Pinkbike Poll: How Important Are Water Bottles?

Jan 12, 2021 at 16:56
by Henry Quinney  
The Grim Donut
The initial Grim Donut had such lofty expectations of hydration heaven.

A few years ago we asked you whether you were for, or indeed against, water bottles in a Pinkbike poll.

The poll was made of two parts. To the initial question, concerning your hydration method of choice, the majority of you said that you preferred carrying a pack. The second question was whether water bottle compatibility was something of a deal breaker when buying a new frame. To that, the significant minority of you said that you felt as if it was. Well, it's been nearly five years and the debate may well have shifted.

2020 Nukeproof Mega 290 Factory Photo Kifkat Shaperideshoot
2021 Nukeproof Mega
The 2021 Nukeproof Mega now comes with space for a bottle and sees a very different downtube shape.

Personally, I have the evolutionary quirk of needing hydration to survive and for me anything that inhibits that is a no-go. I like having a bottle for its ease of access, low cost and also the fact that maybe the water bottle is itself possibly the only true standard in mountain biking.

However, others would disagree. The argument prevails that why on earth are we fitting bikes to water bottles and not the other way around? Rear suspension on a bike is there for grip - anything that compromises that is clearly a bad thing. I suppose I would argue that it's just one of the many design challenges facing enduro and trail bikes and some will embrace it more than others.

But what do you think? In 2021 should all freshly released bikes be coming with space for a water bottle in the front triangle? Or is this something fuelled by thirsty Kirsty's, such as myself, who over emphasise the need for at hand hydration? Vote below, and we'll see how opinions have changed in the last five years.



When considering a new bike, does whether or not it can accept a water bottle factor into your decision making process?




494 Comments

  • 622 8
 I drink water straight from a mountain stream while a bald eagle flies behind me and a rainbow shines on me and reflects off of my perfectly new S-Works and I ride next to wild mustangs.
  • 50 4
 Wild mustangs lol. What is this 2004?
  • 2 0
 lmao
  • 35 0
 All of this but Wyld Satllyns
  • 99 2
 you don't have room for water what with your AR15 mount and all.
  • 31 3
 We're calling them AR-14's now.
  • 27 10
 Ahh must be nice being a dentist.
  • 14 4
 I Mean, Who needs water? it really is quite awkward pee in the forest with your friends watching
  • 21 1
 The opening scene of the next Anthill movie
  • 9 0
 And your Giardiasis kicks in the next 48hrs...
  • 16 0
 When I lived in Mesa Arizona I rode among wild Mustangs a few times. No mountain streams, bald eagles though.
  • 18 0
 What a rugged individual
  • 43 1
 @d-a-n-c-e: I think you're doing it wrong or you need new friends. They don't have to watch despite what they might have said.
  • 6 0
 If mustangs are as riddled with parasites as our brumbies, then do not drink the water.
  • 28 0
 Water? Who needs water when you have tiger blood and cocaine.
  • 2 0
 @j-p-i: I think he is talking about Mustang Sally.
  • 9 0
 If you ride an S-works you can fit a “Swaterbottle”
  • 2 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: just did that in mesa riding NRA
  • 4 1
 @adrennan: I strap the AR to my camelback personally...
  • 2 1
 More like a rainbow shines out of your a*%e!
  • 5 3
 So I clicked "yes it's a major factor" on the second question because I hate water bottles and would rather have a bike without space or mounts for a bottle holder. The question was phrased "whether or not"... Just saying Beer
  • 2 0
 @jarrod801: that’s the spot.
  • 5 0
 @FunctionalMayhem: haha I’ve had to drink from a mtn stream a couple of times (now pack a filter) and always thought “that’s tomorrow’s problem” luckily I have an iron stomach and haven’t caught the ole beaver fever
  • 2 0
 @Honda750: that’s the reason I put a sawyer filter inline on my hydra-pack. Then I can get water anywhere.
  • 4 2
 Wow.....you must be Chuck Norris. I heard Sam Hill is looking for you.....
  • 5 0
 @scotttherider:
Yep I use an MSR mini pump filter. It’s great peace of mind on a big pedal, and also lets ya pack less water if you know there’s a stream 3-4hrs into an epic.
  • 2 0
 No fireworks?
  • 2 0
 @dangeraem: Look, if they pay, they at least get to watch. Now, if someone starts whistling the theme to Ghost... Well, that's another matter. Course, if they look like Patrick Swayze...
  • 1 0
 You are awesome man! Best comments in years. Why people decided with "AR-14" comments is a sad state of affairs.
  • 1 0
 @Honda750: passed down from my father.

Drink from the fast running water to reduce the chances of beaver fever.

Dont know if its true or not. Probably cursed myself now so fingers crossed.

Anyone know if this is a myth or true?
  • 2 0
 @fabwizard: Ok. So 'beaver fever' is giardiasis. Drinking fast running water cannot prevent giardiasis contamination - a still body of water eventually flows into a fast running section. The giardiasis protozoa is not killed by water turbulence. In fact, it is a pretty robust organism. www.cdc.gov/parasites/giardia/index.html
  • 2 0
 @iamamodel: but, as far as weird crap growing in water, stagnant water is more dangerous than moving, no? Also if I understand correctly, giardiasis doesn’t contaminate a body of water uniformly, so if you drink from a stream, you may or may not ingest some. I used to backpack every summer in the high Uintahs of Utah, and we would get our water exclusively from springs and from underneath snow fields. Never used filters or tablets and never got sick. But I don't know if I'd still take that risk. Definitely wouldn't drink anything that isn't coming straight out of the mountainside.
  • 1 2
 @j-p-i: I almost thought ford sponsored a new mustang powered spez ebike
  • 11 0
 @iamamodel: Australia checking in! if it's not poisonous, or 5x larger than it should be, I guess it's cute and poops parasites in the water to kill you.


it's like murder island, but with better looking women.
  • 8 4
 Snowflakes! Can't have weight in their backs?. I put a bottle in a backpack along with some cable ties and assault weapons, ammo, pipe bombs and an American flag·
  • 3 0
 @ronan: better watch yourself. The us is watching all sorts of sites now... you’ll be on a terrorist watch list now....oh shit...I’m gonna be on one for associating with y’all now....better make my tin foil hat and go back inside my copper mesh curtain with my guns myself!....
  • 4 0
 Sam Hill fills his new water bottle with kryptonite to show up Superman
  • 1 0
 You know they done studies right. 60% of the time this comment works every time!
  • 1 0
 Shootin for 2021's top 20 I see...
  • 1 0
 @FunctionalMayhem: that’s no joke. I’d rather die of thirst do that again
  • 1 0
 @AllMountin: You mean the School special
  • 7 0
 Is there any design which sacrifices performance to fit a bottle?

If you want to make a design that can’t fit a bottle, simply make a custom bottle and include it with the bike.
  • 1 0
 @d-a-n-c-e: weird..my friends don't watch me pee
  • 6 0
 @Rasterman: in the future the water will be in the frame
  • 2 0
 @wheelsmith: In Soviet Russia, bottle ride you.
  • 2 0
 @Chuckolicious: dude then they can’t see how much fun riding is and ban it! You might be on to something! I need tin foil turbines in my leatt helmet though. It doesn’t have mips....
  • 1 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: I think the thought is that the parasites will hang out in the still stream water more than on say the rapids or waterfalls.

Forgot to add that on a summer expedition my dad's crew ran out of water and it was drink from trickle of water or die. They made it out the next day but by second day all had beaver fever.

Note they did not drink from fast running water just a dripping moss spot in the forest.
  • 5 0
 @Honda750: Gotta bad case of that beaver fever.....for a long dammed time.
  • 1 0
 @lake-st: sally never asked the question
  • 1 0
 Sounds like you’re the next lead for the up and coming old spice advert son! Time to shine!!!!!!
  • 3 0
 @Rasterman: I think many designs make sacrifices in durability to fit a bottle. The pregnant looking bump-out near the bottom bracket is to fit a bottle and it is the first thing to get smashed, hence the need for such big bash pads. Without that bump out, the chainring protected the bottom of the downtube from big rocks/logs/etc. This was more usefull back in the days when a triple had a 44t ring, but nevertheless, I'd rather replace a chainring than my frame!
  • 3 0
 @AllMountin: nah, AR-14s are actually a real gun. Let's call them AR-1000s
  • 2 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: When I lived in Arizona. I rode among wild Burros, irrigation canals, and bald snow birds!
  • 1 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: Did You Just Drink their blood Instead of water?
  • 1 0
 @sunringlerider: That Escalated Quickly
  • 2 0
 @d-a-n-c-e: Dont' knock it til you try it
  • 2 0
 @d-a-n-c-e: mmmm... iron.
  • 1 0
 @2-1RacingUK: Oh God No.
  • 262 2
 It’s simple. If my ride is less than a couple hours or I’m on a familiar trail system and can easily bail out I will never, ever bring a pack. Going on an all day ride in unfamiliar territory? Then the pack comes along
  • 101 1
 You betcha. Packs have their place for big days, but 80% of my rides are 1.5hrs or less and that means a bottle.
  • 41 1
 Even then, I’ll just add a small hip pack with an additional bottle that augments the one on my bike. So no bottle is a deal breaker for all my riding.
  • 57 0
 Sure a pack comes along, but so does the water bottle. It allows less weight on the back. I also like a water bottle to add drink mixes in since cleaning a reservoir is a pain.
  • 1 0
 Same with me, also in the summer when it's very hot here I tend to do short local rides wearing as little as possible and a big bottle in the frame. For the rest of the year and long rides I take the pack but put a frame bag with spares where the bottle usually goes so the space is super important.
  • 9 0
 @jasbushey: 100% this.

I drink a lot and live in a hot climate so being able to bring a few litres in a hydration pack and supplement with a bottle with electrolytes is an awesome combo.
  • 4 0
 I always bring a ruckie. Easier for me to just leave my stuff in there all the time and just grab one bag each time.
  • 13 1
 i always ride with a pack as the times I did not i regretted it....also it acts as a crash pad
  • 16 19
 Am I the only guy doing neither? I just chuck a water bottle in my backpack, and when I need a drink I stop and have a drink. If I need more water: two water bottles.
  • 1 0
 Same here
  • 5 1
 @jasbushey: 100% this. If a ride is long enough to need a full pack of water, you probably should also be carrying some sort of electrolyte drink. I also never put anything but water in my reservoir either since it is a nightmare to clean.

