First Ride: Marzocchi's New Bomber Air Shock

Jun 12, 2022 at 22:14
by Matt Beer  




When you think of Marzocchi suspension, the first image that comes to your head is probably coil springs, however, their new rear shock isn't bound by a steel coil. Built to suit various kinematic types and rider styles, the Bomber Air offers simple, tool-free damping adjustments in a lightweight package. It's no secret that Marzocchi is a subsidiary of Fox Racing Shox, yet you can visually see the architecture of the Bomber Air simply isn't a rebadged Float X.

The first giveaway is the oil reservoir sits on an angle offset from the length of the shock to allow for clearance on a broader range of bike designs.
Bomber Air Details

• Tool-free single rebound and compression adjustments
• Metric and Trunnion mounting options
• Sizes ranging from 40 to 75mm of stroke
• Compatible with FOX bearing mounts on both ends (excluding trunnion)
• Weight: 484 grams (205 x 65mm)
• Price: $479 USD / $619 CAD / €639 EUR / £529 GBP
marzocchi.com

Secondly, there are just two dials to control the damping; one for rebound and one for compression. Sticking to that no-fuss setup configuration means that there is no climb switch. Instead, a non-indexed compression dial can be turned from fully open to completelyly closed to firm up the shock by turning it 180-degrees, just like the Grip damper in their Z1 forks.

photo

Specifications and Pricing

In order to appeal to all forms of freeride, Marzocchi built the Bomber Air in a fleet of sizes for both metric and trunnion mount shocks from a tiny 190 mm eye-to-eye length with just 40mm of stroke, which you might see on a slopestyle weapon, up to the 250x75mm size typically found on heavy-hitting downhill bikes. Stroke-reducing spacers can be installed in 2.5mm increments to alter the travel amounts per frame specifications. Those exact sizes are 190x40-45, 210x50-55, 230x57.5-65mm, through to 250x75 for Metric size shocks and 185x52.5-55, 205x60-62.5, 225x75mm for Trunnion mounting dampers. The non-threaded end of those shock eyelets are compatible with Fox's bearing-mounted reducers for less resistance where certain frame linkages rotate to a high degree.

The beauty about air shocks is that you can incrementally adjust the spring rate depending on the type of riding that is going down that day, negating the need to swap out heavier, steel springs. Air springs also have a natural progression, unlike their coil counterparts which operate in a linear manner throughout their displacement. Tuning the amount of ramp the Bomber Air has can be accomplished by adding or subtracting volume spacers; less volume equals more progression. Those plastic spacers also differ from the ones used in Fox shocks and come in 0.1 cubic inch measurements and the maximum pressure tops out at 350 PSI - fifty more than the Fox Float X2.

Comparing the price of a similar shock in terms of adjustability, like the Fox Float X Performance (that's the non-Kashima coated version) at $519 USD, the Marzocchi checks out slightly cheaper at $479. Horses for courses though - the Float X has a climb switch to appeal to those who might focus tighter on uphill performance.

photo
A bottom-out bumper ready to take on Rampage size hits.

Ride Impressions

I bolted the Bomber Air to a Cotic RocketMax 4, which is a linkage-drive, single pivot enduro bike with 160mm of rear wheel travel that can accept a coil or air shock. The small diameter steel tubing already offers plenty of free space inside the frame's front triangle, but I can appreciate the thought process of angling the shock's reservoir in order to fit frames with less clearance.

Setting up and getting along with the Bomber Air was also a straightforward process, since the hardware is the same as Fox's five-piece DU and reducers. I played with the air pressure during the first ride and quickly settled on 29% sag by pumping the shock to 175 PSI, while I generally ran the rebound six or seven clicks from closed depending on the trails and conditions on the day.

There's something to be said for the beauty of fewer dials to fuss with too. Similar to the quick setup compression dial, the rebound adjuster has thirteen clicks, each with a notable change to the return speed of the shock.

