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First Ride: Archibald Cycles' AC1 Doomsday Machine

May 17, 2023 at 16:02
by Matt Beer  


What do carbon frames and derailleurs have in common? They’re expensive and delicate, so why not do away with them? That’s exactly what Alex Troughton decided to do when creating Archibald Cycles’ steel, high-pivot enduro bike with a gearbox.

The idea for the bike started as Alex’s capstone engineering project and evolved into a brand after he discovered it was possible to manufacture the frames for a competitive price locally.

The AC1 is a stout bike with 172mm of rear wheel travel, a 63-degree head tube angle, and a mixed-wheeled setup. Effigear takes care of the 10-speed gearbox, which uses a SRAM trigger shifter and standard chain.

As it stands, the medium size bike with a more budget-friendly build weighs 17.6 kg (38.8 lb) and is projected to cost $7,500 CAD. The AC1 will be available in autumn of 2023 through their website but aims to sell to dealers by the end of the year.
Archibald Cycles AC1 Details
• Reynold 853 double butted steel frame
• 172mm travel / 170mm fork
• 29" or mixed wheels
• Effigear Mimic gearbox
• 62.1° head tube angle
• 79º seat tube angle
• Chainstay: 435mm (454 at sag)
• Weight: 17.6 kg / 38.8 lb (490 size frame)
• Sizes (reach): 445, 460, 475, 490, 505mm
• Price: $7,500 - $11,500 CAD
• Frame kit: $5,750 CAD w/ gearbox and shock
archibaldcycles.com

Archibald Cycles AC1
The rear triangle and hardware junction flex points were carefully analyzed and tried on the trail.

Frame Details

The AC1’s Reynolds 853 Double zone butted tubing reminds me of a simple stick drawing of a bicycle, although there’s a lot of machinery at work down low on the frame. In the belly of this beast lie two components that are dedicated to the design, a linkage-driven coil shock and gearbox. All in, the 490 size frame weighs 4.5kg (10 lb) without the shock and comes with a lifetime warranty.

The multi-link, high pivot suspension design uses a steel rear triangle and Enduro bearings in all but the dropout pivot, which houses a bushing. Ironically, Alex was working on his design while Trinity MTB was building their similar frame. Archibald’s frame is not as adaptable to various drivetrains, like the Trinity, but uses far fewer bolts. The rear triangle only has clearance for a 27.5” rear wheel and does not house any geometry adjustments.

For the hardware that is used, there’s a mix of steel and aluminum. 6mm hardware is used across these moving points, barring the main pivot which is 8mm.

Archibald Cycles AC1
photo
Archibald Cycles AC1
The clear-finished frame is the second generation prototype and closely reflects the finished product. Sleeker hardware is used on the rear triangle, an upper chain guide has been added, and the idler wheels run with much less noise and resistance.

Gearboxes are a highly debated component choice and for legitimate reasons. They’re a slightly heavier and less efficient system than a traditional derailleur drivetrain system, but they offer serious benefits too. For starters, they are less susceptible to impacts. Effigear even backs their products with a 5-year warranty.

There’s also the argument for less maintenance since they run in an oil bath, plus, you have the ability to shift without pedalling. In fact, you need to let off the gas to shift, like a manual transmission vehicle. That requires re-programming your brain since you need to pedal for a derailleur to shift gears.

Effigear’s Mimic 469% range gearbox incorporates a SRAM 9-speed trigger shifter which is much more familiar than a twist grip shifter. In order to accommodate the release of an upshift on a trigger shifter, Effigear uses a spring-loaded housing that is attached to the downtube.

The Mimic gearbox runs on a standard chainring bolted to a custom carrier on the freehub and includes the chain tensioner. A 142mm wide dropouts give a narrower overall width for heel clearance while the single speed hub offers equally wide spoke bracing angles as a 148 Boost hub.


