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Shimano Consolidates Entry- to Mid-Level Groupsets With New CUES Drivetrains

Feb 27, 2023 at 11:20
by Henry Quinney  
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Even to a seasoned mountain biker or cyclist, drivetrains can sometimes feel a little overwhelming. You've got two or three main brands that offer several different speeds, with varying amounts of cross-company compatibility. It can be very easy for the uninitiated to be daunted by different brand's tiers and hierarchy. Shimano today release their full CUES range. The range of course won't unify all components but it does hope to simplify everything up to and including what was the 11-speed Deore tier.

There will still be a Deore 12-speed Hyperglide+ group, and everything beneath it will be part of the CUES family. That means you can expect to see Alivio, Altus, and Acera start to fade out in new builds, although Shimano does say inventory will still be available. All CUES parts fall under the Linkglide family.

What is it?

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9-speed 11-46 cassettes could prove a hit on entry-level bikes.
So, what is CUES? Well, rather disappointingly it stands for Creating Unique Experiences. The irony of this groupset supposedly aiming and trying to reduce the number of unique groupsets being somehow lost. Anyhow, it will come in several series. There will be the 11-speed U8000, which will most likely be found on high-end city and urban bikes, the 10-speed or 11-speed U6000 which will be the utilitarian mountain bike group, and the 9-speed U4000 which will be for entry-level equipment.

There will be non-series cassettes coming in relatively wide ranges - there will be nine, ten, and eleven-speed options with ranges of 11-46t, 11-48t, and 11-50 respectively. All chains across the system use 11-speed spacing, as Shimano says this actually gives a greater amount of surface area for the teeth to engage on, and trying to implement an 11-speed system on something like an 8-speed chain width would run into issues in regards to wheel spacing.

Shimano says that the Linkglide is the smoothest shift that can be made when compared to Hyperglide+ of the same tier. The cogs are thicker and taller with a different ramp that's claimed to make them 300% more durable. This also means that the larger jumps you'll find on the 9-speed, 11-46 tooth system won't damage or wear the cassette prematurely. Shimano also claims that thanks to the features of Linkglide this should still be smooth. If Shimano's claims hold water, this will give learners more longevity, easier shifting, and a system less prone to being damaged when being treated with little to no mechanical sympathy.

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The U6000 series could be the long-lasting and relatively affordable option many riders have been looking for.

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The riveted U4000 crankset and chainring...
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...and the U6000 model. Both use 11 speed chains.

Does it actually make things simpler?

All the shifters use the same pull ratio, meaning that you could theoretically run an 11-speed shifter on a 9-speed cassette and just turn in the limit screw. In this instance, you'd be better off tensioning the cable in the largest gear with the ratchet two clicks into its range - not that Shimano is directly endorsing this, but it should make bike mechanics' lives a little easier.

The cassettes are non-series and house all the Linkglide-specific technology. That means that any 11-speed chain will still reap most of the same benefits. Naturally, Shimano claim that their chains will perform even better, but I think they should get some credit for being pragmatic and acknowledging the limitations of specing entry-level bikes, as well as the same problems many mountain bikers have irrespective of where they are on the food chain - getting parts in a pinch at the last minute.

These non-series cassettes feature some weight reductions compared to the 780 grams juggernaut CS-LG600 Shimano gave details on when first releasing Linkglide. They have now replaced that model with two lighter options. The CS-LG700 sheds 170 grams and the CS-LG400 which will be roughly 70 grams lighter and also cheaper than the original.

Because the Linkglide technology is in the cassette, and all the tiers use 11-speed chains, the chainrings, and cranks are all interchangeable, irrespective of what speed your cassette is. You could theoretically run the non-series 9-speed drivetrain and upgrade each piece to a higher level as you fancy should the mood take you, however with Shimano's durability claims the eventuality may not arise.

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The U4000 does without the clutch you'll associate with Shimano, but they say that chain retention won't be a problem.

New Tech in Entry Level Rear Derailleur

The U8000 and U6000 systems use the clutch derailleur that you'll be familiar with. However, the U4000 9-speed system does without. It uses a stiffer spring, and Shimano claims the chain retention is on par with their 11-speed XT and SLX groupsets from several years ago. There will also be a double crankset available, shifter, and mech available, although this will be more likely to be found on commuter bikes.

Pricing

Affordability is very much at the heart of CUES, especially in the U4000 and U6000 groups.

The highest tier groupset, the U8000 is priced at under $290 USD for a shifter, chain, cassette, and rear derailleur. With a crankset, chainring and BB it will increase the price to $451. The lower groups are where the value really begins to shine through though. For a U6000 group, again without the crank, you'll be paying $213 for the 11-speed system or just $186 for the 10. Which is very reasonable for a clutch-equipped wide range, and supposedly very hard-wearing group. Even if it most likely comes at the cost of extra weight.

The entry-level 9-speed U4000 package is just $150, which is competitive and could represent a near full overhaul of a drivetrain, save for the cranks and chainring.

For comparison, an XT Linkglide system currently retails for just over $360.

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There are CUES brakes but they're directed at the on-road commuter and touring sectors.


Author Info:
henryquinney avatar

Member since Jun 3, 2014
346 articles

263 Comments
  • 286 0
 $6K Specialized/Trek/Santa Cruz CUES builds incoming . . .
  • 250 1
 Still better than $7k NX builds!
  • 38 0
 Only the rear derailleur though.
  • 4 2
 #Facts
  • 9 1
 @fentoncrackshell: Good point right there.
Or e-bike builds (not giving brand names here) for 6000 EUR or CHF with SX derailleurs. I think I've sent back to Sram about 25 of them
  • 16 0
 but sold as Deore/XT build, because you know, the shifters are Deore/XT.
  • 6 2
 @Dani-P: this is a boone for ebikes!. delicate 12sp drivetrains are the opposite of a good idea on a 90nm ebike. lol

make them 8sp 12-32 with a 36t chainring and be done with it
  • 208 0
 I feel extremely whelmed with this release
  • 11 1
 pues
  • 8 17
flag jimmyricard (Feb 28, 2023 at 10:34) (Below Threshold)
 @gabrielbps: you're whelmed and I'm under-whelmed
  • 22 0
 It looks like they got an old Alivio rear cassette and bolted it to an old Alivio front chainset to make a 9sp cassette!!
  • 4 5
 Whelmed means buried
  • 14 6
 "Cues" sounds super lame. Definitely the Go-Bot® to the Transformer®
  • 3 0
 @hllclmbr: means to overturn (Old English)
  • 8 0
 I like what they're doing here but I'm already happily running a Shimano e-bike hyperglide chain on a SRAM steel narrow wide ring mated to Shimano Saint cranks. The system is rounded out with a SRAM wide range rear derailleur and a Sunrace 11-50t 9spd cassette. Works a treat and being all steel it's hard wearing and long lasting (going on 3 years now).
  • 5 1
 @sevensixtwo: GoBots were first
  • 8 0
 I am totally gruntled.
  • 89 1
 Most of us started with an Alivio/Acera/Altus rear derailleur. This may not be sexy, 5-axis machined, titanium bling, but I think it's a big step forward for entry level bikes.
  • 23 3
 @brianpark: Shimano have never done anything in a rush. And mostly get it right. With a few blips !
  • 6 1
 @cristiantomlinson: What comes to mind for me is the Dual Control mtn groups from the early 00s. I cringe at the memory of that ad campaign the with the likes of Wade Simmons holding up two fingers (index and middle) to indicate how he shifted and braked….oof, that was a spectacular fail.

