riding the chair lift all day. If you’re not obsessed with performance you can push the interval... 200 hrs seems reasonable to me considering the performance and weight expectations of people these days.
  • 2 1
 @SeanC1: their premium forks cost 10% less then RS, which actually make almost no difference
  • 129 4
 If the average comment section to any given product release or review were to be believed, everyone is snapping their frames every couple of months, and the rare times those frames are holding together, we're riding broken seat posts while braking with flames shooting out from our calipers and bits of tires disintegrating onto the trail as we roll. Interesting to see the general reasonableness of the responses to the polls above belie the general insanity of the comment section.
  • 62 0
 Sometimes when I read the PB comments I think to myself "Am I not riding hard enough?" I just don't break a lot of stuff, so maybe I am not. Or maybe my riding style goes toward smooth rather than smash. I don't race or try for Strava times, but I do ride a lot of slow speed techy lines. Are these supposed to not be slow speed techy lines? Either way, I like the way I ride feels, and it saves me money and shop time.
  • 60 1
 @dcaf: It doesn't matter if you're having fun, you're clearly doing it wrong. Now go break some shit.
  • 14 0
 @dcaf: that’s funny to me, because I read the comment sections and think the same thing. I know I’m not tearing up the trails like a beast, but I’m out there pushing myself. Trying to go faster. Trying to get better in the turns. I’m not breaking stuff on a regular, and the last two parts I broke were due to them failing not my riding. Maybe I should just get a bell and some steamers.
  • 13 0
 I had a good laugh at this. So true. I agree with dcaf too. I am riding an arguably cross country bike on some pretty gnarly stuff and don't seem to consume parts like others. I'm thinking it has to do a bit with rider weight. I'm not the heaviest guy. I also think I ride reasonably smooth. I think that comes from a childhood of riding cheap crappy hardtail bikes though. You learn to soak up hits pretty quick if the alternative means bent cranks and bars that won't get replaced until you grow out of the bike.
  • 12 0
 Now we just need Taj to do a drawing of this.
  • 13 0
 @coast2coast-4: Rider weight plays a HUGE role. I'm 155 lbs and ride harder and much more frequently than my 270lb buddy. Guess who breaks more parts? Not the stringbean.
  • 8 0
 @dcaf: Yeah, I'm with you. I sometimes preface my comments with, "it could be I'm just not rad enough..." But lately I've also considered, "maybe I'm just smoother than other people," and "maybe I just take better care of my stuff."
  • 3 0
 @bocomtb: Good points, for sure, but I'm in the middle of that range (well, closer to your end -- I've weighed as much as 190). But as a rule, I just don't break parts. Parts have broken, for sure. A lot of derailleur hangers, and I beat up my back wheel pretty good. But by and large, I don't consistently break parts to say that any part in particular is a problem.
  • 3 0
 @noapathy: If he did do drawing of this, it would be a top honor.
  • 3 0
 I think i ride pretty smooth, and trails arent very rough.. but for some reason there is always some small stuff to fix.. nothing major but still costs time and gets annoying.. tire worn out, chain worn out, chain to wash, pads gone, suspension 50h service, bearing regrease, brake rebleed blah blah blah
  • 1 0
 @bocomtb: I'm down with that. I'm two bills and the guy I ride with is 145. He not only goes over stuff without leaving a mark, he constantly reminds me that he doesn't know what it's like to have stuff wear out.
  • 6 1
 @coast2coast-4: this. I'm a big dude (250#) and there are things I destroy. Like hubs, I can't ride most hubs. Pretty much anything but dts fall apart (hydras have had to be serviced twice this year, bearings and a damaged pawl). That said, I don't break rims. I ride solid rims built carefully and well (previously Dt welded, now wer1). I also don't kill tires funnily enough. I have a buddy who goons through stuff heels down, and at 150lb needs double down plus inserts, or full double ply to make it through a half season without killing his sidewall. My exo+s with no inserts last till the tread dies. I've also killed a few frames, but that's just a function of riding hard (or a crappy nail). I think some components riding style def kills (like my buddies tires) and some are just a function of weoght/quality (like me torquing hubs to death while climbing... They always die while I'm climbing. It's infuriating. I twice popped the axle on a hope. Wtf). Anyhow. My two cents.
  • 1 0
 @mgrantorser: Funny about your friend and the tires. I don't kill them quickly either, but we ride more local xc and hiking trails.
I used to kill multiple hubs a year until I got a Hope. Love that hub.
  • 1 0
 frame failure is only catastrophic separation frame into multiple parts, you could easily bent it hitting tray or rock and then frame became unreadable;

I agree that this probably classified es user error, however this leads to majority of frame issues
  • 3 0
 ...except for drivetrain parts. People still have ridicuolous ideas about those. I'm putting about 8.000 km on my training bike every year and never exchange drivetrain parts in less than 12 month intervals. Regular and thorough maintenance will do that for your. Turns out your things last a lot longer if you're nice to them.
  • 1 0
 Also, according to the PinkBike marketing machine, you NEED the latest standard that famous brands introduce, such as Boost, 35mm clamps and bars, 30+mm internal rim width, 38mm fork stanchions, etc etc....

The majority of people are NOT breaking things, and don't really need all these changes in standards. It's just a way for brands to offer something new (and exciting?) and convince you to upgrade so that they keep making money.
  • 2 0
 @SeanC1: all of this things are incremental improvements, that makes bikes better and better, to purchase or not - that is consumer option
  • 96 2
 Based on the answers y'all complain way too much on here for how happy you are with your parts.
  • 53 1
 vocal minority
  • 8 5
 Polls are never accurate.
  • 17 3
 Seriously. And why is everyone saying they are happy with the durability of every part? You realize you’re telling the whole bike industry they don’t need to spend any time or money improving durability. This is market research and we’re giving the industry our data for free.
  • 4 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: and we get tons of free content on this website. Win-win.
  • 3 4
 @BiNARYBiKE: Because we are happy? And its clearly fine? Unless you're one of the three hundo pound club boys snapping frames all day
  • 5 1
 @tacklingdummy: 69% of polls are entirely made up
  • 2 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: why not to be happy, majority parts of intermediate level works well for multiple seasons of riding, sure wear and tear have less life, so it is expected, u change tires on ur car ones in while, and in case u race u change them quite often...