Archibald Cycles AC1

Suspension Details

The AC1 falls into the high pivot suspension category but employs a multi-link design, commonly referred to as an inverted 4-bar, where the chainstay is effectively floating between the rear axle and rocker link. This method allows frame designers to further separate the braking and pedalling forces by choosing their optimized idler position. In this case, Archibald has placed the idler behind and lower than the main pivot for a totally rearward axle path.

The CNC’d aluminum rocker link wraps around the gearbox to produce 172mm of vertical rear wheel travel and 32mm rearward. A 230x65mm length shock gives a linear-progressive 39% leverage rate which necessitates the use of a coil shock. The amount of progression increases towards the end of the travel.

Due to the gearbox drivetrain choice, only a single cog on the freehub is needed. This keeps the anti-squat steady throughout the entirety of the travel, not accounting for rider weight distribution. Given that high, consistent number and geometry, Alex didn’t say exactly what that anti-squat number was but doesn’t see the need for lockout.


Archibald Cycles AC1

Geometry

If you’re going to build a steel, high pivot enduro bike with a gearbox, you may as well play to its strength, descending. The AC1 has a 63-degree headtube and short, 435mm chainstays (at sag).

That doesn’t mean the rider will be bent out of shape for climbing though. A steep 79-degree seat tube angle and consistent anti-squat are said to keep the center of mass well stabilized in the middle of the bike.

As far as sizing goes, there will be five frame sizes whose nomenclature is a reflection of the reach. The smallest frame starts at a reach of 445, growing in 15mm increments up to 505mm and all use the same chainstay length.

Archibald Cycles AC1

Pricing and Specs

Archibald’s steel frames will be welded and built into complete bikes right in Delta, BC. Two color choices, matte black or a clear, treated finish are available for the frame kit or full build.

Three build kits will stretch between a $7,500 CAD price tag to the “Maxed Out” $11,500 CAD component list. Each kit uses a OneUp Dropper V2 seat post, Blackspire Brute flat pedals, and the faultless Maxxis Assegai/DHR II tire combo

The “Budget-Friendly” kit comes with a Marzocchi Z1 and Bomber Coil shock, Blackspire bar/stem combo, and SRAM Code R brakes.

The Mid-Range build jumps up to We Are One Composites Union carbon rims, a RockShox ZEB Ulitmate fork and Super Deluxe Coil shock.

On the higher-end, the Maxed Out kit is laced with an EXT Era 170mm fork and E-Storia coil shock, We Are One Composite’s Da Package (bar/stem) and Union rims, this time with Industry Nine Hydra hubs. Braking is taken care of by Code RSCs.

A frame option will retail for $5,750 which includes the Effigear gearbox, SRAM trigger shifter, and a RockShox Super Deluxe Coil.


Archibald Cycles AC1

Ride Impressions

One day is hardly enough to study a bike, although I quickly became confident in the AC1’s ability to descend - this high pivot rig had no trouble eating up the janky old steps on the North Shore with its rearward axle path.

There’s less noise from the drivetrain as the chain is properly damped between the stays and there’s no ratcheting effect of a derailleur’s clutch sapping small bump compliance. If you’ve ever ridden a traditional drivetrain bike without a chain, then you’re familiar with that gliding feeling. That brought back memories of the last time I rode a gear box bike, although a belt does take that silence to another level.

Most high-pivot bikes are known for being on the sluggish side at lower speeds due to their growing chainstay length. The AC1s short 435mm chainstay and 27.5” rear wheel seem to pivot quickly through turns. The bike never felt nervous or wanted to understeer, but with more time I’d experiment with a spring firmer than the 400# we tried.

Alex did preface this and observantly caught on to my feedback. He mentioned how moving up a spring rate would barely change the sag but would stay further up the progressive curve and weight the front wheel a smidge more. This level of progression reminded me of the Crestline VHP205RS where the beginning of the travel moved with ease and ramped up heavily.