I feel that their low spoke count wheels from the era of Rolf hoops were also a miss. Airlines was just freakish. And I think Rapid Rise mechs are still stuck in my old shop manager’s craw.
  • 5 0
 @bunjiman82: I have a similar set up:

Linked together some old chains from some Huffey bikes; took my old 3x8 and tore off two of the chain rings; my cog has teeth on it generally; and I just heavily spray WD-40 before I go and power wash off the grime when I come back. Rock solid performance and easy to find replacement parts since anything fits with enough pressure/force
  • 7 0
 @brianpark: Agreed, step in the right direction for the entry level crowd. Not everyone can afford a bike from a bike shop, if a big box store bike was dressed in this kit instead of the normal garbage it would be easier for shops to support.
  • 2 0
 @sngltrkmnd:
I always thought Rapid rise was brilliant but the issue was they didn’t design a shifter to match that kept the up and down shifts with the standard fingers.

Dual control was basically what gave SRAM the opportunity to become a big player. So in that sense, dual control was successful.
  • 1 0
 @sevensixtwo: I down voted you just because my 6 year old self loved go bots so much....but I can't disagree with you.
  • 17 2
 @sevensixtwo: Should've called it Creating Unique New Transmissions. Would have been more memorable.
  • 1 1
 @sngltrkmnd: and can we compare that to what they did right friend? Let’s see the list bud?
  • 1 0
 @Dem628: schweet tup
  • 3 0
 Agree. I still have a 27 year old Alivio rear mech on my commuting bike which still doesnt miss a beat.
  • 4 0
 @commental: I thought you were Australian for a minute.
  • 1 0
 @bunjiman82: Very interesting. Could you please state precisely the model of your derailleur and shifter? Thanks.
I'm waiting for a Chinese cassette to try the sale setup with a Shimano M5100 and Sram X9 shifter.
  • 1 0
 @Tasso75: I have a SRAM 9spd XS shifter and a SRAM SX Eagle A1 10-50t capable long cage rear derailleur.

Personally I've never found mating a SRAM shifter to a Shimano derailleur works though, so good luck with that tup
  • 2 0
 @bunjiman82: Thank you, I'll keep your setup as a b-plan then!
  • 1 0
 I'm relatively gruntled.
  • 1 0
 @Tasso75: Indexing happens at the shifter but the amount of cable taken up in each shift at the shifter will be specific to how much cable is reeled in at the derailleur with each shift. Shimano and SRAM will be close in this regard but not close enough to share hardware and still get a crisp accurate shift. Particularly when you get up to the precision needed for the narrow tolerance between gears at 11-12spd.
  • 2 0
 @bunjiman82: on paper, it should work like this:
-Sram X5 shifter pulls 4mm of cable each click;
-M5100 rd has a 1,1:1 pull ratio, meaning 4,4mm of cage movement each click;
-9v cassette cogs are 4,35 mm apart.
The error of 0,05 x 8 = 0,4mm along the cassette *should be* negligible.
  • 4 0
 @Tasso75: hey Tasso75, if you "set" you shifting at the center of the cassette, then the worst error/offset will be only .05 x 4 = 0.2mm, at either lowest or highest gear.
  • 176 6
 I wonder if SRAM will take a cues from this and get their shit in order. Start by melting all SX, and NX drivetrains down and selling the raw metal to Shimano to use.
  • 44 0
 After extracting the plastic, I hope
  • 8 6
 There are rumors of SRAM ditching cables completely and developing only wireless derailleurs which sound amazing with existing 6k nx builds...
  • 68 0
 @bishopsmike: not much left of SX without the plastic
  • 14 0
 @winko: yay! 8k eNX builds...
  • 5 0
 @bishopsmike: Ah yes, so it can be turned into seafill more easily.
  • 65 0
 @winko: imagine how craptastic an SX AXS derailleur would have to be to meet OE pricing targets! No bluetooth - communicates via infrared sensors like a tv remote. 100% ABS plastic. Takes 3 AAA batteries. No clutch, no lockout button. No lube on the chain from the factory.
  • 4 0
 @sjma: ooph. I want to laugh but I’m crying a little bit too.
  • 7 0
 @sjma: Takes a single, non-replaceable AAA battery, that is.
  • 21 1
 @sjma: Hi Sjma, I work in HR at Sram, I shot you a message on Linkedin, I think you'd be a great fit on our product management team. Salary for this position starts at 70k, but you'll only be required to perform at the level of employees making 35k per year....
  • 2 0
 @bishopsmike: You wont have much metal left after that.
  • 4 0
 @sjma: you can only shift when riding perfectly straight otherwise the infrared Sensor doesn’t communicate, like trying to use a shitty tv remote while riding.
  • 124 0
 Guys, think about the entry level bikes one year from now. My friends who aren't bike enthusiasts still have those ugly, heavy and complex 2x or 3x drivetrain on their hybrid bikes. This is actually what I want on my commuter bike or kids' bikes. I know Box but Shimano is just gonna popularize 1x on millions of cheaper bikes.
  • 80 3
 Yeah this release is generally unexciting to "real" mtb'rs, like those of us in the Pinkbike comments section, but this is HUGE for the general public. The best way to keep new people interested in the sport/hobby/activity is to make their low-end drivetrains easy to use and maintain. This is good for everyone
  • 3 0
 this is a really good point. kent, schwinn, mongoose take notes
  • 17 0
 @TranceAllez: I dunno, I currently have 12spd XT on my bike (Tallboy, so not exactly an entry level bike either) and I'm pretty tempted to go back to 11 or even 10 speed if the promises about Linkglide's shift smoothess etc hold water.
  • 11 0
 @TranceAllez: I don't think I agree with your unexciting to real mtbrs claim.

There are thousands of otherwise decent bikes out there with NX and SX drivetrains using HG free hubs.

Linkglide seems like a more appealing upgrade than buying a new driver body (or wheel) and a 12 speed setup.
  • 1 0
 Speaking of Box, have they stopped manufacturing their high end 9 speed? Its never in stock
  • 2 0
 @wburnes: I wonder if they did. could just be fairly low priortiy. hard to compete with advent
  • 9 0
 @PhillipJ: I don't want it to seem like I'm not in full support of CUES, I think it's exactly what the lower-specced bikes of the world desperately need; the modularity and freedom to create your own drivetrain is wonderful for those of us who don't want to be stuck in the new 12spd, 13spd whatever (myself included).

