Calibre Parent Company GoOutdoors on the Brink of Administration

Jun 22, 2020 at 2:27
by James Smurthwaite  

JD Sports Group has confirmed it is seeking administrators for GoOutdoors, the retailer behind Calibre Bikes.

Calibre have rapidly become one of the go-to brands for budget bikes and recently impressed us with the Bossnut that was a standout performer on our Field Trip despite being the cheapest bike on the test.

GoOutdoors have 67 retail stores across the UK that carry Calibre bikes as well as Raleigh, Diamondback and other camping and outdoor gear. JD Sports Group bought the brand for £112 million in late 2016 but filed a notice of intention on Friday to protect it from legal action while administrators were sought. JD Sports Group said:

"The group can confirm that it has considered a number of strategic options for Go and that Go’s directors have lodged the notice in court. This notice creates an immediate moratorium around the company and its property, which lasts for 10 business days. During this moratorium, Go’s creditors cannot take legal action or continue with any existing legal proceedings against the company without the court’s permission. Administrators have not yet been appointed and the group will make no further comment at this time.”

GoOutdoors was struggling in the second half of 2019 having posted a loss of around £40m in the six months to August. The brand's shops were then mostly shuttered in April although it was allowed to stay partially open as a bike retailer. It eventually fully re-opened at the end of May with safety measures in place to ensure social distancing, which included limiting the numbers of customers.

The Guardian reports that accountancy firm Deloitte is likely to lead a restructuring of the company, which could involve job cuts across its 2,300-strong workforce.


103 Comments

  • 51 0
 Shame. I like Go Outdoors. Had some good bargains in there for all sorts of stuff - climbing, water packs (cheapest i can find Osprey Hydraulics anywhere) and the odd bit of cold weather kit (most of the stuff they sell is middle of the road but you could get the odd bit of prememium brand Berghaus or Marmott etc on sale).

Looked like they were really going to elevate themselves with the Calibre brand too. The importance of a (just) sub-£1000 full-sus that's actually capable of handling the first few years of someone's progression into MTB (or longer depending on the level/type of riding they are happy to stay at), rather than holding them back really, can not be overstated. The bike had a lot of positive comments but i felt it's importance in the market was really underestimated.
  • 15 1
 I imagine that calibre the brand will be bought out quite easily by another bike company that has healthy books. Would be a shame for the only actually usable budget bike brand to die out, it's a market that is worth a lot of money if it goes global.
  • 12 0
 Some days I’ve been to Leeds bike park I’ve been amazed by how many Bossnuts there are in the wild. It feels like 50% of bikes there are Bossnuts sometimes.
  • 2 0
 It's a shame about calibre but for most kit (and especially climbing) I found GO rarely had what I wanted. A bit like the middle aisle of Lidl, I do love a bargain but when I actually needed a specific thing, not so good.
  • 7 0
 One point to note is that the guy who made Calibre what it is, Mike Sanderson, recently left GoOutdoors and is now at Planet X. So where the Calibre brand may go I don't know, but don't be surprised when On-One release a bike very similar to.the Bossnut! Hopefully with a better name.
  • 7 1
 @alexhyland: It's On One so it will probably be even worse. I mean, this is the brand that brought us the Inbred, Reet 'ard, Pickenflick, Bish Bash Bosh and... Hello Dave.
  • 2 0
 @Fix-the-Spade: o yeah haha. Well, hope the bikes will be good anyway.
  • 2 0
 @alexhyland: that's good news then, I brought an on one codeine a couple of years ago was a great bike for the money, regret selling it, if planet x start a line of affordable bikes similar to the bossnut thay will sell very well. Hopefully bring out a cheaper ebike as well with that bafang ultra motor in it..
  • 2 0
 @theberminator: the Codeine looked like such a great bike, perhaps a bit ahead of it's time - when it came out the idea of a 29er trail bike that worked well wasn't such a regular occurrence.

I believe Brant Richards designed it, I'm not sure where he is at with On-One now, he seems to have worked there then not a couple of times since then. I would assume that Mike Sanderson has taken over Brant's role.
  • 3 0
 @jaame: I wonder how many people the combo of a cheap-but-good trail bike and Leeds Urban Bike Park has got into mountain biking.

