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Video: The Latest Tech from the Fort William World Cup | The New Foxxer?

May 2, 2024 at 7:54
by Henry Quinney  

We're at Fort William for the first round of the downhill World Cup. With a long off-season behind us, there are a slew of new bikes and tech. Most notable is the Martin Maes' non-ebike ebike, the Rockshox Foxxer and a tweaked rear end on the Commencal Supreme of Amaury Pierron.

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It isn't Kashima, but it's pretty close. I don't necessarily understand the thinking behind speccing a gold Boxxer. Apart from the hype of today and possibly putting some noses out of joint at Fox it doesn't seem to make much sense. The casual fan will think it's just a 40.

photo

Cube have had a "nearly ready" production bike for what feels like a long time. This one must be pretty close now, and certainly looks it. If you ask Cube they will indeed confirm they'll tell you the same thing they told me two years ago. The brake-arm reduces anti-rise from around 100% to around 18%. The riders feel that with the suspension being quite sensitive through its stroke, they can find when braking hard as they set up for turns, they run out of travel for repeated hits. Reducing the anti-rise is a way around this.

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The imitation game continues. Kenda is the latest company to come aboard the Assegai style tyre. The NS team were tight-lipped on details but said they're still experimenting with casings.

photo

This svelte chainstay looks so thin it could almost be a flex pivot. However, concealed behind the cranks looks to be another way to adjust stiffness. The Supreme already has one flex-adjust on the stay, and it's interesting to see Commencal try to offer another option. I've heard of people running it without the bridge at all for ultimate compliance, however, clearly Amaury is looking more specifically about how and when the bike flexes, more than just an increased amount of flex, and could even be trying to isolate it further away from the shock to stop any binding that can inhibit performance. The stay itself looks to be steel.

Author Info:
henryquinney avatar

Member since Jun 3, 2014
348 articles

139 Comments
  • 104 13
 Makes the boxxer looks like an Amazon.com copycat fork.
  • 26 17
 Only in this case it's better than the original.
  • 13 3
 Yeah. This also gives more credibility to the performance benefits of Kashima (whatever those are). I think a better strategy would have been to continue to ignore/downplay any perceived benefit, but what do I know.
  • 39 0
 Rockshox did this is 2001 on the boxxer before Fox were even on the scene in DH
  • 2 0
 @TTASS: Or maybe they'll run it for a season and report that it's less durable and has more friction.
FUD works.
  • 8 0
 Yeah but when you see this coating applied to the new pyslo with gold lowers.... The circle is complete.
  • 3 0
 *psylo
  • 3 0
 I don’t know what “kashima” is either, but I must have it.
  • 3 0
 @ceedub72: it's a branded type of finishing coat (not owned by fox), very similar to anodised finishes which everyone else already uses, the boxxer in this case will just be a different colour of anodise, which is possible but no so durable. Hence the proto marzocchi green, blue and red stanchions never cam to market from years ago.