The "unexciting to 'real' (and that is very tongue-in-cheek) mtbrs" comment is more a dig at the people who scoff at this release because it's not top-of-the-line cutting-edge.

People in every stage of biking, from commuters to hardcore enduro bros, will benefit from this. I'm all for it
  • 72 5
 Love Shimano but I'm loving my Microshift setup even more!
  • 25 0
 Yeah I have a Microshift Advent X on my Chromag stylus and it’s been flawless, easy to setup. Shifter feels great too
  • 5 0
 @girthystanchion agreed!
  • 17 0
 I actually like the wide range Deore 10sp stuff more than the Advent X. Deore weighs more but I feel like it shifts a lot better than the Microshift stuff.
  • 3 0
 @girthystanchion: I love mine too especially since I put a sunrace 11-46 cassette on. It is stronger than the MS one and still pretty light.
  • 5 0
 @girthystanchion: lightest feeling shifter ive ever used. shifts dont get harder to push when the clutch is super tight unlike shimano zee
  • 5 6
 My experience has not been flawless,

I had a shifter fail completely (replaced under warranty)

The limit screws were hand tight on mine and required loctite I have had multiple challenges with dropped chains at the cassette and top gear "hunting".

The derailleur cannot keep up with chain growth on my pivot switchblade (per the instructions) and requires a very loose chain at top gear which is where I need chain tension the most.

All in all I think its worth the money and it doesn't self destruct like my Zee components, but its not quite where I need it to be.

All in all I would say its great for all mountain riders and I'm probably asking too much from it as I like rocky downs. In the context of this article I think the advent x is a great option and you can have confidence vs these options
  • 6 0
 @way2manyhobbies2keep: You are able to adjust the clutch tightness. I did that straight out of the box, along with pushing my B screw out a little bit, it's worked without issue for over a year now on my La Sal Peak park build.

I can say that the shifter cable gets shredded easily, so it's a good idea to keep an extra one handy.
  • 2 1
 I’ve got thousands of miles on my 9sp Advent and it’s been really good. A bit heavy, but looking at the picture of the MEGArange 9sp shimano equivalent I think I’d prefer the spacing of my Advent more. I also haven’t tried the trigger shifter, I used to bar top version since it reminds me of MTB in the 80s. My only quibbles are the tension on the shifter backs off occasionally and I had to snug up the clutch once.
I put the 8sp Advent for 20”/kids bikes on my neighbor’s daughter’s bike and it works really nicely, the shifting is super light action, better than the Shimano stuff that came on my daughter’s bike and the price is right.
  • 3 0
 I like Microshift but I do appreciate the effort Shimano put into making things compatible. Not just so that you can actually get hold of spares, but also that if you choose to change one component, you won't have to change so many other things.
  • 12 0
 @vinay: Agreed. Also from another site... "Shimano has also hinted strongly that drop-bar variants of Cues will come in the future, phasing out Tiagra, Sora and Claris." It would be pretty sick if you could mix and match road and mtb components like the old days.
  • 3 0
 @bkm303: super big since the days of compatibility any way you wanted was lost after 9 speed.
Road/touring/gravel/hybrid/mnt - yes!
Adios Dynasis!
  • 2 0
 @bkm303: Yeah, I recall 4X racers used to run Sora and 105 (road group) rear mechs. Especially now that mountainbike rearmech cages have grown so much, it makes a lot of sense if we can get this option back. They either offer it or everyone will just buy that Microshift kids' rearmech. Currently I'm still happily running a Zee rearmech (which is fairly short too) but the Microshift one is tempting. In the long run these could be cheaper as 8sp chains are cheaper than 10sp ones (which I need now). If the LinkGlyde stuff is super durable though, it could be a nice alternative option. Provided they offer these with a clutch too of course.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: my CX (gravel?) bike still has 10 speed Apex road shifters, paired with X9 clutch RD and 11-36 cassette for a monster range 2x system, it's awesome and cassettes/chains/etc are super cheap. Just gotta keep my old shifters from dying until Cues gravel group drops lol. But nowadays people are going AXS just so they can run mtb cassettes with road/gravel shifters, which is dumb. Don't understand why they ever ditched interoperability (other than to be a pain in the ass / sell gravel groupsets).
  • 1 0
 @bkm303: Ratio also sells a small peice that converts an apex shifter to work with a 12 speed MTB derailleur.
  • 3 0
 @noodlewitnosteeze: its not the clutch tension I have a problem with, its chain tension created by the cage spring.

I am glad you are having a good experience, I would say overall mine is positive its just far from perfect.

I purchased direct from microshift, set up exactly to the instructions, measured chaingrowth and worked with the US mircoshift tech team to try and improve.

I will try trp next.

Surprised I am getting downvoted for providing this context. I am a big fan of Mircoshifts model, less gears, more range etc. wish the cage was a bit longer to accommodate chain growth and provide more chain tension in top gear.
  • 1 0
 @way2manyhobbies2keep: advent 9 has a long cage model.
  • 1 0
 @way2manyhobbies2keep: is TRP's cage a lot longer than Microshift's? I would just kind of just assume I'm never going to bottom out in my granny gear and shorten the chain a bit but that's just me. Or I guess you could go with a slightly smaller range cassette.

Sounds like you need that wacky 3-pulley RD shimano patented this year!
  • 1 0
 @way2manyhobbies2keep: I think part of the struggle of running a high range-less gear system is chain growth and that tension (the Box components drivetrain I tried had the same issue). I have noticed that slackness of chain in the 11t as well, though when my clutch is tight it gets about a half inch of free travel before it reaches tension, and I've never had issues shifting out of it when needed. It would be good to see them improve upon it.
  • 1 0
 @noodlewitnosteeze: agreed, I had issues with hunting (unintented shifting) and dropping off the cassette inside which is not a great experience with carbon frames lol.

Generally speaking its a great setup for the price and for mircoshifts first venture into this range.
  • 1 0
 @bkm303: at bottom out with this frame there is considerable chain growth at the end of the travel.