Any commuter bike tire will last huge amount of miles, high performance grippy dh tire 5 days
  • 2 0
 @danny611: That means that 31% of the time it works all the time.
  • 1 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: I'm reasonably certain that no manufacturer is taking a PB poll and using it as a basis for product development direction
  • 3 0
 @Swangarten: I think you're completely mistaken. Pinkbike is clearly a massive source of information for the industry. Why do you think thy try to get us take these polls?
  • 1 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: HAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!
  • 78 1
 If you get married and have kids they will last a whole lot longer........
  • 8 1
 Thats because life feels too long now.
  • 1 0
 U’ll need to change components for entire family
  • 69 1
 Timescales are mostly meaninglessness from one rider to another, mileage is what really counts
  • 11 0
 Agreed although some people don’t maintain their bikes which will shorten the life of parts like brake pads and chains
  • 2 0
 @MDRipper: This is very important to help understand the answers above. How often do people do the simple things of cleaning your bike, lubing the chain, and even check the lube in your freewheel? Minor upkeep can make a huge difference.
  • 10 0
 I'd disagree, I think hours ridden would tell much more but who really logs that accurately? Also, spreading your activities over different bikes will also distort any signals. However, overall you just need a big enough sample size to see trends. It's not science, after all.
  • 6 1
 Our miles, trails, elevations are all different. Our selection of bike vs terrain is different. Our years are all the same. Time makes the most sense.
  • 3 0
 I'd like that to be combo'd with 'are you a masochist that slays winter trails in the pissing rain and gets back to the carpark with no legibility of the bikes colour, shape or tire choice'
  • 3 0
 Miles to elevation ratios. You can do 50 miles with little climbing that is a cake walk compared to 10 miles with a ton of steep climbs.
  • 7 0
 Miles are mostly meaningless. Cased jumps and big rocks are what really count.
  • 2 0
 Conditions and maintenance. Salted roads can kill a lot of stuff
  • 2 0
 Rider weight is a big factor. Riding style too. Some people need new rims all the time.
  • 1 0
 But then road miles barely touch anything but tyres, likewise "traditional" cross country, especially in climates that are drier than what I can see out of my window right now! A friend got 30,000 miles out of a road bottom bracket...
  • 43 3
 Replacing cassettes, chainrings and pulleys has become crazy expensive. Even if it's far from high-end like SRAMs GX or Shimano XT it is a bit insane. Doesn't matter if Road or Mountain Bike - drivetrain is the biggest cost factor, by far.
  • 21 1
 Steel chainring. Lasts 3 times as long, and cheaper. I've just bought a full steel Sunrace cassette as so impressed with the steel up front.
  • 9 2
 Shifters and derailleurs outlast cassettes, and cost less. SRAM cassettes are way overpriced, but Shimano seems fair.
  • 15 2
 IDK what you mean, Shimano XT is high end, literally the second most expensive component line they offer for MTB...if you're actually on a budget go SLX or Deore
  • 16 0
 I replace my chain a lot more now because of these expensive cassettes, just swap it out at the first sign of the gauge showing any wear. I've had pretty good luck with that.
  • 7 1
 @ruggedman: I always buy two chains and randomly alternate it. Doing it more by muddy times. Got a steel ring is also the best thing I did when the alloy one died in 3 muddy rides.
  • 3 0
 @mtb-sf: Shifters, yes. Derailleurs hang out with the rocks and sticks so YMMV.
  • 4 0
 I’m thorough with cleaning I feel that my drivetrain life is excellent.
How there are people on this poll that have never had to service a dropper or get a year out of a tire I do not know!
  • 8 0
 @mtb-sf: In my experience SRAM's higher end cassettes last 2-3X longer than Shimanos, as long as you stay on top of replacing chains. SRAM below GX is rubbish, Shimano above SLX has too much soft aluminum.

So if you're keeping your bike 2+ years, price-wise it's more or less a wash. For me the choice is between X01, GX, SLX and Deore cassettes and how much weight matters to you.
  • 3 0
 @JustinVP: I agree about the higher end SRAM cassettes. I have an 11sp X01 (I think that's what it is) and it will be going into its 6th season now and I expect at least a few more out of it. The chain gets changed about every season and has very little elongation showing but a fair bit of side-side play. I degrease about every ride or second ride and use a web lube and it doesn't see much mud, so these are good conditions for a cassette no doubt. I don't use the aluminum 42T much at all so it's still doing well. The cassette was a good investment for me. XT/Ultegra chains used to be like $20 5 years ago but now the chains are getting bloody pricey too!
  • 9 0
 At least SRAM X01 and XX1 cassettes last an insanely long time, most people will never need replacing them before getting a new bike. I bought a used 11spd XX1 cassette and used it for 4 years, just recently moved to 12 speed but am keeping the cassette for a future bike build because its still in great condition and is one of the lightest cassettes ever made. They are definitely really expensive but for most people they are a buy-once item.
  • 2 0
 @JustinVP: I get 3-4 chains from a SRAM cassette. Usually about a year-18mos. Just got an XT cassette for another bike and interested to see how it lasts. I also prefer the gear steps on Shimano.
  • 3 0
 @Superburner: BikeYoke Revive is how I never have to service my dropper.

It's actually worth the premium, unlike some other expensive droppers that are essentially the same as the cheaper ones but have a "better" sticker.
  • 1 0
 I think Shimano Microspline 12spd cassettes are reasonably priced. Yeah the days of super cheap 7spd cassettes are gone but ~€80 for Deore or SLX Microspline cassettes is not that bad IMO. On the road side you can get 11spd 105 level cassettes for like €40-45 which I wouldn't call crazy expensive.
Replacing 2x chainrings has been kind of a crapshoot in the past, I think stuff like 1x, direct mount and more 3rd party manufacturers actually improved things.
Chains are not that bad either IMO. You can get Deore, SLX, or GX level 12spd chains between €20-30. I don't think that changed much, for example when 10spd was the latest and greatest I don't think we paid less for chains.

Nowadays we also have even lower end drivetrains which work wonderfully, like 10/11spd Deore, Microshift, Box stuff etc. Parts for these drivetrains will be even cheaper. But of course these drivetrains usually don't come on complete bikes, or in the case of 10/11spd Deore mostly just lower end bikes.
When it comes to drivetrains personally i'm very happy with the price to performance ratio nowadays.
  • 2 0
 @HollyBoni: the trick with SRAM chains is don't buy GX or below. They wear really fast, whereas the nicer ones seem to last anxiously ages, as they've got much better hardening. Easily pay for the higher purchase price in chains, time and sprockets
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: Sure, I have no experience with that. All I know is that personally i've been perfectly happy with GX chains and cassettes in terms of durability, I haven't noticed anything wearing really fast. (I'm kind of meticulous when it comes to cleaning and lubing my drivetrain tho)
  • 3 0
 I just replaced my GX 11 speed cassette after 6500km and I think that is alright.
I then got a cassette on ebay with almost no signs of use (Seller said it was only 150km old) for 50 bucks. I guess that is really good
  • 2 0
 @mtb-sf: It’s a result of their different manufacturing processes. SRAM cassettes are machined out of a solid chunk of steel, which lets them be really really lightweight but therefore also very expensive. Shimano still uses stamped cogs which are cheap to make. However, they then have to use a wack load of aluminum gears to get the weight similar to SRAM.
  • 2 0
 @mtb-sf: what are you talking about? I can get 9 speed SRAM cassettes on eBay all day for less than $40. And I don’t have to change it once every....two seasons. I know I know, 9 speed. Hahaha but what I’m saying’ is.....
  • 2 0
 The 11 speed xt cassette on my hardtail / bikepacking rig has lasted about 4.5 years now and its seen massive abuse and after about 10.000km its still in good condition. Swapped the chain about three times. The large alu cogs are showing sone wear but it doesnt matter cause you got enough chainwrap. Problems usually arise when the small cogs wear out. On shimano cassettes you can replace the small cogs vs sram where you can trash your whole cassette if a cog starts to fail. Sram cassete on my enduro died mich earlier with less km! A friend of mine rode his xtr cassette for about 25.000 km and went thru about 12 chains before it started to fail
  • 30 2
 I find servicing my suspension a little annoying and probably don't do it enough, but my main consideration is not having to send it to the company to pay them half the original price to fix/refresh it. I loved my Cane Creek shock, but sending it to them every 8 months felt like a huge waste. Just using DVO and Rockshox stuff now so I can take care of it myself.