Kashima does have a benefit but is in low single digit percentages. And is more effective as a marketing tool then performance.
  • 1 0
 @Thegrumpymechanic: Thanks, it is definately a good marketing tool. I am way faster with it though. Haha.
  • 68 15
 As much as I love Pinkbike, Vital pit bits is on another level, you should take notes PB!
  • 90 6
 Vital does a great job, I especially like how they bring riders' personalities into the show. But Henry, Ben, Jessie May, and Ed are doing a great job doing our own thing too! I think there are advantages to each approach, and things we can learn from each other.
  • 16 17
 Yeah, but at least Pinkbike (as much as I hate their mid-roll ads that interrupt mid-sentence) doesn't put their own pre-roll ads on other people's videos. You can't even click-through an embedded YouTube video on Vital to go directly to YouTube: they intercept the click to play their own ads over a video they don't own, or even host, to then allow the redirect you to YouTube. So shady, so disrespectful to the readers/viewers, and especially disrespectful to the creators of the content. They're profiting from other people's work with no authorization or profit sharing from those people! I actually stopped ever going to Vital because of this gross disrespect for the people they claim to be supporting.
  • 5 3
 @justinfoil: i’ll put up with the ads for great FREE content from an independent publisher. I’d be cool with tiz-cycling-live.io/livestream.php doing the same thing!
  • 21 0
 @brianpark: I really like Henry in this role, he has a great understanding of whats going on, and provides a tonne of insight. I'm glad to see this back, and hope it continues throughout the season. Would love to see it at Enduro, and XC events as well.
  • 7 0
 be happy we have both, theres much to enjoy from different points of view
  • 4 7
 @rubberbutter: Yet, it's not free. You have to spend your time and attention, which translates to income for Vital. But in the case of unskippable pre-rolls ads on linked (not owned nor hosted) videos, that income _does not go to the actual creators_ of the content. I have nothing against their banner ads, or the interstitials, or even pre-roll ads on their own videos. It's the unauthorized (and unshared profits from) pre-rolls on linked videos that is disgusting.
  • 2 2
 @onawalk: I like different points of view, that's why there are a handful of feeds in my "Bikes" foIder. However, I don't really care much for the point of view of someone who profits off other people's work without permission.
  • 20 1
 Why not just watching both and not complaining ? Smile
  • 4 10
flag mototwo (May 2, 2024 at 11:03) (Below Threshold)
 Vital doesn't gouge like Pinkbike/Outside does with Trailforks! Wow ...50% price increase. You kidding!?
  • 3 0
 Both have their own approach and I like them both tbh.
  • 8 1
 @mototwo: What's Vitals equivalent to trailforks?
  • 33 1
 Don't really understand the Fox "Copycat" comparisons considering Rockshox looked like this long before they went back to the black stanchions. They were doing this a decent bit before Fox did.
  • 16 7
 www.pinkbike.com/news/Fox-racing-shox-limited-edition-suspension-2008.html

I could be wrong but I think Fox did the iconic white fork + gold stanchions + world champs stripes first in 2008.

I also think this Boxxer looks sick, so who cares who did it first. Smile
  • 11 7
 @lord-01: oooh the plot thickens. I knew they'd been first for gold, didn't know they'd been first for gold + rainbows. AFAIK it was still Fox doing gold + rainbows + white first.
  • 18 8
 @brianpark: You care, and care enough to remember and find a 16 year old article to try and prove that guy wrong.
  • 10 2
 @lord-01: People come here for the articles, but they stay for comments like this.
  • 6 0
 @chriskneeland: TBH I come for the comments. Just read the article for context.
  • 23 1
 I don't why everyone is comparing the gold (Ti-Ni) RS fork to the Fox Kashima. The RS is shinier then than the Kashima. Also RS did WAY before Fox back in like 2002 or something. I understand that a lot you are probably to young to remember that. Does anyone remember when Marzocchi had the green stantions on their 888?
  • 1 0
 Got to see the whole rainbow at Interbike lol. Almost pulled the trigger for my 66 RC3 Evo Ti but according to them red turns pink rapidly when exposed to UV light. Plus it was about $400 extra per leg for a 888 (~1200 USD at the time I believe). Maybe it was just a cheeky comment but they said that if fox wanted to add colors then they could too. I laughed but Kashima is its own blend and wayyy different to TiNi. I uncovered a good write up when it was new to the bike industry in Decline Mag. Yay for spring cleaning
  • 15 4
 Conversation starter at RockShox marketing dept:
How do we make sure that 99% of viewers will think the highest profile rider we have, is riding our main competitors fork?