On bikes with anti-squat just shy of 100%, like the Cotic RocketMax, a lockout lever would be helpful, but I didn't find that the BB dropped too low and the amount of bob was kept to a tolerable level when the compression dial was cranked closed. For descending, I found that I could quickly reach the dial and open it up again, although I preferred the compression about one-eighth of the way closed. Would a switch be helpful? Yes, but if I had to pick just two adjustments, as a product team might do in order to meet a certain price point, I'd prefer rebound and compression over only a rebound dial and a two-way lockout lever. With the geometry and anti-squat numbers that most modern enduro bikes sport these days, a climb switch is more of a novelty than a necessity.

After a few days on the Bomber Air and becoming more comfortable with it on the RocketMax, I noticed how quickly it was ramping up towards the end of the travel. Mechanical bottom outs that I experienced more frequently with the Cane Creek Kitsuma Coil were now non-existent. However, that did store a lot of energy deep in the travel when trucking through big compressions. I was able to de-tune some of that ramp by removing two 0.1 CI volume spacers from the shock. I was able to detach those two-piece plastic clips while the shock was conveniently still mounted to the bike. Simply releasing all of the air in the shock and unthreading the main air will give you access to the plastic two-piece volume spacers.

photo
The reservoir is offset on an angle to fit frames with tighter constraints and gain easier access to the single compression dial.
photo
The same spacer system used on the Float X is in place to adjust the shock's stroke length.

Despite removing the volume spacers and toning down the rebounding forces at the end of the travel, I would still prefer a more linear action from an air spring when paired with this particular bike. The RocketMax has an overall progression of 30%, which explains why there was so much energy stored at the bottom of the 160mm of travel. That's neither the fault of the bike or the shock, but a larger, more linear air can might suit this combo with less kick.

Overall, I was more impressed with the control that the straightforward damper controls offered in such an unassuming package and only ran into that progression wall at the furthest depths of the travel. There are plenty of bikes out there that could benefit from more progression and it's refreshing to see Marzocchi focus on descending performance in a package that doesn't break the bank.






Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
364 articles

202 Comments
  • 139 4
 shocking reservoir placement
  • 118 0
 Try looking at it from their angle.
  • 24 65
flag AyJayDoubleyou FL (Jun 13, 2022 at 9:59) (Below Threshold)
 Did someone accidently click and drag on the CAD drawing when they were copying Fox's homework?
  • 139 0
 @AyJayDoubleyou: no kidding, it's almost like they're the same company or something
  • 49 0
 A new twist on a classic design
  • 8 1
 They almost got the angle right.
  • 1 3
 Fresh slants from Fox TW
  • 109 2
 I want the shit they smoke at Fox headquarters.
  • 86 6
 The Santa Cruz Mountains green is pretty strong!
Look what happened to the reservoir.....

"Oh bro, I forgot to make it straight in the model. Is that a problem?"

"No worries man, the marketing dept will work it out. Now pass that doob!"
  • 4 9
flag Joebaunce (Jun 14, 2022 at 8:36) (Below Threshold)
 100%. Sad to such iconic brands run into the ground. #halfbaked
  • 43 4
 Hopefully NSMB does a review by Andrew with pictures of the internals and accurate description of shocks seals , oil path , easy of service .
With air shocks you can change the spring rate . Thanks for sharing that with us . Who would have guessed ?
  • 1 4
 Looks like you probably need a nitro charge (no schrader valve for adjusting), so probably a no-go for self service potential.
  • 3 0
 @mammal: no you do not, simple shrader valve and air. Anyway, no nitro is needed and you can actually cheaply create a needle and use a RS 600 psi pump. The problem with more complex shocks is actually bleeding them which is hard without vacuum.
  • 41 0
 So the answer to life, the universe and everything symmetrical is just $42...?
  • 7 1
 One thing about that is though is that the Performance level isn't available for aftermarket purchase in every size, so usually the more expensive Factory level Float X is the only option
  • 4 2
 @matt-15: or you just go to another brand
  • 1 0
 So the answer to life, the universe and everything symmetrical is just $42...?

