Poll: Once and For All, How Much Should a Mountain Bike Weigh?

Aug 6, 2021 at 10:14
by Henry Quinney  
Bikes have changed a lot in the last 5 years. They're undoubtedly better, but also often heavier. So, how much should a bike weigh? And what constitutes being heavy, and what is considered lightweight? Well, it's time we all decided and finally drew a line in the sand which can act as a yardstick in the future.

This isn't How much does your bike weigh? or How little could a bike weigh? but rather how much should a new, middle-of-the-road and off the shelf bike tip the scales at in 2021?

I've divided this into four sections, each with its own brief description. I've even included my own estimate of what I consider a fair example.

Right then, let's settle this - where does the line lie between light and heavy? How much should a bike weigh?

Andréane Lanthier Nadeau's coil-sprung race bike.

Enduro
A bike that is meant to be ridden hard. This bike should be able to ride an EWS course one day and then a 5,000 ft day of climbing the next. I'm thinking thick tires, big brakes and a burly build. My estimate: 35lb / 15.9kg.

How much should an enduro bike weigh?

Rounded to one decimal place.



Greg Minnaar's V10 with all the trimmings.

Downhill
A bike that is never intended to go uphill, but does that mean that weight doesn't matter? Inserts, downhill tires and maybe even a coil shock. My estimate: 37lb / 16.8kg.

How much should a downhill bike weigh?

Rounded to one decimal place.



Tom Richards photo
I think this 14.5kg Salsa Blackthorn is a good example of how I would build a trail bike.

Trail
Maybe the hardest idea to nail down. For this experiment, a trail bike is 140mm of travel with Exo+ style tires and is designed to be ridden hard, if only not quite as hard as an enduro bike. My estimate: 32lb / 14.5kg.

How much should a trail bike weigh?

Rounded to one decimal place.



Jofre Cullell's Olympic race bike, including dropper post.

XC
Gone are the days of 26" hardtails, so how much should an XC race bike weigh today? 29" wheels are almost universal and dropper posts aren't uncommon. My estimate: 24lb / 10.9kg

How much should a XC bike weigh?

Rounded to one decimal place.




357 Comments

  • 491 5
 I just put in my bike weights because obviously I am doing things correctly, and everyone else is doing them wrong
  • 238 0
 I just took 2 pounds off my bike weights, because I would be doing everything correctly if I had more $$.
  • 76 3
 easyAF... we should all just do what Dangerholm does.

WWDD?
  • 37 1
 @WasatchEnduro: I'm sorry, but most of the posters here do not have the quads to rock cutoffs like Dangerholm Does
  • 100 0
 Pick a weight and be a dick about it
  • 42 14
 The key question is: What should an e-bike weigh, and why doesn’t it yet?
  • 7 0
 @90police: Wise words to live by. Really applies to everything in life huh?
  • 21 3
 @nsteele: 30# with a 1k watt motor and 1k watt hour battery is what I'm holding out for. Should be available by the time I need an ebike!
  • 6 3
 @nsteele: This. Plus the follow up poll: how many minor crashes should each bike be able to sustain? (E-bikes especially)
  • 2 2
 @RusMan: are you under 25?
  • 1 0
 I knew it without weighing
  • 3 0
 I just put my weight and seriously, I know where I can save weight. (Not my wallet)
  • 1 2
 Danget downvote button!
  • 9 2
 I haven’t weighed a bike in 6 years. I don’t race and I don’t care how much it weighs unless it feels heavy and sluggish.
  • 4 0
 I just took 2 pounds off my bike weights because I’m waiting for parts
  • 17 7
 Are people confusing trail with park? Why the heck should a trail bike weigh 30lb? All the other highest numbered responses I agreed with but not that one. A trail bike is for the long haul and fun on the way, but you want to be able to ride it all day with no uplift and given that there are a few companies making them around the 25lb mark whilst still being very capable at talking on the rough stuff, I don't get why anyone would want extra weight on a bike with these design intentions?!

I have my opinion, but it's a genuine question Beer
  • 2 0
 @SJP: OHHH YEAH, its only 1 gram per dollar or used to be.
  • 7 0
 @WasatchEnduro: your sandpaper budget is going to go through the roof! time to buy 3M stonks....
  • 5 0
 @landscapeben: because I’m heavy and things break.
  • 2 0
 @landscapeben: I feel it may be due to a percentage of the community not wanting to partake in these market research surveys…
  • 4 1
 @landscapeben: Those of us over 100 kilo naked get tired of breaking things when we ride that rowdy trail out in the middle no where.
  • 3 0
 Who cares, my bike is heavy AF but at least it doesn't break and I can ride it hard.
  • 1 0
 @peschman: heavy riders need heavy strong bikes.
  • 7 3
 This all makes sense if heavy equals strong and if you can't have strong with light but that's clearly a fallacy. Didn't anyone catch Brendog riding his Scott spark xc bike over rough stuff? He totally abused that sub 25lb bike and it held up fine! We've just seen an enduro rig at hard-line, other enduro riders are using bikes like the IZZO with an upgraded fork. Bike strength to weight ratio has come a long way in recent years.
  • 6 0
 @landscapeben: A short promotional manufacturer video is a poor stand in for bike durability. I highly doubt a Scott Spark RC will tolerate that kind of riding for long, at least not on the OEM tires and wheels.

Heavy doesn't equal strong, but there's definitely a correlation.
  • 6 0
 @landscapeben: strong, light, cheap - pick 2. My budget doesn't extend to light.
  • 4 1
 @fartymarty: that's fair enough but these polls are based on ideals right... So on the assumption that low weight and great strength are possible, why would anyone want extra weight on their Trail bike? That's where I'm coming from. In real life though I ride a heavy old 26" second hand enduro that's around 35lb cause I can't afford lighter either.
  • 1 0
 @SJP: If you have bike weightS plural, then you already have enough $$.
  • 12 1
 @landscapeben: I have to agree. My Ripmo is just under 30 pounds and feels like a Pig compared to my Mach 5.5 at just under 26 pounds. My Ripmo is the heaviest bike I have ever owned. But it’s also the most capable and when things get interesting it has my back. It’s also more bike than I need 90 percent of the time. The 5.5 is simply pure joy to ride. It seemingly floats up hill and would rather spend more time in the air than on the ground. My Santa Cruz TRC was without question the greatest trail bike I have ever owned. It was stupid fast everywhere. It was a mere 24.43 pounds. Many things have lead to heavier bikes. Mostly people pushing bikes beyond their intended use. This was fine but many of those people didn’t have the skills or finesse to pull that off so warranty rates jumped. So manufacturers responded by adding a pound or more to most companies trail bike frames. Add in the want for Dh level grip and and tire inserts and all the sudden a trail bike weighs as much as an enduro bike and an enduro bike a DH bike.
The really question is. With all the talk of lighter and stronger. Why does almost every trail bike frame on the market today weigh more than the first aluminum full suspension Trail bike frame I bought over 20 years ago? It was a Foes FXR with a Ti Curnutt coil spring shock. 27.54 pounds. In case you cared. Bikes have gotten FAT! Thanks to bikes I still weigh the same as I did in high school.
  • 3 0
 That’s complete bike weigh with a full XTR Kit, King / Mavic wheels, Easton bar, Thomson stem, Gravity dropper post, Manitou Minute Fork, Specialized Revolution 2.3 tires set up tubeless with electrical tape and and modified presta valve stems. A friend of mine still owns and rides it regularly.
  • 2 1
 @WasatchEnduro: you mean build bikes which aren't fit to be ridden in the category they belong?
  • 3 0
 @landscapeben: They also said middle of the road off the shelf build. I said 30 because I'm assuming somewhere around 4k, so aluminum frame with a good spec or carbon with a not great spec. Top end trail should for sure be down around 26 or 27 I would think, but cheaper forks and cranks add up quick.
  • 1 0
 @Bikethrasher: if you think a 30lb trail bike is a pig try riding one that's pushing 41lb (that's ready to ride with tools and a full bottle). Saying that I'm 95kg and ride an XL so it ain't ever going to be light.
  • 1 0
 @landscapeben: I want a bike that will last me at least 5 years. I've had my steel HT 7 years and ain't planning on selling it. Hence I buy steel bikes and get fitter / stronger so I can ride them. If money was no object maybe I would have a super light bike.
  • 1 0
 @landscapeben: Agree. Longer rides, all trail types... 25.5 lbs or else I'd ride a slack XC bike, Transition Spur for example.
  • 1 0
 @nsteele: it's an e bike it doesn't count
  • 3 0
 @eastonkooka: Well...riding naked could make it easier to break things, I suppose.
  • 2 3
 @nsteele: who the f*ck rides an e-bike and who the f*ck wishes to ride one. An e-bike is for age 85 and above
  • 2 0
 @Jebu:what about folks with medical problems or folks with too much money who like to show off? I would personally love to ride an ebike now and then if it was free, because holy hell those things go!
  • 1 1
 @landscapeben: define "trail"? Your 25 lb trail bike would last about a month in Whistler unless you are a very smooth rider. Terrain also dictates what is trail rather than trail centres or forestry blocks where the owner is more concerned about liability than letting the builders develop challenging trails.
  • 3 0
 @andrewbikeguide: Whistler is not the world chum, you might need to get out more Beer