TRP is in the box and I cannot compare it, technically it should not be considered for comparison because they are not like products in a remotely similar range. Pricing is vastly different

I am rooting for the underdog and these non shimano sram drivetrains, I particularly love the less gears more range.
  • 1 0
 @way2manyhobbies2keep: yeah I was just saying I'd ignore bottom out because you're (hopefully?) never sending big drops to flat in granny. Are you still running out of cage capacity in the next smallest cog?
  • 1 0
 @bkm303: I understand you, I find you can bottom out climbing, especially seated, and it only takes one time to tear your drivetrain apart. Shortening your chain is creating a hazard and that's not a reasonable tradeoff for me.
  • 1 0
 Meant this as it relates to Shimano (not Sram - Box - others).
Getting past Dynasis makes things easier to get creative on running STI w/ mnt derailleurs.
  • 37 0
 "Shimano Consolidates Entry- to Mid-Level Groupsets" I assumed this meant Deore and SLX.. Does this mean I'm a pretentious jerk?
  • 23 0
 From an Enthusiast perspective you are right, from a global bike-market perspective this press release is correct
  • 4 0
 Kind of depends on which categories there are. If there is just entry, mid and high then yeah I'd add SLX to mid level too. But bike categories are typically (and in no particular order): low, entry, enthusiast, sport, mid, comp, high, pro, race, expert, ultimate... Let me stress this list is by no means exhaustive. Either way, going by these categories I'd say SLX is somewhere around "high-level". If you disagree, you're probably correct too. We're all correct. That's the beauty of bicycle marketing.
  • 1 0
 I did too
  • 2 0
 @vinay: you forgot about super deluxe ultimate, duh
  • 33 0
 Finally!
I have MTB rent bussines in Portugal and the problem is to maintain 12speed drivetrain in top condition... Little hit to derailleur, little rust on cable and shifting sucks...

was even thinking to swap all rear wheels because of MS hubs and to mount regular Shimano 11 speed.
This looks even better.

Less money for drivetrain more money for shred Smile
  • 5 9
flag conman1395 (Feb 28, 2023 at 18:57) (Below Threshold)
 So you've just ignored AdventX for over 2 years?
  • 5 0
 @conman1395: I don't know in the States but, here in europe, AdventX (which I was strongly considering for my build) avaibility has not been great (and COVID made it worse) so, if i was trying to run a business on affordable and easy to mantain drivetrains, I'd look elsewhere
  • 1 0
 @Becciu: I bought one two years ago mainly out of curiosity (it works great so, huge fan!), but had to get it directly from the German distrubitor as it was not possible to order online or via a shop...
  • 1 0
 @michaelheinrich: bike24 now has them in stock
  • 27 0
 Blues CUES
  • 21 0
 On my YT TUES?
  • 36 1
 @YukonMog: until Specialized SUES
  • 8 0
 Dans ton cues
  • 6 0
 @Mac1987: and the tantrum ensues
  • 1 3
 A Cue of People trying to pass you on the way up the Trail?
  • 6 1
 Pay your DUES while learning to ride on CUES
  • 21 0
 "2025 Santa Cruz models that come equipped with Shimano CUES drivetrain start at the low low price of $7999!"
  • 1 0
 Pffffffffff
  • 18 1
 I've always thought all Shimano's low end stuff was highly confusing. Not that I would buy any of this CUES stuff, but I think it's a good idea. They should have done it before the great bike boom.
  • 13 0
 If only they could have predicted a pandemic and lockdown -globally restricted exercise situation that led to a massive increase in bike sales.
  • 1 10
flag downhilljohn (Feb 28, 2023 at 14:44) (Below Threshold)
 @YukonMog: They could have predicted it. They knew it would happen.
  • 21 11
 Hopefully this paves the way to a 9 speed SLX/XT level set. I would rather cut unsprung mass and complexity than have more cruising gears. In my experience, in any sort of descending where I care about performance 12 speeds is a liability because of the time spent letting the drivetrain shift. This would probably be solved with a fancy drivetrain but IMO it's more money and complexity to solve a problem that was created by having too many gears to begin with. I find myself double ushifting with my SLX 11 speed all the time.
  • 12 1
 I agree, I really hope high end, wide range 9-10 speed cassettes become a thing soon from companies like shimano/sram
  • 6 0
 Hopefully gear steps will be different, because those shown on this 9 speed 11-46 are totally anti-mtb, tight high gears and sparse low gears. Even the Xt 11-46 was awfuly spaced for mountain (not XC) riding. Would love to have a good value 9 speed mtb cassete (not priced like Box One).
  • 5 1
 Shimano already does make a wide range 10sp cassette (M4100, 11-46t) that you can use with SLX/XT derailleurs. It's very good. I have mine matched with an SLX der and Saint shifter. This is my fav groupset I've ever used.
  • 6 2
 Trying to stop change or go backwards is pretty much not an option in any industry. Best thing you can do is just buy some older components if you like to kick it old school.
  • 2 0
 This! I am currently running the Sram EX1 wide ratio 8spd on my big travel bike and love it! In reality i still only use about 4-5 cogs anyway.
  • 1 1
 you should look into microshift
  • 6 5
 I don't need 500%+ range on my enduro bike. I never touch bottom half (tall gears) of my cassette. I'm either climbing a short gear or in the middle of my cassette on the way down. Talk about a waste of unsprung and rotational mass.

Smallest chainring I can run is 28t without throwing off anti-squat but I would love to have a high pivot bike so I could run a ridiculously small chainring + a smaller/lighter cassette and still have good climbing gears.
  • 2 0
 @ATXZJ: I've been looking for an EX-2 grouper for so long. Pretty much given up at this point.
  • 3 0
 About to post the same thing. Also the 12 is super finicky if there is a slight discrepancy they shit the bed. 9 is all many would need. Do people really use all the harder gears that much. I wouldn't want to be pedaling in rough stuff at those speeds guaranteed pedal strikes with the new bikes. Sprinting on an fsr in an Enduro race I understand but many aren't racing or digging pedals like that.
  • 1 0
 @andwrong: EX-2?

I was able source the 899 cassette on sale for UNDER $200 and the shifter and rear mech were around $200 for both.

Will say the clutch on the EX derailleur seems a bit weaker than other eagle or X stuff. Dropped a chain which almost never happens. added a guide and was G2G.

HACK: you can still run 11 & 12spd chains with it since its designed around 10spd spacing
  • 2 0
 I really enjoy my Saint derailleur with 10sp road cassette. Less weight, crisp shifting, and close ratios for getting my cadence where I want it.
  • 2 0
 @ATXZJ: I meant EX-1 but I fat fingered it on my cell phone. Haha.
  • 3 4
 @haen: so you speak for everyone? "You don't need...". What was 3x & 2x for then? Just because YOU don't use a full doesn't mean everyone is doesn't. Build & ride what works for you. Let others do the same
  • 2 0
 @ATXZJ: damn, I didn't know about that stuff. 11-48 cassette weights 320g! I don't wanna give up on my silent xtr hub, but I'd totally give it a go otherwise
  • 1 0
 Sunrace already offers 2:1 ratio CLUTCHED rear derailleurs compatiblem to 8 and 9 speed shimano drivetrains. Pretty light too for the mix of alloy and composite in the construction. Basically Deore 4100 pricing but the weight is comparable to XTR.
  • 4 0
 @bman33: They said, "I don't need 500%+ range...". They did not say, "You don't need...", as you claim. Why are you making shit up and putting words in people's mouth?
  • 2 0
 @pmhobson: may have been an edit. If not, I stand corrected
  • 3 0
 @lkubica: Looks like the CUES 11s 11-45t is more sensible than the XT 11-46t; its steps are between 13% and 18% rather than 11% and 24%. The 9 speed appears to be as you suspected but it's already going to have an average step size of 20%...