It can't be so simple... Fox only bought marz, not AWS...
  • 38 3
 Where exactly is the angled reservoir creating clearance? It seems like rotating it by such a small angle actually makes the bounding box for the reservoir longer and wider.
  • 38 3
 99% for Stumpys
  • 5 1
 @hamncheez: Stumpies are doing fine with other piggyback shocks so...
  • 4 0
 @hamncheez: Or water bottles nozzles?
  • 6 1
 @the-burd: unless they are coils...
  • 4 0
 @funkzander: that's for a different reason though...
  • 33 1
 Meh, for being a middle-of-the-road option I'm not impressed by the value proposition. As a point of reference, a RockShox SuperDeluxe Ultimate costs ~400€ at most online retailers.
  • 21 0
 Seems like Fox stuff is always overpriced in Euros. Maybe it balances out in the end with us North Americans paying about double for tires.
  • 45 28
 @AndrewHornor: In the UK you can get a Lyrik and a pike for the same price as a 36. Fox is seen as more as poser brand especially with the tacky colours and those cheesy gold Stanton tubes.
  • 28 2
 @thenotoriousmic: looks like you upset the kashima crew
  • 11 1
 @Sambikes11: gotta have something to match the tan sidewalls
  • 13 1
 @Sambikes11: That's the staff at Silverfish downvoting him.
  • 3 1
 @Sambikes11: we’ll I’m unlikely to see them out on the trails anyway so I think I’ll be ok.
  • 3 4
 After the disappointing / irritating experience I've had with their Z2 fork (lower bushings play), Foxocchi/Marzoshit won't have me anymore...
... and I've got plenty of satisfaction with my 290€ Suntour Triair.
  • 3 0
 @Sambikes11: That's the Cash-ima crew i believe
  • 6 0
 @danstonQ: Z1 is definitely the way to go. Mine has been on my bike for three years. Zero issues. I don't know of anyone who has had problems with their Z1 either.
  • 2 0
 @AndrewHornor: and for most stuff. on bike24 sramano stuff is all half the price it is in the us.
  • 30 0
 I read this whole review and I'm not really sure what to think. Sounds like it works like a shock and the bottom-out bumper is very needed.
  • 64 4
 Most bikes have between 18%-22% progression. To test an air shock on a bike that has 30% progression and then say the shock could use a bigger air can seems really silly to me.
  • 8 0
 He said it had really fast ramp up at the end of its stroke, which would suggest that the bottom-out bumper is less necessary on this shock versus a more linear one…right? Or did I misunderstand?
  • 3 0
 @Frederick-Analysis: That's a very narrow window to put "most bikes" into.
  • 23 5
 Guys, I see that most od you still don't understand that blewed up shock is mostly caused by your frames. I say this as a suspension lab technician and former bike mechanic.
  • 38 7
 You say it in a words of local Polish suspension distributor, who always claims that this 2021 blewed up X2 is a frame fault, even it doesn't happen for Ohlins or RS shock.
2021 Fox dampers are so shitty that I will never return to Fox again.
Previously hard user, now hard hater of Fox stuff Smile .
  • 4 4
 