….. ah, I got an idea ….
  • 11 0
 You are very good at this Henry! Cheers!
  • 8 0
 Kashima Boxxer is way too low key. Bring back the Ti-Nitride Boxxer. Everyone loves shiny stuff.
  • 1 0
 yeah that stuff was pretty. shitty durability, but looked good.
  • 3 0
 Because everybody misses when the coating started corroding and bubbling off the stanchions.
  • 2 0
 That's exactly what this is. That Boxxer IS NOT Kashima. It's exactly what it use to be, Ti-Nitride from the Boxxer WC form like 2002 or something, Probably just a one off now.
  • 2 1
 @moutnbiker: actually, it could be generic Kashima, but they just can't call it that. Fox and Miyaki have an agreement about using the "Kashima Coat" branding/labeling, and that anything with that name has to come directly from Miyaki Corp, but the patent seems be older than that 2009 agreement, and may be expired. If so, then anyone can make and sell the coating, but they just can't call "Kashima Coat", because that name, and perhaps "Kashima" alone, are trademarks, which don't really expire as long as you keep using them.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: insightful, you might be on to something. But if you look closely, there is definitely a difference between to two coatings. the RS has a more glossy coating than the Kash.
I really do wish you could buy Kashima touch up. And yes, I do know its not just painted on.
  • 3 0
 @moutnbiker: Except "Kashima Coat" (TM) isn't always the same color. It's different between my Float 36 and my DPX2. Which are both different than an old Float 32, yet all three carry the "Kashima Coat" trademark. And they're all yet again different than an even older RP23.

If there was a generic, I would actually _expect_ it to be slightly different than the branded one.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: I guess I have never really compared my shocks and forks like that. Interesting. Maybe the formula for Kashima has changed slightly over the years.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: According to Miyaki Co. directly the difference in finish colour can be linked to dozens of variables in the annoying process such as material purity, temperature, time and even electrical inconsistencies
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: all anodizing processes have variation due to multiple factors and you will always struggle to have 100% visual match from one batch to another.
  • 2 0
 @misterkslays: @Shred-BC: Yeah, I know, that's the point I was making. The color difference on the RS stanchions, as pointed out by @moutnbiker, is NOT an indicator that it's not Kashima. And I'm not saying it IS Kashima, just that the color is not proof either way.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: Absolutely, the finish is where the noticeable difference will be as the molybdenum give the unique "matte-shine" of Kashima, whereas the hue could be almost identical depending on the process
  • 6 1
 For those who want Kashima for the performance benefit (and I don't believe this fork has it), consider:

1) Servicing lowers at appropriate intervals ($5 in oil)
2) Upgrading to SKF's latest 2024 seals ($40)
3) Burnishing bushings (~$100)
4) Debatable, but coil conversion...
  • 3 0
 1) definitely
2) for sure
3) an absolute must on all new forks!
4) depending on rider preferences.
  • 1 0
 what does Burnishing bushings mean?
  • 1 0
 @milanboez: Forcibly polishing, basically. Burnishing fork bushings requires a special tool (sized for each stanchion diameter, 34/35/36/37/38/40/etc.), some oil, and some patience. I’ve personally not performed the process as I’ve gotten lucky with most fork purchases, but the fork uppers should perfectly slide into the lowers with the damper and spring removed. Most new forks don’t do this and this leads to harshness. Over time, the fork will break in, but this could take tens of hours.
  • 1 0
 Exactly. All of this is just allows for tighter tolerances to be met which in turns means better performance (sometimes very noticeable) and more importantly a longer life expectancy.

Think your fork performs like garbage. Get your stanchions and bushings measured with a high precision micrometer. Even thousandths of a millimeter can have a drastic effect on relatively low pressure air sprung suspension
  • 10 2
 I feel like rockshox just did that to troll fox.
  • 6 2
 Weird move from RockShox to put the gold on there. Do you really want everyone watching Vali fly through the course on her way to victory to assume she’s doing it on a Fox fork?
  • 3 0
 It really is surprising that no MTB suspension manufacturer has gone to DLC stanchion coatings, at least that I'm aware of. It is also surprising that more dyed "chameleon coat" Ti-Nitride hasn't made it's way over from the motocross market.
  • 3 0
 Then again moto doesn't care about friction like we do, they use sticky hard chrome finishes.