Mountain biking can be a pretty expensive hobby really, while you can get a cheap hardtail, many people still need a car to get to some trails worth riding and then will need money for fuel and parking too.

Plus in the case of younger riders, you'd need someone to take you trails. LUBP really helps with that as many more people can ride to it.

I've noticed a big difference in the value of bikes between riders at LUBP and riders at Dalby for example.
  • 2 0
 @wisey: Affordable bikes and venues that are visible, advertised and accessible could make a huge difference in mountainbiking.

Venues like LUBP can really shift things from 'Have mountain bike --> seek places to ride it' to 'See MTB venue --> get mountain bike to ride there'

How much of a difference this makes to numbers of people getting in the sport i couldn't possibly say.
  • 1 0
 @jaame: How is LUBP mate? I am about three hours away, worth the drive?
  • 1 0
 @alexhyland: I have had my 2014 Codeine 29 since 2015, bought sold others, so glad I held on to my Codeine, it is my favorite bike. 140 mm 29er...good geo, comfortable....for me perfect bike.
  • 1 0
 @alexhyland: I left Planet X in November last year - I'm back working full time with Ed Oxley on our clothing brand www.hebtro.co
  • 1 0
 @shedfire: Cool, good to hear, hope it's all going swimmingly! Lovely stuff, bit out of my price range atm but so is most stuff ha
  • 1 0
 @shedfire: I take it my assumption is a fairly safe one then? Sounds like Mike would be an ideal replacement for yourself.
  • 1 0
 @Radley-Shreddington: in my personal view, it’s not worth a six hour drive. I drive about 45 mins to get there and that is annoyingly far. If you could incorporate it into a longer trip it would be worth a visit, although it is officially closed at present. It’s good, but not that good. I would go there every day if I lived across the street though.
  • 1 0
 @jaame: Cheers, I am also three hours from Wales which is a better shout, I just thought as I used to those length journeys it might be worth a look. I have a couple of pals in Halifax so maybe next time I visit I'll take my bike and give LUBP a look.
  • 2 0
 @Radley-Shreddington: sooo much good riding near Halifax though! Calderfornia!
  • 2 0
 @Radley-Shreddington: if you’re in the area, Leeds is worth a couple of hours of your time, fo sho yo.
  • 1 0
 @alexhyland: Definitely packing my bike then!
  • 21 0
 I would imagine that JD are planning on putting it into administration to enable some renegotiation on debt, rents and staff, and that the business will probably continue. I've no idea whether bikes were profitable for them, but you have to imagine there will be an increase in staycations this year, and camping would be part of that, so this sort of business ought to be viable
  • 23 4
 Fart in the tents, zip them up and run, fun for all the family and primary reason for visiting, we end up in there loads but never actually buy anything.
  • 12 0
 Tone it down over there, you wild animals!
  • 6 1
 Sounds like we would be friends. But I would probably zip up the tent while my daughters were still in there.
  • 22 13
 The future world I see is almost everything is direct to consumer via the web. The idea of storing stuff in a building so that you can look at it will only be for artisanal things. town centres wont exist as they do now, mass unemployment or 3 day working weeks will become the norm, buying power will dry up for all but the richest and you'll work for a month to purchase a basic tv. Our current abundance relies upon taking advantage of those on a pittance, as the world becomes more equal in overall minimum wage the split between the richest and the drones will become ever more apparent. This is just the beginning of the end of our neoliberal capitalist age.
  • 9 5
 This is some serious conspiracy shit. Seems just a bit far fetched....
  • 8 2
 That's a new one. Higher minimum wages = less working hours = bigger difference between rich and poor.

I'm not sure I agree, but I do offer a solution - no minimum wage, but tax the hell out greedy rich effers who don't pay their employees decent wages. If you want to business in our country, your employees need to afford to live here without sucking up tax dollar benefits - or being destitute - or being slaves.

Coronavirus has shown us two very evident things: businesses don't keep enough cash reserves to pay employees without asking for a bailout, and employees don't make enough money to save without asking for unemployment.
  • 5 0
 @PHeller: I think he means world wide minimum (not a legal definition). Meaning that as poor countries get more export work, their income rises, and then shifts to another, new poor country. All while the developed world sees no pay increase. More and more factory workers at low wages building stuff "we" want.