I jest. Look I understand your point but I think actually what I'm saying still stands. Generally it is possible to ride a 25lb trail bike on most trails without issue and if it's that serious a trail then it probably isn't for a "trail bike".
  • 226 3
 Also: a dirt jumper should never have a motor.
  • 10 39
flag bat-fastard (Aug 6, 2021 at 12:17) (Below Threshold)
 what about a slopestyle, I'm just fitting a cyc stealth kit to my double.. I've too many years on my knees so seeing if keeps me on trails without uplifts.. Just hit 32mph on it down my road Smile
  • 70 3
 And Olympic courses shouldn’t have wood ramps…
  • 36 1
 @sportstuff: That's why they are removable.
  • 9 0
 @sportstuff: the organizers realized exactly this halfway through the games!
  • 7 0
 It should, but there also should be uphill dirt jump courses.
  • 5 16
flag ajaxwalker (Aug 6, 2021 at 15:05) (Below Threshold)
 @TwoHumanPower: I know you're joking. But a motor may allow for dirt jump / slope style courses to be made on flat land. Who knows what might come of it.
  • 50 8
 *bicycles* should not have motors.

Fixed it
  • 12 14
 @JSTootell:

I won’t own an ebike until I’m super duper old, but one definitely cycles their legs, while riding on two wheels, on an ebike, so pedantically, it’s a bicycle.
  • 18 0
 @ajaxwalker: damn you are right....imagine if they made formed dirt courses in like a stadium or arena or something and had races or jump competitions on motorized bikes? It would be like nothing the world has ever seen before! We could call it.....Electro-cross.......or maybe.......Lithium Circus
  • 13 0
 @ajaxwalker: it's called motocross.
  • 6 3
 @hllclmbr: If you want to be properly pedantic you could say that the word bicycle stems from the classical Greek bi ("two") and kuklos ("wheels"), and therefore anything with two wheels is a "bicycle". That said I think that most cyclists today would agree that a bicycle is simply a two-wheeled vehicle propelled by a rider without motorized assistance.
  • 9 0
 If it had a motor, wouldn't that make it a motorbike?
  • 3 0
 @bat-fastard: Username checks out
  • 4 0
 @andyw101: just back from 2 weeks in morzine on the DH bike. Just can't pedal worth a crap. Name comes from the hainbrink 8" travel upside down forks from late 90's..
  • 1 0
 Neither should striders, but they still do...
  • 86 18
 The problem with these polls is it doesn’t account for size.
I’m 6’3 and my XL enduro bike weighing 33 pounds is pretty damn good .
That same weight on a medium is not so good.
  • 56 10
 The difference in weight between frame sizes is a small fraction of a pound, if you keep all other components the same.
  • 11 0
 Wheel size makes a difference as well.
  • 36 2
 You're talking about 200-300 grams difference between a S frame and an XL though... it's not like a Fox 38 on an XL enduro bike weighs any more than a Fox 38 on a S enduro bike, or like a 29x2.5 DHRII weighs more on a small than an XL.
  • 19 0
 Tire choice makes a big difference
  • 114 2
 @badbadleroybrown: yeah but larger riders run higher tire pressure (usually) so you gotta account for all that air.
  • 16 6
 @badbadleroybrown: typically there are also component differences between sizes. A size small might have 160mm cranks and a 125mm dropper post and a size XL might have 170mm cranks and a 180mm dropper post.
  • 14 0
 @badbadleroybrown: I'll disagree on a minor technicality - steer tubes are most certainly longer on larger frames....but that is being pedantic
  • 5 2
 @creativefletch: You are talking about less than a 1/4 pound total.
  • 20 2
 @SJP: Don't forget, rider height correlates with rider weight. There are a lot of components that will be or at least often are, due to preference, heavier for heavier & taller riders: spring weight on coils, tires/inserts, longer dropper posts, frames, brakes/rotors, pedal size. It can add up to a substantial difference.
  • 6 0
 While the frame size weight difference is negligible is taller and heavier riders can’t as easily get away with lighter weight parts. We just put way more stress on the system. Tires in particular come to mind but also the same can be said for rims, spokes, and even brakes.
  • 5 0
 @rburroughs4: that is where my head was too, indirectly a larger bikes weighs more for those exacts reasons, my buddies M is always 1-2 lbs lighter than my XL for very sim builds...but 100 grams here and there adds up and he can get away lighter carcass tires....
  • 8 2
 @badbadleroybrown:

As a taller rider you also have a longer dropper, longer cranks, maybe wider tyres, wider bars, larger rotors and so on. While these parts don't weigh that much more on their own they eventually add up. I guess a more realistic difference between a S and XL bike is about 800g to 1000g
  • 5 0
 Amen. I’m stumpy in height, and bike weight matters. I don’t need the same reinforcement/ component strength that someone weighing 100kg does
  • 29 0
 @SJP: This has always bothered me. Why do people keep all the other components the same. For example why should a Raceface SixC carbon bar be used on 2 different people's Enduro bike if one person weighs 240lb and the other person weighs 140lb. Is the bar on the verge of snapping on the heavy person's bike, or is it massive overkill on the 140 lb, or I guess is it both? Because it can't be the right bar for both, assuming the 2 riders ride about the same level as far as aggression and speed.

Do 120 lb DH racers need DH carcass tires?

Does a 140 lb Enduro racer need a Zeb or 38 fork, or would a Pike or 34 be the best fork for them and plenty stiff. If that 140lb rider needs a Zeb, what should a 225lb person run on their Enduro bike?
  • 6 0
 @SJP: Long long ago, when I raced, a lot of parts were selected depending on the riders weight. The biggest parts differences that I can recall were, rims, seatposts, cranks and handlebars, but even included stiluff like getting away with running a Ti BB spindle or lightweight QR skewers, that would feel very strange to me. There were many options that I could never get away with, since I was never short at 6'4" entering high school, and wasn't ever super skinny with a competitive weight at around 190 at age 17. This seems to have mostly gone away and I never see it discussed that maybe that light weight rider should put RF Next 31.8 bar on their Enduro sled, while the heavy rider should probably be running that SixC bar.
  • 4 0
 Agreed - I'm 6'6", 250lbs. At 35 lbs, my XXL trail bike seems light enough considering I run heavier duty components than others I ride with.
  • 5 0
 @insertfunusername: you make a very interesting point. I think that in hobbies like MTB and motorcycling, people buy what they want rather than what they need. People buy sexy parts to sex up their builds, or high horsepower bikes they don’t know how to ride.
The Fox 38 is sexy, the Fox 34 is seen as boring and soft. 35mm handlebars look cool, we all want what looks cool. Fat tubes. Moar travel! Moar diameter! Moar carbon!
  • 10 0
 I agree that a "good" weight is not universal. Bike weight as a percentage of rider weight seems like a more useful metric. A 33 pound bike for a 200 pound rider is a better weight ratio than a 30 pound bike for a 150 pound rider.
  • 2 0
 @jaame: The way all these parts are marketed is that particular parts are for particular disciplines. This is just wrong headed and I have always thought that lighter people have much worse performance than they could have. Running heavy tires, rims, forks and bigger inserts would make a light person's suspension feel terrible and perform much worse, compared to how those same parts on a heavy person's bike would feel and perform.

Sometimes when I watch women's DH it just looks like some of the smaller ladies are getting just tossed around and getting hung up, in the rough sections, then I wonder how much lighter, if any, their unsprung mass is than what is being run by heavier riders. It does come down to other factors though sometimes, like I don't think most tire manufacturers, make DH rubber compounds and then put them on heavier trail casings.
  • 4 2
 @badbadleroybrown: If that person on that S size bike is also a lot lighter than the person on the XL bike, why should they both have a 38 though? Again if there is a weight difference why would the light person have the same casing on that 29x2.5 DHRII as the heavy person?
  • 1 0
 @insertfunusername: What they should or shouldn't have isn't relevant... when you buy a bike, the spec level isn't determined by the size.
  • 4 1
 @badbadleroybrown: Probably should be speced differently based on size, but that isn't the intent of this poll. Also I have only bought 2 complete bikes in the last 31 years and 1 of those had its wheels, tires, fork, cockpit, seatpost, and cranks swapped before riding, so stock spec doesn't matter at all to me. The poll did not ask how heavy stock spec bikes should be, it asked how heavy do you think bikes of a certain category should weigh. Then the OP said that because he is taller and not super light he needs a heavier bike for a given category.
  • 1 2
 @insertfunusername: Well if you want to start accounting for anecdotal variables then this becomes an impossible question without an interview outlining weight, riding style, terrain, and a number of other factors.
  • 2 1
 @badbadleroybrown:
an·ec·do·talˌ adjective
not necessarily true or reliable, because based on personal accounts rather than facts or research.