Sometimes when I finish the bottle, I will just refill it from my pack to move some of the weight on my back onto the frame as well.
  • 1 0
 @Sasquatchumus: No you’re not. One of my long term riding buddies does exactly that.
  • 12 7
 I rode the White Rim back in November and only brought two bottles with me and whatever food I could carry in my bib pockets. We planned to meet the support vehicle at 50 miles and top top off water and food because I hate carrying a pack. Turns out bikes are faster than trucks out there and he didn’t catch us until after we finished. We had to push through 100 miles and 7,000’ of climbing with 44 oz of water and 650 calories. I’m glad it didn’t end poorly, but it could have. Hating packs can get you into trouble.
  • 7 1
 Same here. I ask friends who come on 10-15 mile rides with packs if they expect our expedition to reach base camp 1 before dark.
  • 3 0
 I recently realized that I've got no problem going for a run for 1.5 hours and I never bring water with me. So why do I always bring water on my bike? I've been doing a lot of rides with no pack, no water bottle. It's been awesome. But it's also not 90 degrees out right now. I'm sure I'll go back to bringing water once summer comes.
  • 1 0
 @Hayek: you should have waited in the shade tbh not too smart be careful
  • 1 0
 Bring a pack and then use it to refill your water bottle. Ride a quick local loop, and fit in a 100 mile epic into the same ride. Best of both worlds.
  • 1 0
 Winter: bottle with spares on the frame. Lots of mountain streams on my trail systems.

Summer: pack. It gets hot and the streams dry up.
  • 7 0
 Maybe I've just got old and sensible, but I decided to always ride with a back protector. And if I'm going to have straps around the front and something sweaty on my back, it may as well be useful. So I have a back protector camelback which has snack, small first aid kit, phone, goggles cloth in it. For longer rides I'll put a squashy bottle in it (cleaning bladders sucks). But heavy stuff - bottle, tool - goes on the bike to save my lower back.
  • 4 0
 I usually ride for 3 hours and so its not really practical to have bottles for that. Anything less than an hour is great for just camelling it, and ninety minutes with a bottle means that I'll go 30 minutes without water at the end. Camelbaks for the win!
  • 1 1
 @ahauck I had the same mentality until I read an article about an accident at Leeds bike park where a rider was badly injured 0.5 mile from the car park and spent hours laid in the freezing cold waiting for an ambulance. Despite many people bike around few were equipped to help as most were only carrying a water bottle. Since reading that article I’ve found myself using the pack even on short loops I know well as that could very easily be anyone of us laid 2 miles from home on a local trail as we expect help to arrive quickly.
  • 3 0
 @Sasquatchumus: But that... defeats the entire purpose. you have the uncomfortability of a backpack, but the inefficiency of a water bottle.
  • 1 0
 @Sasquatchumus: Some Serious Sientific algorithm; If you Need more water, bring another water bottle!
  • 104 10
 I find it surprising how many people don't like hydration packs. I feel like water bottles don't hold enough water for long rides.
  • 55 0
 It's true, but they are perfect for short rides or rides in a trail center. You sweat less and have a greater freedom of movement eithout a pack.
  • 68 1
 It’s not that people don’t like packs. It’s just that riding without one is so much more comfortable. I still like hydration packs, but riding without one is just “nicer”. It’s a luxury to ride without a pack. Not a requirement.
  • 7 0
 If you have enough streams you can just filter or use aquatabs.
  • 8 1
 What I find surprising is everyone has to choose a side and there’s no option or opinion after that decision. Why can’t both situations be good, but people just prefer one over the other?
  • 14 0
 I used to use a hydro pack. Then I tried riding without one and it was a game changer. Bottle on the bike for up to 2 hour rides. Longer rides and racing I add a small hip pack that carries a second bottle.
  • 13 0
 Same. I regularly empty my 3L camelbak.

I'm in the PNW, and in the winter, on 1.5hr rides, I'll drink 1.5-2L. In the summer I've had to cut rides short/refill halfway at times.

Maybe I just sweat a lot.

That said, its because of my thirst for water, that I want to make sure that my bike at least fits a single bottle, to extend my range in the summer, and maybe play around with what riding with a single bottle is like.

Current bike won't fit one though :/.
  • 2 0
 @ocnlogan: they make removable bottle mounts
  • 6 1
 Wasn't the rage in the early 2010's was not having water bottles. Now water bottles are a must-have?
  • 3 0
 When I got out for a 1 hour ride at my local trail it’s much easier to grab a water bottle. When I go ride in real mountains, no bottle I take the pack.
  • 5 0
 Even hydration packs don't hold enough water. I like riding with just a bottle as much as anyone else, but anything over an hour I take a a waist pack hydration bag, if it's going to be 3 hours a water bottle goes on the frame, over 3 hours then a pack, a bottle on the pack, and another on the bike. For all day epics I bring a full CamelBak and a bottle of sport drink.
  • 4 4
 @femto505: just like oval rings (biopace). These trends are cyclical
  • 10 0
 @cuban-b: I think it goes along the lines of 'Pick a hydration source and be a d**k about it". This is Pink Bike after all (smiley face).
  • 12 1
 @philalm: you pack-wearing wusses are lame!

(Flat)

Hey... so does anyone have a tube? Hehe forget about what I said before..
  • 2 0
 @cuban-b: you typed the b-word - my knees just had involuntary anger spasms
  • 2 0
 @cuban-b: I guess the debate is perhaps bike companies need to make big design alterations to fit a bottle inside the main triangle. No one seems keen on a downtube or toptube mounted one!
  • 6 0
 @cuban-b: im all for any solution. I have a bin full of saddle bags, straps, hip packs, back packs, cage mounts... all depends on the ride in going on. I will only wear a backpack if I absolutely must, they are the least comfortable thing to wear on a bike.
  • 8 0
 Man I must sweat more than most because a 1.5h ride above 80F and I'm going through 2L of water for sure.
  • 5 0
 @ocnlogan: Try adding an electrolyte powder to your water. I sweat like a pig when I ride, or do just about anything else, and I cut my water consumption in half on my rides. Drinking water doesn't replace the salt and whatnot you're losing.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: I’m just like you - I have all these half assed solutions ready to go, so I feel like many riders are like this as well
  • 2 3
 EVER had one open up and pour cold water down your ass? I never trusted the plastic tasting bag again and threw them all out. I would rather stop and fill them up.
  • 2 3
 Backpacks are so much hotter, they make you sweat more and then you need to drink more, it's self-reinforcing. I usually drink about a bottle an hour, so I can go three hours with frame mount + 2 in a hip pack.
  • 2 0
 @ocnlogan: try the NUUN tabs, if your drinking that much water on rides I would hazard a guess you get wicked dehydration headaches if you don’t? As a guy who also drinks a LOT of water on rides having a non sugary electrolyte mix has helped me a lot.
  • 2 0
 @madmon: I once sat on my camelback mouthpiece on a long drive to a snow ride. Didn’t realize it until my pants and chamois were soaked. Luckily we stopped at a shop for a buddy to rent a fat bike and they let me stand in front of their space heater until I dried out. Otherwise it would have been a rather uncomfortable ride.
  • 3 1
 Depends on climate, location, fitness, and season. In the PNW I have no problem doing 50 miles with a single bottle and a small water filter.
  • 2 3
 Packs are uncomfortable. You wont notice if you only ride 1-2x a week. If you start racing, do multiple rides a day, and/or start being more competitive, the big pack becomes burdensome.
  • 2 0
 @cuban-b: hey! I didn't say which hydration source I was going to be a dick about!
  • 6 0
 I don't know why no one hasn't mentioned this yet, but drinking water before the ride is almost/more important than drinking water during the ride.
  • 1 0
 Wait, are we talking about water still, or politics?
  • 2 0
 I don't pee between rides. Store all the water in my bladder. If I have an epic ride planned I don't pee for the week before the ride. No need for a pack or a water bottle.
  • 3 0
 @captbennett: This!
It makes a massive difference to how much you have to carry. I usually sip little and often on the way to the ride in my car, followed by 400-500ml just before setting off.
  • 5 0
 @cuban-b: the only commonality between Biopace and modern Ovals is that they aren't circular. lol

Biopace was clocked ***exactly*** wrong.
  • 2 0
 @madmon: HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA i'm so sorry man
  • 1 0
 @Notmeatall: it happened to me and it was cold out about 40F and I was in deep an hour plus from home when ...WHOA WTF. At that point you are riding with a wet pack and rear end and the snacks were drenched as well.... not fun... Starbux was like an oasis that day.
  • 1 0
 @OldDert: just imagine a happy ride in cold temps shortly after putting in a 2L fill up.gotta laugh about it now but that day i was freaking out
  • 1 0
 @conoat: yeah you’re right- I totally forgot about that huge fail on their part.
  • 1 0
 I used to ride with hydration packs, but then I went back to bottles and stuck with them. I found them to be the prefect unit of 1 to manage and maintain. This is has taught me how much water I'll need/want on a ride as bottle unit of 1 is easier to track and be familiar with as I don't want to carry excess water on my back. And yes I do long rides and I'll carry 2 bottles if I need and refill along the way as required.
  • 1 0
 to me packs can be inefficient. they take a while to clean and if you ride a lot you will have to or mold will win pretty quick. i use water bottles because of that, but i dont need the bottle on the frame. plus on the frame you always get dirt on the mouth piece lol. i find a bottle in a fanny pack is just fine, sometimes a spare on the frame for bigger rides or i just get the pack out. basically i dont think theres a clear answer, however, in the world of trade offs, if a bike is particularly good and cant take a bottle i dont mind
  • 35 0
 As one of what seems like very few readers on Pinkbike that almost exclusively rides XC, one of the major considerations for me is whether a bike can carry TWO water bottles. Seriously, it's the reason I own an Epic and not a Spark or an F-Podium. My rides are usually 2-4 hours long and often involve a ton of climbing. Wearing a pack kinda sucks. Plus, it doesn't fit my World Cup racer delusions.
  • 2 0
 There is a strap on water bottle cage I use for longer rides on my Spark without issues. No issues on long enduro rides either.
  • 1 0
 @bigogoat: Any other info on that strap-on bottle cage? (The one Nino used on the seat post or somewhere else?) I used to ride a size M spark and modified a specialized swat box to barely fit below the bottle cage. That carried all of my tools plus I taped a tube to my frame for long rides. For rides longer than 2hr and without water stops, I put an extra bottle in my roadie jersey pocket or carried a backpack. Now I have an epic though and can carry all of my tools and water on the bike for sub 4 hour rides. It's definitely nice, although I will admit that the Spark suspension platform was better.
  • 6 0
 @mymy0932: I ride an XL Norco Optic and it has space for two bottles, using Lyne Components double cage adapter. Hope the pic link works: imgur.com/a/jtjLCM8
  • 2 0
 @spenelson: huh never seen one of those before. Definitely looks like a good solution for XL frames with the vertical shock layout, as long as it's sturdy. Thanks for info.
  • 1 0
 For one bottle frames I just carry extra bottle in my jersey pocket. Always worked for me.
  • 1 0
 @mymy0932: SKS anywhere bottle cage sold on amazon.
  • 1 0
 A bike has to carry two bottles for me to consider it, as I also like endurance XC. I won't wear a pack (I don't want weight on my back, and it causes more sweat that has to be replaced by drinking more water which means carrying more water). I will put a water bladder in a frame bag for longer rides, but that means I need lots of space in the frame just like for two water bottles. For one upcoming ride I'm considering bringing a portable water filter to replenish from a stream.
  • 32 5
 If I’m buying an XC hard tail I want room for two full size bottles. On an enduro or DH bike, I care more about performance going downhill, and my size small frames don’t do well with bottles anyways. I carry a pack for tools/tubes anyways so might as well keep the bike lighter at that point.
  • 16 4
 Weight is weight - the lower the better
  • 18 4
 I’d way rather keep that weight low down on my bike than dancing around way up on my back.
  • 11 8
 @islandforlife: people don’t understand center-of-gravity, and the difference between sprung and unsprung weight
  • 13 3
 @cuban-b: They do, but most probably recognize it just doesn't matter that much for the average rider on a normal ride.
  • 3 0
 Yep, I have an idea for a bottom bracket mounted after bottle that sits almost exactly horizontal on the bottom of the bike and is only a few inches of the ground. It keeps the weight down and all bikes have space for it.@cuban-b:
  • 1 4
 @Kiotae: then why use that reason for any bike related tech? E.g. gearboxes, inverted forks, etc.
  • 3 0
 @AFunFox: plus it works as a Bb guard! We can run a hose up from the bottle so you wouldn’t even need to remove it from that location. All internal routing so the hose would come out at the headset cap.
  • 3 0
 So the hose would be like a roadie bottle? All you have to do is lean down and a straw type thing is there for you? @cuban-b:
  • 4 0
 @AFunFox: this started as a joke but now it’s starting to sound like a great idea. Triathletes already that reservoir at the front, and SWATerbottle exists, so this hose would be a evolution of these. It could be retractable too for aesthetic reasons.
  • 1 0
 Ok so we sit it in the swat box and run the hose up the down tube? @cuban-b:
  • 2 0
 @AFunFox: correct. The exit point can be decided later
  • 17 2
 @cuban-b: Where do you think folks are carrying packs and bottles? It's all sprung weight.