Also, hubs have been my most annoying wear item that shouldn't be a wear item. Amazing how many nice bikes come with disposable hubs. I just end up switching them to DT 350s after they break and I keep the warrantied one for a spare.
  • 5 1
 Didn’t realize cane creek was a nuisance, good to know cause I’m looking at different stuff right now
  • 7 0
 @DizzyNinja: if you are interested in servicing both front and back shock I find rockshox are generally fairly straightforward. Also their technical service manuals are fantastic. You are going to need a couple of specilized tools which the tech manuals list and can be ordered online.

So my advice (if you want to do your own serving) is before buy a shock download the tech manual and see how easy or difficult the services are.
  • 1 2
 @DizzyNinja: several tuners won’t touch their stuff
  • 3 2
 @DizzyNinja: CC stuff isn't a problem. Maybe DHHack just had a lemon or something over used? I have two Helms and a CC coil previously. All worked like a charm as long as serviced regularly. Suspensionwerx in Vancouver is excellent.
  • 3 3
 I had the same slightly sour experience with Cane Creek. My DB Inline has been collecting dust for years because I can't service it and I refuse to let other people work on my bike/parts. RS and Fox stuff requires special tools and other silly things, but at least I can do my own full air spring and damper rebuilds.
  • 9 1
 @alexsin: I prefer to work on my own stuff tho, it’s not about trust, there’s plenty of reputable shops, I actually enjoy doing the work, and saving the money is a bonus. If CC needs special tools they won’t sell, then I won’t buy. Not the end of the world, plenty of options that perform at a high level
  • 2 0
 @DizzyNinja: Cane Creek make a lot of great suspension components, but the "Get the f*ck of my property" attitude towards users servicing their products completely turns me away from them instantly.
  • 24 2
 Pshhh! Only noobs need to replace brake pads! Good riders shouldn't even need brakes!
  • 11 2
 Or drivetrains. Just get dem legs strong
  • 13 0
 @Kamiizoo: just flintstone it
  • 5 0
 Don't @ me unless you ride a fixie MTB.
  • 3 0
 @GumptionZA: adult sized balance bikes
  • 2 0
 @lyalltheweebeastie: yea I saw, that guy is a riot
  • 1 0
 @DizzyNinja: my take away from the video is: to ride a bike without brakes and pedals you have to wear a flintstone suit
  • 2 0
 @zachstill I know right? Guys changing their pad at six months?? WTH? Get off the brakes!
  • 1 0
 I heard metallic pads are good, so metal pads must be better!
  • 4 0
 @gibspaulding: metallica pads were good until early 90’s then they sold out, had to switch to a grungier pad for a while
  • 20 0
 Rear tire lasts 4-5 days at whistler but about 5 months at home trails...... proof that we need chair lifts at home
  • 2 0
 Indeed. DH wear and tear is crazy. I consumed a rear tire in only 5 days of DH at my local lift-serviced places.
  • 6 0
 You guys know what the lever on the other side of the handlebar does?
  • 17 1
 These questions should be qualified by "how often do you ride" or "on average how many KM / vert do you ride in a week." My experience will be different from someone who rides more or less than I do. Part two: certain things here are so different, depending on what you buy. Does a heavy casing, hard durometer tire last a year? Probably, even for the most frequent flyers. Does a paper wall XC tire blow up on ever third ride? Does super grippy rubber wear out in weeks, not months? Yes.

Everything is a balance of performance, longevity, price, and environmental concern. I've thought about running shittier (harder durometer) tires, so that I don't throw away so much rubber. But at what point does that become a safety concern?
  • 1 0
 Came here to say the same. Between the difference of ride style, quantity of ride and the personal equipment choice with a light/heavy bias this can change a lot the answers there.
  • 1 0
 Same here - more so the place / terrain. If i ride The North Shore some parts / servicing may only last months due to rough terrain, the wet and grimey trails, and of course broken/ bent derailleur hangers. If i ride the Okanogan and the buff deer trails there parts and servicing seem to go on forever/ years. Maybe a few more tubes / more sealant due to the odd cactus punctures.
  • 2 0
 Maxxis dual compound on the rear wheel (with something grippy up front) wears well and has been good enough for me, but I can see how it would be a valid safety concern in some contexts.
  • 2 0
 Ohhhhh, I didn't even consider the EXO gang. I only buy DD harder compounds. Good point
  • 1 0
 @regdunlop: my area has mostly sandstone and loam so puncture are super rare and wear rater really slow despite a lot of milage even on soft compound. Comparatively and with same gear I was going through tire very quickly when living in Dublin and riding very harsh and abrasive granite.
  • 1 0
 @DAN-ROCKS: yeah... but depending on your reason for choosing DD, EXO might not be strong enough. Very easy to cut on rocky terrain
  • 2 0
 @AndrewHornor: yeah I know I'm saying I realized after reading this guy's comment that different casing choices would effect the survey results.
  • 19 4
 When it comes to brake pads and rotors, I usually have to replace them due to contamination and horrible squeaking. I dont think Ive had a set last until they were actually worn out.
  • 11 1
 Have you tried heating/burning off the pads?
  • 7 0
 I had this problem when I used shimano brakes. After my bikes sat inside my apartment for the winter in a spare bedroom the pads would be contaminated and have no grab. Sometimes I was able to get them to come back by sanding them or riding them, but usually it was replacement. Between that and the wandering bite point I've stopped using shimano brakes.
  • 5 0
 Decent break cleaner is your best friend when it comes to contamination. Remove the pads, put on some gloves and squirt those pads and wipe away the crud with some clean paper towel. Then do it again. The cleaner is going to get all the crap out of the small groves in your pad, which sanding is not going to remove. If the rotors are contaminated, just spray the cleaner onto some clean towel and wipe them down. Don't go spraying break cleaner directly onto your bike.
  • 1 0
 I'm an auto tech, quite familiar with brake clean. I wondered if the pads were becoming oxidized in someway. I've not had the same problem with SRAM metallic pads that I did with Shimano. I also find SRAM pads to be much less prone to contamination.
  • 3 0
 @als802: I don't know what it is, but when it happens I burn the pads and rotors with a propane torch or my stove. The pads will smoke up for a few seconds and when they stop I let them cool down and they almost always work. I think I had one pair once that this didn't work on.
  • 18 0
 Bikes change geometry and standard faster then I can wear out components;
  • 14 0
 Brake pads have to be the most overpriced but necessary bike part. $40 retail is absurd when you can get a decent pair of pads for a truck for the same price. It's not like Shimano is dumping money into R+D for the exact same semi metallic compound they've used for 20 years. Fortunately you can usually find them for around $20 online but that just goes to show how absurd the full retail price is.
  • 2 0
 I'm surprised more aftermarket companies haven't gotten into the brake pad game. They should be $10, and even at that, would be a considerable profit.
  • 7 0
 @njcbps: Trucker Co. brake pads are around $14 a pair I think.
  • 2 0
 I got mine for $8 a pair. Shimano brand.
  • 5 0
 @njcbps: Trickstuff, maker of the most expensive brakes I know of, sells aftermarket pads for other systems. I ordered two pairs and the cost (with 20€ shipping from Germany) came out the same as two sets of SRAM pads from the LBS.