None of those factors are anecdotal, they do absolutely play into how heavy a bike should be. Like for instance I am quite heavy, but can run EXO casing tires with a light insert in the rear only, because I'm generally pretty smooth, and the terrain were I live isn't super abusive to tires. So of course my ideal weights for a trail bike would differ from others. Nobody is making any decisions for the market with these polls, so no interviews are needed through the poll.

If someone is building a bike from parts, the interview you are talking about, should definitely take place, since not doing so would result in the rider not having the best bike for their money.
  • 4 0
 @SJP: yeah but everything adds up, generally longer cranks, longer posts, longer steerer tubes, taller bars or longer stems. It is extra weight... so if your comparing full bike builds starting with a heavier frame you can NEVER hit the same weight of some dudes small or medium build and generally its always the smaller builds manufacturers are quoting weights on and more likely to be a medium from general population.

Then if your tall AND a bigger rider you have component spec issues. Granted its a whole world of difference nowadays. But back in the day you had to either constantly replace shit breaking on your bike or buy heavier DH spec components for your xc/ trail bike.

Enduro racing was kind of a godsend for big n tall mountain bikers. We finally got parts, wheels, forks that didn't suck at decent prices AND steeper seat tube angles... Smile
  • 4 1
 @insertfunusername: Literally every part of those variables is anecdotal; based on personal account as opposed to absolute fact.

Two riders weighing 250lbs do not have the same needs, two riders weighing 170lbs do not have the same needs. There are 170lb riders who can ride Exo casings without issues and 170lb riders who shred DD casings, ditto for 250lb riders. I'm a heavy rider and I'm hard on suspension, but easy on tires. I have friends who are much lighter and ride the same trails... I can't ride a 34 and need a 36, but they can get by on a 34... I can ride Exo's without issues, they'll tear up Exo's and need DD. These factors are the literal definition of anecdotal variables.

If you just wanna argue, there's way more fun shit we can argue about but, in this case, you're wrong so let's just move on.
  • 2 0
 @pcledrew: I run helium. But it’s $$$$. Luckily I sell it at work so the discount is great.
  • 2 0
 @rburroughs4: I assure my weight is not correlated to my height. And yes that is a self own.
  • 3 1
 @badbadleroybrown: Weight, terrain, and speed are all not anecdotal. How smooth you are or riding style are anecdotal, but can still be accounted for.

My main point is that ideal weight of a bike is based off a ton of factors that should, but often don't account for any of these factors. If a 115# person is getting an Enduro bike, they should probably be running lighter everything than I was running on my favorite short travel trail bike, which weighed about 29 lbs, or my current mid travel trail bike which weighs in around 32 lbs.
  • 1 0
 I like your thinking - but I think rider weight and style is a bigger factor.

Heavier riders who ride fast and smash into things will need a stiffer fork, heavier tires / rims, bigger rotors, and tire inserts. Frame weight changes from sm-xl are small compared to the cumulative difference of these other changes.
  • 1 3
 @insertfunusername: You don't seem to comprehend what's being discussed... weight itself is a concrete measurement but how weight impacts a rider's decision to run specific parts is absolutely anecdotal. There is no part that's a concrete necessity based upon weight aside from some super lightweight parts that won't support a given rider weight, in every other case weight is an anecdotal variable in a rider's component decisions. There are certain parts that I require heavier parts than other lighter weight riders and other parts that I can ride lighter weight components than other lighter weight riders can get away with. Ipso facto, weight, in the context of this discussion is absolutely anecdotal. Ditto for all the other variables.
  • 2 1
 @badbadleroybrown:
Since you don't seem to be able to comprehend whole posts and get totally hung up on one word, I have no need to say more to you.
  • 2 2
 @insertfunusername: lol

Bro, the only person hung up on one word here is you. Since I said that it wasn't worth considering a bunch of anecdotal variables into the discussion about weight vis a vis frame sizes, you've been running on about how those variables aren't anecdotal. The bottom line is that frame size doesn't drive bike weight significantly and it's a flawed assumption to pretend that every rider on a medium frame needs less heavy duty components than a rider on an XL frame so those variables, anecdotal or otherwise, aren't really a consideration in this conversation. Ultimately, frame size accounts for a couple hundred grams of weight and it's the difference between a 32lb bike and a 35lb bike.

But sure, we can stop now like I said several posts ago.
  • 2 0
 Preach! My XL 29er is a tad over 35lbs, EXO tires don’t work for me…
  • 1 0
 @pcledrew: that’s why I run low pressure. The wrecked rims are worth the lightness
  • 2 0
 @VtVolk: this dude gets it.
  • 1 0
 @itslightoutandawaywego: anything for that negative weight gain.
  • 4 0
 Agreed @solorider13.

The real question is, what weight should I weigh to make myself go faster……

Answers:

1- A teenager who’s not yet discovered beer!
2- An early 20’s rider who’s discovered beer but has the metabolism of a teenager.
3- An Early 30’s rider who’s single, living life and somehow fighting off the weight gain.
4- an early 30’s rider who’s in a long term relationship and struggling to fight the weight gain.
5- aged above all the above with a dadbod.
6- dadbod: the only time you get to ride is when you make out you’ve gone to work just to get a ride in.
  • 3 0
 @2-1RacingUK: meh… dadbod here because I like food and booze and my family more than I like working out. I’ve got time for a fair amount of short rides OR working out to stay fitter, I always pick riding.
  • 3 0
 @DHhack: you’re lucky to have a choice dude. Haha.
  • 62 2
 Rule number 1 is the bike needs to hold up to intended use. Rule number 2 is as light as possible now that rule 1 has been established.
  • 2 25
flag ybsurf (Aug 6, 2021 at 12:18) (Below Threshold)
 I like that my dh single speed weight at 29.6lbs qith everything dh rated on it I would no go exo casing to save weight or light wheels, or can be light but got to take the abuse.
  • 57 0
 @ybsurf: I tried to read what you wrote three times then gave up
  • 15 0
 @ybsurf: I think I had a mild seizure in the middle of reading this
  • 8 0
 @ybsurf: I am not Denglish but I understand, dude.
  • 11 1
 @Peskycoots: I put it in Google translate, and got that meme of the dog with a bike helmet shaking his head.
  • 5 3
 @Serpentras: It was not a joke! I know that being German you have to pretend but that applies only for jokes Wink
  • 4 0
 So basically it needs to weigh as much as it needs to
  • 2 0
 @pakleni: big neighbour inferiority Complex?
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: How the heck can you be sure it was not a joke? That would mean you made sense of it…
  • 1 2
 @FuzzyL: it's easier for the the Swiss to tell when it's not a joke: if it doesn't involve chocolate, it's probably a joke.

For Germans I'd refer to Monty Python's Funniest joke in the world sketch.
  • 1 0
 What about features & functionality?
You could make a super-sturdy unicycle only 15 lbs.
  • 53 1
 I dropped half a kilo off my dad bod. Performance gains were massive.
  • 6 0
 I always make sure to poop before I ride. Easy half-kilo weight savings.
  • 3 0
 @srjacobs: I just poop in the middle of the trail and let people ride through it.

No wait, I'm not a horse.
  • 3 0
 @mikealive: i bet you wish you were a horse though. they drop a lot more than half a kilo with every load, imagine the weight savings you could have
  • 40 8
 I'm shocked by what people think "appropriate" bike weight should be. Are 32 pound enduro bikes really that common, or am I just completely out of the loop? Or do most people have a skewed idea of what an enduro bike is? Are most people considering an Ibis Mojo with a 36 on 28 hole Industry 9 wheels and Exo+ tires a full enduro bike? There's absolutely no way you're hitting the 32 pound mark on a 6" travel bike with a 170mm dropper, decent wheel set, and tires that can actually be used. Let alone running inserts.
  • 20 1
 Literally just got home from a shop where we weighed a 2022 Trek Slash 9.8 in M/L size. As it sat, albeit with no pedals, it scaled at 32.02lbs.
  • 13 1
 I find it interesting that trail bikes are voted at 30 with exo tires and lighter components and Enduro at 32 with Dd's and inserts with EWS level components. I don't really understand where people are pulling these numbers from
  • 8 0
 32lbs would be a fairly premium spec, and EXO/EXO+ tires. A race prepped bike is almost certainly not getting that low with DD/DH tires and probably a little heavier wheelset.
  • 7 1
 @pcledrew:
And it probably had some form of slightly beefed up single ply tires and a wheelset made of recycled crayons. Even just adding a pair of SPD pedals and an enduro worthy (DD, grid gravity, etc...) and a bottle cage for good measure, and thst bike is easily 34 pounds.
  • 5 0
 @TheBrosCloset:
Right?
I'm on a '19 Stumpy Evo 29 alloy, DT alloy wheels, air suspension, XO1 drive chain, alloy cranks, and grid gravity 2.6 F&R with Cushcore Pro out back and I'm well past 36 pounds. It's far from guicci spec, but besides general maintenance I never have to touch the thing.
  • 12 11
 It's not so much what they do weigh as what they should weigh. I have an Evil Calling trail bike and was disappointed that it came out at 30lb- I'd been trying really hard to get it sub 30. The fact that trail and Enduro bikes are so heavy shows a real lack of development or imagination by the manufacturers. They've conned us all into thinking 35lb is acceptable and are happy to just churn stuff out at that weight rather trying to make stuff light AND strong.
  • 8 4
 And before those comments roll in, I'm as light as I can be. I race, I'm fit. The joy of riding a light bike with light wheels really brings me pleasure.
  • 15 1
 @lukeb: We tried light and "strong". We ended up with creaking CSUs on Fox 36s, dual piston brakes that couldn't handle large wheels in any sort of extended downhill, and flexy rear ends that caused premature shock wear (this one obviously has some other solutions).