COG is the only argument here and it's largely trivial 99% of the time because it's such a small percentage of the system weight. If the load is secure on the back, the rider can adapt just fine. You don't see top gravity racers cutting upper body weight just to improve COG, so why would it matter for the rest of us?

We've accepted that tons of stuff doesn't matter enough to worry about it. Folks ride inserts because for them the benefits outweigh the cons. Plenty of other examples. It's a highly objective call given a rider's situation and what you're doing is implying that people who ride with packs are idiots who don't understand basic physics. Perhaps, they understand it well enough to realize having enough water, spares etc makes more sense than the largely intangible benefit of moving 8lbs down a couple feet.
  • 3 0
 @Kiotae: I agree with u
  • 3 0
 @cuban-b: Haha, and I spent all that time writing. /fistbump
  • 5 8
 @islandforlife: Hmm... IDK. Lots of people spend hundreds if not thousands trying to keep bike weight down to a minimum. Shaving mere ounces here and there. I cant see adding 1-2 pounds of water, bottle, and cage to the bike itself. Carrying the weight on your person has less impact on performance... kinda like your body weight fluctuating 1-2 pounds... imperceptible.
  • 7 4
 @Kiotae: sprung weight on the frame acts as an Inertia damper and allows the suspension to isolate impacts from the rider better. So you get lower COG plus a non-trivial improvement to suspension. A very light empty pack weighs around 400g more than an empty bottle. So if you can get away with it, no pack is a lighter overall solution.

You are correct, top gravity riders are not cutting upper body weight (which is a ridiculous argument for all sorts of reasons), but almost all top enduro racers are not using packs when they can get away with it.

If you like packs or can't fit everything on your frame, then that is a great reason to use a pack. But from a physics perspective, packs are whack.
  • 4 0
 @FatSanch: It's still sprung weight, which is all I was commenting on. While we clearly don't agree on what's trivial, we're on the same page that from a numbers perspective packs are inferior. I don't agree that experience bears this difference out for many riders. I suspect that the main reasons folks avoid packs have more to do with style/comfort than performance.

My issue with the comment was that folks had already, either consciously or not, weighed the cost/benefit of wearing a pack and decided that the performance difference was trivial enough to go ahead and wear a pack when needed.
  • 3 0
 @Kiotae: yes, forgot to mention that looking cool is the most important reason to not wear a pack :-)
  • 2 2
 @Baller7756: No. Just...no

Unless we’re talking suspension performance characteristics, all the other reasons you would seek to cut weight (faster acceleration, improved climbing efficiency, etc.) it doesn’t matter if it’s body weight or bike weight. Total system weight vs. available power is the critical measure.

Bigger picture, we fuss about a millimeter here or there in BB height for center of mass reasons, but freely add 6-8 lbs in water, pack, tools, and gear to chest height. Not saying there aren’t situations where that compromise makes sense, I wear a pack full of water and gear for long rides, but I don’t try to convince myself there isn’t a performance trade off in cornering and bike mechanics, there is. Simple physics.
  • 3 1
 @mtallman2: On the simple physics front... force x distance = work, you are correct... it doesn’t matter where the weight is. I’m talking about something more complex that can’t be easily calculated or measured.

Your body with more than 600 muscles and nearly 200 joints, is much more complex and capable than the bike frame at adjusting for forces from multiple angles.

When you add components and weight to a bike itself... you basically change the bikes behavior in many ways. The same weight can be easily absorbed and compensated for by your body without altering its behavior.
  • 2 2
 This. I can only infer from the survey that the majority of PBers are XCers.
  • 5 3
 @Baller7756: agree. You are manipulating the bike with your body. People pay $ thousands for a carbon frame to be light then want to strap 4 lbs of multiple water bottles to it.
  • 2 3
 @mtallman2: so if you are pressing a barbell, it doesn't matter if you add an extra plate to the bar or stap it to your back? Your point is taken if the bike and rider are a single unit that doesn't separate much (XC, gravel), but if you jump, trick, and work the bike to a significant degree I think bike weight is different.
  • 4 0
 @DriverB: if you jump, trick, and work the bike to a significant degree, you should be especially interested in not having 4-6lbs of jiggly ballast at shoulder level in my mind.
  • 1 0
 @mtallman2: I agree -- that's why I drink water before ride and after, stash water for breaks, carry none!
  • 2 0
 @Baller7756: Not sure about you, but I've ridden with both... and for me... when I'm doing mach chicken down a steep gnarly chute, I've noticed a HUGE difference between 6 pounds (2 pounds of water, 3 pounds of backpack plus a pound of tools) flopping and bouncing around on my back vs not noticing 3 pounds of water and tools way down low on my bike.

I used to use a hydration pack and used to be kind of a dick about it. Then I decided to actually test out using a water bottle and strapping stuff to my bike. It made 2 big differences for me:

1. Weight.. as I said before, getting rid of all that weight sloshing around high up on my back made a large noticeable difference. When controlling the bike at 10/10ths, moving my body around just felt easier and quicker. Fast weight shifts from one side of the bike to another like in a quick series of quick S turns or when you get knocked off line and need to very quickly adjust your body weight or you're hitting the deck was also just easier. During races I felt like I was able to more confidently go faster.

2. Comfort... again at high speeds, no matter what pack you have or how tightly you strap it down, when riding hard, the things just move and bounce around... it's annoying... and trying to find that fine line between comfort and tighly strapped was always a struggle. Then there's the heat and sweat... I don't think this needs much explanation other than going pack-less is night and day in comparison.

I've now got a great set-up where, for my usual 1.5 to 3 hour ride, one water bottle and all the tools/pump/spares I need fit on my bike. Riding longer or further away or for enduro races, I'll add a small (1.5L) hip back that can hold an extra water bottle (nice and low and tight on my hips) as well as a couple extra spares and snacks that I need to get through the day.

I did lots of research and testing... I'm a super anal guy about comfort and weight and I notice every small change about my bike... and I've found what I deem an almost perfect set-up. Yes, some people don't give a shit... I see people riding around with giant packs half open, loosely strapped to their back with straps almost hanging in their wheels, with their seat posts not in the proper position so they're climbing all bent up and hunched over... my point is, there are people on both the extremes of not caring at all/oblivious and those who care a lot about very small things. I happen to be on one side of the extreme, and this shit makes a big difference for me... and lots of other people. And even more people once they actually test it out and realize how much of a difference it does make.
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: I can appreciate that. I will say that I'm not on either end of those extremes. I do prefer a pack for the conveniences it provides (adjustable water volume, snacks, real tools and repair gear, extra clothing layer, no hands/no stop drinking, phone, keys, back protection, warmth in the winter... etc., etc.). I must deem those conveniences worth any trade off in comfort. As I have said... I don't seem to be negatively impacted by a pack. It may come down to body types... size, strength, short, tall, etc. Who knows... kinda like Android and Apple I guess.
  • 1 0
 The snack storage is the most important part! Big Grin @Baller7756:
  • 1 0
 @Baller7756: Yep for sure to each his own... but... my water bottles have adjustable water volume and I can clean them wayy easier, don't need a snack for my 1.5 to 3 hours rides, longer rides, I have my 1.5L hip pack for snacks, have all the tools I've ever needed in my OneUp streerer system and my strap, shorter rides I don't need an extra clothing layer... I wear the appropriate clothes for the weather and I'm good.. seems to work well for me all year in the PNW. Long rides, I have my hip pack which can accommodate taking off a layer or adding one. I have a fidlock water bottle system which means I can drink easily while I keep riding... feels about the same as when I used a hydration pack. Also realized that with or without a pack I tend to stop to drink anyway so it's same/same for me. Phone goes in my side pocket, keys go in my lumbar pocket. Thought I needed back protection when I used a pack, but looking back I've never needed it **knocks on wood**, warmth in the winter - again I wear the appropriate clothing for the weather and always found a pack made it more difficult to moderate temps (hot back, cold front). Again... I went through this with a fine tooth comb and no-pack has won out for me going forward. For me I feel I have no downsides and don't have to bother with a pack on my back. I used to use all the exact same justifications for using a pack until I really thought it through and it's been really nice not having it. Cheers!
  • 1 0
 @AFunFox: Pockets!! :-)
  • 1 0
 The more the merrier! @islandforlife:
  • 38 8
 Very important.
  • 19 0
 You’re just a shill for big water. We’re all on to you, Levy.
  • 26 1
 I feel that at this stage many would rather have a bottle and no bike than the other way around.
  • 5 2
 Sad but true. Lack of mother's milk at the teat, perhaps.
  • 4 0
 @suspended-flesh: endless blocades in the old lactic channels maybe?
  • 49 28
 Yeti made the one of the most beautiful bikes ever with the SB5.5. It didn't take a water bottle. They turned it into the pregnant walrus know as the SB150, one of the most ugliest bikes ever made, just so they could fit a water bottle inside the triangle. Water bottles ruined Yeti for me.
  • 26 2
 I'll have to admit the SB150 was a polarizing design when it first was released though it quickly grew on me. I personally think it's one of the best looking in their fleet. But hey that's just my personal opinion
  • 4 0
 The linkage and shock yoke design is one of the biggest improvements on the SB150 that most people overlook. Flipping the shock eyelet vertically allows it to rotate when the rear swingarm is side loaded instead of tilting the islet bolt axially and transferring load to the DU bushing and shock. My SB6 constantly ate shock bushings and my SB150 is still tight after a full season.