Not sure exactly how realistic it all is, as a lot of the stuff we consume is WAY cheaper than it ever has, and we are only paying premiums for premium items. Example: I use a $100 smart phone, something that I don't think existed 10 years ago. People CHOOSE to pay $1500 for a flagship phone. LIkewise, you CAN buy a cheap TV, but people CHOOSE to buy the 80". Also, I don't own a TV at all.

Of course, I am sitting here at work, typing this, waiting for my layoff that I expect to occur after July.
  • 9 1
 @PHeller: You're also assuming all those companies actually needed a bailout. It's been shown a bunch of companies got money that have zero need...it's just greed. As well assuming all employees don't "make enough money to save"...we live in a society/culture of living beyond the means...majority of Americans are deep in credit card debt. I live in a town with something like 16,000 full time residents and 60,000 visitors each weekend it seems like, but there are 600 realtors here(excuse me..realtor/yoga instructor). It's my estimate 10% actually make any money, yet I see so many new Mercedes, Range Rovers, etc.---because---image.
I'm self employed and I was bringing in plenty for a while, then some things happened and I had to stop buying multiple $7000 bikes a year..I had to scale back and adjust my living. Lots of people don't want to accept that they can't post awesome stuff on their Instagram and Facebook. But yes, there are people working hard not making enough...but if they are that hard of a worker I'd assume they'll go find something better and get paid what they deserve....free market.

To me what this "virus" has shown many of us(and we'll see if it sticks around), is that life doesn't have to be so hectic..go go go...18 things on our plate. It's an idea and a construct that people just fall into. Slow the f*ck down! When the lockdown started and the tourists left and the streets were empty, I started flying a kite at an old spanish fort near my house that is usually covered in tourists..I'd meet a few friends, have cocktails and watch boats. Then go sit on my porch and listen to records and have more chats, maybe play board games with my neighbor. To me my life improved greatly, and now I'm already sick of how crowded everything is again. Most of my friends prefer lockdown period, but it's obvious that most of society wants it back how it was...crowded, loud....
  • 2 0
 @stumphumper92: I think you might be confusing conspiracy theories with educated opinion. as far as I'm aware, most conspiracy theories deal with events in the past, rather than thinking about what might happen in the future (that way they can never really be held to account).
  • 1 0
 @GlassGuy: I have to agree. Lockdown was great for local goings abouts of one’s business. I saw more wildlife than cars on bike rides. I could drive over to my parents’ house in 45mins to deliver essential food, not stopping once in the way. Heck, if I was that way inclined I could have driven way over the speed limit all the way there because there were no coppers about either. I also saved a ton of cash on fuel and other superfluous items. More time with the kids, no commuting. There was a lot to like about it. It must have been great in many respects to live 150 years ago, when the population of Earth was under 1 billion.
  • 5 0
 Oh I think it could get much bleaker than that. As more things shift to online it all but eliminates the service sector. As more wealth accumulates at the top people default on their mortgages leaving the super rich to buy property all over the world. Since the working class has been decimated they no longer have much spending power and industry shifts to producing for the wealthy. Instead of large scale auto plants we have super yacht factories employing a small number of skilled professionals. Due to the multiplier effect the super rich can still maintain current GDP levels and government will continue to tell people that everything is clearly fine. As the lower class gets priced out of more housing markets we all live in slums. Then the economy craters and its time for torches and pitch forks in the streets.
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: Part of the equation is quality and techno-relevance. Our parents spent a weeks salary on a TV and it lasted 30yrs... not so much today.
  • 2 0
 @pourquois-pas: My ex wife still has the plasma TV we bought together 15 years ago. Eventually it might need to be repaired, or replaced.

Just because people CHOOSE to buy a new TV, doesn't mean the old one is bad. Hers is only a 42", nobody can handle such a small TV anymore...

I still use the original Surface tablet as a computer, works just fine. People just like to throw away their stuff to buy the newer, fancier item and then use "poor quality" as their excuse. I break my cell phone constantly, haven't had one fail yet that wasn't broken by me. The stuff we buy is still good, we just want upgrades to keep up with the Jones's.
  • 2 0
 Fight for the Right to Repair!