In a lot of cases the only alternatives are looking to increasingly exotic (read: Expensive) materials. Do we really want to pay even more for bikes to save a 1lb of weight?

Light/Strong/Cheap. You only ever get two.
  • 3 0
 My mondraker foxy size medium with dh casing and aluminum wheels is 31lbs
  • 2 0
 @pcledrew: sure it got weak ass tires, to small rotors too?
  • 1 1
 @lukeb: Light, fast, and cheap. Pick two.
  • 6 5
 Why would an Enduro bike need DH tires? DH tires are for DH bikes. The two Enduros I have owned weighed 32 pounds.

Specialized Enduro - 32 lbs
Yeti SB165 - 32 lbs
  • 6 0
 @Baller7756: What are Enduro tires?

Wrong naming I would suggest. There are only tires rated for different terrain and f*ck-ability with that. DONT give a shit about this sharp edge with those buffed tires. Well, get ready do increase your weight by 7lbs, by that alone , ha!.
  • 3 0
 @Baller7756:
Why don’t you ask most of the ews field ?
  • 4 0
 Commencal clash at 36 pounds. still comfortable to climb, but forget about getting the KOM Smile
  • 11 4
 @skiandmtbdirtbag: Those are different circumstances... in a race you are willing to take on that weight penalty to ensure that you finish. Even though the chance of a flat is low with EXO+ and Super Trail casings, you have to finish the race to win the race.

For the non sponsored among us riding Enduro bikes... the risk of a flat is even lower in the majority of cases (exceptions of course for extreme terrain and rider weight), and the weight penalty for DH casings is not worth the extra insurance against flats.

But I suppose it is pretty cool to say "I run DH casings"...
  • 11 3
 Unless you are racing what on Earth are you needing inserts for? Never run them, never needed them, they just add unnecessary weight
  • 5 1
 @lukeb: very true. It’s easy to engineer a heavy bike. The skill is making it light and strong enough
  • 8 0
 @RoboDuck: now we only get one. Strong. Light doesn’t exist nor does cheap
  • 8 4
 @skiandmtbdirtbag: no one on here is in the top 100 in an ews race. PB Riders put dh tyres on because it makes them feel like a pro and they like to think they Ride hard and fast enough to need them. They are only kidding themselves
  • 9 2
 @CM999: Either:
You weigh the same as a bag of quavers;
You don't ride ride any rocky square edged sh#t.
You are the world's most precise rider.
You own a wheel company.
You just haven't seen the light yet.
  • 6 2
 @Baller7756: I guess you don't have rough terrain then if you think Exo+ is enough.
Another reason to ride DH tire's. Les pressure needed because stiffer sidewalls. Also way more damping.
  • 3 1
 @Baller7756:
While I understand your school of thought on lighter casing tires, there's people like me who think the weight IS worth not having to worry about a puncture or slice right where the sidewall meets the tread 12 miles out from your car and having to get covered in sealant trying to fish a tube in there or not have to stop a ride to toss in a dynaplug and top off with co2. Not to mention the usual better and tackier rubber compound and damping qualities of the casing on heavier tires.
  • 5 1
 @CM999:
I take it you've never ran any sort of insert, and likely never will with that attitude. I'm guessing you figure your bike rides really good, right? Works perfect for you? What if it could work even better and the penalty would be less than $100 out of pocket and maybe the weight of a full water bottle? Add to that it might reduce the amount of flats you get, allow you lower tire pressures for potentially improved grip and ride quality, keep your rim safe, and help cornering stability.

I was once in your shoes running 800 gram tires wondering why people would pay money for a pool noodle. Then I simply tried it. Never looked back. The ride quality and ability to be nearly care free of what I'm riding over or landing on heavily eclipsed the want for a lighter tire so I could be what... 2 minutes faster up a 30 minute climb?
  • 4 0
 @Baller7756: Btw Super trail casing is old super gravity, schwalbe went bonkers on the casings this year
  • 3 0
 @lukeb:
I don't think it's that the companies can't produce stuff like that, it's that there's no market for it. I'm sure most bike engineers could design an ultra light weight and durable enduro worthy frame and likely most companies could manufacture it.
At what cost, though? People flip at the cost of an S-Works Levo and that has a motor and electronics, so why would they go through the effort of design, testing and manufacturing a push bike where the frame alone might cost $6,000 just so a bunch of people on the internet can rip it apart.
  • 1 0
 @danbgbg:
Ditto. '21 meta am29..... 39.5 lbs
  • 1 0
 @Tayrob: bottle cage was attached. Tires I can’t say because I don’t know Bontrager. Bontrager line elite 30 carbon wheels. Your choice of those are crayon or not.
  • 1 0
 @pcledrew: damn, just weighed a small norco shore at 40lbs.
  • 2 1
 @Tayrob: I have had a flat or two in my day… but they are very rare and were due to unfamiliarity with the trail… and thinking it was cool to run low pressure.

I suppose if I had more flats, I would be pushed into a heavier casing, but 90% of my riding is on local trails that I know very well. I know where the flat edges are, I know where to land on drops and jumps.

For me, and most riders, the DH casing is overkill. But piece of mind is important too.
  • 1 0
 My 2018 specialized Enduro is 30 lbs with inserts but it's full carbon with 28/24 spoke carbon wheels. X01 drivetrain. Composite pedals. 170 one up dropper. Of course it's an outdated design now. Current enduro bikes are basically DH bikes you can pedal uphill. I don't feel comfortable riding my Enduro in the park (both the geometry and spec) so I also own a supreme.
  • 1 0
 @ThunderChunk: my 2017 alu enduro pushes 37lbs
  • 3 1
 @Tayrob: my DH is 32, my enduro is 29. Not everyone needs dd, cushcore and heavy wheels ride fast, knarley tech terrain. Some riders are smoother than others, and not hacks that trash their rides after a season. Just sayin.
  • 1 0
 @Twenty6ers4life:
I'm going to venture a guess both of the bikes you mentioned are not current, modern geometry machines or they are severely lacking in the wheel department (narrow, stiff, carbon rims) if they have current reach/chainstay lengths.
I don't choose cushcore because I'm a hack who trashes bikes. I've been on the same wheelset for 3 years, the rear has a small flat spot but I'm dent free. 3 years and probably close to 30,000 miles on my Stumpy Evo and I just replaced the pivot bearings by choice. I use them for the ride feel first, added durability second.
  • 2 1
 @CM999: Because I wreck rims and cut tires on the regular. Because at my local fun races when I blow a tire, I can still ride out without destroying it. I live in bike park and shuttle land where everyone rides hard and breaks shit. I've the case of tire inserts, that little bit of extra cush in the wheel saves the aforementioned parts as well as labour time. If you've never needed them, cool, but don't say people don't need them. That's just ignorant.
  • 2 1
 @Baller7756: I was going though 3-5 rear tires a season from cutting the casing. I don't race EWS, this is on normal rides in difficult, rocky terrain. In dry conditions going into a loose corner, I've drifted off line and dented my spoke bed of my rim into the inner wall. Some people need big tires on Enduro bikes. It's very possible, if your using exo casing tires, that you don't actually need an Enduro bike where your riding.
  • 1 0
 @TheBrosCloset: Like I said earlier @Baller7756 doesn't ride in rocky terrain. Even if you know your local trails enough if you really have the rough stuff your sidewalls are f*cked every time.
I like it how others think that stuff is enough and no-one ever needs more.
All my dudes and other locals ride at least super gravity or DD for our hometrails. If not, they are very light or not familiar with that terrain we got.
With the Super Gravity I really can say I dont have a flat tire anymore.


@pcledrew I did use this combo for long time, I just sized up to 223mm front and rear, also 2,2mm thick.
I wont go down again. Good relive for my finger if my hands got enough.


@Tayrob if you really want a modern Enduro light as possible , get a Tarvo. Made in Germany and cost you around 4k in €. The weight of this Large frame is unreal.
  • 1 0
 @TheBrosCloset: Fair enough… and already acknowledged. It was noted earlier that extreme terrain and extreme rider weight were situations where DH tires are necessary. I think we were generalizing that Enduro bikes don’t typically require DH tires, and thus should weigh in the 32lb range.