EDIT---> The less contoured SB150 front triangle gave them space to do the new linkage. Bottle fit too (woot).

I strap a tube where the water bottle cage mount is. I need more than one bottle for real rides.
  • 14 1
 Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion, man.
  • 4 4
 You can never call an old yeti “one of the most beautiful bikes ever” while the 1st gen Kona 153/167’s have existed.
  • 7 4
 THIS. the 5.5 was beautiful to look at and have almost perfect Geo. the 150 was a damn pig and nothing like what came before it. the 130LR is close, but not the fabled 5.5 that we all know and love
  • 1 0
 Pretty sure that’s why they published that new patent to get rid of the whole “switch infinity” system and make more room down there so that they can make a good looking bike that will also accommodate a water bottle.
  • 13 9
 Yawn. This debate is like the oval chainrings. Nobody cared for those things (Shimano Biopace), but they’re back anyways. This discussion ebbs and flows with the fashion. The advent of the camelback years ago allowed engineers to prioritize the function of the rear suspension in frame design. It was a deliberate choice. Almost nobody missed water bottles. Nobody said anything for years. If a frame I purchase coincidentally has a mount—I may use it. But, I don’t think bicycle design engineers should be constrained by an “all frames must have a bottle mount” fatwa or edict. That sort of constraint could kill a breakthrough design before pen is even put to paper. I remember feeling liberated from the clunking and sloshing of water bottles on my frame ruining the trail experience. The clamor for their return is like all the other trends that eventually come cyclicly roaring back.
  • 10 1
 @AKwheels: That's not a good analogy. Modern oval rings are literally (and I am using the word 'literally' correctly here) the opposite of Biopace. Biopace had the longest lever at the weakest part of the pedal stroke to flatten the torque curve. Modern oval rings have the longest lever placed to take advantage of your awesome downstroke power.
  • 3 0
 The 150 is a pregnant walrus? Jeez that's harsh. What do you think of, I don't know, every other bike on the market?
  • 3 1
 Agreed. It's one of the few things wrong with the new mega up there, too - let's take the spot on the frame that the industry almost universally agrees needs a bashguard and make it stick out an extra half a foot so I can sip my beverage on the side of the trail after smashing the bottom bracket. Clean up the lines, and lower the shock mount, center of gravity and stand-over, and I'll figure out my hydration on my own.
  • 8 0
 Yeah, I like my bikes nice and sexy like an un-pregnat walrus...
  • 2 0
 Yeti had to make room for a bottle. One of their riders kinda highlighted that need a few years ago.
  • 4 0
 This is regularly brought up at our conventions.
  • 2 3
 @iamamodel: if you like oval chainrings...more power to you. I’m more cynical. The older I get I see trends just cycle right back in, and usually with a thin justification. I mean Fanny packs came back. The dreaded tourist style Disneyland Fanny pack is worn in Enduro on purpose, and without irony. There are intervals where things leave the market, fail, and then return to the market with a stronger sales pitch, and a new virgin audience to do a number on.
  • 6 0
 @AKwheels: obviously you are cynical if you still don't understand that biopace was completely backwards and harmful to the pedal stroke. I don't understand why this is the second incorrect biopace/oval reference I've seen in this poll about water bottles. Complaining about wheel size and biopace is top 5 "I'm a cynical mtb'er" complaints I see in the PB comments regularly. What does it matter if someones chainring isn't round or they are wearing a fanny pack?
  • 1 0
 @AKwheels: This is why I’m starting pinkrollerblade.com
  • 3 0
 @AKwheels: I don't use oval chainrings. I just know the mechanics of them. Instead, I just change gears four times per pedal stroke while cycling uphill. Cheaper than getting oval rings Smile
  • 12 1
 @AKwheels: water sloshing in a bottle ruins your trail experience? That’s some princess and the pea shit if ever I’ve heard it.
  • 3 0
 @iamamodel: Concept literally 180, number of degrees not 180 literally
  • 1 0
 You know what's ugly? A nasty mud covered water bottle hanging off your downtube like an exposed nut.
  • 1 0
 @AKwheels: lemme buy you a beer, buddy. And your 8 (as of now) hataz can suck on my moldy water bottle.
  • 1 0
 @hellanorcal: Oh damn. I'm jealous I didn't see my flaw by not seeing that extra logical step. Chapeau to you sir.
  • 2 0
 I don’t think the 150 looks bad, but the 5.5 was indeed the sexiest mountain bike ever made.
  • 1 0
 @subwaypanda: i cant like this enough.
  • 21 0
 Water is weakness entering the body. Anybody who says quitting cigarets is hard never tried quitting water.
  • 5 0
 The withdrawals are horrific
  • 5 0
 How long have you been dry for..?
  • 13 1
 Haven't used a water bottle for 20+ years. Short ride? fill up the pack only partway. Long ride? Fill it up all the way. Easy to get to the water; pack also holds other stuff I normally take on a ride. I'm at the point now where it feels strange to ride without a pack. I guess I never quite understood the fascination with water bottles, or why it needs to be such a big deal when designing a bike when (in my opinion) a better option already exists. I simply can;t wrap my little pea brain around NOT buying a bike I liked because it couldn't hold a water bottle.

But as they say, different strokes for different folks. I'll keep using my pack, and y'all can keep on with your water bottles. Everybody wins.
  • 7 0
 Agreed.
Other benefits:
-Fill it up with ice completely before water and it cools your back for a couple hours.
-Damn near hands free drinking/Keeps your eyes on the trail/Dont have to reach awkwardly down somewhere.
-You cant knock it off your frame with your knee or extra rowdy impacts.
-spine protector (#1 reason for me)
  • 11 0
 Honestly, this question has always baffled me. Ride the best bike to suit you and your riding style; hydrate with whatever you need to hydrate with. Your bike has bottle mounts? Cool, drink from a bottle. No mounts? Sweet, hydration pack it is.

I've literally heard people lamenting that the bike they bought doesn't ride as well as [Brand X] that they tested out, "but it has a water bottle mount, so..."

Like, what? You would sacrifice how well your bike rides to have a water bottle? I feel like I'm taking crazy pills when I hear those conversations.
  • 4 1
 Packs are uncomfortable as hell to many. Why would anyone choose to ride with one when there are plenty of good bikes that accommodate them is also baffling. Not that I believe any modern bike is truly compromised due to the bottle, but I would prefer to be comfortable on a slightly underperforming bike than uncomfortable on a marginally better bike.
  • 1 0
 I don't understand this concept of sacrificing your ride. A bike is an over-constrained problem --- it will always be compromised for some part of the ride. I have one bike for use on any trail that I find, so it is definitely sacrificing in many conditions, and I have to make up for that with skill and lots of hiking.
  • 11 0
 Riding in the south, a 3L Camel Bak was essential. Now that I live in the north with no pack, I rarely even finish the water bottle that I bring with me.
  • 19 1
 I'm in the Northeast. After switching to a water bottle all of last year, there's no going back to a pack. The freedom of no pack is just awesome.
  • 7 1
 @learningcycles: but where do yall put your wallet and keys?!
  • 7 1
 @jofn00: I don't carry my wallet. I only carry my car key not the whole bunch in my pocket.
  • 3 0
 @jofn00: I wear Specialized Swat bibs under my shorts and jersey. They have three pockets on the back that I carry wallet/keys in one, phone in one, and a carton of coconut water in the middle one if it's a long ride. Big water bottle on the bike, tools in my oneup pump, tube and basic first aid kit and snack in the swat box on my bike. Haven't worn a pack for anything but epic rides like Whole Enchilada in Moab for years.
  • 1 0
 @jofn00: I usually leave my keys in the gas cap. That way I don't loose them, and I don't risk being impaled if I crash on them. Recently upgraded and now have wireless key, not sure what to do with it since you can't leave it with the car, but at least those won't stab you if you crash on them.
  • 2 0
 @jofn00: Stashed in the front wheel well behind the spring. Or was it rear? Gosh dang it. At least I have this here bicycle so I can ride home.
  • 1 0
 Good point, in the summer a 2 hour ride will have me finishing a bottle but this time of year I'm barely taking more than a few sips.
  • 2 0
 @jofn00:
Wallet is locked in the car. I hide my key on the car somewhere.

I've lost a key before on a ride when my pocket rubbed a hole through it from the key. It's also come in use if someone needs to bail back to the car.
  • 1 0
 @jofn00: one of my pet peeves about non-pack storage - they never give you a place to store keys. I'm always afraid I would impale myself with a key in my pocket.

I 3D printed a single key holder for a specific key when there was no good option to hide it. It worked great for that one key. I'm never really find of hiding them and still waiting for someone to make an armored key pouch.
  • 1 1
 @jofn00: Leave the wallet in the car and a single car key you can tape to your bike, seat post or handlebar.
  • 1 0
 @jofn00: check out a Flipbelt. It’s a runner’s belt with room for keys, phone, snacks, and wallet as long as you don’t have a Costanza. Then again, maybe even if you do since it’s stretchy.
  • 2 0
 @FatSanch: If the car key is flat and not an electronic fob then you can just tuck it into your wallet.
  • 1 0
 @unfknblvbl: I don't ride with my wallet, but I was thinking perhaps I could find a small coin pouch or something similar that fits a key or two.
  • 14 1
 No bottle, no buy!
  • 5 5
 Water bottle mounts are like front derailleur mounts were when the migration to 1X was happening: an unsightly abomination ruining aesthetics. Same as V-brake bosses on a disc brake frame. An affront to good taste.
  • 8 2
 "Personally, I have the evolutionary quirk of needing hydration to survive..." Me too. In fact I need enough hydration on most of my warm-weather rides that a water bottle or two just isn't going to cut it. I need the pack regardless.