Full Linkglide cassette specs are here.
  • 2 0
 @vitaflo: the Shimano 11-46 has the silly huge jump on the last cog.
  • 1 0
 @dave119: As i'm old I remember when shimano maintained a 5T jump was the limit of their cassettes (on the extremely rare 13-34 7 sp, which jumped 24 to 29 to 34).
  • 2 0
 @haen: I find myself using the entire thing, I mostly wear out my bottom three gears and my top gear. I run a 30tooth
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: Thanks for having my back!

@ElijahVan: I am not the faster rider but I live in SoCal where it's pretty much grind up and coast down. I'm only in the tallest gears when riding to the trailhead.
  • 2 0
 @haen: I’m in a similar boat. I’m at riding level with my my local terrain where the key to descending faster is braking less, not pedaling more.

Also, I live in a place where riding-to-the-ride largely isn’t feasible.
  • 11 3
 that image of the CUES brake handle/shifter combo has me worried....cable routing is directed along the handle bar...headset cable routing on entry level bikes???
  • 5 0
 you will more than likely find them on lots of £3-4k hardtail/trekking/city ebikes which are probably pushing integration anyway... and that makes a lot of sense if they're harder wearing link glide.... hopefully this just means base model expensive bikes are more reliable!!
  • 5 0
 Closer to the bar cable routing designs are going to pop up in a lot of brakes and shifters, as we've seen already in the forthcoming SRAM stuff. While it doesn't necessitate headset routing, it does help a lot in keeping hoses out of the way of larger handlebar mounted accessories. I suspect this is just copying the design language of other forthcoming Shimano stuff, but we won't know for sure until the next refresh of the high-end MTB groups hit.
  • 3 0
 It's already happening, 2023 Trek Dual Sport 1 has Tourney/Acera, mechanical discs, and headset routing. It's gonna be super fun to explain those labor charges to the customer of a $900cad bike. Had to fully redo cables and hoses on a Cervelo after a barb/olive needed replacement because there just wasn't 10mm of extra slack on the hose. Added a couple hundred bucks.
  • 4 0
 @kevinjordans: Well, balls. The Cervelo I can sort of understand, as it's being pushed as some sort of aero upgrade, dubious as that may be.

Hybrids, however, are absolutely not somewhere where this belongs. I don't care if it harmonizes the look of them with the rest of the design language Trek employs, it's another barrier to letting average riders inexpensively maintain their bikes, and that sucks. Hopefully other brands can sell conventional routing as an economic alternative and put this silly trend to bed.
  • 7 0
 That brake angle is telling you that headset routing is coming for cheap bikes too.
  • 6 0
 "Creating Unique ExperienceS"... Ugh. I like it better when the names are made up and don't mean anything--"Ultegra", "Alivio", Alfine", and such.
  • 4 0
 I still haven't moved past Microshift AdventX or 10 spd Shimano stuff; either run their old school 11-42 hg-500 or a Sunrace 11-46 on the newer Deore derailleurs and everything just works.
Both MS and Shimano 10spd have clutches, are cheap, and work really well.
The gear ratios on the 11-46 Shimano cassettes had a stupid big gap at the top, and 12speed required new hubs; no thanks!
Looking good, Shimano!
  • 5 1
 Henry I usually dig your reviews but this article is a technical dog's breakfast.


"All chains across the system use 11-speed spacing..."

What is spacing when talking about a chain? Pitch? No, has to be talking about inner and outer width.

"...as Shimano says this actually gives a greater amount of surface area for the teeth to engage on,"

Okay he must be talking about inner width..

"and trying to implement an 11-speed system on something like an 8-speed chain width would run into issues in regards to wheel spacing."

Wait what? Chain width can't have anything to do with "wheel spacing", that's not even a dimension. Do you mean cassette width? Because chain width also doesn't directly affect that across 9, 10, 11... Do you mean cassette spacing (sprocket width and distance between sprockets), in that the sprockets are going to be the same distance apart regardless of speeds? That makes sense. So the cassette spacing stays the same as the number of sprockets changes, so that the shifter and derailleurs all have the same pull and conversion ratios, which means the cassette widths are different? So I guess the 9S and 10S cassettes require spacers?

Oh wait do you mean that they didn't design it around an 8 speed chain, because then you'd need 8S cassette spacing, which means you wouldn't be able to squeeze in more than 8 sprockets with an 11S mountain HG freehub body, necessitating a new hub standard? I mean, sure, but why are we even talking about this? Tesla didn't design the Model S around a diesel engine, because there's no room for a diesel fuel tank when you have to carry batteries for the electric engine...

"Shimano says that the Linkglide is the smoothest shift that can be made when compared to Hyperglide+ of the same tier."

Smoothest when compared to.. ..Wait so it's the smoothest, in comparison, so that means it's smoother than Hyperglide+? So HG+ shifts worse than Linkglide? "Linkglide is the smoothest shift that can be made"........you mean the shifting on Linkglide cassettes is the smoothest?

Okay, be honest....did you use ChatGPT?
  • 6 3
 So this replaces everything but the 12 speed systems? This is a tad troubling, since I still use 10 speed, and was looking to upgrade to an XT 10 speed. Now it’ll force me to go 12 speed, or with this new CUES system. Not sure how I feel about it yet. Someone who’s smarter than me needs to explain it all
  • 12 5
 If you're looking to upgrade your 10s then get shimano zee, but I would recommend just upgrading to 12 speed Deore, SLX , or XT.
  • 3 0
 There is, and always has been, so many drivetrain options and combinations to choose from. I'm sure you'll be able to find something that will work for you. And if you're going to get 10 speed, it is better to just go ahead and get 11 speed because you can still use a wheel with an HG freehub.
  • 7 7
 For what its worth, this CUES is going to shift better than anything SRAM under X01/XX1 levels, so it will be an upgrade.