Great pads too, if you like organics.
  • 2 0
 @AndrewHornor: I loved the dry braking with Trickstuff Power pads. But they just evaporated in the wet gritty mud round here, and frankly didn't work very well in the wet either. I've gone back to SRAM sintered as they work pretty well and last utterly ages. Though due to stock shortages, I'm trying Uberbike sintered, which seem similar to SRAM
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: I share similar winter conditions (if perhaps less mud). Thinking of pairing one Power pad with one sintered pad in each caliper. But I'm not sure if it would give some of the advantages of both, or just average out to nothing special!
  • 3 0
 @AndrewHornor: I guess the risk is that the power pads will just wear through, but you might not notice as one side will still be working, then metal on metal on the other side. As pads aren't cheap, might be worth saving the power pads for summer
  • 2 0
 @Avanwin: been using Trucker Co. for awhile now and I can’t tell a diff between them and SRAM pads. Can’t beat the price.
  • 2 0
 @lightsgetdimmer: Me neither. Mine are doing fine in the rain but I'm probably not riding in the mud as much as most Brits do. I'm committed to them for awhile regardless, think i bought 8 of them cause the price was cheaper.
  • 13 0
 As an old man, my stable has grown to many a fine steed. Wear and tear is spread out across multiple bikes depending on the season and type of ride. That of course affects how long things last. I'm wondering if most people responding to these polls tend to have a single do-it-all bike.
  • 3 0
 Yes! Solid point. I think hours per bike would be a good way to narrow everything down.
  • 13 0
 If your rear wheel is still somewhat round, then you're not done yet
  • 6 0
 When it stops rotating due to hitting the stays.
  • 8 0
 I'm a staff member at a local bike co-op and I can confidently say that a very large chuck of cyclists don't use parts until they are broken, but until they want to upgrade. Most of the parts that we re-use have plenty of life left in them.
  • 8 0
 I just replaced a nearly 6 year old X01 11-spd cassette & derailleur (with over 7000 miles on them). Still shifted fine, but chain slap was getting annoying. Hard to complain about that longevity.
  • 2 1
 I’m only changing 4 yr old XT 11spd cause I’m a sucker for 12 spd shifting under load
  • 5 0
 I have a tendency to use the drivetrain and tires for wayyyyyy more long than intended. they seem to be so expensive for a part that wears out so quickly. brake pads used to wear out quickly, but i've found more recently for what pads cost they're lasting longer now than before. so i'm less "cheap" about milking my brake pads. but how quickly drive-trains go bugs me. tires ... we need the sticky around here in SW BC, so I can understand they won't last suuuper long.
  • 5 0
 I’m completely surprised by the people that don’t think that consumables could last longer and are “quite happy”. Shouldn’t everything strive to go that extra mile?
  • 6 1
 It's called being reasonable. My brake pads are maybe 1.5mm thick when new, and last me a full season through all kinds of slop and the worst grit. My rims weigh nearly nothing and survive getting smashed into the craziest shit. They might die after 2 years, or maybe go much longer. Could things be even better? Sure. Am I "quite happy"? Heck yeah.
  • 3 0
 I think that price/durability seems to be pretty good right now. Someone tested 8,9,10,11, and 12 speed chains and durability triples from 8 speed to 12 speed with pretty linear increases in longevity throughout. Manufacturers have made good progress. I'd be surprised if my nx eagle cassette doesn't last 4000kms, it barely shows any wear right now at 1200-1500kms.
  • 7 2
 since switching to carbon rims, I get a lot more out of them than aluminum that I am destined to flat spot. Honestly one of the major reasons I am ok with carbon for rims whereas I don't buy carbon frames.
  • 9 1
 Agreed, carbon frames are over rated and over priced for the return on investment, but rims can be a wheelie good deal how long they last, rotational weight, and a good carbon rim can have better trail feel
  • 4 2
 @DizzyNinja: not to mention carbon rims almost always have a better warranty.
  • 7 0
 I have no problems with replacing stuff -IF I CAN GET PARTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • 4 0
 so true, I'm currently running two bikes with no cranks... so drive train wear is surprisingly good on those.
one other bike has only a front brake... so the longevity of the back tire is amazing.
my bike thats ridable is a hardtail single speed which, you guessed it, has a ridiculous service period on the suspension.

#NZsinglespeedchamps #temiro2021 @NZSSC_cloak
  • 5 0
 I am definitely doing shuttle runs with my XC hardtail. Can't descend worth a damn on this thing so I climb to the top and bum a lift back down.
  • 3 0
 Let's talk REAL longevity , like a Schwinn double top tube steel frame bike . i bought one of these in about 1959 and the last time i saw it was in 1985 . i don't recall ever doing any maintenance on that bike other than oiling the chain . Now THATS LONGEVITY. LOL
  • 4 1
 I would honestly be cool with my suspension needing a full service every 20 hours if the top performance stuff could be serviced by the reasonably knowledgeable home mechanic.
  • 3 1
 I'm the opposite. I dont like servicing suspension. The less I have to do it or have someone do it the better. I already spend enough time servicing bikes.
  • 2 0
 Twenty hours?

I ride that much in a couple weeks, f*ck that!

I don’t service my suspension that often, i prefer to ride my bike, seriously, few of us need that level of performance a CS snd frw would notice the difference.

100 hr service interval seems reasonable., 200 hrs would be better.
  • 2 0
 I've always looked forward to parts wearing out as an excuse to try new things. Constantly messing with things is part of the fun for me. But my last 2 bikes have been so reliable that it's hard to find excuses to replace things. Only real problem was rear hub issues on both. I'm trying to invent some issues so I can get new toys.
  • 2 0
 This is all so dependent upon if you ride trail or shuttle/DH and whether or not you’re pushing your bike beyond it’s intended use. I had a hardtail which everyone says is up for park use (Specialized Fuse, I put a yari and Code Rs on it) as my only bike last year and I was blowing through rear brake pads and rear tires every 3 months doing trail and lift service duty. I didn’t really know any better; it’s all I had and all I could afford to swing at the time. I’m sure if I stuck to more trail style riding it would have been much less labor intensive and my parts would have gone a full year, easily, without a major overhaul or replacement.
  • 2 0
 The only frames I've ever broken (cracked, actually) were BMX frames. I accepted that as a given. Never rode that hard (but lots of failed rotations), just did stupid shit that should've (and did) lead to cracks.

I realize that the price categories are different, but we have to try to remember that when you expose materials to forces they weren't designed to take, they fail. My golf variant isn't going to like jumps or reverse donuts. I can drive it hard, but eventually something has to give.