Who are these people that can survive on one water bottle?
  • 3 1
 not me!
  • 5 0
 Me
  • 2 0
 My usual lap takes me about an hour. Mostly a climb for 40 min and then downhill back to the car. I can easily get by with a single bottle, even in summer.
  • 2 0
 @gafoto: Same, unless it's really hot, I'm usually fine even on a 2-3 hour ride with one bottle as long as I drink water before and after the ride.
  • 2 0
 When u have short lap, Just refill and go for another; also for park riding - it is good to have some water attached to frame
  • 5 0
 I can always grab a hydration pack for longer rides, but anything under 90 minutes, which is honestly most of my rides these days, I don’t want a pack. And if I’m on a longer ride, I want an electrolyte drink and they make bladders funky, so I still want a bottle.
  • 1 0
 they make bottles funky too Frown
  • 4 0
 @steezysam: but its way easier to scrub a bottle, or throw a bottle in the dishwasher.
  • 2 0
 @steezysam: True, but easier to wash and just designate one or two for mix duty
  • 1 1
 I never ever clean my hydration pack - I just throw it in the freezer after a ride (doesn't need to be completely empty either, a bit of liquid is fine and works as ice for the next ride). Been doing this for years, with electrolytes, and never even a bit of foulness. I pity the fool who cleans their hydration pack.
  • 1 0
 @SamurAchzar: that's a good idea. I always just empty mine and hang it to dry on a folded up coat hanger
  • 1 0
 @mtb-sf: those are both great ideas, but I will say throwing a bottle in the dishwasher takes far less time and effort.
  • 6 1
 I ride in the desert. Unless it's a really short loop, I prefer to have a pack with more water than most bottles carry. Given that I'm mostly riding with a pack anyway, it's then easy to stash my tools, spare, phone/wallet there.

When looking at my next bike I would have a slight preference for it to take a water bottle, but it would only be a tiebreaker.
  • 5 0
 It’s not just about carrying a drink and a couple of energy bars. Where I ride if you crash then help will be a hour away minimum. Therefore some form of first aid kit is essential and probably something to keep you warm whilst waiting for help. The local mountain rescue are called out most weekends to riders who thought a bottle, tube and a multi tool would be enough to keep them out of trouble. It’s embarrassing for the rest of the riding community who are trying to show they are self sufficient and should get greater access to trails
  • 8 0
 Bottles should be designed to fit round bikes, not viva versa
  • 5 0
 I wouldn't buy a bike without water bottle bosses cause I hard wearing a backpack. Also, I wouldn't buy a bike with water bottle bosses on the underside of the the downtube - dumbest place ever!
  • 5 1
 When you've tried to ride with a hip pack you never go back. With a water bottle, tools and snacks inside you don't even feel it on your hip. No need for that Swat stuff and you can ride every bike no matter if it fits a water bottle or not
  • 1 0
 I do have hip pack "camelback podium" and backpack (minimalistic osprey), cause my bike do not have bottle cage; While it is certainly improvement over the backpack it is not like riding without;

Also I found flexible bottles (water tubes) could be used as a solution to allocate some water with pocket;

SWAT ( Stumpjumper ) allow you to carry all essentials + water and look so 'enduro bro'
  • 1 0
 I prefer a hip pack to backpack but once I got a bike that could carry maglock bottle I was sold. No more spinning the hip pack around to get the water, just reach down to the frame bottle. My hip pack is relegated to carrying a small pump, multi-tool and my phone. Even lighter and less noticeable than before!
  • 4 0
 I do a lot of riding now on my E-Bike. So I bring a seltzer dispenser and various syrups to make trail side sodas. The bottles clank around a lot but it supplants my bell (saved .05 oz, yeah boi!) and its so refreshing to drink from a glass during rides. Never going back to a water bottle!
  • 4 0
 Short ride. Bottle

Long ride. Pack

Gnarly / tech / dangerous ride. Pack for the extra spine protection.

* not a fan of big packs though and prefer the super lightweight ones that ultra runners ( and Kirt Voreis) use.
  • 3 0
 Osprey hip pack with the water bottle pockets plus one on my bike. The one on my bike is for my trail dog, and one or two on my pack for myself depending on where and season the ride is. The bike bottle doubles as a backup as the dog drinks from the open bottle =o)
  • 3 0
 The real questions here...

1) how often do you empty/clean your water bottle?

2) how often do you empty/clean your hydration pack?

I clean my bottles every ride, maybe second ride if it wasn’t empty, but I don’t know the last time my osprey was empty... I figure as long as it tastes of a little iodine, it’s still clean
  • 3 0
 "maybe the water bottle is itself possibly the only true standard in mountain biking."

Sounds like foreshadowing for 2022 model year announcements that 10 bicycle makers are introducing proprietary water bottles for their 2022 bicycles. Maybe they will replace all their standard frames with their e-bike frames, putting built-in water bottles where the in-frame batteries go. Carry the water inside the frame the way batteries integrate into the frame.

The only problem is where to run the water line? Only solution is to double the price of dropper posts by running the water line through the post for direct hydration into the lower intestine. They can patent it "Intero-Rectohydration". Bike mags will rave about it saving .0003 seconds off 20 mile loop times, while 10,000 fps chuck-to-flat videos cause a massive collective shudder across the biking internet.

(caution, this post may contain sarcasm and pop cultural references)
  • 3 0
 One key thing I learned from a someone involved in high performance physiology is that 80% of your hydration is done the day before your physical endeavour. That means taking in plenty of fluid and ensuring that you have an electrolyte balance in your system that prepares you for the loss of fluid during the exertion.

Since I’ve paid more attention to this I have been finding my physical exertion has been more effective and my recovery a lot easier. It also means my 20km ride in the Australian summer this (and every) morning was effectively handled by a single water bottle.
  • 3 0
 I gotta weigh in on this one. Maybe I just do the bottle thing wrong. But backpacks come in multiple sizes and hydration capacity. I like the clean lines of my bike and hate seeing things like inner tubes and what not tied onto the frame. But that’s just a minor quibble of mine. What I’ve most noticed about water bottles is that they get gritty and dirty. We ride on dirt, mud, etc. our drive trains need to be cleaned constantly to remain free of abrasive particles thrown up from the trail. I’ve read at least one article regarding CX racers getting sick from inadvertently drinking in goose fecal matter that had splashed up onto their frames from riding in a field with goose shit. (Been there done that many times) with all the crap literally out there on the trail why place your hydration source in anyway within the path of dirt, pathogens, whatever that gets splashed up on your frame??? You’re putting all of that in your mouth with every sip. If it’s a short ride take a small pack a few spares and a cookie. Everything you need is in one place and stays clean. Also. I can’t mention how often I’ve had and seen water bottles fly off of bikes when bombing through serious gnar. IDK I think they belong on road bikes maybe. But even then you’re still sucking down street slop. I am the guy that always sees things differently than 99% of the rest of the world in most cases so I’m probably wrong but I’m not really a water bottle fan.
  • 6 0
 That Grim Donut frame design sure was Waki, eh?
  • 1 0
 In the spirit of the article, it had no “Donut Hole”, “THC” (Tim Horton’s Compartment), “BFD” (bladder-filled down tube) - those are the only ones I’ve trademarked so far, Mike. I guess WAKI is a pack fan.
  • 2 0
 any climb with abundant streams or under 600m elevation gain I want to stay light and just bring a waterbottle. anything bigger than that I'll just bring the hip bag. no waterbottle holder sucks because I dont want to wear the hip bag on shorter rides
  • 3 4
 In the US you can't let rain touch your skin. No joke, the thought of drinking naturally occurring water near me is literally making me feel sick.
  • 4 2
 Backpack. The bike stuff is in there anyways. (No need for compromising steerer tube tools.)
Just put in a fresh plastic bottle from the tray... Good to go.

Plus room for wallet, cell, keys, rain stuff if weather looks challanging.
  • 4 0
 Who needs water bottles and packs. I have a little wagon that I attach to my bike and I carry a gallon size jugs of water on my rides. Oh did it mention I ONLY RIDE PARK!
  • 3 1
 With the variety of options for carrying water available these days (pack, cage, stash bibs, fanny pack etc.) I feel like a very unnecessary amount of emphasis is put on the ability to fit a bottle cage. I would far rather have engineers at bike companies able to mount the shock/pivots where they need to in order to get the most from the design.

I do appreciate bottle cages (my current bike has one) but the ability to fit one on a bike would never influence whether or not I buy a certain bike.
  • 3 0
 Chris Porter has this right: "Why should bike designers have to design around a bottle? Surely that’s the wrong way round! It just requires a water bottle manufacturer to make a bottle that fits. ”
  • 2 0
 Although my frame doesn't have a bottle bracket, my 1.5L Camelbak Chase is perfect for me for rides up to 3 hours which I wouldn't be able to do with a single bottle anyway. It doesn't flop around at all and sits high up so I forget it's there once I start moving. Plus it holds all my things yet still feels light. Say no to floppy packs.
  • 3 1
 I just dont get the hydration pack hate? One place to store every thing, water, phone keys, snacks, tube(or what ever) tools, light first aid jacket in winter works as back protection.....
Having a super duper expensive light bike an the bolting
all the tings In random places all over the bike looks so fkd to me.
Even an enduuhhro fanny pack if you're in a super hot climate

Then to be, I'm not buying that frame/bike because water bottle Seems even more fkd
  • 1 0
 ^first aid kit^
  • 1 0
 @mtallman2: a fairly light empty pack weighs about 800g, so...
  • 1 0
 @FatSanch: so aboot the weight of a light lunch ;Wink
  • 1 2
 @nojzilla: you were the one talking about people not making sense for fussing about weight. If you are going to fuss about weight, then you should avoid a pack.
Also wearing a pack looks bad. I'd rather my bike look bad than me :-)
  • 2 1
 @FatSanch: wut??? That makes zero sense?
  • 1 1
 Oh an MTB isn't a fashion show. We look like kooks, an when were covered in mud, we all mostly look the same
  • 1 0
 @nojzilla: sorry, I misread your first statement. Thought you were talking about strapping stuff to I light bike doesn't make sense, but you just said it looks bad.
  • 1 0
 @nojzilla: Totally agree. Spine protection is right up there with head protection. So I don't get the short ride/long ride - water bottle/backpack-thing. Do the short-ride-water bottlers wear a spine protector then? Puts the sweat argument offside...
  • 3 1
 so you get an unobtainium polymer cocaine-ish expensive bike, then smack 1.5kg to it. congrats, now you have a commencal. sense, makes none.