All of CUES will be compatible with standard Shimano HG freehub that you already have.
  • 1 0
 Microshift supports Shimano DynaSys with shifters, cassettes and derailleurs and for that matter, while shimano won't admit it as a blanket statement (just as they won't endorse the alternative method of shifter/derailleur setup mentioned in the article), the DynaSys ratio is the same from 10 to 12 speed, so its not as if you have to forgo the shimano clutch if you prefer it over the microshift one, should you smash the rear derailleur on your XT 10 speed. The information is publically available if you look at product catalogs listing cross compatibilities, but by not just outright saying it, they steer people who break a 12 speed derailleur for example into buying another 12 speed derailleur, instead of a cheaper 10 speed one that might work just as well. The other thing is the link-glide already isn't compatible to the DynaSys 10, 11 and 12 speed setups as the chains, chainrings and cassettes are different.
  • 7 7
 @8a71b4: Stop being so dramatic, GX Eagle will shift better than this if you know how to properly set it up. I ran GX Eagle for all of 2021 when I couldn't get my hands on X01. After running X01 for years I was impressed with the GX, it ran flawless.
  • 6 0
 Don't worry, Shimano still plans to make replacement parts for all your "current" groups for many many years to come... There are millions of those groups still in the market. CUES will replace all the OE level spec (aka new bikes on the sales floor).
  • 1 1
 @needmoregears: 10sp ultegra and Duraace dead. I suppose I can pick up a 105 derailleur.
  • 5 0
 @pbandjam: Ultegra 11 speed came out 10 years ago, so I can't be too upset about that. Even the much-vaunted Hope only promises 10 years of support.
  • 2 0
 I believe the cues rd works 9 10 and 11 speed Linkglide cassettes.
  • 4 8
flag whackflyer FL (Feb 28, 2023 at 12:05) (Below Threshold)
 @ZSchnei: GX is solid. Feels better than 11 spd Shimano XT and for sure better than 12 spd Deore.
  • 2 0
 It's likely that Shimano will continue supporting their standard HG 10/11 and 11spd Deore groups. It's really just the cassette (cog spacing) and shifters (cable pull ratio) that are specific. Chains/rings/cranks are interchangeable.
  • 6 0
 @ZSchnei:

> if you know how to properly set it up.

Any 12 speed setup is much more sensitive to btension, limits, and cable tension. This is why 11 10 or 9 speed will always be better for mountain bikes (sans XC racing) where the derailleur is subjected to a whole bunch of forces. With SRAM you get the bottom of the barrel 11 speed components that don't last. With Shimano, their 11 speed stuff is way higher quality.
  • 3 0
 @8a71b4: I agree completely. After spending a couple of years on my first ever 12spd setup, I was super disappointed at how finicky things become due to wear and/or damage. I've "downgraded" to 11spd on that bike for this season.
  • 4 0
 Shimano makes XT in an 11s Linkglide group (M8130) that uses HG freehub bodies if you don't want to go to 12 and microspline freehub. bike.shimano.com/en-US/product/component/deore-xt-m8130.html
  • 2 0
 Why ditch 10 speed? You'll need a new hub for 12speed. Just buy a few 10 speed cassettes and chains and ride until they wear out.
  • 1 0
 @8a71b4: Since you changed direction with your latest comment, I think what you meant to originally say is " For what its worth, this CUES is a better shifting alternative than anything SRAM under X01/XX1 levels for beginner level riders and bikes, making it an upgrade in that category".

If your argument is that CUES is a better system for people who don't want to take a deep dive into bike maintanence, due to the simplicity of less gears, then I completely agree. I sense that your argument more so seems to imply that 12 speed systems as a whole are tempermental compared to lesser geared systems, which makes them better.

For what it's worth, I know a lot of people who can easily set up their 12 speed systems (SRAM and Shimano) and keep them running just fine, my household included.
  • 1 0
 XT 11 speed (used or cheap old stock) is still by far the best value and is insanely durable, maybe costing a hair more than brand new top-tier CUES but surely worth it. Shimano components undoubtedly have declined in durability since the release of 12 speed. Where I live you can piece together an XT11 for roughly 300-320 USD for components in great condition or old stock. Not including cranks which are ubiquitous and you'll find a good deal anywhere (sub $50 easily)
  • 1 0
 @ZSchnei:

No, CUES with 11/10 speed is better for mountain bikes in general, not just entry level. Sram X01/XX1 is well made with higher tolerances in derailleur and better machining on the cassette, leading it to function as well as 10/11 speed, but you obviously pay the price for it.
  • 1 2
 @8a71b4: you obviously live in an alternative universe where shimano never fell off or still think it’s 2012. You must be super confused to as why we’re all paying significantly more money than the shimano equivalent for a sram drivetrain. I’ll help, check out this video. It’s not so much about what they guys saying it’s just a good video that shows the difference in quality, design, materials used, workmanship between the two systems.

youtu.be/LlDVpl6m7Hk

And here’s a video of the end result, you can clearly see the sram system shifts so much smoother and more importantly faster which great when you’ve only got half a crank to shift gears.

youtu.be/OR6lRHCFWhM
  • 1 0
 @8a71b4: I have to disagree with the blanket statement that CUES with 10/11 speed is better for mountain bikes in general. Regardless of manufacturer, a cheaply made 10/11 speed will also perform poorly compared to a higher priced (higher quality) 10/11 speed. The user still needs to understand the basics of drivetrain setup and maintainance, and neglecting either of those will end up with a poor performing system.

With that said, CUES 10/11 speed is likely better than 12 speed SRAM SX/NX, where 12 speeds and cheap production do not mix well.

Once you acheive GX/XT level 12 speed drivetrains you get a quality product that will likely perform better than a cheaply made 10/11 speed product.
  • 4 1
 @thenotoriousmic: I knew the exact video you were linking before even clicking on it, as this video is most commonly peddled by SRAM fanboys as justification for spending >$1000 on a drivetrain.

2 things

1. Learn to read, because I specifically say XX1/X01 is fine, since its well made. GX and lower with cheaper materials and more flexy derailleur is subpar to Shimano 11/10 speed.

2. No, the system doesn't shift smoother. If anything it shifts just like SRAM, WITH a frayed cable nonetheless (which he has setup wrong, I can't tell what it is but the small black part is not supposed to be there).

The clutch on Shimano is adjustable in pressure, on SRAM its not. You can use a lighter setting that allows for faster shifts, or a heavier setting that has slower shifts but way better chain retention. Since he didn't even mention or tested adjusting the clutch, its pretty clear that the person making the video is non technical and is a SRAM fanboy.

Keep in mind that the vast majority of the road cycling teams are on Shimano, where drivetrain actually matters quite a bit.
  • 4 0
 @ZSchnei:

The key is the available margin in the indexing error of the derailleur cage side-to-side movement. Generally there will be a little play in the system from how its put together, including things like bending of metal parts. For a 12 speed system, where the margin for accurate shifting and chain not snagging is small, you need high quality manufacturing at the XX1/X01 level to minimize this for accurate shifting. When you have more margin with 11/10 speed, you don't have to build the system with as tight tolerances, but still have reliable shifting.

That being said, the derailleur will get pelted with rocks, branches, dirt, e.t.c as you ride your bike, and you will get slight misalignment stack-up over time. The common response to this is "maintain your drivetrain" which is good advice, however the 11-10 speed systems are more tolerant to this.