If we want all the things to be indestructible,been need to let go of our weight concerns.
  • 2 0
 It seems like 'wear' parts have gotten substantially more expensive over the last several years. Brake pads, tires, chains and cassettes in particular. With cassettes and chains, they seem to be lasting longer (I'm amazed at the longevity of higher end SRAM chains and cassettes these days), but I haven't seen the same from tires and brake pads. Tires are easily $60 each, and sidewalls are much better - but they still wear out pretty quickly. Brake pads are kinda crazy - Some of the Shimano 4 piston ones are $40+ a pair, if you can find them.
  • 1 0
 Brake pads are an especially sore point. I can get pads cheaper for my car than I could for my bike - there’s something seriously wrong with that.
  • 2 0
 I suppose being only 65kg in weight definitely has its benefits. I have rarely worn parts out apart from brake pads and tyres. However, even they have lasted ages. My pair of 5/10s lasted 7 years! I've never worn a cassette or chain out in my life. Broken plenty of parts but rarely worn out.
  • 2 0
 Please buy chain wear tools as the answers above suggest people are replacing their chains way too early. Transmissions in general have evolved like crazy the last 10 years. I can put 2000 km on an 11s SRAM X1. Suspension has also gotten a lot better, just 10 years ago you needed to service your fox fork all the bloody time and the stanchions would still wear off. One area that needs improvement are harder compound, bigger sideknobs aggressive rear tyres. Something to put on in spring and last a full bike park season, then put the real tyres on for winter and racing.
  • 2 0
 My main grips at the moment are;
Fox 34 - £60 for two tools to remove the lowers to do an oil change. Currently waiting for some £5 bits from Aliexpress to make my own.
X Fusion - how about you sell some spares? I had to get a seal kit for a rear shock from Israel
  • 2 0
 @BreakLikeTheWind you don't need any special tools for doing a lowers service. You don't need the damper removal tool, a socket works fine just like it has for at least the last 10 years. You don't need the seal driver if you buy SKF or Manitou seals that have a flange.
  • 2 0
 @kiksy: For strict performance, you're correct. A drivetrain is a system concept. You would be on the optimal/racer track for replacement at that rate. For good (consumer-level) performance and factoring in value and environmental considerations, you could do, as @gaberoc mentions, chain once a season (6-12 months) followed by the other items as needed (I would stretch some parts past two years). And obviously, as many here have wisely pointed out, everything depends on local conditions, parts quality, rider size and riding style, etc. Ride weighing over 200 pounds in a Scottish winter, for example, and stuff will obviously go faster.

In general, many competent shop mechanics will use a maxim for drivetrain wear order for consumers:

1. Chain
2. Cassette
3. Chainring
--
4. Derailleur (if it ever goes; really should only need cables and clutch servicing plus new pulley wheels)

As a wheelbuilder, I like to add further that hubs should be cleaned out and re-greased and spokes checked for tension once a season (well built wheels should not need more than that, barring any rim-damage events).
  • 4 0
 With the amount of force that goes through the parts when hammering it down rough trails I'm surpised parts don't break more often to be honest.
  • 2 0
 I’ve been riding single speed for the past 2 years and I weigh anywhere from 235-255lbs without my gear on. I’m a little surprised by some of the consumables you guys are going through so fast. Also I’m a little surprised I haven’t been snowballing through parts.
  • 2 0
 when I bought entry level bike (deore level I believe ) 6 years ago it last me 2 season till everything fall apart including frame, then I bought middle level bike (xt level) it last me 4 seasons and still in decent shape;

It heavily depend on component level, I would not expect a lot from deore / NX however XRT covered under warranty of 3 years and typically harder to brake;

also under-biking and riding whistler 30 days per year probably not the best idea, I prefer to overbike just in case - in long run less headache in regards of durability
  • 2 0
 I would have absolutely no problem with current part lifespans if it were not for how expensive they are. Not discussed here, derailleurs; they develop an enormous amount of bushing slop after a heavy season of use. Also brake systems often develop a hydraulic vacuum or leak at the lever. Reverbs... don't even get me started on those things with their sag and $170 service... $4000 frames cracking after a season... I could go on but no one really cares. Bike parts are great, but not relative to how expensive they are.
  • 1 0
 For $170 you can just buy a more reliable dropper.
  • 2 0
 Funny how the Brodie was a reference for robustness. I remember my teammate breaking his 8 Ball frame back in 2003. It was heavy and still broke. Now the Big Hit DH with the 24” wheel. That was heavy and indescribable. Never had to re-align the rear wheel. ????
  • 2 0
 I'm only 60kg but i wear out the consumable parts way to quickly. I do use softer compound tyres so they are obviously going to wear quickly but my drivetrain (which I do look after) seems to where quickly (could be the uk weather). for things like wheels though at most I've dented an aluminum rim. I do run heavier duty stuff though because I hate spending money on things that have broken but then I end up with a heavier bike. I'm sure the bike Industry could make stronger and less wearable at a decent weight but... That means it will be expensive, off course, that's the majority of the bike industry.
  • 5 0
 So much of this depends on conditions and where you live
  • 2 0
 You need a poll for heavy riders as we munch through shit far quicker than the lighter folk. Rider weight and size plays a huge part in maintenance cycles and requirements. Same goes for wheels.
  • 3 0
 Well, I still have a 5.10 Minaar Shoes, the white/orange, remember those?? And a Fox Talas R blought in 2010, and I ride a GT Ruckus 3.0 2005 frame...
  • 1 0
 Just want to give a shout-out to the OG Fox Transfer post!! I got mine the month they were released and have yet to pull it apart. Thing still works like the day I bought it. In that same timeframe I’ve had Oneup, PNW Ranier, and Specialized Command, while they’ve all worked well, they all of needed a basic service after a few months
  • 1 0
 I would like to give a shout-out to the Bike Yoke Revive post. It is expensive, but after 3 years of hard riding, I still haven't even used the revive feature. Rock solid post.
  • 1 0
 @crudestmass: I have heard good things about the Revive. I am running PNW posts. They have lasted >3 years, and cost a lot less $$ than the Bike Yoke droppers.
  • 1 0
 I have two pairs of FiveTen Impact VXI, that are both over 4 years old and still in good shape, I exclusively ride flats, 4-5 days a week during the summer. I even use them on my gravel bike and indoor trainer in the winter. They must be pre-addias, as I haven't had the problems others complain about.
  • 1 0
 Mine are Adidas branded, nothing is falling apart on them and they have had a rough few years. Im sure its like the shimano brakes in these comment sections that are absolutely useless, or all of the rocky mountain/pole bikes that EVERYONE seems to have destroyed.
  • 2 0
 Yup, the people with issues are probably much more vocal than the people who are happy with them.
  • 1 0
 Flat shoes last about a season for me, and after trying several different brands, I don't see much difference in how long they last. Bontragers didn't last any longer than 5-10, Adidas Terrex also held up about the same, and Northwave is looking like they might hold up a tiny touch better, but maybe I just rode less this last season. Overall, I would stick with 5-10 or Northwave for future flat shoes, as they seem to last just as long as Vibram soled shoes, but actually grip the pedals.
  • 1 0
 I bought a Ripmo v1 1/6/2019. Ride between 1000-1200 miles of trail riding in NWA per year. I weigh 220lbs without gear and I jump but am not graceful. I'm quick but hold no KOMs or ranks on Strava.
Front and rear tires are maxxis minion exo+ 3c DHF and need replacement every 3-4 months b/c rear wear is extensive. I just tried a 2c rear to see if it will hold up any better.
Brakes pads are original saint pads.
Ibis carbon rims have been true and unbroken.
Ibis rear logo hub replaced at 18 months because of failure.
Bikeyoke dropper with loss of optimal function at 18 months but replaced today for warranty send off.
Ergon seat is original.
Ergon g2 grips are original.
Race face bar replaced for ergonomic reasons.
Stem original.
GX group set replaced with shimano XT at 8 months just because.
Shifting cable for xt replaced 3x since then for sticky/slow/poor shifting. Optislick shimano shift cable installed today to see if this helps what seems to be a design flaw.
Chain & cassette are original to xt swap.
Chainring new due to trail damage.
Ripmo frame discovered to have defect at main frame lower linkage mount today and will be replaced under warranty.
Fox 36 CSU replaced at 12 months for deep scratches on the stanchions. Not under warranty.
Fox x2 only had oil changed at 12 months because it was in pristine condition.
I'm most surprised by the tire wear. I thought my frame issue was premature but the quick approval for replacement indicates it's a known issue. The suspension has worked well. I think the wear is reasonable given the amount of use the bike gets. It seems to endure much more abuse and for longer periods than some of my peers' bikes.
  • 2 1
 My bike yoke post has never functioned all that well. But all the reviews are so glowing. Either I got a lemon or bike yoke is paying an army of people to post nice stuff about them online.
  • 2 0
 @iantmcg: my bike yoke ha s performed flawlessly (knocks on wood) Super smooth and I will service it this winter. Must have got a lemon.
  • 1 0
 @iantmcg: my OG 160mm Revive is good as new after about 3 years and all I have ever done to it is wipe it down sometimes.
  • 1 0
 @PhillipJ: nice yeah I suspect I just got a lemon, the price you pay for being an early adopter sometimes... which I usually never am but broke my rule here and paid the price. They even upgraded to the gen 2 internals when I paid for it to be rebuilt and it still is squishy that last 1/4 inch or so which is super annoying. My buddy sheared a post off too which is not an unheard of issue for the post.
  • 1 0
 They last long enough for the 1 year lease program that I seem to run even though the bike is perfectly fine. The bike is fine Chris. You don't need to keep buying new bikes every year. What are you searching for? Will the next bike be any better? How will I know if I don't keep trying? And then that's how the cycle repeats itself. So again, I guess it all lasts long enough.
  • 1 0
 For me the freerider pros wear out in about 8 months. Still have sole and grip but the support is gone and they are super soft. This leads to pain in the feet on long descents for me. I only wear them riding too. The soles wearing out is expected just wish the guts lasted longer.
  • 1 0
 I have *NEVER* work out a frame, if dented lots of rims, but simple maintenance takes care of the rest. I also find a good wet riding session on the MTB destroys drive trains. As for my road bike, I replace the drive train like every 2 years?
  • 1 0
 Definitely. My Fox Van 36s feel like the world of difference with a lower leg service, feel like a new set of forks but the bladder bleed in the damper is such a b!tch. I do feel that Fox forks are a bit needy with service intervals. Thinking of it.... I've got a pair of Totems running super smooth still after just under 2 years.
  • 1 0
 So far, I’ve had about three downhill seasons on my old syncros wheels laced to hope hubs. I’ve only just recently snapped an alloy nipple but they still roll true. They’re not the lightest wheels by far but they just won’t die lol.
  • 1 0
 My mountain bicycle parts in the past have not necessarily, "broken" for the most part, just degraded. Like you know, kind of like riding around with 40% damage. Like dented inwards frame, bent rims, flat rims, ovalized headtubes, bent handlebars, etcetera.
  • 2 1
 2 alloy rear rims per 6 month season was pretty normal for me, and then I switched to @WeAreOne . Based the garbage I smashed it through this year and its current condition I don't know that I'll ever wear this rim out. Its already on its second hub.