When it comes to bike selection, of course trail and terrain are a major consideration among others… but riding style is 51% of that total equation. Do my local trails demand an Enduro bike? No. I ride the same trails with my Downcountry bike. I could ride them with a Hardtail or even a Downhill bike… I just ride them differently.
  • 1 0
 @pcledrew: lol i have the aluminum 2021 slash, 37lb.
  • 1 0
 @DAN-ROCKS: Probably with pedals and a few accessories?
  • 1 0
 @pcledrew: with pedals, bars cut to 800, still with the thin tires it came with. With the 38 and dh/dd tires i put on it it comes to about 38lb
  • 3 0
 @DAN-ROCKS: So thats why Fox called it the 38.
  • 1 0
 @DAN-ROCKS: Sounds to heavy to me, no coils?
  • 1 0
 @Serpentras: stock air shock that comes with the bike. The fork weighs 5lb by itself lol I weighed it when i got it
  • 19 3
 Where is the “I don’t give a f***” option? I have no accurate weight on my bikes. And I don’t feel like it’s a necessity to know the weight of my bike.
The only time it seems truly necessary to know the weight of your bike, is in the parking lot at the trailhead, or the lift line at the park when some jerry asks what your rig weighs…
  • 7 2
 This man gets it
  • 6 2
 The only time you really need to know the weight of your bike is when you want to take it on an airplane. I honestly don't know the weight of my bike. Could be anything between 11kg and 15kg.
  • 16 0
 In general WTF has happened to bike weights? Back when I was a kid we rode flimsy ultra light weight 26ers coming in around 20 lbs and we liked it!
  • 3 0
 Jesus H. How much money did you have to spend back in the day? I built some crazy light bikes and none of them were 20 pounds. 24-25 maybe. And those were pretty baller bikes at the time.
  • 3 0
 @onemanarmy: about $2k-3k. I had a fully rigid trek 990 with light wheels and shimano XT crank, derailures and cassette. Grip shaft shifters. Also had a Specialized ti-carbon seat, specialized ti QR skewers, light weight tires/tubes, cut down bars, S-wroks stem, speedplay frog pedal and some ti bolts.
  • 6 0
 @Highlander406: I remember how those old bikes rode. Bone shaking, canti brakes and 560mm wide bars. I'll happily take the weight penalty for a modern bike's handling. Good times though.
  • 7 1
 Even in 2005-2010 you could easily find an all mountain bike at 26-28lbs
  • 2 0
 @fewnofrwgijn: with a RP2 and 32mm stanchion fork, 2.25 tires, 23mm with 26” rims and no dropper? A dropper by itself adds almost a pound.
  • 1 1
 @stubs179: I guess that’s the question, is it 4lbs better? Is 1x12, a dropper, bigger tires and longer frames 4lbs more convenient?
I guess the point is we’ve kinda passed the era of slimming down bikes to what’s absolutely needed, and we’re now just adding more stuff to make things better. A droppers worth a pound, 1x12 is worth a pound, modern geometry is too and modern tires are probably worth 2lbs honestly, and of course water is worth 1kg/L, what’s the next pound of tech that’s gonna be gamechanging and completely necessary? And how heavy will “the ideal bike weight” be then?

After all this ranting I’ve just concluded that weight doesn’t matter. But it’s fun to point out that bikes are getting heavier, and that’s a good thing
  • 1 0
 @fewnofrwgijn @stubs179 you guys are spot on - a lot of these bikes have the same names as the 2010 models but every single thing on them is bigger, longer, and heavier - they're not the same bikes anymore IMO.

Don't get me wrong, I love modernish geo, droppers, and 29 wheels but 5-10 years ago all these Enduro/AM bikes had Pikes and 95% of people weren't held back by that at all. Just saying that in terms of capability/intended use today's 140-ish mm trail bikes are more similar to the old enduro/AM bikes. Those bikes were all-arounders, not single crown, semi-pedalable DH monster trucks.
  • 3 0
 Yeah, I miss breaking frames, dropping chains, useless brakes, flat tires, flimsy suspension, and scary geometry. It was sooooooo awesome!!!!!
  • 1 0
 @fewnofrwgijn: I think 4lbs is absolutely better. Tires that can take a huge beating, stiff forks, bikes that can climb and descend amazing and dropper posts are probably the single greatest thing since deraileurs were invented.

I've never had a "light" bike because I ride hard and would rather make it home without walking. My trail bike for a lot of the mid 2000's was a Kona Coiler Supreme with a 66 and DHX5, 2x9, Navegals, and a lot of Hussefelt components. It was a heavy bike at the time, probably around 32lbs? 160mm front and rear. That bike kicked ass but was a big compromise compared to a 160mm bike today.
  • 17 3
 I'll submit the obviously dissenting opinion: Y'all need to set higher expectations for lowering bike weight. 30lb enduro bikes are absolutely possible.
  • 8 2
 Possible? Yes. Likely with a mid to low budget? No.
You can get a super light DH bike, it just comes at a higher cost... heck you can get a 6lb road bike for 45k
  • 6 0
 My stumpy was 28lbs dry and it can handle more than I can throw at it.
  • 5 5
 You’re half right. With current geometry
30lbs for an enduro won’t happen. You need 27.5/26” wheels, slacker seat tubes( means less dropper post weight/ shorter droppers) wheel bases that are not crazy long, etc…


P.s. My enduro bike is 30lbs, but it’s got older geometry…(HD3).
  • 5 2
 @Saidrick: can you explain how geometry makes a bike heavier? a 64 degree head tube angle doesn't weigh more than a 67 degree head tube angle
  • 1 1
 @twonsarelli: More linkage, more alloy, etc.
  • 9 0
 Cheap - light - strong....pick two
  • 2 0
 @Saidrick: Brought mine down from 15.5kg to 13.8kg. Extremely happy.
  • 1 0
 I had a 2015 specialized Enduro that weighed about 28 without pedals. I couldn’t believe how fast it felt on XC trails, seriously impressive for a bike with that much travel.

Then came the reality check. The ultra thin tires it came with tore to bits as soon as I hit chunky trails at high speeds, and the ultra light wheels sounded like they were going to explode, they did not last long.

After putting proper dual ply tires on, and a durable set of wheels, the bike weighed almost 32 pounds.
  • 2 1
 @drummuy04: what wheelset and tires? Fork and shock? 28 lbs isn’t going to hold up to true enduro riding.
  • 4 1
 @twonsarelli:

In a vacuum, you are right. In the real world you are wrong: As the head angle gets slacker the wheel base and travel tend to get longer ( bigger wheels add to this too). As head angle gets steeper, the wheel base and travel tend to go down. Please see my original comment: wheel base is part of geometry…

Longer travel and longer wheel bases almost always mean heavier, since there is more mass and hence more weight.

I am sure there’s an engineer that will tell
My numbers are not correct.

But for reference compare the numbers on my mojo HD3 vs the current Mojo HD 5 : a size large HD 3 has a 67-66.5 head angle and a 1168mm wheel base. An HD 5 has a 64 degree head angle and 1250 mm wheel base( size large).

Frame and shock weight for the hd3 5.9lbs.

Frame and shock weight for the HD 5 is 6.5 lbs.
  • 4 0
 @stubs179: You can, easily, if you are light.
  • 2 0
 @twonsarelli: Just taking the Spec Enduro as an example, in the last 10 years it's gotten 4" longer, 10mm more travel, bigger wheels, a reservoir shock, a fatter/longer fork, and a dropper. Can't really make every single part of the bike longer / burlier and keep the weight the same (without making it flimsy or super expensive).

Tbh the 2010 Enduro looks a lot more like today's Stumpy (Pike, non-reservoir shock, etc). Idk if it's the EWS or more people riding park, but these bikes have morphed from being long travel trail (all-mountain?) bikes into mini-DH bikes.

Today's "trail" bikes look a lot like the "enduro" bikes of a few years ago, both in terms of component selection and weights... if I'm not actually racing enduro then I'm definitely picking the trail bike, but that's just me.
  • 1 0
 @Saidrick: interesting ideas for sure. My 2017 ripley LS weighed 29 pounds (carbon cranks, wheels, bars, saddle) and had a steep head tube angle and a slack seat tube angle. The spur is a longer bike with a slacker head tube angle and according to their website, weighs as little as 24.7 pounds with their builds. I suspect it is the that components make the difference, not the geometry.

That being said, my SB5.5 is about 30.5 pounds and my Highlander is about 34.5 haha. They can both take a beating
  • 1 0
 @JacobyDH: agreed. I think the cost of the bike should also be factored into expectations of weight; an enduro bike that 35-36lbs is perfectly acceptable for $3-5k (cnd) but if we’re talking $10k then it should be sub 32lbs.