I also blame a lot of our 40/hr week, 52 weeks a year, 35 year careers (in the USA at least) as a reason we're all so consumerist. I think we'd spend a lot less money, or need a lot less money, if we could have healthcare without working, and if our employers not only paid us better, but gave us more time off.

In places where the average wage is higher relative to the cost of living, where people have socialized medicine, and where they get considerable mandated time off, the quality of life is generally better as well. People are happier in the countries that offer more state mandated vacation time - and while they might complain about higher taxes, those countries also tend to be less consumerism driven.
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: true, but you probably bought a reasonably good TV. And 15yrs ago these were premium, not a lot of options around.

The $199.99 model available at the local grocery store? Maybe 2 years. “Cost optimization to grow the category by offering value price points to price conscious consumers”.
  • 2 0
 You might get ten years out of a computer. They’re meant to last seven. I managed to get 13 out of a MacBook but the mouse pad was shagged, the button stuck, the battery exploded and the speakers delaminated. I only used GarageBand by the end because nothing web-based worked. TVs are another story though. My TV must be close to 20 years old. I don’t see the point of changing it. A tv is a tv. You sit on the sofa and look at it.
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: nah planned obsolescence is totally a thing. The fact that they're telling you your new car can go 9k miles without an oil change is because they know it will make it past warranty and after that they want it to blow up.

Everything is crap these days and just falls apart. It's the logical conclusion of public companies chasing never ending growth.
  • 1 0
 @friendlyfoe: It's funny that. In Taiwan they recommend you change the oil in your scooter every 1000km and your car at 3000km. It sounds absurd, but Taiwaneses want their shit to last a lifetime.
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: my ps3 is still going strong, and my 32 inch second hand plasma is somehow still working even after the coaxial ariel lead was struck by lightning and burnt out the antenna socket lol, ps3 still works in the hdmi thow... I refuse to buy another until its smoking and sparking...
  • 2 0
 @jaame: so many people do 0 maintenance on things they buy and expect them to work. Toss the lawn trimmer on the shelf in fall and wonder why it won’t start in spring, then buy a new one instead of just cleaning the carb and replacing the plug.

Old equipment is awesome. I have a 1967 air compressor from an Exxon shop. My drill press is older than I am.

I have a 26yo trolling motor, speeds stopped working. 3 marinas told me to “save the hassle” and replace it, one fixed the $60 magnetic and it purrs again.

But even newer stuff can be repaired if you’re persistent. Parts can sometimes be hard to source but there’s usually a solution out there. The web has actually made repairing things so much easier - parts and knowledge access like never before.
  • 1 0
 @friendlyfoe: My car has 160,000 miles with 10k oil changes, 2012 model bought new. Only failures were wear items (rear shocks for example), and no wear item that is on the PM schedule has failed (I just did the timing belt at 150k, on schedule, as another example).
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: what brand? I bought a dealer serviced Volvo at 40k miles and it was about to blow up at 70 when I traded it in. The list of failures is long. I've heard their non turbo SUVs fair better.

Leasing a rav4 with 9k oil change interval and after about 7k the motor definitely picks up a light vibration. Anyway cars are just an example.

Oh I had a nice example putting on a spare tire where there was no visible jack point so I went inboard off the subframe rail. Jack collapsed and folded in half. Never had that problem in the past. Everything is made as cheap as possible these days.
  • 1 0
 @friendlyfoe: Ford Fiesta, with the manual transmission. 35 MPG and reliable. And with the backseat removed it has enough storage space for road trips with all my camping gear and multiple bikes (two bikes on the rack). Might (only maybe, and if I don't get laid off) replace it with a new Bronco (or preferrably a Ranger if they offer a manual transmission) around the end of the year. But I am moving into a retired ambulance soon (E350 with 7.3L Powerstroke, 300,000 miles) so who knows. Ex wife kept the 2002 F150 (bought with 100,000 miles), only failures there are wear items too at 200,000+ miles. I purposely try to pick reliable packages when shopping around, all three of those have known reliability.

Of course, I learned a few months ago that the ex wife bought a 1400cc Yamaha VStar motorcycle, and commuted on it for about 40,000 miles without even checking the oil, let alone replacing it. She is a former diesel mechanic and should know better! Last time I looked, it has 70,000 miles with only the final drive ring failing, which is also a wear item (she did 99% of the work, I only assisted here and there).
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: yeah little engines will be more reliable and mid 2000s was the peak of performance/quality before seemingly in most industries new features got added at the expense of durability.