  • 4 1
 @fnk: I have opposite experience. Ride what you believe performs better end of story.
  • 7 1
 @fnk: Agreed, their stuff breaks far too easily now, and is $200 to rebuild an X2, really 1/3 the price of the shock to service it? And plan on doing that at least yearly because they cavitate all the time. I'm going to rockshock.
  • 1 0
 @lightone: You can have, I'm just sharing my experience od 2021 X2 which was serviced 3 times within 6 months. My LS had another exactly same Fox with exactly same issues. I've heard that 2021 was a "pandemic" series and it common.
  • 19 1
 This has specialized status written all over it
  • 3 0
 No way, we need the climb switch that the factory DPX2 or Float X has
  • 4 0
 @sjma: my status has a CR coil and it pedals just fine honestly. I actually pulled the dpx2 off and sold it. that being said, i did order the new super deluxe coil..lol
  • 2 1
 @creative72: fairly certain I've seen multiple buy/sell listings for 230x60 SD coils that said "thought this would fit my status" but good luck with it dude. Too many super smooth climb trails for me to do without a climb switch
  • 1 0
 @sjma: not gonna lie, a climb switch is pretty nifty at times. The new RS SD coil fits just fine.
  • 19 4
 Looks like they dropped a bunch of Float X's on the ground and are trying to pass them off as a new shock
  • 16 0
 Will this fit in my hardtail?
  • 27 0
 Yes, it replace your seat post
  • 12 2
 Does it have a schrader valve on ifp? If yes then it will be a great shock. Nothing beats a serviceable monotube shock for value, you can easily tune it and make it work great and it will be more reliable than something like x2 and so much cheaper to service. Good to see such offerings.
  • 3 9
flag cougar797 (Jun 13, 2022 at 9:42) (Below Threshold)
 Haha that is real life user experience there. I know that this guy knows cause I feel the same way because of experience. .
  • 87 0
 @cougar797: I too am an experienced experiencer with lots of experience
  • 17 2
 So DVO?
  • 7 1
 @hamncheez: Yep. Good stuff for that reason. If i understood how to actually shim suspension it'd be perfect. Wonder if they sell a dumbass end user upgrade kit?
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: I don't know, probably yes. Having options is great.
  • 6 1
 @hamncheez: Rockshox also has a Schrader valve on the IFP. The pressure isn't tuneable with rs but it negates the need for the expensive nitrogen setup required for a fox shock damper service.
  • 4 0
 @hamncheez: yes mate, DVO.
  • 4 0
 Manitou already offers that shock yet hardly anyone uses it.
  • 5 0
 @rickybobby18: Expertise as an experienced experiencer can only be achieved through attaining experience experiencing expertise.
  • 3 0
 @vtracer: Actually I have experience with RS Coil and the design of this shock damping is hopeless, it started working properly only after installing an NRS valve kit (Vorsprung also does Tractive kits for RS). It's made so it has a PERMANENT platform on rebound, nothing like a coil shock which is not supple because rebound opens only at a specific force. So I paid $200 to make it work like a Bomber CR Razz Don't know about new ones, but they seem almost the same in this depertment. But hey, with them your bike climbs like a goat! (because you buy coil for climbs, every RS product manager knows that).
  • 1 0
 @eshew: Fig Newtons
  • 4 0
 @hamncheez: and a topaz is only $21 more so this thing is overpriced for sure. They should have went with $399
  • 6 1
 @Frank191 : at 399 I would still go for a suntour triair before this one... underrated.
  • 5 1
 @hamncheez: DVO all the way. Stopped using creaky Fox forks and shocks that don't last a few years ago, and haven't looked back....
  • 10 0
 Has something happened to Beta MTB? They haven't posted anything new since late May. Is it already dying? I know this is totally off-topic, but I can't (in seconds, more than one of them!) find anything about this anywhere.

I bet there's a place on the forums to ask something like this, but I'm a middle-aged man. I don't like learning new things! Or looking for things. Or not being an idiot.
  • 9 0
 Yes Beta is dead. The latest Podcast episode touches on it.
  • 7 1
 @skierdud89: ha. Put that in your paywall and smoke it.
  • 3 0
 @skierdud89: Thanks, man. See, that's why I never do for myself what I can ask others to do for me from my keyboard. hehehe

How come everybody around here isn't freaking out that the new owners of PB are cutting staff and shuttering properties? Are we all super-confident PB's days aren't also numbered?
  • 11 0
 Shock Week, let's go.
  • 9 0
 You from Boston? Let go riiiiiide kiiiiiid.
  • 11 3
 so in 2022 after all the evolution of air shocks, we are being offered the most basic air shock as it is something new, ground braking and unique.
  • 4 0
 Strawman much? Literally no one ever said it's "new, ground breaking and unique" except you. They're clearly marketing this shock as affordable and available in lots of sizes, nothing more, nothing less.
  • 4 1
 @bananowy: do you regard £530 as "affordable"?
  • 1 1
 @chakaping: I never said anything about what I regard affordable.
  • 2 5
 @bananowy: why not? What have you got to hide?
  • 2 0
 @chakaping: Lol what? What exactly am I "hiding"? I'm just sticking to the topic that the OP started, which is how this product is being advertised. Not sure why you want to derail the conversation tbh.