For a mid to high spec priced bike ($7-8k cnd):
DH: ≤36lbs
Enduro: ≤ 32lbs
Trail: ≤29lbs
XC: ≤25lbs
  • 1 0
 @NinjaskinShinguards: 28lb enduro bike? It has a lot more to do with how fast your going than how much you weigh.
  • 1 0
 @stubs179: roval traverse sl mullet. Eliminator grid up front purgatory grid on back.
  • 1 0
 @twonsarelli:

You’re not really comparing two similar bikes. The Ripley LS is designed for up to a 130/14m fork, the spur is designed for a 120 mm fork. Longer travel ,on either end, almost always equals more weight.

Also remember that published weights are almost always weighed without pedals.

Are you running a 120 mm fork on your ripley ls?
  • 1 0
 130/140 mm fork… auto spell gets worse by the update.
  • 1 0
 @Saidrick: the only difference between the 120/130/140 is the air spring- the CSU and lowers are the same, so weight remains identical. I see what you’re getting at though. A bike with 63.X HTA is more likely to have a zeb/38/lyrik/36 than a 32/SID/34/pike and also more likely to have a coil and DD or DH casing tires. It all adds up
  • 1 0
 For what price? I have a light(ish) build on a Reign 29 and it's 31 pounds. On a longer travel bike that'd go up another pound or so. As soon as you need DD or DH casing and cushcore in the rear, good luck with that 30lb target. And if you're riding an enduro bike as intended, you need at least a heavy duty rear tire.
  • 15 3
 All around the world today, the kilo is the measure, a kilo is 1,000 grams - easy to remember. Fishscale is still to this day one of my favorite albums.
  • 18 6
 XC hardtails: 18-20 lbs
XC full suspension: 20-23 lbs
Downcountry: 23-25 lbs
Trail: 25-28 lbs
Enduro: 28-32 lbs
Park: 30-35 lbs
DH: 36-38 lbs
Late 90's freeride: 45+ lbs
  • 6 0
 I agree with all.
  • 9 1
 is 28 pound possible for enduros? 12.7kg is very light
  • 3 1
 @Noeserd: My Remedy was 28.8 with a Z1 on it. Lighter with the Factory 36 on it. Right at 28 I think. That was a 150/160 bike and a large. So yeah I'd say it's doable. If you consider some of the smaller riders that are still on 36's. 28 is definitely doable.

seraph's range is pretty much right on par with where my mind was at for DC/Trail/Endur/Dh.
  • 2 1
 @Noeserd: not at all. A proper enduro bike, with a big fork, proper grippy double down tires, long travel dropper, 12 speed, and real wheels that will hold up. 32lbs is pushing it even.
  • 1 0
 @onemanarmy: funny that pro bikes even back in 2018 weight around 32lbs. Pro bikes now with bigger wheels are even more heavy. Even some of the smallest riders have rigs that weight 38lbs.

My Enduro with 29" and coils on both ends weight 36lbs. That is with extra beffy 7lbs tires.
  • 1 1
 @onemanarmy: the Marketing-Agencies put the Remedy from Enduro in the All Mountain Category. Only 170+ ist now labeled as an Enduro ¯|_(ツ)_|¯
  • 2 0
 Damn - I just got my XC hardtail down to 22 lbs. Guess it's time to break out the drillium.
  • 1 1
 Lol this assuming you have top of the line bikes. Not everyone can afford to drop $6k+ on a bicycle. All people really need is a $3k bike. Unless you're pro, everything else is negligible or for show. You'll do yourself and your wallet a much bigger favor by actually riding your bike and trimming some weight of yourself instead of throwing copious amounts of money at your bike for minimal gains. The rider makes the bike, not the other way around..
  • 1 0
 @stumphumper92: I think by now everyone in the world is well aware that knocking fat off yourself is more important than off your bike. So that's a moot point. Which is why they're not asking that question.
  • 14 0
 About 10-11 Courics.
  • 10 3
 A bike should always be as light as possible. Bit of a dumb poll imho... As technology improves, bikes can be lighter and lighter without losing stiffness. Why not get a carbon nanotube 5kg downhill bike with anti gravity suspension?
  • 5 6
 Disagree 100%. Bike weight has a sweet spot, and it depends on an individual's strength, ability, and application. It also matters where on the bike that weight is located.

Light bikes are great for acceleration and climbing (duh), but deflect more and make suspension setup more finnicky. Data point: my last DH bike (2015 V10cc) handled better built at 38 lbs than it did at 34. Adding weight also cut lap times. Can you go too far? Of course. That's why it's a sweet spot.
  • 2 0
 disagree, heavier bikes to a degree, do handle better, sus works better and they require less input to ride. If your statement were true we'd see extreme weight cutting measures on pro EN and DH bikes which we don't see....don't want excessive or needless weight or course..
  • 1 0
 @RadBartTaylor: Sus works better because the ratio between wheel weight and frame weight is better. With ultra-light wheels, the frame can get lighter too.
  • 7 2
 I'm boring enough to have done Strava based local trail tests on this. Without going into specific data, basically faster on the downhills with more weight upto about 42lbs, which only gets noticeably harder to ride uphill at about 38lbs ,which suggests that the ideal weight of an Enduro bike (for me at least) is around 39/40lbs.
The unweighted bike in question weighs 34lbs.
Used lead roofing flashing held on with jubilee clips and gaffer tape.

Not suggesting we all start carrying weights, but things like frame and cranks-especially are advantageous to be heavier, not lighter, for gravity based riding
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the test, I couldn't be arsed to do it myself so I'm happy to read your findings. I can't comment on the actual numbers (I don't even know the weight of my own bike) but I always thought having weight low and central doesn't hurt. So it always struck me as odd why someone would invest in a ligher frame (or front triangle) and lighter cranks. These aren't cheap. In BMX racing people spin super high cadences so it may make more sense there but I don't quite see that in MTB.
  • 5 1
 I have not weighed any of my last 9 bikes, from road/xc/trail/enduro. I just build them for what is reliable for how I'm using it. Who cares between 30 or 32lbs when the real difference is a fun ride or a flat tire, lol. Can't win if you don't finish!
  • 1 0
 100% agree, this article is just to generate clicks
  • 4 0
 Is it bad that my enduro bike weighs a shit ton more than what people think it should? Anyone mind giving me a bit of advice? Am i running anything really overly heavy?

2021 enduro expert s5, reserve 30 wheels, renthal carbon cockpit, full x01 drivetrain, dhx2 with a vault prog spring, saint brakes+pedals, oneup 210 dropper, maxxis assegai + Minion dhr exo+, cushcore xc in the rear, oneup bash guard. everything else stock. That means a bottom of the line specialized saddle, fox 38 performance elite and other various unremarkable but quality parts. This weights almost 40 lbs without a water bottle or anything in the swatbox.

Am I running anything overly heavy? Is this bike massively overbuilt?

Should i really be striving for 32 pounds?
  • 1 0
 It’s pretty hard (expensive) to get around the weight penalty of coil, larger wheels/tires and flat protection. I imagine frames are also a bit heavier as they’ve became longer and stronger, designed to handle stress from bigger wheels, brakes, longer fork, wider bars. 5-10 yrs ago your build would probably be 5-10 lbs lighter.
  • 1 0
 Actually, in 2017 my process 153 was like 32lb, mostly stock and just over $3k. So just 3-4 yrs ago. That was right around the time all bike prices dropped as most companies went DTC to compete with brands like yt, canyon, commencal etc.
  • 1 0
 That was also right around the time the bike industry almost unanimously and instantly decided that wagon wheels (and flat protection) were the future.
Cost saving/revenue generating “performance advantage” that actually translates to heavier, flimsy and boring imo. I’ll take the 2017 process over any 29’er so I hope more 27.5 options come back.
  • 1 0
 At S5 (massive bike), the weight isn’t too bad relatively speaking.

The coil shock is the biggest culprit IMO. The saint pedals are also quite heavy. Saddle could be another half pound worth of savings.
  • 3 0
 I have no idea what any of my bikes weigh. They are heavy enough to not break, which matters a lot more to me than being light. I know that they would also be a lot lighter without all of the stuff I feel obligated to carry when I go on an all day backcountry ride where I wouldn't enjoy walking 40 miles back to my car.
  • 2 0
 As lighter bike as possible is always preferable to a heavier one. But it's not always worth the equipment or price sacrifice. With modern widenrange gearing it has definitely taken away the 'need' to have a light bike I think and means you can therefore run heavier duty kit. I have a pretty light xc bike but it has dated 10 speed not wide-range gearing. When I ride my modern FS with wide range that is not far off ten pounds heavier , on the same trails and climbs it doesnt really feel any harder - just more of a crawl.
  • 4 0
 The only useful information I can glean from this poll is my bike is real friggin heavy and I’m happy being slightly less broke and ignorant.
  • 1 0
 Also for the average rider durability > chasing weight, especially with parts & component shortages. I’ll happily keep running heavy tires, alloy wheels, and NX cassettes until the world gets its poop in a loop again.
  • 2 0
 My Banshee Titan is a boat anchor. Dual coil, double down tyres, ex511 rims. It's far less than ideal, but there's a reason for those decisions and even if I drop a few more grand I'm not going to save lots. Ideally it would be a kilo less, but then I wouldn't enjoy it as much
  • 2 0
 The harder you ride, the heavier they get......I look at the lightest parts that aren't stupid expensive and meet my needs. Bike is still between 31 and 32 pounds with the Cushcore out back. If I thrashed harder the weight would creep up another pound or 2. Shredders who need a double crown and DH coil shock out back on their enduro bikes are pushing 36 pounds.