Archibald Cycles AC1

What about the steel chassis? Well, there’s elements of the steel Cotic RocketMax in there too. Those small tubes don’t act like a carbon drum machine. Instead they dull down the little chain or cable noises that occur.

In terms of flex, the AC1 was rolling on alloy wheels and there wasn’t a disconcerting amount of flex in the steel rear triangle, but that would be something to dive into deeper during a long term review. What’s most important though is that there were no carbon vibrations through the back end of the bike.

On the uphills, new techniques and learning are required for the Effigear gearbox, even compared to the Pinion on the Machina. The shifts seemed to be less consistent, and if they are mistimed when easing off of the pedal strokes you can become stuck in a gear until it decides to shift at will. Spending more time on this would likely cause the shifting to be less fickle, although I certainly appreciated the trigger shifter.

Based on the comments left by some of our readers, a high-pivot steel frame with a gearbox is the future. I’d be curious to bring a bike like this in for a longer term review against some of the other systems out there - maybe a gearbox bike shootout is in order.

Archibald Cycles AC1


Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
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145 Comments
  • 170 0
 But how do I know it is durable? Please post pictures of someone standing on the gearbox.
  • 25 1
 Check out Paul Aston’s YouTube channel, he’s got you covered.
  • 41 1
 Missed opportunity to call it the Archibald Haddock
  • 24 0
 This is not the place I was expecting a Tintin reference, but I applaud you!
  • 16 0
 Naming it the Archibald Bunker was an obvious oversight.
  • 2 0
 Or the Archibald Prince Henry
  • 1 0
 I actually thought it was called the Doomsday Machine as if it was made by BMC. Then I re-read the article.
  • 3 1
 @LucaP: the women's version could be called the 'Edith'
  • 30 0
 I'm happy to see a new option for gearbox bikes. As with all innovation, there is a high initial price and some tweaks to work out, then if consumer demand is high enough innovation will rocket ship and price will drop. Personally, I think it is a beautiful machine and would like to imagine myself owning a riding a bike like this!
  • 16 0
 I'm impressed the price is as competitive as it is for a full build. $7500 CAD isn't too bad. Compare it to what you get from SC for that money and it basically looks like a deal.
  • 8 0
 @eh-steve: And it isn't that heavy for a steel gearbox!
  • 4 1
 @hamncheez: Yeah, 39lbs and steel seems pretty reasonable. Chromag Darco is quoted at 35lbs-ish and I assume the Lowdown is even heftier. My XT build Druid (a carbon bike) is over 35lbs iirc.
  • 11 0
 I’m stoked to see more options crop up too, because they are quite limited for now. After about two months on a Zerode Katipo, I’m totally sold on a gearbox for any mtb with more than 140mm of travel. The planted and quiet ride is super satisfying, and shifting while coasting is a gamechanger, the grip shift is a non-issue. I’d pick a Pinion over the Effigear any day based on gear range, product support, and (based on reviews like this) shifting performance. My gripes with the Zerode are due to it being a carbon frame and the belt tensioner being in a vulnerable spot and limiting ground clearance, which are both solved by a design like this Archibald. Make a 160mm version and use a belt and I’ll buy one immediately. The combo of steel frame, high pivot, and gearbox is indeed the recipe for an incredible enduro bike.
  • 4 5
 @tdeems: The benefit of Effigear is that you can make a high pivot without an idler pulley. I can't imagine pedaling a pinon AND and idler pulley. Like pedalling a fatbike with DD casings haha
  • 4 0
 @tdeems: I love my Katipo too. I've spent a good amount of time on both pinion and effigear (this is my second pinion mtb) and I can say that while the trigger is interesting and probably great for some people, I still prefer the grip shift and would stick with it even if they came out with a pinion-compatible trigger. The thing about effigear is you really do have to let off the gas to shift especially in the low gears, whereas with pinion you can time the shifts based on the torque of your pedaling. I'd be interested in trying the new iteration of the effigear drivetrain though cause I was using the older version from 2018-19
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: That is for the old effigear 'box, which has the cranks connected different to the drive sprocket. This effigear 'box is the mimic, which uses the same form factor as the pinion gearboxes.