My (probably incorrect) Google search of friction coefficients:

Hard Chrome: 0.39
TiAlN: 0.35
AlTiN: 0.35
ZrN: 0.35
TiCN: 0.30
MoS2: 0.15 (Kashima)
TiN: .05-.9 (Foxxer)
  • 4 0
 @50percentsure: they do care about friction but with the ~250 lbs or so not sure it makes much of a difference in the end. My tuner used to 'microfinish' my stanchions:

www.kreftmoto.com/micro-finish

OEM WP fork: 40-60 Newtons
WP Cone Valve fork with DLC coating: 27-29 Newtons
WP fork with Kreft Microfinish: 16-18 Newtons
  • 4 0
 @RadBartTaylor: Good points.

Also moto racers tends to be practical, like understanding that clean lubrication and better seals (SKF) will make more difference than what your fork is coated with.

Try tearing down moto or MTB forks with different stanchion coatings and using stock seals, the bare stanchions all have detectable stiction. Switch out to a higher quality seal and it feels noticeably more slippery.
  • 1 0
 Didn't Rockshox try DLC?

www.sram.com/en/rockshox/rockshox-technology/boxxer-legacy

Its mentioned in there midway down the page.
  • 2 0
 @koncretekahuna: it was a big surprise, I rode with a bunch of the guys that worked there. The owner Adam owned CushCore also if you didn't know, I think that still doing well.
  • 1 0
 @50percentsure: yeah, I always go SKF but will admit...zero shame....I love the look of the DLC coating on moto forks. Most seasoned moto guys are really in-tune with maintenance and my thought process is sim to yours, better off keeping stuff maintained with high quality parts than throwing fancy coatings or parts at a problem.
  • 4 0
 There's a bunch of competing theories on stanchion finishing methodes. Some say a super smooth finish like Ti-Nitride is superior because it creates a surface with a smaller friction coefficient - others say Ti-Nitride is too smooth and what you actually want is a finish with more surface roughness, as it allows a thin film of oil to cling to the surface. But as far as I'm aware there's no definitive proof that one is better than the other.
  • 2 0
 @50percentsure: Racers care but moto is very much like MTB where the appearance of improved performance is highly valued by the customer base that's why almost all the factory teams run the chameleon coat TiN. Better than chrome, not as good as DLC, but they have the bling factor which DLC doesn't.

See here:
www.ridejbi.com/jbi-suspension-chameleon-coat
  • 4 0
 @Muscovir: I posted some data above, actual measurements from the engineering team at Kreft, a suspension tuner for moto's, who use a suspension Dyno to validate all their setups:

www.kreftmoto.com/micro-finish

OEM WP fork: 40-60 Newtons (standard chrome finish)
WP Cone Valve fork with DLC coating: 27-29 Newtons
WP fork with Kreft Microfinish: 16-18 Newtons (std. chrome finish with roughed surface - fork stanchion placed in a lathe and an abrasive medium pressed which creates cross hatching)
  • 1 0
 @RadBartTaylor: Very interesting, thanks for posting!
  • 2 0
 @RadBartTaylor: yeah, I'm from the Bend area, I know a bunch of the Kreft and Cushcore guys. Was a big surprise to all of us.
  • 2 0
 I wrote my Engineering Materials final paper on Miyaki Co. and Kashima Coat. The reason is it sees continued use is the surface finish is extremely smooth compared to other forms of anodization allowing for less friction between the seals
  • 3 0
 @Muscovir: As far as my research on Kashima shows the molybdenum aspect provides "lubricating" properties allowing Kashima to have a surface finish that is measurablly smooth all the way to the micron level
  • 1 0
 @Shred-BC: did you do any actual experiments to measure differences in friction between Kashima and other coatings?
  • 1 0
 @misterkslays: No, as the project was a research paper and we weren't given time or resources to conduct our own tests. However, I've spent lots of time in bikeshops and have evidence of Kashimas advantage. The percentage of black annodized forks with severe wear compared kashima forks is certainly notable as Mikyaki's coating has a higher relative hardness allowing for more robustness against grit and grime that can accumulate on the seals.