Direct injection is a disaster for a few different reasons, and then add a turbo to the mix and you have things like the new f150 eco boost motors blowing up before warranty is even up. Or the countless problems with audi/volvo/Subaru burning an insane amount of oil but not qualifying for warranty unless burning more than a litre per 600 miles! It's all a bit frustrating
  • 1 0
 @friendlyfoe: the one that gets me is newer diesel transport and tractor engines. The DEF and reburn process may burn cleaner but the engines last maybe 1/3 of the mileage... I wonder in the long run which is more harmful, releasing dirtier exhaust or manufacturing more vehicles/engines. Our intense focus on emissions seems to keep raising other issues (car batteries!!)
  • 5 0
 The recent rebranding didn't help. Gone from a nice blue with a green hill to a bland grey that says GO and outdoors in small. Like to say GO Away from the shop. Message I thought after I seen all the stores get repainted grey. What on earth was marketing thinking?
  • 6 0
 ‘Greyed out’ is going to be the most negatively recognizable trend in 2010’s design, the same way ‘Brown and harvest gold‘ evoke 1970s kitsch.

A few years ago, the management of a local business park decided the best way to ‘modernize’ their (otherwise presentable) brick facade was to paint it all a vague, primer grey. Looks absolutely awful, like a prison. An expensive choice to strip off in a decade, I suspect. Thousands of companies have made similar choices.

Once you notice how prevalent the grey is, you can’t un-see it. New condos with grey walls, countertops, and grey fake wood floors. Grey logos and branding. Grey cars, etc. I understand how it can look good, but it’s become a played out, cynical choice, and I’m ready for it to be over.
  • 3 0
 @alreadyupsidedown: Exactly. Of all the colors offered by Porsche, Audi, etc., why anyone would choose that grey concrete camouflage is beyond me.
  • 3 0
 @PNdubRider:

Agreed. I thought it was kinda cool and edgy for a while, but now that I see it on lots of cheaper cars, it sort of exposes the trend for what it is.

At least we don't expect cars to look 'timeless' forever, the same way we do with buildings.
  • 5 0
 Bikes are getting to be like micro brews...way too many good options to choose from (which is great as a consumer) but it doesn't seem sustainable for the supply side in the long term.

.....unless we as consumers consume new bikes regularly.
  • 1 0
 true, though it's the big brands that are more like micros in that none of them try and compete on price. We're lucky that their are several good bikes from smaller companies that are actually affordable. Now if I can only find a good, cheap microbrew (noramlly it's choose two options)...
  • 3 0
 Yeah. I love all the value bikes I’m seeing lately. I just saw Fuji has an updated lineup. The geos and builds are not bad at all. Similar to Marin. Diamondback needs to update their bikes, though. Their bikes are looking dated.
  • 3 0
 The problem is in the consumer's method and research at a given price point. It's kinda backward, but the cheaper the bike, the less likely the consumer is to search it out. New riders likely go into their local bikeshop...err dealership for a new bike. Granted, Calibre's mention on PinkBike will help that a little, but as a whole, Commencal, YT, and Canyon kinda have the "cheap direct bikes" market on lock (although they don't really target the very bottom of the market).

Which is funny, because Walmart actually had a good idea with Viathon - but they went the other direction - high end builds at a reasonable price - but no innovation at all. Anyone who is willing to buy a $3000 bike from Walmart will be blind if they can't see those as Chinese Carbon rebrands. At least Calibre was having their own bikes built.

Which brings us to the consumer's new ability to identify original products. I can't imagine KHS sells too many bikes anymore - they are catalog bikes. Lots of "brands" are trying to pawn off Chinese carbon full-suspension bikes with limited success. Anyone who is spending $1500-$3000 on a bike is doing their research. It's the guy looking for a bike at Walmart or Target who is the perfect market for a cheapish but still decent MTB.

It's going to be hard for any new brand to sell bikes at $800 or $8000 if it doesn't have a physical presence in common stores (dealers), no innovation or in-house design (can't just be a rebrand/catalog bike) and doesn't generate any type of hype (people were actually wanting to buy Cam Zink's Hyper Bikes, but they were never produced as he rode them.)
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: you hit the nail on the head with that comment.