So you could reasonably swap the effigear for a pinion on this bike if you so choose.
  • 2 9
flag nismo325 (May 20, 2023 at 16:06) (Below Threshold)
 @eh-steve: yea 39 pounds is reasonable…. For a e-bike haha my nomad weights 8 pounds less and is the same travel.
  • 2 0
 @nismo325: Didn't know SC started making the nomad with impossibly light steel frames.

Any steel fs is gonna take a weight penalty. Gearbox is also a weight penalty.

As for ebikes: The turbo levo SL is around 42lbs, heckler is 50lbs.

Try swinging a leg over a Lowdown or Darco if you get a chance. There's a reason people are willing to lug around a few extra LBS of bike.
  • 1 0
 @Lookinforit: Yeah, plus I don't think the Effigear gearbox has the pulley that far from the crank axle. This one has it pretty high and obviously the gearbox would get in the way of the shock.
  • 1 0
 @Lookinforit: Yes, I"m aware. Even in some of the photos here you can see a pinion equipped.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: you’re thinking of their original gearbox, this frame uses the Mimic which is similar to a Pinion.
  • 14 0
 "What’s most important though is that there were no carbon vibrations through the back end of the bike."

What? I have been sold by reviewers and marketing that carbon dampens/lessens vibrations.
  • 26 0
 Aluminum > Carbon > Titanium > Steel
I don't know, just winging it
  • 5 0
 I think they did back when they were lighter but as bikes get overbuilt to provide the required durability that vibration damping effect is reduced. I think.
  • 9 0
 Depends on what you do with it. Carbon fiber can bend way more than steel and have "built in" damping properties. It can also be incredibly stiff and transmit every tiny bump.
  • 2 1
 I’ve run a number of different carbon bars and a couple carbon forks on my rigid bike. I’ve gone to steel fork and bars now. Significantly better damping.
  • 2 0
 @Lylat: try one up bars bro. Like a wooden axe handle compared to a steel pipe axe handle which is brutal!
  • 1 0
 @alexsin: With carbon the stiffness on the fiber layup, but the damping depends on the resin. Resonance is result of a combination thereof and stiffer isn't necessarily better. They need to design it such that the eigenfrequencies are different from the frequencies the suspension is likely to encounter. Either way, I think initially the main goal with carbon production was to produce parts with the highest fiber content hence as little resin as possible. And the resin typically was epoxy, which is glassy already (so with little damping and also brittle). Nowadays you see more brands work with tougher resins (including thermoplastics) which probably also have higher damping.

Either way, "carbon" isn't just a material. It is a composite, hence a construction. And the properties depend on how to compose it.
  • 14 1
 Agreed that it's a gorgeous bike. But, there's a suspicious lack of discussion regarding the uphill performance. Between the weight (which, admittedly, a lot of which is trading unsprung RD/cassette weight for sprung gearbox weight) and the drag from the gearbox and idlers it just has to be pig going uphill, right?
  • 3 0
 38lbs, 62.1* HTA. Yep, that's a pig uphill. But between enduro, chair lifts and ebikes few put much effort into riding up hill now though. It's just not cool anymore.
  • 11 1
 Do you have some not so well done or cracked frames for collectors?
I could possibly spend a whole day just starring at it. It's gorgeous!
  • 3 1
 Agreed. I love swoopy carbon designs as much as the next guy - but this thing is stunning.
  • 8 0
 Would be interesting to get some sort of analysis on frame flex. Matt mentions it in most reviews he does, but I never notice it when I'm riding. Granted I'm not as good and I'm also not testing multiple bikes back-to-back, but would be cool to compare with some pseudo-science
  • 3 0
 That would be a great pseudo-science review actually. Use control, really stiff carbon rims, mount up some chainstay view GoPros in slow motion and test something flexible, something in the middle and something stiff. If not a whole fleet of bikes. I've also wondered about the stiffness issue and have never noticed it myself.
  • 1 0
 i'm more worried that the seatstay pivots are tiny.
  • 10 0
 Oh shit, I wish I didn't see this. I think this is my new favorite bike to drool over, oh fuck, I might have to buy this
  • 9 0
 How many niches can you fit into one description?