Also, who is leaving their chains on for two years?! I hope thats due to the bike spending a lot of time hanging in the garage
  • 2 1
 I felt I had to generalize a lot as some brands or parts wear out way quicker than others IMO but when judging across the entire the whole category couldn’t differentiate. For example, for wheels if I am talking my Stans on 350’s it’s going to last years. If I was talking an E13 on a Novatech Hub I’d give it 7-12 seconds. SRAM GX- 6 months/ Shimano XT- a year. Etc.
  • 1 0
 I do but parts that generally last a long time. I am willing to spend more to get them. The driving reason is the amount of maintenance I have to do to keep it working well more than the environmental impact that it might have (though that is a nice side benefit). I have found Sram parts to last quite a bit longer than their Shimano counter parts, particularly the cassettes and chains, but also derailleurs and shifters (the gaps is much smaller there). For tires I buy what works for me pretty much without thought for longevity and the same for things like brake pads.

Overa bike parts are way better than they were 15-20 years ago when shit broke all the time.
  • 1 0
 FWIW I think both the frame and rim durability questions should have been preceded by a "carbon" or "alloy" question. I've had an alloy frame break, but never a carbon one. Likewise I've trashed quite a few alloy rims, but never had an issue with (admittedly high quality) carbon. The materials are vastly different WRT damage and wear life. Just sayin'...
  • 1 0
 Measuring the life of a component in months instead of hours of riding is the biggest fault of this poll.
There's a huge difference between a component that lasts 3 months being used 5 hours a day 7/w and one that is used once a week.
  • 2 0
 Would be great if Adidas/5.10 started offering resoling their shoes - except holes in the soles (and their complete lack of stiffness) my Freeriders are perfectly fine after 2 seasons.
  • 1 0
 I have no idea how long things last because I typically have more than one bike and I change tires and shoes depending on the season and which bike for which purpose. I never run the same tire or shoes every ride all year round.
  • 2 1
 Why choose time as the metric. It is totally subjective. Kilometres is objective (despite terrain and load variables) and irrelevant to time. My normal ride week is some peoples month (if they are lucky) but 3000 km in a year is always 3000 km in a year.
  • 1 0
 some o us are unable to ride year round so some parts last longer than others. Some local trail networks do not allow riding in wet conditions so parts will last more time on our bike depending on riding frequency. Regular cleaning and maintenance are important factors when calculating the longevity of drive components. By the time the laces need to be replaced, the soles are blown out of my flat shoes or they've shrunk due to repeatedly being dried over a heater.
  • 1 0
 i use eagle x01/xx1 casette and chsin because it lasts forever.
i replace my rear tire far too late.
i replace my brake pads when it hits the metal (ie far too late)
droppers tend to "need service" too quickly