Even when I recommend an online bike to a friend, that’s getting into mountain biking, they still prefer a store brand like specialized. People are scared of the unknown.
  • 2 0
 @PtDiddy: I was scared to death to buy my Ripmo AF without having ridden it. Up until then I was buying 3 yr old used bikes that i could sell and break even if i didnt like it. I had a little over a 60% success rate with actually liking the bikes that way. Not getting to even ride it around a lot before dropping $3k was a hard decision to make. Ultimately with stock being so low i figured if i hated it i could get rid of it fast with little loss if i had to made the move easier. Big plus, holy hell that this is awesome, 10-15% faster then my best timed runs on the initial shakedown/tuning runs having never ridden one before.
  • 1 0
 @Snowrydr01: Yeah, I know what you mean. I have multiple bikes online without testing them, even a Mondraker Foxy, which has a geo that can't be compared to anything else. I just had to go by online reviews and what I new I liked, regarding geometry.

As long as you are buying something someone else will buy from you, down the road, you are good!
  • 4 0
 The thing that puzzles me is that Decathlon, a business selling quite a lot of the same sort of things, seems to have been doing pretty well; Decathlon's CEO said they had to ramp up their online sales massively, but that there was demand out there.
Certainly where I am (Surrey Hills in the UK) the volume of people getting out and about has gone through the roof in the last couple of months - loads more cyclists, walkers and equestrian types out during the weekends. There are also quite a lot of peeps out and about on Bossnuts here as well - and not just beginners, either. They always seem like really well-thought-out bikes for great prices.

@hamncheez - nope, slightly different. Administration in the UK is similar to Chapter 11 in the US: a way to restructure the business to save it. Well, that's the theory, anyway. In the past I've seen some unscrupulous people put their business into admin in order to ditch debt and employees and then buy it back for a token amount. I doubt that's what's happening here - it sounds like they've been in trouble for a while.
  • 4 1
 Such a shame, Mike Ashley's buyout was always a worry

Go outdoors in thery couldve done well in the crisis, running gear & bikes are selling like hotcakes & 1000s of people will be looking at camping in the UK rather than foreign holidays this year

heir stores are big & social distancing shouldve been easily achievable

Decathlon have a similar product range & they switched to a click & collect model at Asda straight away
  • 11 0
 I'm pretty sure JD Sports (Go Outdoors' parent) is nothing to do with Mike Ashley...

You'd hope the Calibre brand could be salvaged and turned into a direct sales model or similar. I've no idea whether the brand was profitable though.
  • 4 1
 @willstevenson100: Ashley is involved with JD Sports group, Go Outdoors, Evans, Millets, Black's etc.
If Go Outdoors does fall by the wayside I expect Calibre to line up in Evans Cycles.
  • 3 0
 I would also add... I bought a Calibre road bike for training purposes and it has been an absolute joy to ride. Kitted out in full Shimano & FSA and under £500. 2 years & 1000s of miles later everything is still running perfectly.
  • 2 0
 @willstevenson100: Ashley owns about a 20% stake in JD Sports, not that anyone's ever really sure how much money Ashley has in what.
  • 1 0
 @Fix-the-Spade: I didn't know that. Not quite the same as Evans where Sports Direct or whatever it's call these days owns all of it but he'll still have an influence on JD.
  • 2 0
 @Dropthedebt: good shout there
  • 2 0
 "Sports Direct, which has a reputation for investing in rival retailers, previously owned shares in JD Sports but sold its entire £12.5million stake in 2016."

IIRC he tried to take them over at one point but they refused the offer..
  • 2 0
 I thought JD Sports only sold tracksuits and trainers for the chav brigade. You learn something new every day.
  • 2 0
 Hard to make such a comparison without a bit of digging. JD bought Go in 2016, so was likely still paying off however they financed that acquisition, and if they had been optimistic they may have structured it such that the burden is higher toward the end of the financing (often done as you assume you will be more profitable and turning better cash after having a few years to turn around the business). This may simply be a way of forcing creditors to renegotiate such terms - while outdoor gear sales are up so are cost of operations for retail.
  • 3 0
 @Fix-the-Spade: He has his teeth in many pies.
  • 7 0
 In the race to the lowest price you always end up losing.
  • 3 0
 This isn't necessarily true, but it sure is if you run a traditional distribution channel with full retail and try to go cheap. I suspect chain reaction does really well with their Vitus house brand which is both decent quality and affordable.
  • 3 1
 I'm glad I bought a Triple B (for the wife) and Libe 29 a few weeks ago. Both are super fun bikes (and cost relative peanuts compared to the competition) and should hold us over until the kids are a few years older and we have time to actually make use of expensive bikes.