"A Canadian-made steel high pivot enduro bike with a gearbox."

None more, is the answer.
  • 10 0
 I stand corrected:

"Belt driven."

I guess n+1 applies here, too.
  • 8 0
 Why does the review say this:

“The AC1 has a 63-degree headtube and short, 435mm chainstays (at sag).”

When the geometry chart says it’s 62.1 deg static (and slacker still at sag)?
  • 1 0
 The details box at the top of the page says Chainstay: 435mm (454 at sag)
  • 9 0
 first thought...that looks amazing!
second thought ....that is going to be a nightmare to clean :/
  • 7 0
 Am I missing something, how is it 29" or mixed wheel if the rear triangle can only clear a 27.5 wheel? Mixed wheel only then right?
  • 2 0
 Then it's 27.5 or mixed wheel, since the front can take 27.5.
  • 2 0
 Or the typos regarding its chainstay length at sag Vs unweighted.
  • 5 0
 That stack height is insanely low, I don't understand how that would work for anyone. Looking at the photo, the dropper is almost slammed and the saddle is at the same height as the bars.
  • 5 0
 This and the stack is the same regardless of frame size! I want the stack to grow proportionally with reach.
  • 6 2
 All of you folks less than 40 years old, please search up Brooklyn Machine Works, and let me know if someone from the now went back into the past, or if some mountain biker from Brooklyn in the mid 1990's is walking among us right now.
  • 8 1
 Carbon frames are delicate? That’s debatable.
  • 6 0
 Great work Alex. It's a beautiful bike. Look forward to see them out in the wild.
  • 5 3
 A gearbox shootout sounds interesting but only if it's slanted towards how they are to live with compared to a traditional bike. Too many media sites have compared all the mullets or all the high pivots. To me that's not a useful comparison. Let's assume that all the bikes that share the same unique feature share similar pros and cons. I'm more interested in the bike as a whole. An enduro shootout including some strange bike like has been done in the past is a much better comparison. Does this steel, high pivot, gearbox, mullet bike have a real performance advantage over a Megatower (an example of a well executed modern traditional enduro frame) that makes it worth sacrificing in frame storage and a great warranty?
  • 1 0
 Test this one against maybe the Forbidden Dreadnought, the Nicolai Nucleon 16 and the Williams Racing Trinity. There's so much to talk about these bikes it would have to be focussed on day to day living/maintenance and how awesome they are every single day (or not). I think people are consistently concerned about drag in the system and increased maintenance and whether (if true), those things are worth the perceived performance benefits. Those bikes are super wacky. We want to know more!
  • 2 0
 Damn, that thing is super rad! Not a hydra fan, but that all-out build is a killer deal for so much Canadian made, kitted with EXT.

I'm an outlier in the comments, as I keep my bikes for several years, and I love the idea of carbon. It repairs easily and well (been there). Congrats on such a rad bike and I suspect you have awesome ethical values. Just need Maguras to drop SRAM entirely...