The other thing to mention is price. Often times you can get 2-3 10 speed cassettes for the price of one GX cassette, so per dollar, you get way better shifting quality.
  • 3 0
 @8a71b4: Yep. Great break-down on the variables. A system that doesn't need to be as precise is going to perform better as it wears or becomes damaged from impact. That is exactly what I want for my drivetrains, along with acceptably smooth shifting.
  • 1 3
 @8a71b4: maybe you need to learn to read. I specifically said it wasn’t about what he was saying in the video and that it was just a good close up video where you can see the obvious differences in quality and design between the two systems followed up a video where you can clearly see the sram system shifts better which you denied even though you’d just seen it with your own eyes.

Road cyclists are a joke it took them over 20 years to start using disk brakes, they’re fully stuck in the past so I’m completely no surprised that they’re still running shimano and in all fairness Shimano is a lot more invested in road cycling than they are in mid to high end mountain bikes for all I know there road components could still be great but the instagram page @thanksshimano might say differently.
  • 2 1
 @thenotoriousmic:

>where you can clearly see the sram system shifts better

Yes...because its XX1. Which I said specifically said is fine. Man, Brexit really f*cked with your guys mental states.
  • 7 2
 So will the front derailleur be finally eliminated? When I think of non-biking people, the front derailleur just makes things more complicated…
  • 3 0
 I love seeing people cross chain their 3x9 with the biggest front and the biggest rear and the derailleur hanging on for dear life
  • 2 0
 @DizzyNinja: Then they come to the shop complaining that there's a grindy clicky noise when they pedal.
  • 6 0
 Shimano Cues them up... Pinkbike comments knock them outta the park...
  • 5 0
 ... ad15 mixes the metaphors
  • 3 0
 Here's the pitch... he scores!!
  • 1 0
 @YukonMog: Cued up and outta the park--scratch that?
  • 5 1
 Just give us a wide-range 9-speed Deore XT groupset already. And that new forward-facing derailleur with huge ground clearance.
  • 3 1
 The article says "everything beneath it will be part of the CUES family," yet talks mostly about the mid range components. $150 for a 1x9 without crankset isn't expensive, but it's also more expensive than a full Acera groupset with a 3x crankset, and even more expensive than the bottom-barrel Tourney lineup.
Does Shimano anticipate releasing additional trickle-down CUES parts to replace the $20 derailleurs of the world (or other spares for older 3x setups) in order to overhaul their entire lineup, or is the "everything beneath it" more market-speak than definitive statement?

...and for what it's worth, I know most of those dirt-cheap components are garbage quality compared to a modern deore setup - I'm just curious about the even-lower-than-$150-price-class and aforementioned spares for my own older bikes.
  • 2 0
 So it sounds like you can use the 9s cassette, U8000 11s shifter, U6000 derailleur, screw the limit screw in and then use an XT crank with 11S chainring and get a bulletproof, cheap wide range 9 speed setup. It's a shame they aren't making a U8000 9s specific derailleur but the limit screw trick should work just fine.
  • 2 0
 That 9-speed 46T is more than I need on my hardtail. I have noticed that I use maybe five gears skipping double on my 10-speed. I am using seven gears max on my 12 eagles on a full suss. The largest cog and the smallest and maybe something in the smaller middle size, and from there, always skipping two. On my 'city' bike, as I am lazy and cycle daily to work and back 32 kilometres, I have a THREE-speed Shimano for low maintenance. So far, 7K km with only cleaning and single-speed chain changes a few times.
  • 2 0
 OK, maybe it's just me: Why can't you just post a table with the prices listed per component per groupset? It would make it clear what your total will add up to, if you are interested..

And the weight! what about the weight?!
  • 2 0
 Overhauled my Hope threaded BB with new bearings and replaced the 104BCD chainring on
a Shimano hollowtech II SLX crank, so simple and cost effective, no pre load spacers etc and the choice of
chainrings out there, cost under £25 to keep this 10yr plus setup going some more,
10 spd chain and cassette on top of that but still.......
  • 2 0
 For my kids bikes I like it! I need farm kid tough. Or
Farm kid careless, what ever. My girls don’t ever shift the front rings ever. Middle ring and mash! I like the wide range 9 speed idea but never tried it myself. The micro shift seems great but it’s nice to have Shimano making it too.
  • 4 1
 this is cool back to 9, 10, and 11 speed. 12 speed is overrated, it will make the back more lighter because of that. Now, sram , you should make that too.
  • 5 0
 Not gonna make it much lighter, if at all, because these are low-end steel cassettes with similar sized big cogs and similar range. Reducing cog count while keeping the range is mostly just removing/swapping some of the middle cogs while keeping the biggest, and heaviest, cogs mostly in place (within a few teeth). Mid- to high-end 12sp systems swap the biggest cogs to lighter materials, where the most weight savings can be found.
  • 5 0
 Can’t wait for this to be specced on the next $6k Santa Cruz!
  • 1 0
 On the plus side this might shame some brands into Deore 12-speed on their intro hardtails.
  • 1 0
 I agree- will push the Deore up there, as this has to be getting the market share back from Microshift 1x drivetrains on all the entry-level 135/142 oem Giant, Spez, etc. bikes.
  • 2 0
 What does spacing have to do with surface area? 9 speeds at 11-speed spacing just means a better chain-line in the biggest cog, since the biggest on 9sp would sit where the 3rd biggest would sit on 11sp.
  • 7 4
 What if i told you, you dont need 12 speeds, you just need stronger legs. This whole 12 speed thing is excessive. I wish SRAM would offer 10/11 speed AXS systems
  • 3 1
 You don‘t need 10 speeds, just go singlespeed and train you quads a little bit
  • 5 0
 Give me a wide range 8 speed. Its all a lot of people really need.
  • 3 0
 Cue the onslaught of puns….

Actually this looks really promising in severe ways, and definitely a step forward from Shimano
  • 1 0
 This is great news for the newest members getting into the sport, however i'm slightly upset at the loss of 11 speed Deore, with the switch to a heavier linkglide Cues, after running 12 speed a while i really just want a less finicky, good value, but still high end hyperglide+ 11 speed drivetrain that's light and 11-48 is still enough range.
  • 2 0
 I only see advantages here!!! I bet that I'm not the only one preferring an 11 speed Shimano system rather than the common 12 speed - Cheaper, more durable, easier to tune. Lets see how about the overall weight!
  • 1 0
 wasnt this the topic of one of the first podcasts? if i remember correctly Kaz mentioned something along the lines that he would prefer a cheaper 11 speed drivetrain and have better spec brakes instead.