for regular country/mountain rides, bottles are ok, I guess. but once it turns gnarlier or down the hill, bottles start flying around. (and not to mention a centre of gravity)
  • 2 0
 All the bottles pops open when filled with a Pilsner, I don't get how you guys using it. For the worst cases I have the Fabric bottle which don't use the cage and can be mounted on downtube as my old yeti is rather looking great than being a water boy
  • 4 2
 Watch any Nate Hills build video...he always mentions Pinkbike's obsession with water bottles. Not against them, I appreciate the convenience on short rides but I generally have pack with a bladder.
  • 2 1
 Well if nate hills doesn't drink water I guess ill stop.
  • 2 0
 Not saying it's some grand conspiracy, but Nate is also sponsored by Yeti and Ergon. And I'm pretty sure they were founded by the Illuminati and Bilderberg Group respectively.
  • 1 0
 @derekbnorakim: that bilderberg group again //DRAt!!
  • 5 0
 Hi Henry I miss you on GMBN! Hope life is good.
  • 3 0
 Came here to say this, I was definitely reading in your voice Henry, haha
  • 2 0
 Yes, Doddy is great as always, but Henry's peculiar sense of humor was a treat. Hope to see more of him here.
  • 2 0
 Henry you were my favourite presenter on GMBN. I saw you at FoD not long ago playing some old Metallica song (I think something from Justice) from your vehicle while getting changed in the car park. What a guy!
  • 3 0
 covid brought back the Water Bottle to every bike park on the east coast. Ive never seen so many. Cant wait for those huge sideline gatorade coolers to return!!
  • 11 0
 Covid brought Whistler sized braking bumps to my local XC loop, ill take water bottles over ruts.
  • 6 4
 It blows me away that we are willing to spend 1000's of hard earned money to buy light Mt. Bikes then add a kilo of weight to it. Pinkbike bro science test. Compare water bottle on bike to water carried by rider.
  • 1 0
 Latley I have been using a custom made frame bag to fit inside the tiangle between the headtube and rear shock. A bladder fits in there and it has an exit port for the hose which I clip to my bar. I like it and it holds some tools and a jacket as well. FBJ Creations made mine.
  • 2 0
 I’m curious how much the demand for water bottles has had on suspension layout, design, kinematics? Are compromises being made? - or has good engineering figured it out? Would we see as many trunnion mount shocks, etc?
  • 5 1
 I hate water bottles and hate that they influence frame design. Stupid fish-belly looking bike design.
  • 1 0
 Bottle for every ride, even the rides long enough to need a pack. Most rides for me are in the 2-3 hour range so a pack is just ridiculous. I’m also riding with a dog about 2/3 of the time and when the streams dry up in the heat of summer I don’t want to add the misery of a pack on a 80-90 degree day with 75 percent humidity. So yeah, no bottle = no buy.
  • 3 2
 Never been a fan of the water bottle....IMO...water bottles make all frames look like shit. I will wear a hydration pack just so I don't have to see my poor bike with some nerdy water bottle ruining her curves. Its like a super hot chick with a giant mole on the tip of her nose. Its like Jennifer Lopez ass with a tumor. Its like....insert pun here....
  • 4 0
 I'm a camel. Yes, it's a major factor because frames that accommodate a bottle are too ugly to consider buying.
  • 2 0
 The real question should be. Is having a "SWAT" hole a deal breaker?

Personally I think it should be a requirement for all new bikes to have one. It just makes so much sense.
  • 1 0
 I love the freedom of riding without a pack, but I my water bottle is almost always close to full when I'm done my ride. I just plain forget to drink from it! With the pack, if anything I was overhydrated. One time though on a steep chute the size adjuster on the back of my helmet got caught on the handle of my pack. Very scary.
  • 1 0
 [Edit]
in Jamaica the hydro packs get stinky and moldy quickly. I use limes or lemons to sterilize but they turn colour quick. Water bottles are my go 2 I will store one in my backpack if I have to....even my Nomad has a zipp tied cage.
  • 2 1
 So i havent used a water bottle for probably 10 years. Being able to drink hands free on the move is way too valuable to give up. I do, however, use a bottle cage mounted tool holder, because its easy to switch between bikes and it gets heavy tools off my back. So i really dont care about water bottles, but i do like that my bikes have a place for one. Just me anyway
  • 1 0
 While I agree that it's nice that they're pretty much standardized, I'd happily buy some sort of custom water bottle system for a frame that doesn't fit a bottle cage. If only the manufacturers made those along with their funky custom tool solutions.
  • 1 0
 Honestly, started using a frame bag. Loved the storage capacity of the backpack but hated the heat / sweat. Kinda the best of both worlds, water bottles, tools, and jacket while still feeling the freedom to move and ventilate.
  • 2 0
 I usually ride with a backpack or hipack, I’m a T1 diabetic so it’s handy to carry an emergency bag of jelly babies and other medical stuff. The pack is there for that so may as well carry water as well in it.
  • 1 0
 My current bike doesn't, but my next bike will. Unless there's a bike with such crazy value and didn't have a bottle mount. It's nice to have the option for shorter rides. I am really looking towards the evo stumpy with swat so I don't have to strap anything to the bike.
  • 1 0
 I miss not having the water bottle space. I didn't think it was going to be, but I was wrong. Most of my ride only consist of maybe a hour to two hour rides where I don't the pack. My next frame will have to have a space for ONE.
  • 4 3
 If a camelbak impedes your movement on the bike....You might want to work on your core a little bit more. I ride with a pack because I like to keep a multi-tool, tube, first aid, my wallet and phone in it. Again, if that's weighing you down--then squats and lunges are your friend
  • 1 0
 Not only does it need to have the capacity to carry a bottle but the size of one and the location matters. For shorter rides or where refilling is possible I prefer a bottle. If the ride is longer water would go into a pack and the bottle cage may carry tools or a bottle with electrolytes.
  • 1 0
 Not really asking the important questions here Pinkbike. Is a water bottle a nice thing to have? Of course! The real question is, is it worth compromising the other design features of the frame to fit a standard shaped bottle in? I'd say no to that.
Frames have co-moulded rubber protectors nowadays. I reckon they should do a similar thing with water storage. Make the suspension and geo good, then fit a custom bottle into the available space, rather than mess up everything in order to fit a generic bottle in.

As if water bottles are the only actual "standard" the mtb industry has actually agreed on...
  • 1 0
 Pack for when I wipe out I can bounce off my hydration bladder like a ninja turtle.

Bottle cage mount in case I wanna ride no pack just bottle.

Pack for carrying 3 liters + of water for a big ride.

Bottle cage mount on frame for bear spray on a big ride. Or a short ride.

Pack to carry all my things, Indiana Jones style.

Bottle cage mount also on my DH bike please, I mean cmon why not? For various reasons.

Two bottle cage mounts on frame, plus pack? Sure I’ll take that. Can mount spare tube to one, etc.

I’ll have it my way, thanks for playing.

-Everyone
  • 2 1
 Unfortunately the poll for me isn't quite asking the right questions in order to understand the 'why' and 'how'. Only the yes or no.

It's also not specific to the type of riding. I personally like my bike feel to be constant, and dislike launching waterbottles into the trees only to get to the bottom of a descent and realise I've got no water. So in certain cases, I want that weight off the bike. I.E.- more than one bottle.

I also find a hydration bladder easier to access when riding. As a taller individual where bottles are typically mounted low on MTB's, it can be a PITA to reach for a bottle while pedaling/climbing, and return it without some fobbles. A hose/mouthpiece is always at the ready.

Here's me...

If it's riding where I'm just getting out to have fun with little consequence, and only need a single-bottle's volume of water or less, it's the bottle. Pack is optional if I think I can walk out in the case of shit going south. But... depending on the style of riding (aggressive/enduro) or terrain, I'll probably still ride with a pack and no bladder, because I like the back/spine protection in-case of a spill, as well as the ability to carry spares, kit, beer, weed, etc.

If it's aggressive riding with more consequence I'm riding with a pack regardless for back/spine protection, and depending on temp/environment/length of ride, I'll lean towards a pack/hydration bladder over a bottle. The nice thing about a bladder is you can choose to fill it up with 1l, 2l, or more depending on your use-case, and it gets the weight off of the bike, which is important to me for ride/bike-feel.

But if it's longer, all-day or multi-day adventures where ride-feel is less important and my bike has the capacity to run two bottles, (Gravel, HT, Touring, etc) than I'm going want that weight on the bike and off the shoulders, and go with two of the largest bottles I can fit- because they're easily refillable, and gets the weight off my back and shoulders which can lead to fatigue over long distances.
  • 1 0
 I have a 2019 Stumpjumper with the swat downtube, and this combined with the flexible water bottle from Nukeproof was a gamechanger, allowing me to take an extra portion of water on the bike. Obviously Specialized has realised the value of this with the custom SWATerbottle you can get for new Stumpjumpers as well.

Also, I’ve been toying with buying an Evil Wreckoning for a while. For me, the difference between the first Wreckoning with no water bottle mounts, and the LB version that came second with water bottle mounts, is way more important than the difference between the LB and the newest v3 with updated geo
  • 1 0
 I copied this idea for my Evil Insurgent with no bottle cage mount and it has been working great.

www.mtbr.com/threads/solution-to-wreckonings-lack-of-waterbottle-mounts.1008247/post-12562952
  • 1 0
 I ride mostly in the desert. Pack with water and a bottle with Scratch Labs. Scratch Labs helps your body retain more of the water so I drink it slowly throughout the ride. I feel a 1000x better after a ride since doing this. Guess I’m getting old. Haha
  • 1 0
 Who cares when it's -15C, like today? Survived fine for 2+ hours. Plenty of ice on the trails, no need to bring it with me.

In summer, my OCD kicks in and leaves me in utter rage every time I come home from a ride with a pack, and find I've been dragging an extra 2 kilos on my back for hours.
  • 1 0
 A long ride to me requires more water than a pack can hold and Im usually adding bottles to my bikes how ever I can fit them in these cases as well so bottle mounts are a factor for sure for me. Bike type is irrelevant. Ride far, ride hard.
  • 1 0
 I'm not sure if the question is phrased correctly. Having room for a water bottle is not the same as having riv-nuts for the water bottle standard that you can use for toolboxes or other accessories. "Should your bike have room for a water bottle?" or "Should your bike have water bottle mounts?" - yes, all bikes should have riv-nuts to mount things to inside the front triangle. Hopefully room for a 450 ml bottle even with a piggy back shock.
  • 1 0
 I feel like most people answer that the water bottle is a deal breaker mostly because of how much pinkbike has been pushing the necessity for one, and has been giving negative reviews about bike that didn't have great bottle room for a long time
  • 1 0
 summer / spring / autumn serious ride -> hydration pack is a must
summer / spring / autumn / winter easygoing ride, maybe with kids , or maybe just a quick lunchtime ride of 1h -> water bottle for sure....
cleaning the hydration pack for 2 hours of spring ride with the kids or for a lunchtime ride for me is too much....
  • 1 0
 I'd prefer a large bottle (or 2), but once every couple of rides I lose my bottle halfway through and notice it 10 minutes later. My frame only accepts sideways bottle mounts, so that might be the reason for losing the bottle.
I already have a pack for tools, food and spares, so water in the pack it is...
  • 1 0
 What do consider a long ride? For me anything less that about 12 miles or 3 hours and I don’t bring water along. Usually just chug a half liter before. Another important thing is I make it a point to not drink alcohol or caffeine the night prior or day of.
  • 4 0
 If they were beer bottles you’d care
  • 3 0
 My GG fits two, which was a pretty significant factor in my decision to get the bike.
  • 1 0
 I've always rigged up a way to carry two bottles on frames not meant for them. I'm currently thinking about how to get more on the bike. Where I live it's all long climbs and then long, single descents, so the bottles are all empty when it's time to have fun.
  • 1 0
 This is very interesting for me. I had no idea. Thanks for the info.
  • 4 1
 I want the lightest bike ever but it has at least two water bottles!!!! SILLY Smile
  • 2 0
 Where's the option for "I want to drink out of a water bottle, but my bike doesn't have that option."