Enduro gearbox showdown would be amazing!! (And a G3 review too)
  • 2 0
 So the pics with Matt are Effigear and trigger shifter and all the static shots are Pinion and grip shift. Is either one offered? Was that a development phase with the Pinion? Did I just read the article too quickly and miss the details, lol?
  • 5 0
 Is Archibald a long lost nephew of Studebaker?
  • 5 0
 I'm pretty obsessed with this bike
  • 6 0
 Steel is real.
  • 3 6
 Apparently really heavy.
  • 5 0
 @generictrailrider: 3 to 4 pounds heavier than a carbon X0 AXS Coil Santa Cruz Nomad. But comes with a gearbox.
  • 1 1
 So is aluminum. In other news, water is wet.
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: But they don't rhyme....
  • 5 0
 I wish I was interesting enough to buy one of these...
  • 2 1
 Article detail correction: A 142 SS hub gives equivalent flange spacing as a 157 super boost hub. Wide and nearly completely symmetrical. No need for offset drilled rims or different sized spokes. Hydras are the widest, but unsure if they can take torque of gbox, have heard of a lot of failures. Embrace the weight and go onyx
  • 5 1
 39 pounds, $4300 frame, guess we gotta start somewhere.
  • 5 0
 Honestly that’s lighter than I thought it would be after reading steel frame and gearbox
  • 1 3
 Preferably in a chair lift because at that weight it's gonna climb pretty poorly, I don't care how steep the seat tube is.
  • 3 0
 @Glory831Guy: idk man if only it had a 90 degree seat tube then it would literally climb like an XC race bike (still slam the saddle forward of course)
  • 4 0
 Mad Max approves, flame thrower and spiked bar ends required add one.
  • 2 0
 Steel, high-pivot, enduro, gearbox; I can hear y'all losing your shit already. It's the comment section's wet dream come true.
  • 1 0
 Hard pass, I don't see a water bottle mount and even though it's not applicable here, I'd still like to see a threaded BB.
  • 1 0
 @mattbeer

"I’d be curious to bring a bike like this in for a longer term review against some of the other systems out there - maybe a gearbox bike shootout is in order."

I support this.
  • 1 0
 Would like to know what the seat tube length is on the 505? Bummer about the low stack on the larger sizes... Nice looking bike!
  • 3 1
 I wish more brands had a 460mm reach option. So many bikes now go from like 445 to 475 with nothing in between.
  • 3 0
 Love it, but is the HT angle 62.1. Or 63 degrees?
  • 1 0
 I caught that as well. I'm assuming 62.1 on paper, as it said 63 at sag below the geo chart. Still a little unclear.
  • 1 0
 Now with this, the Williams Racing Trinity and the Nicolai Nucleon 16 I would say it's time for an old fashioned MBA shootout!
  • 2 0
 Not a single picture of the non-drive side!? What does the linkage look like?
  • 4 2
 Doesn’t seem like a “competitive” price to me
  • 13 1
 $5750 CAD for a made in Canada steel frame with the drivetrain and shock is a pretty great value. Maybe not cheap, but it’s ldefinitely competitive with other stuff in the category
  • 4 8
flag the-one1 (May 19, 2023 at 8:36) (Below Threshold)
 Competitive to be the most expensive.
  • 2 0
 @BamaBiscuits: I missed that pricing was in CAD, thanks for pointing that out. Converting to USD puts it in a similar price range to other high end frames.
  • 5 0
 Same price as a Santa Cruz frame, made in china.
  • 10 0
 $11,500CAD/$8,510USD for a Canadian-built frame; WeAreOne bar, stem, rims; I9 Hydra hubs; EXT suspension.
Right about in line with an overseas-made SC Bronson with alloy rims and 1/1 hubs.
  • 3 0
 Better value than Deviate frames!
  • 2 0
 @BamaBiscuits: This. Carbon frame+shock from most companies is now $5,500-$6,000 depending on brand/model.
  • 3 0
 Disagree. By my calculations, $7500 CAD is about $5500 USD for a full suspension gearbox niche market bike made in a first world country. If you think this is expensive, how do you feel about a $13500CAD Moots titanium hardtail?
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: I think the moots is absolutely idiotic haha
  • 2 0
 Strong Deviate Guide vibes.
  • 1 0
 Ahhhhhhh!!!!!!!! Awesome amazing “in-tension” forward shock mount! Major props from this armchair engineer.
  • 3 1
 Once scrapped you could get around $12.30 for your 17.6 kg of steel
  • 1 0
 Weight aside, it’s a good looking gear box. There’s no frame clutter with the shock on top of the gear box.
  • 1 0
 is this now mixed only like the text says or can you run a 29er in the back like the info box says?
  • 2 0
 Picture of the non driveside would be nice.
  • 1 0
 I thought Starling stopped making their effigear gearbox bike due to quality issues from effigear
  • 1 0
 This thing should either be ridden in a clean environment, or it should come with a removable cover for the bb cluster area.
  • 1 0
 Dang I want one. Like literally could see 2024 be a new frame year and this the solution.
  • 2 2
 I want a gearbox bike but needs to be 64* head angle for more all around capable. Geometry is only good for steep trails looks pretty good though.
  • 1 0
 So, if we were to forecast sales off of the PB comments section, they should sell eleventy-seven jillion of these things...
  • 4 2
 Looks like a grim donut
  • 3 2
 That's a nice looking bike, price isn't bad either!
  • 2 1
 same headtube length for every size is tough :^(
  • 1 1
 My freaking derailleur cable snapped without warning on my ride this morning. I want gearboxes to be a thing!
  • 6 0
 Gearboxes still have cables.
  • 1 0
 @SunsPSD: but protected, away from fast spinning things, never exposed, and doesn't have to endure weird articulations.