At £875 and £1350 it doesn't seem too bad if we only manage to get out 2 or 3 times a month until the kids are 3 or 4 and start nursery/school.
  • 3 0
 I've just had a look at the Triple B, and honestly its the perfect budget bike. Why anyone getting started in MTB would need anything more, and for the price! It's not even hugely heavy, and looking at some pictures you could easily slap another brand on the downtube and it would sell 10x as many
  • 2 1
 @melonhead1145: If you're new to the sport and looking to do MTB seriously, you're probably going to buy at least two bikes before finding the bike that best suits your needs:
- Frame sizing.
- What geo numbers suit your body dimensions.
- What type of riding/trails you want to do (xc, trail, park, flow, tech, big features etc).
- How much travel do you need for your preferred riding.

Without being able to demo extensively, some of those you wont know until you get some actual riding done and work out what you like and don't like (both in terms of the type or fiding and the bike itself).

If you spend £999 on a bossnut (for example) and then look to change for something more suitable to your wants/needs after a year or so of progression and fun, then it's not too bitter pill a swallow paying out for another bike (especially if you can sell it and get some money back). Certainly much better than paying £3000+ and realising it doesn't suit you or your needs. I had to learn the hard way - bought my first full sus but it wasn't until i started riding more technical terrain did i realise the bike was too long for my body dimensions (short arms and legs). I had the correct frame size but the specific geo just didn't work for me (although i saw a review from a Mr S. Hill who was perfactly happy with the same bike). Changed bike and it made a world of difference.
  • 2 0
 There screwed if its delottie dealing with it, they screwed poundworld over and are only there to make money not save any business, they refused offers multiple times for poundworld buyouts instead chose to liguidate the company, end of go outdoors and calibre
  • 5 0
 I declare ADMINISTRATION!!!
  • 1 0
 I tried to buy a tent online from them last summer (10kg, so not huge), they wouldn’t deliver to my home address or my local store...if they were still doing that during lockdown I’m not surprised they are having problems.
  • 1 0
 It's such a shame that gooutdoors is in this position. It's gone from being a really successful company under private ownership to the usual run by a bunch of monkey corporate types that basically removed everything that made the brand work in the first place! My other half worked their when it was private and for a bit after it was bought and JD group would not listen to anyone about how what they were doing was the wrong thing. It pretty much started losing money the minute they bought it and started making changes.
  • 6 2
 Turns out price matching internet prices doesn’t always work
  • 2 0
 It's worth pointing out the guy behind the bossnut, and most of the calibre bikes is now employed by Planet X. Genuinely excited to see what is created!
  • 1 0
 Aw crap! That’s a lot of jobs, and a good bike brand too. I use my local two local GO stores quite a lot. Another blow to UK retail. This is very sad..
  • 2 0
 there hasn't been an option to ship a Calibre anywhere out of the UK in a long time
  • 2 0
 I mean if you're the Boss-Nut you're probably going to be all in for ADMINISTRATION
  • 1 0
 Hold up!! Mike Levy gave a positive review. Certainly, that should sustain the entire organization through another fiscal cycle.
  • 3 0
 #SaveTheBossNut
  • 2 0
 Left or right?
  • 2 0
 Bossnut, we hardly knew ye
  • 2 0
 They need to start selling the Bossnut world wide.
  • 2 1
 Guessing "administration" means what us colonials call "bankruptcy"?
  • 3 0
 It's a British version of Chapter 11
  • 1 0
 Americans
  • 2 1
 Bossnut, getting a new boss
  • 1 0
 Same as the old boss
  • 1 0
 hold on... the bike industry is SLAMMING and this seems almost impossible
  • 1 1
 Sell cheap = bust simple
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