Sincerely,

A small person who rides a small sized Evil
  • 5 1
 I will not buy a trail/enduro bike that cant carry a bottle.
  • 2 0
 I used to live in NM, wore a pack. Now I live in a rain forest, bottle and filter. Currently won’t even consider a bike without a water bottle holder
  • 2 1
 I'm a big fan of the SWAT, water bottle and absence of backpack; next frame will be definitely Spesh or Trek; just based on those factors;

Majority of frames have modern enough geo, so those features became selling point's;
  • 1 0
 Internal hydration reservoir located within the fames down tube and a retractable hose that pulls out the top tube. All removable for cleaning, filling, or if you choose to ride with a pack instead.
  • 1 1
 Bottles = good, packs = sweaty. I use either depending on the bike and/or ride. It always seems pretty crazy, to me, those frames that pack a big pregnant goldfish bump in the down tube seemingly just to make room for a bottle tho... ok on easy terrain, but when your lumping down a rocky descent, that belly’s a major strike zone. #itcantbeonlyme
  • 1 1
 I guess I use both/neither options - I carry water bottles - in a backpack! Smile

Went for the camel option though - here in dreich Scotland I can pretty easily ride for a couple hours without water, unless it's roasting hot - and by roasting I mean 20°C! (In my younger days I did a 30-mile ride on a Penguin bar and a few sips from a stream...)

PS that new bottle-friendly Nukeproof downtube is pretty hideous...
  • 1 1
 Drink water dude, you can ride without it but you're being cruel to your poor body by not staying hydrated.
  • 1 0
 @Imabigboy82: yeah, usually got a small bottle or two in the backpack these days, and bookended with plenty from the big bottle in the car! Generally not out for too long and that keeps me going.
  • 1 1
 The comment section is where bikers get the reputation for being whiny... "It doesn't hold a water bottle" "It only holds one" "I don't want a sweaty back"... or every hardtail rider's favorite... "Watching that makes my knees, back, ankles hurt"

Can we stop whining and get back to the DJ/Freeride content, like oldschool PinkBike?
  • 2 0
 I fit 3 water bottles in my DJ frame so I can make sure to stay hydrated while mid-air. I call it the "One-handed Back-Flip Water-Chug"
  • 2 1
 One measly water bottle does not last for a 2+ hour ride! And that's even more so during summer, so who really gives a shit? I don't know why people freak if there isn't a bottle mount.
  • 2 2
 My considerations buying a bike are low standover, shorter seat tubes, geometry and suspension performance.

If that means weird swoopy tubes so that water bottles fit, then it’s a hard no.

I’d rather carry water on my back or hip than ride a swoopy tube ugly bike. Anytime.
  • 3 0
 So... you're all about performance, except when you are all about aesthetic.

I'm seriously asking, what if you needed the ugliest, swoopiest tube ever to get perfect geo and performance?
  • 2 2
 @RonSauce: what’s wrong with considering performance AND aesthetics ? It’s not an either/or proposition
  • 1 2
 @short-but-sweet: But have you seen yourself while wearing a pack?
  • 2 2
 @FatSanch: just because I’m physically functional but aesthetically challenged, does not mean my bike should be too
  • 1 2
 Perhaps I’ve touched a nerve, and some people getting touchy about their swoopy tubed bikes...
  • 1 1
 does anyone else want smaller water bottle options or am i the only one? maybe they make them already?
most of my laps are about 1 hr long. and on those i literally just want a sip or two to wet my mouth with mid ride. otherwise i can replenish back at my vehicle.
  • 7 0
 You don't have to fill the bottle.
  • 1 0
 Pinkbike: "the water bottle is itself possibly the only true standard in mountain biking."

Fidlock: "hold my (water)"

(no complaints, I actually have the Fidlock bottle / mount system and it's great.)
  • 2 0
 In the desert of Arrakis where I ride my water (is the tribe's) and is reclaimed by my stillsuit. I need neither pack nor bottle.
  • 4 0
 Nicolai owner. No bottles. No fucks given
  • 2 0
 Anything around an hour I dont ride with tools let alone water. Anything over an hour deserves a backpack with water and the rest of the stuff.
  • 1 0
 Kinda hard to dump water on the back of your neck from a hydration pack when it's 80+ degrees out. I always like to have a bottle on the bike, even if I'm on a longer ride and using a hydration pack.
  • 1 1
 Naw, though I drink like a fish I've found adding a "bob" trailer to the back of my bike and a 5 gallon igloo filled with icy freshness is all I really need. I mean, with 3 chainrings and a biopace crank I'm fickin' indeeeeestructable!
  • 1 0
 Why dont they just make the freakin frame the waterbottle. Stop fussing around. They've made it a clif bar compartment. Dont worry about how itll work just let the consumers figure that out.
  • 2 0
 And straight above this poll is an article on Camelback’s latest range of hydration packs, someone must still be buying them !!
  • 1 1
 i think there should be another option in the poll stating "depends on the ride and distance". If its a short ride or trail center then I strap a tube, pump and multi tool onto the bike and have a fidlock bottle. Bit if its a decent lakes ride then I prefer a bag as you usually take on more fluids etc etc
  • 1 0
 Hip hydration packs for the win! they carry 70oz of water, you don't feel it nearly as much as putting it on your back, and they don't make you sweat. there really isn't a downside.
  • 1 0
 Depending on the length of the ride I go with a bottle or two in a hip pack; however, I like the option of carrying a bottle on the bike and won’t drop some coin on one without this.
  • 1 0
 Water bottles ? pfft . i live and ride in Germany . that means you are never more than fifteen minutes to a restaurant ,even in the middle of the forest or at the top of a mountain . No need to carry anything . (-;
  • 1 0
 I cut the top off an old water bottle, inserted a can of bear mace and spray-foamed in between the two. I carry water in my pack, having the bear mace so that I can quick draw is more important.
  • 1 0
 Markus Flossmann dislikes water bottles so much he moved from CEO to CVO Chief Visionary Officer to correct on specializes MTB atmospheric water generator (AWG) to replace the water that will never fit on is frames
  • 3 0
 Looking for the option for a pack that carries water bottles Smile
  • 7 6
 If the bike is made to go any sort of hill, it needs the ability to carry a bottle. Not being able to do so is a major design oversight.
  • 3 1
 Up*
  • 3 0
 Previous gen Mega owner here. Camelbak is necessary in the summer.
  • 5 6
 I'm slightly baffled by the numbers reflecting massive water bottle usage. I'm slightly concerned everyone is submitting that as a joke, and as a result, we will end up with engineers continuing to prioritize water baottle space over performance. Or maybe we'll end up with more phanny packs like the new ibis...

Or maybe water bottles are performance enhancing due to weight distribution and such? Hmmm
  • 12 2
 Not a joke.

The difference in performance between a bike that can't carry a water bottle to something that can is going to be negligible for me. I will 100% of the time choose the bike that can carry a water bottle. Hydration packs in the summer are the f*cking worst
  • 3 6
 @ihatetomatoes: nah, i consider the extra sweat i produce with my camelback on in the summer as a feature not a bug ????

Sweat: nature's cooling mechanism
  • 1 0
 @ihatetomatoes: Excessive back perpetration can be treated. Just how hot are your BC summers, anyway?
  • 1 0
 Not sure why you’re so concerned here. Many frames can already fit a water bottle and they ride really damn well.
  • 1 0
 @jofn00: geezus dude, yuk. Not wearing a pack doesn't stop your body from sweating. You just don't have a spot that excessively sweats and isn't able to cool because no air can pass by, you know, how sweat works. I suggest trying it out.
  • 5 0
 @suspended-flesh: who should I see about my excessive back perpetration?
  • 3 0
 Just a few years ago I would have not cared about the water bottle. Once you loose the pack it is a freedom that cannot be explained.
  • 1 0
 @ihatetomatoes: LOL Your probation officer maybe?
  • 2 0
 @Tormy: Freedom's just another bottle, waiting to be lost.
  • 1 0
 I really wish pinkbike would transpile emojis into something other than hostile looking question marks. Turns a joke into a dick statement
  • 2 0
 @suspended-flesh: your bottle ain't worth nothin till its free!
  • 3 0
 @flaflow:

Well I’d trade all my tomorrows for a single yesterday,
Holdin’ Bottle’s body close to mine