While backed up by science this is still annecdotal evidence and performance gains are likely negligible. Also there is a possibility people who pay for kashima also pay for/do services at the recommended intervals. \\shrug//
  • 1 0
 @Shred-BC: Thumbs up on investigating something you're passionate about. But that's a shame your university prioritized research over practical quantitative experiments. Massive problem I observe when trying to hire recently graduated engineering students these days is their significantly lacking practical skills.
  • 1 0
 @misterkslays: Agreed. I'm at an applied college and it's still not great
  • 3 0
 I have the impression Kenda already had the Hellkat before Maxxis released the Assegai. I believe it was in response to the popularity of the Magic Mary with the 2-2-3 center knob pattern. Maxxis was kinda late to the intermediate knob party but the rest of the brands copied the Assegai following it's success.
  • 8 3
 oMg WhEn DiD rOcKsHoCk Do KaShImA?!
  • 18 11
 Kashima is nothing special... just a marketing term. Just a PVD coating. Those gold drill bits... yeah, same pixie dust.
  • 14 23
flag 541freeride (May 2, 2024 at 8:25) (Below Threshold)
 @AppleJack76: kashima cost is absolutely something special and not just marketing term.
  • 18 4
 @mrbrighteyes: alright geeze make me do all the hard work. Here's a little snippet from Miyaki who creates the kashima coating. "Kashima Coat is lubricated anodizing developed by Miyaki Corporation by adding a lubricating function to hard anodizing with the goal of enhancing wear resistance.

The repetition of “hard + lubricant” shown in the diagram produces up to 70 billion molecules per square centimeter that significantly improves the wear resistance of Kashima Coat in comparison to hard anodizing.

Check out the website to get schooled global.kashima-coat.com/service_en/kashima-coat
  • 9 1
 @541freeride: You are spot on. Kashima is all about being very durable, meaning you can go way longer than you should between lube changes and not wear down the OD.
  • 6 4
 @mrbrighteyes: keep in mind that the old gold coating rockshox did in 2002 which was a Titanium Nitride stanchion coating. Quite different from the kashima process. Try checking out a website I like to use to source info, it's called Google.
  • 6 2
 @541freeride: I get the hate for blingy things and people scoff when kashima benefits are mentioned....but they are real. I have scraped black ano against rocks and kashima against rocks...the Kashima is usually unphazed while a similar hit does significantly more damage to black ano. The durability and wear resistance is the biggest benefit with the ability to hold oil in surface tension better is a performance benefit but probably not noticeable by most.
  • 8 2
 @AppleJack76: wrong on all accounts. Kashima is an anodize process. Titanium Nitride is physical vapor deposition (PVD) entirely different process. Similar goals in providing a hardened wear resistant surface but vastly different in application. Both processes result in performance improvements that are more than just marketing filler. Do you need them on your suspension bits, absolutely not, do they improve performance absolutely yes.
  • 6 9
 @541freeride: Sorry, but no. It's special alright, but not on your fork.

Under certain circumstances, a molybdenum sulfate coating (aka "Kashima") can enhance the friction and binding behaviour of mechanical elements in high-load, high-stress applications. But none of those circumstances, under which Kashima would be benefitial, apply to your suspension fork.

A simple analogy to illustrate my point: A spoon made from a titanium alloy will be lightweight, strong and fancy. But since none of those properties affect it's usefulness in its application as a spoon, it won't make you any more efficient at eating your breakfast cereal in the morning.

The same thing applies to Kashima coating on forks. Mechanically speaking, there's no point in having the Kashima coating on the stanchions of a bicycle suspension fork over other anodized surface finishing methodes.