I hope bike companies take such route.
  • 1 0
 I assume couple new standards being introduces like new BB, chainring and some other's, despite SX and NX from SRAM total crap, at least it is being cross compatible all across the line. Also Microsoft seems to be much better option on 9-11 speed segment price wise
  • 3 0
 good on you shimano. Ill still go advent though, can be had on ebay new for 133 bucks, better shifter feel (subjective)
  • 6 0
 careful with ebay....pretty much everything on their nowadays is counterfeit. there are some pretty crazy side-by-side comparisons of ebay shimano stuff that I've seen on youtube showing the very hard to spot differences. Not sure if there are any similar vids for microshift
  • 4 0
 @rory: from a real bike shops ebay store. of course it can be had elsewhere for the same price.
  • 2 1
 @rory: microshift IS the knockoff :p
  • 1 1
 "The U4000 does without the clutch you'll associate with Shimano, but they say that chain retention won't be a problem."

Well, yeah, because narrow-wide rings do way more for retention than clutches. Clutches are for quiet. Just turn off the clutch on a modern 1x drivetrain and see if you get annoyed at the noise before you get annoyed by a dropped chain.
  • 3 0
 Idk, I dropped chains two rides in a row last year, but the problem went away when I tightened the clutch again (Advent X). I feel like chainring and clutch are equally important.
  • 1 1
 Concept is great (blending to create cross-compatibility), but as an average-plus technician, the following annoy me:

- Rivetted chainring? Yet another fully garbaged crank when that single ring wears out.
- Still with that 4-bolt asymetric spider? I think they could adapt Centrelock as their direct-mount chainring standard as well, and then life is easy for everyone...one crank, standard rings in almost any size you want.
- Never have been a fan of one-piece shifter/brake units. I know it'll be awhile before the shifter bonks, but it may not be awhile before any of the levers on that gets bent or broken. It's unbelievable how some people (new owners, family types, some just don't care) manage to break things just by hanging the bike wrong, moving it around the garage, running it over in the garage, or dribbling it down the highway as the new owner of a new Thule rack they've never used before. Run them separate or with Ispec-something so you can replace one without the other and have a brake lever available as a repair item.
- Not wrapping my head around the advice to leave a more-speed shifter 1 or 2 clicks into it's travel. I see new-rider issues more than I see easier wrenching.
- Name, graphics and font....c'mon Shimano.
  • 2 0
 There's only one CUES brake lever on Shimano's website (BL-U8000) and it's I-SPEC II.
  • 1 0
 @cmrn: Thank you, I retract that point. Also seems they have band shifters as well. My bad for not doing a full look.
  • 2 0
 This sounds like what the world needs. Cheap, durable and easily interchangeable. Now let's wait for the review and see if it is really like that.
  • 1 0
 Used to buy cheap 1x cranksets from Aliexpress to upgrade older and/or budget bikes. I'd be excited to switch to CUES in the future. The 10-speed U6000 might be my new go-to groupset. Kudos Shimano!
  • 2 0
 plenty of old alivio and acera bikes rolling around today, hopefully these can match the quality of those.
  • 3 4
 I still don't see a durability concern with 12-speed. Shimano cassettes and derailleurs aren't wildly expensive to replace every few years or after the odd crash. If I were putting thousands of miles a year on any bike, I'd definitely want 12 speed for range and spacing.
  • 3 0
 Looks OK but 'creating unique experiences'? F**k off.
  • 3 0
 Priced over Microshift? I'm good, thanks. Also a riveted chainring?...
  • 4 0
 Yeah, that looks sustainable...not.
  • 3 0
 Alivo is dead, long live Alivo.
  • 2 0
 Acera got robbed
  • 1 0
 Just put a Deore 10/11 speed rear mech plus a 10 speed 11-46 casette on one of our bikes. Range and performance for almost nothing compared to anything SRAM.
  • 1 0
 I'm excited about this. The wide range 9 speed sounds wonderful, provides the weight isn't absurd and chain retention is decent.
  • 2 0
 Does the shifter have a bearing?
  • 3 0
 Well done Shimano.
  • 1 0
 All linkglide, so ebike ready out the box? Sounds ideal. Interested to know the cog spacing compared to the current range.
  • 1 1
 Seems like Box has been doing pretty good with their prime 9 drivetrain recently, so much so that Shimano felt the need to try and compete
  • 2 0
 Henry has been pumping out articles like there's no tomorrow
  • 2 0
 But do shifters also only change 1 gear at a time?
  • 1 0
 Now that 1x is the norm, makes more sense to bring back the flappy paddle brake lever for gear changes.
  • 1 0
 Gigarange to the rescue. Would make a good nica bike sx and nx are a headache
  • 1 0
 I hope it’s good and they didn’t make a SRAM SX equivalent pile of shit so manufacturers can sale bikes at lower prices.
  • 2 1
 I like the look of that brake lever shape.
  • 1 0
 ok so spares for my 2x9 and 1x11 found on alibaba next time
  • 1 0
 Are square taper bottom brackets no longer required for 9 speed?
  • 1 0
 I never ran them on any of mine.
  • 1 0
 Did I miss the bit where it says whether it’s HG or microspline?
  • 3 0
 I'm gonna venture a guess that it's HG cause they're all 11-nn gear range
  • 2 0
 You did not, but it's HG.
  • 1 0
 @barp: Give me 9 speed Microspline!
  • 1 0
 I for one think that this is excellent news for the consumer.
  • 2 0
 despite my phrasing I swear I'm not a bot
  • 4 0
 @LowBuckCanuck: That is exactly what a bot would say.
  • 1 3
 So Shimano is totally ceding the upper end of the market for this…

Really need them to step up and put some pressure on SRAM.

Shimano is the only thing that can slow the arrival of 12k XO/GX bikes and 6k SX bikes.
  • 4 3
 Current Shimano 12 speed groups are better than that GX AXS crap
  • 1 0
 No mention of the di2 version? Strange
  • 1 0
 put that cues on your tues, brues
  • 1 0
 Hopefully this doesn’t result in shifting miscues.
  • 1 0
 Obligatory: xkcd.com/927
  • 1 0
 NOT THE BRIFTER, ANYTHING BUT THE BRIFTER
  • 1 0
 Still just 170 and 175mm crank length offerings. Rats.
  • 1 0
 Shimano declares the front derailleur dead?!
  • 1 0
 11t is garbage for Mullet bikes
  • 1 0
 They should have named it STX (RC).
  • 1 0
 So they made the new one even cheaper and shity
  • 1 0
 so this is just micorshift advent X with sram graphics on the cassette
  • 1 0
 cute
  • 1 1
 Don't look up "cooz" on Urban Dictionary. Or do if you need a chuckle.
  • 1 0
 ¿Cuánto cuesta?
  • 1 0
 No se.
  • 1 1
 Someone at shimano has it out for microshift
  • 1 0
 Mooga-Oomgawa
  • 1 2
 Old school, where's digital drive?
  • 2 4
 OMG, what a disaster!

You know what works? Numbers, like things we can count. Like an Audi A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, A6.
  • 6 0
 They still have that though? These groups still follow the Shimano product number convention of "higher number = mo better." It's just a product number rather than in the name.
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