Me n Bottle McGee
  • 1 0
 All You Really Need Is One of those ice dispensers, then fill a few bottles up with It. Then, Shove those into the biggest backpack In history.
  • 3 0
 Mine are usually filled with bear spray.
  • 4 0
 Totally agree. I run into bears on the trail a few times a year and need easy access to the bear spray. It's about safety, not hydration.
  • 2 0
 Underrated comment. I ride in mountain lion and bear country (and I'm sure most on here do as well) usually solo especially when I travel. I ran into a black bear and heard them nearby more than a few times up in BC, ran into bobcats, coyotes, fortunately no mtn lions yet but I'll gladly carry a pack so I can quickly access my bear spray from the water bottle cage.
  • 1 1
 I honestly think bear problems are alot worse in canada than the us.
  • 1 0
 @szed3: I live in a large city and bike in a busy river valley... no bears, but a few coyotes. (Edmonton, Alberta.)
  • 4 2
 Don't want to ruffle feathers but how is this a worthy subject? I've used a backpack for decades and been fine. Next?
  • 2 0
 ...there's an option for that in the poll. I'm interested to see how opinions have changed in the last five years.
  • 2 3
 Backpacks suuuuuuuuucccckkkk. In my opinion at least.
  • 3 0
 The back pocket of my cutoff skinny jeans is my bottle holder.
  • 4 1
 Literally haven't used a water bottle since my first bike back in 1992
  • 3 4
 I know a lot of people here hate ebikes, but one major advantage I have found this winter, is that I can ride 3 hour huge loops with my ebike and only need a small water bottle. With the colder temperatures and shorter lockdown affected rides a backpack isn't needed anymore, I have DH tyres that basically never puncture and a few plugs+pump+multitool strapped to the frame. My last rides have been over 2000 meters of climbing in 4 hours, with a stop at the car in the middle to swap out the battery and bottle.
  • 2 0
 you don't need water because you should be burning 2/3's less energy pushing a button
  • 2 0
 Missing a category for those of us who need a water bottle for hydration supplements in addition to the backpack.
  • 1 0
 Water bottles definitely a good option and many modern brand start adopting this concept, also based on water cage improvements water stay in place on a toughest trails
  • 2 0
 What is? 1997?
Camelback on 5lts backpack for short.
Camelback on 20lts backpack for long.
  • 1 0
 I take a Salomon soft flask for an extra 500 ml on longer rides in Summer. Since it is in my jersey pocket I drink it first or on fireroads. It's excellent.
  • 2 0
 I think the 0 - 1 decision is huge, between 1 & 2 not so much at all.
Can't imagine having a bike without a single one
  • 2 0
 I'll just drill a hole in my frame so I can fill my frame up with water instead. Suck on that Specialized SWAT!
  • 1 0
 traded a transition smuggler for a commencal clash and im sad that theres no room for a bottle inside the frame. Bottle in the frame is so handy
  • 3 0
 Should we differentiate between backpack and hip packs as well?
  • 2 0
 I carry a couple packs of powdered water. I mean if it gets serious I can just add water.
  • 1 0
 Poll results should be taken with a grain of salt: reportedly, staunch water bottle users are 5x more likely to be online poll takers.
  • 2 0
 So now I'm beginning to wonder....was that sound actually my bottom bracket or was it my water bottle.....
  • 2 0
 Less than 1 hour ride - water bottle. More than 1 hour, or riding park - hydration pack. Bottles are a lot less hassle.
  • 2 0
 I would rather have no water bottle mount than a water bottle mount under the down tube (looking at you @orangebikes).
  • 2 0
 I don't see how is it that bad. You have the best of both worlds: Suspension design is independent to water bottle storage but you also have water bottle storage. Plus lowers the center of gravity... If suspension design allows water bottle storage without interferences, that would be ideal, but, how many brands ceased brilliant suspension designs in favour of worse ones just to allow a water bottle?
  • 1 0
 @Zeeroone: it looks ugly.
  • 1 0
 There are no bottles that fit in cages and carry a litre and a half of water so for more than a morning or afternoon ride they're a waste of time anyway
  • 1 0
 I survived to seasons on a process with the water bottle attached to the bottom of the down tube, that’s no way to live a life.
  • 3 0
 Water bottles are so 90ies????
  • 1 0
 I don't like having a bottle on the bike but I do prefer the ease of a water bottle on shorter rides. I just wear a hip pack with a water bottle.
  • 1 0
 I carry 8 lbs of useless crap everywhere based upon many failures over the years.... and unless you have a 3-liter water bottle, that just ain't cutting it.
  • 1 0
 So, a big factor in going from 5010v2 to bronson3 is the Bronson 3 low shock moves up the bottle mount to make it easier to access while riding.
  • 2 0
 Specialized will have a Dentist sucking water out of a down tube bladder before you finish reading this.
  • 1 0
 You joke about it, but they already have that. I find the concept of in-frame storage utterly ridiculous, but this would be the first half decent scenario I've seen.
  • 1 0
 I don't care about a cage. Just use a pack for long rides or use an "enduro" bib with back pockets for shorter rides to hold my bottle.
  • 1 0
 there’s not really a water bottle holder on the pivot firebird but it won’t stop me buying one it’s one of the greatest bike
  • 2 0
 Wait, you people put a bottle of water in that holder thingy on your bike? That is were my bong is mounted brother.
  • 3 0
 Water bottles directly mounted on the frame is so 1990's.
  • 1 0
 Bottle mounts for me even on a dh bike please. I love the idea that bike designers might see this poll and design product accordingly.
  • 1 0
 The bottle-holder on my frame sits so low that the bottles get horribly dirty and muddy, Therefore I don't bother with waterbottles anymore. Back- or fannypack!
  • 1 0
 when manufacturers think a waterbottle mount is so important for us tthat hey design it under the downtube, that is WRONG thinking, y'all
  • 1 0
 I use a hydration pack for water and usually a water bottle with electrolyte added. So the questions were a little stacked. Smile
  • 2 0
 These figures show how important is to publish a test for the water bottle cage of the decade.
  • 2 0
 Winnar- Specialized Zee Cage.
  • 1 0
 Honestly I switched to water bottles and that became a deal breaker bike shopping, then I got a SWAT box and now that is a deal breaker. Makes bike shopping very easy.
  • 2 0
 i wear a pack almost every ride, but only put water in it on long/hot rides. water goes on the bike.
  • 1 0
 Doesn't really matter much to me, I always ride with a hip or backpack. Though I prefer having the option to run a bottle too.
  • 1 0
 Since the GRIMDONUT has had such wild real world success, could we maybe have the GrimDonutCC with the high Pivot and the three waterbottles and the carbon frame then??????
  • 1 0
 Used to own an Orange Stage 4. Loved it. No longer own it. Guess how I voted!?

(Yes they added mounts to some frames for 2020 but still under the downtube).
  • 1 0
 Hip Pack with tools and bottle...extra bottle on bike if going longer that 2 hours. I have a backpack, but never use it after getting hip!
  • 4 2
 The very reason I've never owned a YT or Nukeproof Mega yet.
  • 2 0
 There are currently many camels standing round a monitor nodding slowly.
  • 1 0
 Brilliant idea. Surgically implanted camelback. No more sweat between pack and back
  • 2 0
 Or Maybe Just An XXL frame size hardtail..... that'll fit 3-4 bottles
  • 1 0
 Short (under 10 mile) ride = bottle and a multitool on the bike. Longer ride = pack with water and all the other essentials.
  • 2 0
 I only use a water bottle and wear a pack. Am I doing it wrong?
  • 3 0
 Bibs with back pockets
  • 1 0
 Or just wear a Xc/road jersey
  • 1 0
 Packs and clothes are too heavy and uncomfortable so much faster without them
  • 1 0
 The bottle on my bike has a sports drink mix. And the bottle(or bladder) on me has regular water. I drink a lot.
  • 1 0
 No water bottle mounts is a no (does that even exist in other than DH bikes?)
But I'm fine with one under the downtube
  • 1 0
 waiting for the downtube camelbak straw outta the Specialized Shiv to make it to e-bikes.
  • 2 0
 Both, obviously. Horses for courses.
  • 1 0
 sometimes 2 water bottles aren't enough water for my rides so I 100% need a pack
  • 1 0
 I'm 6'4", 95kg and a heavy sweater. Where's the option for "two water bottles and a hydration pack"?
  • 5 3
 If you design a bike without a bottle mount... you are an idiot. Period.
  • 2 0
 Looks like there is a lot of xc guys on here
  • 1 0
 I only ride dh and dj- I don’t think either of those bikes require a water bottle.
  • 2 0
 Water bottles are so 90ies
  • 2 0
 ENDURO BRO'S always have a hip hydration pack!
  • 1 0
 Water bottle is for the energy drink, hip pack is for tools and straight water.
  • 1 0
 Riding in Alaska you need both....pack for water and water bottle mount for bear spray!!
  • 1 0
 hahaha i couldnt laugh more. so who's the big 2 hump, legged beast here. or camel back :o
  • 1 0
 Never ride without a pack. I prefer to have as little things strapped directly to my bike as possible.
  • 1 0
 I don’t need a hydration pack for even log summer rides, I can ride for 4ish hours with just 600ml.
  • 2 0
 Because water bottles are so trendy duhh
  • 1 0
 This survey should include where you ride. Here in the NE the bottle is covered in mud in no time a lot of days.
  • 1 0
 Every bottl'r I ride with sees me handing them thier bottles after losing them on the trail ahead of me.
  • 1 0
 I’d rather carry a bottle for shorter rides but definitely not a fan of 1’ of flat downtube in front of the BB.
  • 1 0
 Water bottles are extremely important. They hold Water.... and other adult beverages.
  • 1 0
 Did not find the option: "Not as important as a Beer Bottle" so I clicked something else
  • 1 0
 A bike, in no way, should be compromised, at all, to accommodate a water bottle.
  • 1 0
 All Santacruz/Enve riders need not answer as they have a rider on an appilo ride with them with their water.
  • 1 0
 Appropriate frame bag with flexi bottles...or Capri-suns (for the UK contingent)!
  • 1 0
 I mostly ride with a pack, so the water bottle mount isn't the most necessary thing for me.
  • 1 0
 I want frame mounts so I can carry as much water as I can even when I'm using bags and packs.
  • 3 3
 Water bottles are important. Over 76% of the people on Earth need water just to survive,
  • 2 1
 Didn’t Waki create that illustration?
  • 3 2
 Yes, for the Grim Donut!
  • 3 1
 @brianpark: any way PB can credit the photo with his name? I know he’s not the most well-liked former member, but credit is due.
  • 1 0
 Banned the guy, continue to use his content. F*ckin LAME
  • 1 1
 Cancel culture on pb seems like, eh? Waki always signed all his drawings......miss that dude not being here
  • 1 0
 @southpark: he canceled himself (he requested to be banned) but he was entertaining nonetheless
  • 2 0
 @cuban-b: my understanding is he left on his own and wasn't banned. But like you, I think the continued use of his drawings ought to be credited to him. This way pb just seems to pretend like he never existed. Hopefully, his signature wasn't removed from the drawing before using it this time around
  • 1 0
 @southpark: yeah I’m a big stickler for bylines and credit when it comes to journos and art. Maybe there’s some clause when we sign up that anything we create on this site is property of the site, which is fine, I’m just not familiar with the rules.
  • 5 4
 Water bottles are for dirt roadies.
  • 1 0
 Yes, I always have a bottle of fine whiskey with me.
  • 1 0
 Fidlock universal mount..... Problem solved if it's a dealbreaker no?
  • 1 0
 Agreed , no water bottle holders then no buy for me
  • 1 0
 Screw the water bottles and lets get some beer cozies.
  • 1 0
 WATER IS LIFE...........then beer.
  • 1 0
 Pack for water, bottle for hydrating drink (or vodka)
  • 1 1
 Fitting a water bottle isn’t a deal breaker for me but I much prefer to ride without a backpack
  • 1 0
 Without water you die....kinda important.
  • 1 1
 Water bottles for my dogs, pack water for me. No water bottle mount, no buy.
  • 1 0
 My new bike has one , and a nice new bottle cage.
  • 1 0
 Water in my hip pack, some electrolytes in my water bottle need both Big Grin
  • 2 2
 I would rather turn to dust than screw up my suspension sag with a bunch of dead weight from a pack filled with water.
  • 1 0
 (no one Ever); Who Even Needs susupension on a 180 Degree Black Damond Downhill Run?
  • 1 0
 i wish we had water, mostly fluoride here.
  • 1 0
 Call me old school but I still ride in a stillsuit.
  • 1 1
 I ride a downhill bike with space for 4 bottles (using only 2 right now) and never going back to hydration packs
  • 2 0
 pee pee
  • 1 0
 Wouldn’t even consider a bike without a cage
  • 1 0
 Is Henry Quinney writing for Pinkbike now?
  • 1 0
 Very.. End of!!!
  • 1 1
 --
  • 1 1
 Their a must have!
  • 2 4
 Gathering free statistics to sell to brands. And people being happily exploited. Facepalm.
  • 2 3
 CLEARLY SHOWS PINKBIKE IS FULL OF OLD PEOPLE NOW.
  • 4 0
 Even worse, a train of old pinkbikers just passed you doing back-flips on 90's retro-rides on a black diamond run at the bike park. They were riding in all caps.
  • 1 0
 @r-rocket: Now THAT is disturbing.
  • 3 5
 Cant live without ‘em
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