Ride the lightest bike that you can trust (and afford) when you're 20 miles from the trailhead in the desert on a hot day. If that scenario gives you pause, put that DD or DH casing tire on the back, or throw that bashguard back on. The only thing slower than a "heavy" bike is waking a couple of hours.
  • 1 0
 Since I'm a simple rider, that presently have discard Strava, don't compete, and just love to push the envelope with same safe tolerance, I'll say that my bikes weight enough to keep me busy uphill.

For those that think weight.... I'll just descriminate each bike are
Tires - for me the most important part since it's the only part tha contacts the soil for propeling the bike, brake...corner everything plus the gyro effect.
How much it weight a set of really GOOD tires, that last at least some weekends? I would say around 1kg to 1.3kg... so with liquid and cores, bla...bla, let's assume ~ 3kg

Wheels - 29er, without breaking the bank ~ 2kg

Brakes ~ 1kg

Transmission (cranks,cassete,chain,rd,shifters,cables,bb) ~ 2kg

Cockpit (handlebar/stem/grips/saddle/seatpost) ~ 1kg

Fork ~ 2kg

Resume
Wheels (tires+wheels) ~ 5kg
Brakes ~ 1kg
Transmission ~ 2kg
Cockpit ~ 1kg
Fork ~ 2kg
Total ~ 11kg

Add your frame ~ 3.5 / 4.5

And we've got bikes between 14,5Kg and 15,5kg for trail/enduro

You can go lighter with exotic parts.... or heavier with blurrier parts, but I'd say it's a sort of threshold


Personally i think weight influences performance. But if you are a fat turtle like me... a weighweenie bike is more an hobby than performance
  • 1 0
 Transmission and wheels + tires are key differentiator btw Enduro and Trail bikes easily 2 kg difference; 13,5-15,5 kg is expected

DH bikes typically have minimal cassette and no dropper which equalize them with enduro bikes or even make them lighter; so 15 kg is expected either;

like 15 kg is about sweet spot to handle bike from physical perspective; Imaging lifting 15 kg suitcase
  • 3 0
 Weight, like age, is only a number!
Price too...
How much fun you have riding your bike cannot be quantified by numbers!
F**k numbers!
  • 3 2
 The weight thing drives me nuts. The reality is that it's such a small portion of the bike's performance and a total rider's total weight as to be irrelevant. I recently rode a bike that was almost 10lbs lighter than my current ride on an uphill road climb with similar gearing and... the steep head angle of that CX bike was far more a factor than the 10lbs. Obsessing over weight by product managers, reviewers, and and the PB commentariat is about as significant as a pebble in a rockgarden. I'm (still!) heavier than most reviewers so my stats aren't indicative of journalist riders, however, if I drop my bike weight by 10lbs, it's a difference of 4% of my overall riding weight decreased (bike plus rider plus kit plus 2x water bidons is around 250lbs today). 4%. If you're everesting, that's a big difference. If you're trail riding? It's less than the difference of a better line choice. But that ten pounds had so many other factors involved that made me considerably slower on the downhill sections and overall I was slower on the lighter bike because CX bikes are the "light" models and therefore have much steeper HTAs, much thinner tires (less grip in the rowdy) with far less durable casings (a bit more timid in the rock gardens), much less braking power, etc. I'll take my 10lb (4%) penalty and increase in downhill speed, durability, and stopping power, thank you very much. Cycling About did a test on this using up to 55lbs of increased weight (luggage) and found a difference of... 2 minutes over 60 miles. If you *need* to finish your 60 mile ride 2 minutes faster and you already make perfect line choice decisions, then by all means, work on the weight. For the rest of us? I'll take thicc and fun all day.
  • 1 0
 Exactly. Unfortunately, pb reviewers and a lot of riders riding abilities are very limited compared to their financial budgets. They still think that a lighter bike will make them a better rider. Quite absurd.
  • 1 0
 My enduro bike IS my trail bike and my DH bike. So I just made up some random numbers that people mostly don't agree with. My XC bike on the other hand is apparently light, and I still wish I could afford to drop weight off it somehow.
  • 1 0
 All dem idealistic weights goes out the door when they add on the "latest n' greatest" flavor of the month tool in frame, in headset, etc. and water bottle, heck even wireless seatpost and derailleur with their batteries. Don't forget the sponsor's stickers.
  • 1 0
 2004 Slayer Alloy 50 - 30 lbs. 2016 Process Alloy 134 - 34lbs. With that 4 lbs comes more 20-40mm more travel, stiffer thru axles, better brakes, dropper, wider bars, burly wheels, heavier/grippier tires, and more gear range. But, I still do like me a 30lb trail bike.
  • 2 1
 If you're not racing, why does it matter? Never understood the obsession people have with bike weight. If a coupe lbs bothers you, it's time to hit the gym and get some muscles. You weight weenies wouldn't have been able to handle the "heavy" bikes we had pre 2010
  • 1 0
 Today I learnt that trail bikes and enduro bikes aren’t the same thing. When I pick up my bike it feels heavy and I’m told it’s very heavy but it doesn’t break and I ride up and down anything on the beast. In other news I had ice cream with gwin the other day and he said he is focusing on darts more these days
  • 1 0
 Strange poll and results. The question is not "what do you think would a current enduro/trail bike weigh with best components available you could choose" but "what should it weigh". In that case in my opinion the answer is obvious: as little as possible, while still being fully functional in the use case and not break.
Maybe in 10 years there is new technology or materials, and we will laugh about the heavy bikes of the 2020's. Or the skill level and trail difficulty and speeds get so much higher that we will laugh about the current flimsy and small 29ers we are having now.
  • 1 0
 Gotta be honest... I have no idea how much my trail bike weights. Maybe somewhere between 28 and 30 pounds? It could be 26 or 32, for all I know. I guess I just put the parts I want on it, and then I go ride it. Who cares how much it weights?
  • 1 0
 If we're estimating 32 lb for a "middle of the road, off-the-shelf" trail bike (which I think is fair) I'm genuinely very curious where you take out EIGHT POUNDS for a middle of the road OTS XC bike. Definitely a less burly fork, light tires, narrow rims, and a few hundred grams from a frame, but still seems like quite a leap to me. Maybe we're talking about a hardtail, but that seems like a different category (maybe that's the point )
  • 1 0
 Fork: 1-1.5lb
Shock: 0.5lb
Tires: close to 2lb
Wheels: 1lb?

Other things (cockpit, brakes, pedals, saddle) (No bashguard/chain guide/swat tool/etc): 0.5-1lb

And the frame makes up the remaining 2-3 pounds. The new Scott spark is 1870 grams at its lightest: pretty dang impressive.
  • 1 0
 Well all I can say is my pivot switchblade with plus tyres is faster on everything than my tallboy 2 from 2015 in spite of being heavier. D9nt know if its the plus tyres which roll over stiff better the suspension rhats better or what. Both are carbon frames and wheels but as I say the heavier one is faster so worry more about other things maybe
  • 3 0
 Reminds me of the most common tourist question in Banff, "Excuse me sir", pointing up, "how much does that mountain weigh?"
  • 4 0
 Need to vote on a "down country" bike option.
  • 4 0
 Man are y'all running your enduro bikes with XC tires and no sealant?
  • 5 1
 The author providing his opinion completely ruined this poll
  • 5 0
 A silly poll really
  • 2 0
 A better measure might be bike weight vs rider weight as a percentage

Though that would mean the smaller folk need more expensive bikes

There’s no easy answers
  • 3 0
 Bikes would weigh a lot less without those big wheels and the big dish in the back!
  • 4 0
 This exactly the kind of content you can stick this behind the paywall.
  • 2 0
 Until I start getting paid for my contribution to these exercises in market research I'm going to continue providing spurious answers.
  • 1 0
 Rider weight (being in shape and light) and light wheelset/tires makes the most difference for trail/xc riding.
A 30lb bike with heavy wheelset/tires will be harder to pedal than a 30lb bike with light wheelset/tires.
  • 1 0
 I’ve come to the conclusion that (within reason) the geometry and suspension set up of the bike makes more difference than odd pound here or there to the average person on PB/Vital/NSMB/etc.
  • 1 0
 I think people are answering as if the questions read: “how much would you *like* the bike to weigh”… The answer distributions are definitely lower than realistic for off the shelf bikes.
  • 1 0
 I'm finding lots of stuff is way overbuilt for my weight and ride. I'd love to see lighter builds on all kinds of stuff, then I could have the 25lb enduro bike of my dreams and wallet.
  • 2 2
 Theres something to be said about the rotational mass on a DH bike, the old dh tubes and tyres gave more stability in my opinion. Maybe why heavy inserts don't matter to much for tubeless now..
  • 2 0
 Voted "More than..." option on all polls... because listed options didn't go up to 69.
  • 3 0
 No more free consumer data for the Outside overlords from me....
  • 1 0
 I’ll answer the same way I answer my wife:

You’re just right the way you are.