PLUS kindernay's solution is hydrolically shifted
  • 2 1
 @hamncheez: rotor has a hydraulically shifted 13 speed dérailleur drivetrain
  • 1 0
 Love it. More like this please!
  • 2 3
 The "high pivot suspension type category" with "invented 4-bar" must be why moving up a spring rate "might would barely change the sag". Enlightening as ever.
  • 1 0
 Need some digital drive bikes.
  • 2 0
 79 degree seat club!
  • 2 0
 "Carbon vibrations"?
  • 1 0
 On the picture the bike run with a twisted grip shifter??
  • 1 0
 Where is the squish video??
  • 1 0
 A bike which could have been designed by the comments section. Smile
  • 1 0
 Don't show this to Mad Max. He's gonna want one.
  • 1 0
 Man, no non-driveside pics of the suspension linkage??!!
  • 1 0
 Can it run an oval chainring?
  • 1 0
 but it looks so Titanium to me! even the welds...
  • 1 0
 How on Earth do you clean this
  • 1 0
 I can't imagine spending $1000usd on a fancy shock that nobody can admire.
  • 1 0
 Wait guys, you've made a mistake. This isn't an autoplay video.
  • 2 3
 Love the use of steel. But man, nearly 39 pounds...that's some serious weight to carry around even for an enduro machine.
  • 4 0
 That's not far off what most sub-mortgage spec enduro bikes seem to be these days. Seems like 35-37lb or so i is pretty standard.
  • 1 3
 @danprisk: There's a huge difference between 35-37 pounds and 39 pounds. They're all heavy though.
  • 3 0
 @streetfighter848: 2-4 pounds difference I'd wager. Depends where the weight is. Lighter rotating mass makes a huge difference.
  • 1 1
 PINKBIKE, ARE YOU NOT ENTERTAINED?!
  • 1 0
 We await the Fails.
  • 1 0
 I want that chainring
  • 1 0
 Absolutely Beautiful!!
  • 1 0
 Beautiful!!!!
  • 1 0
 Beautiful bike!!
  • 1 0
 Gorgeous looking!
  • 1 1
 Nice Machiny !
  • 1 1
 why
  • 1 4
 t.me/talktomehere2023

Wickr id: peterking2014

Oxycodone Valuim xanax psychedelics adderall buds tramadol and more
  • 2 0
 @pinkbike:
@moderators:
Can you ban this user quick
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