i choose parts based on how many weird tools are needed and how complex servicing is, cuz sending them back for service is crazy shit (between delay and price)
  • 1 0
 Longevity of 12 speed Shimano really not acceptable at all for me, especially in comparison to 11 and 10 speed XT that last forever if changing out chains as required. 3 years on XT 10 speed on one bike, 2-4 months max on Shimano 12 speed. Since converting to 12 speed last June, on my third cassette (XT and SLX), 4 chains (XT and SLX), 2 chain rings (OneUp 12spd oval). Love the range and gears of 12 speed, just too thin and tight tolerances that accelerates wear too fast for the cost especially. Fact cannot change Hi individual cogs on 12 speed Shimano like 10 and 11 when getting a bit worn, cassettes just don’t last. In market for ebike this year, and really wish companies offered with longer lasting stuff like Zee short cage FR derailleur, Saint shifter, XT full steel cassette 11-36. Rant out! Also most all single ply tires (with or without foam liners) don’t last two squats for me as well before badly torn and off bike. At the prices the these companies charge, stuff really needs to last longer
  • 1 0
 Because I moved to Boise, and because I got sick of fixing stuff, I switched to single speed. It was a good choice. If you have the resources and live in a place that doesn’t have aggressive terrain I recommend you make the switch. Parts last longer and there are fewer of them
  • 1 0
 For MTB shoes and rubber, I’m happy with the grip of my five ten free riders, and it’s really durable considering the abuse on the pedal pins that it takes. The one thing I would like to see would be maybe just a thicker sole made of the same rubber. The tread could be deeper and the the outsole could even be double the thickness. This would retain the same grip and also increase the durability. I wouldn’t mind if there was a little less sensitivity as well. The soles have always felt a bit thin and flexible on my freeriders for my taste. Thicker sole would also change that.
  • 1 0
 I put a fair number of km’s on my bike each year (around 3500 km of singletrack trails). I have found higher end parts to last longer for sure. I would have no problem with replacing (and upgrading parts) if they weren’t so darn expensive. It seems crazy to spend $1000 to replace worn parts on even a $5000 bike, never mind a less expensive on a less expensive bike. I also feel that all parts of a bike should be serviceable by a decent home mechanic without the need for any ridiculously expensive tools. All manufacturers should provide good service manuals and nothing should require a component to be sent away to be serviced.
  • 1 0
 I have broken a rear wheel after 5 hours by riding like an idiot. I halve also not broken a rear wheel for 5 years by riding like an idiot. On the 5-hour wheel, there was a rogue rock in the way of me being the regular idiot.
  • 1 0
 I miss hucking but a pile of broken frames has taught me that if I want a bike all season avoiding big drops with hard landings must be avoided. New bikes are better in most aspects except being able to take massive abuse. Bring back the huck rigs! (I know it doesn’t make sense for companies to do this)
  • 1 0
 Average "regular" riding is 3 times a week? I think this is pink bike journalists in their own bubble. As long as I am have been working I have never been able to ride three times a week unless I include cycling to work or skatepark trips, which would have been on a different bike so not count towards the ware on the components I was measuring.
  • 2 0
 Shout-out to Manitou who are actually committed to making user-serviceable suspension. Almost of the tools are easy to source or you already own. I wish they got more love on Pinkbike.
  • 1 0
 Give us two groupset levels. Rider and Pro. Rider is good durable stuff that does the job, lasts and doesn't break the bank. Pro is all the latest tech and max lightness. The amount these companies would save in marketing, designing, packaging and stocking 5 different levels of groupset would save enough to bring down the price of components as a whole, saving us money and them greater margins.
  • 2 0
 Tough questions to answer. Up here in the great white north our riding season is barely 6 months. Answers should be based on riding season and not months.
  • 1 0
 I just considered 1 year to mean 1 riding season.
  • 6 6
 f*ck. That most people think their drivetrain last 2 to 3 years shows how unbelievably ignorant so called serious rider bike owners are about bike maintenance. That they are happy with the current longevity of drivetrains shows how easily and how well they have been duped by Shimano and Sram.

No one thinks replacing the transmission or clutch in their vehicle every 1 to 2 years is acceptable but they lap that shit up form the bicycle industry like its hagen das ice cream.

Why do we have shit drivetrains with constant cross loading and full exposure to the elements and dirt when no other vehicle on earth does? Because fools have been duped into believing a better just as light and jus as efficient internal system is not possible or cost effective.

LISTEN UP! Its not cost effective for Sram or Shimano who like making you buy a new drivetrain one or two times per year. You folks who think your drivetrain lasts 2 years and are blown away when you get on a demo bike or your buddy's new bike are feeling what your own long dead drivetrain should feel like.

Stop being a hapless sheep dipping into your pocket for what ever the latets n+1 cog shit the S guys shove down your throat next to pad their bottom line. Demand better. If your 20k car transmission lasts 20 years your 5k bike should have a transmission that lasts 5 year.

They already exist as internal hubs. Why dont you have one for your bike or a gear box based on it? Not weight, not lack of efficiency or strength. That can all be done. Shimano knows their Alfine and Nexas hubs last decade without even the recommended oil changes. If they gave us that their bottom line would be f*cked instead of yours.
  • 9 0
 @davemud Is this something you’re passionate about?
  • 1 0
 We need to do the service of your mountain bikes at the shop to see what we need to do. very nice. SRAM is very good.l did seven upgrades it looks very nice for this season.2021
  • 1 0
 The answers need more context. There are so many variables. How often do you ride? What's you riding style? Are you heavy on the brakes? How well do you maintain your bike? etc.
  • 1 0
 I'm sure someone already pointed this out, but the poll should of been based on mileage/distances ridden AND vertical. Time doesn't really factor into wear and tear, because we all have different riding habits.
  • 1 0
 I expect Fox forks to last about 3 months before needing a new CSU so imagine my surprise when I got my 38 to last 4 before it started sounding like a bowl of rice krispies snap crackle popping down the trail.
  • 4 2
 Should have another option on the drivetrain question detailing whether you use SRAM or Shimano lol
  • 6 0
 same for droppers. have a reverb? probably need to service once a month
  • 6 0
 Xt will probably last longer then the frame
  • 2 0
 @nickmalysh: Honestly it's true. I bought a demo bike 5 years ago and all I've done is throw a new cahin on it every few years and she's good to go
  • 2 0
 @OlManJenkins: my shimano saints are now on their third bike.
  • 2 0
 My issue with tires is splitting the inner casing so their all wobbly before I even wear the tread close to down.
  • 6 0
 Mainly due to low pressures; the tire squirming around under a ton of load and hitting the rim can cause the internal plies to tear
  • 1 0
 @mnorris122: I usually keep between 26-30 in the year but ride pretty far back on the bike. Just put a insert in so maybe that will help out.
  • 3 0
 Grip longevity could be a good addition to this article.
  • 2 0
 My 510s are like 4 months old and they do not have another 4 months in them for sure. Love the Adidas warranty tho!
  • 3 0
 I couldn't count the number of rear rims that I have busted.
  • 9 0
 I that about your riding or your math?
  • 5 0
 @dcaf: Unforchently both.
  • 8 6
 In general, do parts last as long as you expect them to?