The only point is to stand out and for Fox to have a reason to charge you twice the price.
  • 3 3
 @maestroman21: Sorry, but most of what you said is not even what a molybdenum disulfide coating does.
  • 5 1
 @maestroman21: People love to get butthurt about Kashima but it's like only a $70 difference between Factory and Performance Elite forks.
  • 4 2
 @541freeride: Like I said, same thing.... Solves the same problem. BTW, how long do any of us REALLY keep our bikes to wear this 'coating' out and/or feel the difference between different coatings? NONE... none of us.
  • 2 2
 @misterkslays: Like I said, same thing.... Solves the same problem. BTW, how long do any of us REALLY keep our bikes to wear this 'coating' out and/or feel the difference between different coatings? NONE... none of us.
  • 5 0
 @Muscovir: Actually, a titanium spoon can be useful. It has lower thermal conductivity than stainless steel or aluminum, so would help keep your spoon from melting your ice-cream as you scooped it, or help keep your fingers from getting hot when eating a lot of hot soup.
  • 3 2
 @Muscovir: your spoon analogy is absolutely horrid. But it brings up another idea. Could we kashima coat our steak knives to make cutting meats easier and more efficient?
  • 6 1
 @Muscovir: Exactly, Kashima was created as an industrial coating process for applications that don't really match up with what is going on in a properly maintained fork or shock. And that's why there is zero perceptible difference between Kashima and standard hard ano stanchions in performance. It's fine for what it is but the real value it offers to Fox is marketing hype.
  • 5 1
 @AppleJack76: I can ensure you that coatings do wear off when one rides over 300 times a year
  • 4 0
 @tiffe: I can ensure you that no one maintains their bike parts to the exact manufacturer hourly time limits too.
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: keep fingers getting hot from hot soup!? What kind of soup you eating? Don't disagree though, I mean they make them for camping/hiking for a reason....
  • 1 0
 @AppleJack76: Well, the wiper seals on my DH fork start to leak after ~5-10 bike park days now so I wouldn't argue against more durable stanchions personally
  • 3 2
 @velodonata: "zero perceptible difference between Kashima and standard hard ano stanchions in performance"

And people pay for looks all the time. A custom painted bike doesn't make you faster. Color matched fork lowers don't make you faster. But people still pay for them, because, as you said, it doesn't hurt.

There is also some good evidence that Kashima is harder and better wearing than other hard-ano, so it might maintain that level of performance for longer, which actually might be more important for the regular folks who don't get free fork maintenance every other weekend.
  • 4 0
 @Muscovir: Weight is everything in spoons. Just think of how many more repetitions from bowl to mouth you could make with even a 5% weight savings! That is time you get back! You could entirely eradicate morning arm pump (easy now) and go into your day fresh, fueled and ready to rock.

You enjoy your cereal with your heavy, outdated steel spoon like a loser. I'll be using my titanium alloy, Kashima coated smart spoon to destroy the most important meal of my day like I'm wearing rainbow stripes.
  • 2 2
 @Muscovir: yes, it does. Follow the link in @541freeride post. It's all explained. You can questions the manufacturer if you'd like.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: Of course people pay for what they think looks cool. Kashima looks like sh1t to me, but plenty of people like it. That's another part of its primary reason for existing being more marketing driven than performance.