Clearly Outside Mag is involved in PB now; there wasn’t a single nonsense answer.
  • 1 0
 I like the weight of my 2020 C2 Optic @ ~31lbs. A fam member has the Fluid FS1, and not sure what it weighs, but feels heavy.
  • 2 0
 The fluid has an extremely heavy frame with very thick tubing. This article says 15.1kg/33.3lb for the full bike: www.google.ca/amp/s/www.bikeperfect.com/amp/reviews/norco-fluid-fs1-2020-tested
  • 1 0
 @MaplePanda: Norco would want to overbuild it to keep warranty claims at a minimum.

But it feels like it could shed 2lbs–IE 31lbs would be perfect IMO.
  • 2 0
 @njcbps: Most definitely overbuilt, which does make sense considering the target market (first-time/entry level FS buyers).

I ride a FS2 myself that I’ve given the dentist treatment to. It’s right at 32 pounds in a size medium, and that’s with carbon bars, XTR hub, XT/XTR 1x11, XTR 2p brakes…

Very heavy baseline for sure.
  • 1 0
 I'm 6'5 and always on xl or XXL bikes, most of which are still too small. I'll never have a trail or enduro bike under 30 lbs so I stopped checking years ago.
  • 1 0
 dont really care, i know if i use heavy tyres it feels heavy, if i use exo its light as, tyre weight plays a massive part, also carbon wheels are not worth it.
  • 2 0
 My bike was awesome until Tuppence from Oxford built a lighter one, now I hate it.
  • 3 0
 Everyone has lost there bloody mind's, go ride your bike ya wombats.
  • 1 0
 Bikes have changed a lot in the last 5 years. Tthey're undoubtedly better, but also often heavier.'' Typo in that second sentence just a heads up to whom ever wrote this.
  • 2 0
 As long as you have to pedal anything - as little as possible. No need for polls and abstracts.
  • 2 0
 Weight really is not a valuable metric. Let's discuss ideal bike colours for each riding style.
  • 3 1
 I shaved half a kilo of my enduro rig, and i think i preferred it heavier
  • 2 0
 I tried putting my bike on a diet. But it refused. It ain’t no quitter.
  • 2 0
 My dh weight at 29.6lbs and my trail bike is at 31lbs Smile
  • 3 2
 No free data for the corporate overlords...the weight of their paywall will be all you feel.
  • 2 0
 Ask Hugh. Hugh gives a f@#k.
  • 1 0
 No option for 95lbs? I mean with 30 pounds in my minions that bike gets pretty heavy pretty quick
  • 1 0
 If you're an uphiller - as light as possible. If you're a downhiller - as heavy as useful.
  • 1 0
 No one else noticed Trail Bike went 27 29 28

I mean really, you can't even count to 30??

:P
  • 2 0
 Stong, light, cheap.

Pick two.

Bontrager, I think?
  • 1 0
 As much as it needs to weigh. If that's still too much, ride it on the moon.
  • 1 0
 Spot on with all of my votes it seems. Generally, taking a pre race $hit does more than dropping 2K on a higher build.
  • 1 1
 People care waaaaay too much about having a light bike. Out on the trail you can't tell the difference. It's only picking the bike up in the parking lot.
  • 1 0
 My bike 2019 Trek Stache 5 weighs 13kg and I find it's perfect
*is this my second comment lol*
  • 1 0
 none of my answers will help allow bikes to be heavier and scam us into accepting a new "standard".
  • 1 0
 Weighing your bike is like measuring appendages. It’s always just disappointing.
  • 1 0
 Trail Bikes with 130-150 travel;
26"=28.5 pounds
27.5"=30 pounds
29"=32 pounds
  • 1 0
 My Privateer 161 weighs 39 POUNDS! EXO+ tires, air suspension....luckily it rides down hills amazingly....
  • 1 0
 Putting in your own estimates can bias responses...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anchoring_
  • 1 0
 I would happily add 5+ kg to my bike if it meant it didn't shit the bed as often as it does.
  • 1 0
 just ride what you want to ride and forget about all these details. have fun
  • 1 0
 More important how fat or athletic is the rider. Stop sweating the bike, and start lifting weights.
  • 1 0
 I have just weighted my Scott Genius Lt 720 2015 model and it was 14.5 kg Smile
  • 1 0
 Hell you lot like heavy bikes. Literally the highest polling 3-4lb more than my answers
  • 1 0
 I have an "old" giant glory 26 tires, fox 40.... at 15,5 kilos ( nothing carbon )
  • 1 0
 This poll is fkn stupid. I answered it but ffs just get a random number generator to do it.
  • 1 0
 XC must be split in hardtail and full sus. Because a 11.3 kg XC hardtail is definitely not a XC riders dream.
  • 1 0
 All my enduro bike builds end up at 32-33lbs w/ a carbon frame. While good, I’d still appreciate it hovering around 30lbs.
  • 1 0
 Are all my answers 2 pounds more than the most popular answers because I ride an xl?
  • 1 0
 What size bike am I saying ideal weight for? I'm 2 pounds over the popular answer on every single one hahaha
  • 1 0
 Anyone else not see dj's and freeride bikes in the article? and what about eebs?
  • 2 0
 Poll: how much should a rider weigh?
Dh:
Enduro:
Xc:
  • 5 4
 I came here for the comments
  • 4 4
 An XL bike has a completely different weight compared to an M, but still, just sit down and pedal.
  • 1 0
 And a heavy rieer needs a heavy strong bike.
  • 5 4
 Of all the stupid polls, this might be the worst.
  • 1 0
 I want those new Shimano rotors on the RM.. nowww !!! Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Weight doesn't matter - says everyone with a heavy bike.
  • 1 0
 bike weight don't matter when I should weigh at least 5lbs less
  • 2 1
 More importantly how much should a mountain bike cost.
  • 1 0
 I voted two to three pounds lower than most. Wishful thinking.
  • 1 0
 I am on a mission to get my gravel bike to weigh 30lbs...
  • 1 1
 My every day bike is 37 lbs. not sure how ppl build reliable enduro bikes under 35
  • 1 0
 Pre ride poop is easier than losing bike weight
  • 1 0
 Why do all the metric bikes weigh about half as much as the freedom ones?
  • 1 0
 Your estimates are spot-on Henry, but where's the bloody downcountry poll?
  • 1 0
 Why does 28lb bike weigh closer to a 30lb bike than a 29lb bike?
  • 1 0
 Wait how was this not written by mike levy
  • 1 0
 However much it needs to weigh for you to have fun.
  • 1 0
 no dirt jumper category? lame
  • 1 0
 Bikes SHOULD always weigh less.
  • 1 0
 A bike should weight whatever you can afford .
  • 1 0
 Hey, I guessed right each time!
  • 1 0
 The bike should weigh what it weighs.
  • 1 0
 Came here to participate in the forever war. I.e. the upvote downvote war.
  • 1 0
 Save weight, ride a single speed.
  • 1 0
 my 2001 Schwinn Straight 8 weighs 40lbs
  • 1 0
 Fuck weight. If it's light and breaks down all the time it's useless.
  • 1 0
 How much do I have in my wallet
  • 1 0
 It is like asking what size of penis should be right
  • 1 0
 *walking a couple of hours*
  • 1 0
 Hey, what has happened to Levy? Doesn't seem to be around much.
  • 1 1
 I put the max weight for each category as my 55lb ebike does all them disciplines.
  • 1 0
 My bike weight 3,85g/€, and dont give a f…. about it.
  • 1 0
 There you go industry, now build 'em.
  • 1 0
 Is my 23kg. Giant Glory '07 good?
  • 15 15
 I don’t F**king care. That should be the only option.
  • 3 3
 Yes, Who gives a shit, ride your bike. How much SHOULD a mountain bike weigh? Really?
  • 2 1
 What? No eBikes?
  • 3 2
 Electric Boat Anchors need not imply.
  • 1 0
 Down-Country? Up-duro?
  • 2 3
 All bikes should weigh one @mikelevy plus/minus 4 Tim Hortons doughnuts (donuts?)
  • 1 0
 just like the bike in the thumbnail
  • 2 1
 Slow news day I guess.
  • 1 0
 Ounce and for all**
  • 1 1
 Y’all want a 35 pound DOWNHILL bike? LOL
  • 1 0
 26 lb baby Jesus
  • 1 0
 Fat baby
  • 1 0
 Shut up & go ride
  • 1 1
 30lb trail bikes and 25lb xc bikes?! Yall doing it wrong
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