Yes - Shimano
No - SRAM
  • 6 2
 Funny, I have the opposite experience. Shimano brakes with wandering bite point, leaky pistons and always needing a bleed. Sram Codes have been the epitome of reliability for me, though I prefer the lever feel and power of Shimano (when they work).
Shimano 12sp has also been the least reliable thing ever for me. And I've run Sram NX...
  • 2 0
 @notthatfast: i find the reports of the wondering bite points in Shimano brakes confusing. I’ve used brand new Shimano brakes from SLX thru XTR from 3 generations ago to the latest and have never experienced any pumping issues that people have reported, except for older levers where either the bleed is improper or when the maintenance is neglected on the calipers and/or the master cylinder piston seals. Brand new Shimano brakes, especially the XT’s and XTR’s and even on SLX feels so good. But after a while, when the fluid gets contaminated most likely from the fine dust on the calipers, the brakes start to feel spongy. I neglected to maintain the piston seals clean (or i thought i did like most people) and the lever started leaking. Is this Shimano’s fault - no. All i needed to do is replacement seals on the piston for the master cylinder, apply some sliicone grease, and rebleed. Then, clean the calipers. If this maintenance was done every year, i won’t have to deal with the leaking issue. However, like most people, i didn’t know about this as it was undocumented. I even asked another friend about this and he said there only thing he does with his brake maintenance is just flush and bleed. If there wondering bite point is really an issue, Shimano would have recalled or fixed issue their brakes long ago due to safety concerns. XT parts have like s 2 year warranty and XTR parts have 3 year warranty. What does SRAM have -1 year?
  • 4 1
 If you ever wondered what Levy's face looks like while taking a shit....
  • 2 0
 Shoes: run them until I can no longer stand the scent of them in my truck. So bad...
  • 3 0
 how much do you sell this data for PB?
  • 2 0
 The rim questions need to be separated out for carbon and alloy. Alloy rear rims are basically wear parts.
  • 2 0
 I fukc rear rims often, that could mean 2 things but I'm most certainly talking about bikes.
  • 1 0
 My answers are a bit skewed as I have multiple bikes, so my riding gets divided between them and parts typically last longer.
  • 1 0
 My brake pad last until I get some sort of oil on them. I never actually manage to wear them out before spilling or spraying something on them.
  • 1 0
 It’s hard to gauge wear timelines in terms of months/ years due to variable use of each bike and trail conditions. NBD, just N+1 problems.
  • 2 0
 Fork is the bigest problème for me .
2 creaking fork in 2 year
I am only 180 lbs
  • 3 0
 Parts last for a long time. Standards dont
  • 2 0
 In Argentina it isnt only cost regarding replacement, availability is a major issue.
  • 2 0
 Where’s the everything on my bike is worn out and or broke, But I’m still riding it options?
  • 1 0
 The cheaper magura brakes are terrible, I've had two rear brakes and neither of them have lasted more than about 6 months, I only ride that bike about once or twice a week
  • 1 0
 I really don't like the durability of grips. They don't really wear out, they just aren't that durable when crashing, or even just leaning your bike on a wall etc.
  • 1 0
 Id love to see bike shops offer recycling of old components, especially tires.

Perhaps some of the bigger brands could help create these programs?
  • 1 0
 Be interesting to see how much different the wear rates on components are on e bikes compared to real/acoustic mountain bikes.
  • 1 0
 The best suspension product for service intervals was the original Z1 Bomber. I would take the weight penalty of all that oil sloshing around any day.
  • 1 0
 Frames are fine. Frame bearings on the other hand... 3-6 months is not good enough. Most frame problems I have had in the last 10 years have been caused by rubbish bearings.
  • 1 0
 Why isn’t the first question on this poll, what breaks first in an accident, you or your bike? For me, it’s me, every time...
  • 1 0
 No one talking about bearings. I get one season out of a set of frame bearings. Riding all year round, UK, wet, Sandy and salty.
  • 2 0
 What's going on in that 2nd to last photo??
  • 4 0
 Bad things
  • 4 0
 That danger noodle did not deserve to die like that, poor snake.
  • 2 0
 Rampage
  • 2 0
 over/under rotate a 360 at rampage. Also, Freeriders still use tubes
  • 1 1
 Needs more air.
  • 2 1
 I want to know about these people who are only getting 3-4 chains per complete drivetrain.
  • 3 6
 I just replace all at once. 1 chain to 1 cassette. Get about 18 months about it and around 3000 miles. Is that not normal? The cassette seems done by then in first gear rather than the chain giving up.
  • 1 0
 @kiksy: The results say people change their chains every 6-12 months and drivetrain every 2 years. Seems that they would be better off using your method.
  • 6 0
 My experience for 20 years of racing is: frequent chain swap means chainrings and cassettes last much much longer
  • 2 0
 @kiksy: I get 2/3 chains per cassette as long as I don't let the chain stretch past 75% really depends on the conditions - I was fortunate to work in a shop so easy to stay on top of maintenance.
  • 1 0
 @flowgnar: how long/many miles do you think you get from a cassette with swapping chains?
  • 4 0
 @kiksy: no if you wash and lube your chain it will last donkeys but more importantly your cassette will last double donkeys
  • 3 0
 A simple chain checker, and then replacing when stretched, keeps my cassettes going for a very long time. I have cassettes that are 4-5 years old and still have plenty of life in them.
  • 1 0
 @Offrhodes: I changed lubes to one that keeps my chain pretty clean (at the cost of needing to apply it between rides, or even take it with on rides over 50 miles or with lots of creek crossings), and my component life has improved so much. On my current cassette I've worn out my "favorite" gear but I'm just avoiding it for now because it's winter...
  • 2 1
 Strava needs to up its game so we can track this ....I got 4000k out of a drive train and RF narrow wide.
  • 2 0
 You already can do this... you can add components on the my gear page and then you'll know what date it went on and the km you got out of it.
  • 2 2
 "I would expect the drivetrain to last as long as the bike". Doesn't make any sense, how long a bike "lasts" was not defined.
  • 2 0
 Environmental concerns my ass!! Better late than never consumers...
  • 2 0
 still running a kenda kozmik lite from 20 yrs ago!
  • 1 0
 Is it just me or am I going through 12 speed chains and rings like underwear?
  • 1 0
 Frame bearing wear out way to fast and often cost a fortune and need special tools to install.
  • 2 1
 no bearings problems ? ????
Freewheel ? ????
Lucky Guys...
  • 1 0
 The answer is no, but sometimes yes.
  • 1 0
 I hope this isn't a prelude to another summer of Trivia!
  • 1 1
 I feel brakes have become less reliable in some ways for the sake of weight. I'd bad things for an old set of hope v2s.
  • 1 1
 I think about the price, but not for very long, guess that's because I don't run a Sram 12spd!
  • 1 1
 need a lower option on the frame question, i cracked my last one in under 6 months from just riding a lot
  • 1 0
 I’ll wait the new wheel size!!!
  • 1 1
 I wish I could get 2 months from a chain and 6 months from a drivetrain on my ebike. Half that.
  • 1 0
 and that is the OEM part, not a jobber.
  • 1 1
 Most riders never broke a frame-rear rims last 2-3 years. No watt pushing, no drop sending wankers!!!
  • 2 1
 A tire lasting a year? Do you even ride, bro?
  • 2 4
 Wow I was so surprised,I kill a rear tire in way less than 3 months, chain yeah one per season 1 months max , so people here dont ride as much
  • 4 0
 Either you have legs the size of Dangerholms, or just buy really cheap chains
  • 3 0
 More than one bike Wink
  • 3 4
 If your not wrecking an aluminum rim at least once year, your not riding hard enough.
  • 13 3
 No, you're just a hack with poor line choice and too low tire pressure.
  • 2 2
 I feel we should be compensated for these surveys.
  • 1 0
 A lot longer than I do!
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