And anyone that thinks Kashima is a license to neglect regular maintenance is wrong and also the kind of rider Kashima seems like it is most successfully marketed to. It's not an actual advantage unless you are woefully neglectful and it's not going to do anything beyond slightly minimize the damage, extending performance isn't part of that equation. It's designed for running dry. Nothing else about a fork is.
  • 2 1
 @541freeride: This is correct the hardness and lubrication properties allow for a tighter tolerance between stanchion and seal leading to virtually no oil or air leakage, negligible friction reductions and increased theoretical service life
  • 1 3
 @Shred-BC: there's only a few of us who truly understand...
  • 1 0
 I wonder if this year's bike trend is increasing mechanical grip by manipulating the stiffness of the rear end? The new YT is high modulus, the commencal team are testing rear ends. I'd quite like to see where this trend goes
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney Awesome video, love the tech!
Question: Would the lockout on the IFR bike not be more functional adjusting the LSC rather than HSC? If the intent is to firm the bike up for the motorway (see: jumps and pedalling) I would see this as something more easily improved through the LSC circuit. Am I missing something here?
  • 2 0
 Great question. While LSC is usually great at tuning out pedal bob (it's essentially a small amount of oil being circulated and a low velocity) it sometimes doesn't take much to go beyond the range of its adjustment. The HSC will not only adjust LSC, but also dictate the overall feel. By going to fully closed on HSC you will get the largest effective change with the smallest amount of rotation from the adjuster, making it really easy to affix the cable-operated lever to.
  • 1 0
 I’m almost 100% certain that Rock Shox were first with the gold fork thing back in 2000 for the Olympics.

The Sid-ney were a limited edition fork with gold stanchions and as others have pointed out, the stanchions were Ti-Nitirde.

I remember seeing them with either white or blue lowers.
  • 2 0
 I’m not in the market for a DH fork but think they look great to be honest! I used to love the old Boxxer with the writing on the stanchions themselves!
  • 2 0
 Remember the one off custom for Semenuk that said Semenuk half on stanchions and half on lowers?
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: I didn't, had to look them up. Very bling, that's a blast from the past!
  • 2 0
 @brucemacd: sorry, they actually said Brandon. The tetris looking ones. I had to look them up again. Very cool seeing that one off again!
  • 2 0
 Ha, as an automotive mechanic, neat to see them repurpose stick on wheel weights for the downtube lower weight loading.
  • 4 1
 RockFox Shoxxer
  • 1 0
 I don’t know if that gold rockshox will eventually destroy my eyes or destroy my bank account.
  • 2 0
 Likely both.
  • 2 1
 Gold and white with the World Champs stripes is fire. You're not allowed to disagree with that because World Champ.
  • 2 0
 The Kenda Pinner and Hellkat hybrid looks nice!
  • 2 0
 Is it just me or does this look like the Walmart Kashima?
  • 1 0
 That Steel chainstays on commençal looks classy!!
Old 90's Max/Sunn Team Vibes..
  • 1 0
 Not to be outdone by Fox, Rock Shox has licensed Nahshima coating for the new Boxxer prototype.
  • 1 0
 Photos set to private on clickthrough @henryquinney
  • 3 0
 Thank you!
  • 1 0
 Really looking forward to a new Cube DH option!
  • 1 0
 red sliders on a red boxxer would look rad!
  • 1 0
 Boxxer with stancions in 2001...
  • 1 0
 Maybe the exclusivity deal with Miyaki is running out?
  • 1 0
 RockShox: We’re going to start making gold stanchions
Fox: Hold our beer
  • 2 4
 Come on Henry you know this is not a fox copycat. This Clickbait shit is getting really old. It would’ve been a much better idea to show the history of the boxer and this and why it’s like this
  • 1 0
 When are we gonna see some hot pink stanchions from PB????
  • 1 0
 TRP levers/Maven calipers...
  • 1 0
 still waiting for rainbow ti-ni sliders like bling MX forks Wink
  • 1 0
 The original Boxxer had gold legs.
  • 1 0
 Rockzocchi?
  • 3 4
 Can Americans please stop copying our «Ø»? It does not make you cool and it is pronounced «Uh».
  • 2 0
 Nø wåy
  • 2 0
 @owl-X: Enjoy your «Cummencal».
  • 1 0
 @joni0001984: Pretty sure Commençal is an Andoran brand. What other "Americans" are you thinking about?
  • 2 0
 @pmhobson: Damn, you are right. Sorry, America.
  • 1 0
 Really good job Henry!
  • 2 2
 Rockshox Foxxer
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