My opinion about its price is irrelevant and frankly I don't even have one. Are you asking if I could afford it? Of course I could. Are you asking if I think it's well priced against competition? I have no idea because I'm not looking for a shock and can't be bothered to check other brands' prices. I said it's marketed as affordable and that's a simple fact, is it not?
  • 5 7
 @bananowy: no, I'm just teasing you because you seem like an angry little shit
  • 6 1
 I think at this point in my life I'm more interested in the fact that Matt chose to NOT run the der cable through the seatstay on his Cotic. Oh, never mind......probably running battery powered shifting something or other......
  • 19 4
 That's because it doesn't use a cable - the bike he's testing has a GX AXS derailleur.
  • 9 4
 The only actual descriptive words regarding the performance of this shock in this article:

"the amount of bob was kept to a tolerable level when the compression dial was cranked closed."
"Mechanical bottom outs that I experienced more frequently with the Cane Creek Kitsuma Coil were now non-existent"
"However, that did store a lot of energy deep in the travel when trucking through big compressions" (and I'm not really sure what this means - does it mean it felt rough?)

Things I'd like to hear in suspension ride impressions:
- smooth climbs/bobbing (touched on it)
- technical climbs
- flowy descents
- chunky descents
- hard hits (touched on it)
  • 11 1
 This is a First Ride and not a review. Literally the first words written at the top of the page.
  • 11 0
 I would also have liked to know how it felt over some bumps.
  • 3 0
 I agree the initial impressions didn't provide a lot of useful insight. But the "however, that did store a lot of energy deep in the travel when trucking through big compressions"... He's alluding to the rebound circuit getting overwhelmed at full or close-to-full compression, because of the lack of air spring volume (extra spacers installed + small overall volume). I've dealt with the same thing with DVO Topaz, jacked with spacers to compensate for lack of frame progression. After Cascade link installed for better frame progression, removed volume spacers, and the shock is now way more composed at and around full compression (rebound circuit isn't overwhelmed by so much stored energy at full squish).
  • 1 0
 @IMeasureStuff: Yeah, sure. But even after one ride I'd expect more than just "pedal bob is OK and it doesn't bottom out harsh." And that was a lot of words to really only get those things across in the ride impressions.
  • 7 0
 shock looks nice but for a little more I can get the float x2. If it is a budget option make it so!
  • 5 1
 budget in cycling means, just cheaper than the rest. People will still lap that up, especially on PB when saving $40 here and $40 there can save $400 on a build so they can come in the comments an tell everyone how they priced X bike at XX cost and its the best bike ever... despite not actually owning said bike. lol
  • 3 0
 The x2 is a piece of shit tho
  • 7 1
 "a non-indexed compression dial" ...WHY?

they also lost their low price advantage they had with the Bomber CR....
  • 7 5
 Lol what a turd. To prevent pedal bob, you have to use the compression dial like a climb switch. But no clicks / detents to help you get back to your descending setting.

If only they (or their parent company) had some sort of "climb / trail / descend" system for compression damping...

Also really curious what clearance issues they solved with that fugly reservoir.
  • 4 0
 At least they never get the "ideally it should've been between clicks 2 and 3 for my riding" complaint...
  • 2 0
 @bkm303: because most riders won’t touch it and half of the ones that do will be wide open or fully closed.
  • 1 0
 This! It would be nice to have some test of these shocks b2b and also test of inline shocks.
  • 1 0
 @somebody-else: Yeah possibly... tbf maybe the terrible climbing is just a poor tune for this reviewer's particular bike. But if most people are riding it fully open/closed then a climb / CTD switch seems perfect? People mostly seem happy with the TriAir and Topaz.

Idk, I'm sure they're hitting some magical OEM price point, and adding detents would just make it too similar to the Float X Performance in terms of cost and function. Still just feels like a weird/cheapskate choice.
  • 1 0
 @bkm303: yeah I wouldn’t look at the climbing performance on that bike to be indicative of anything other than not the right tune for the bike.

I’ve had a Topaz and a couple Jade X shocks. They were pretty good, but nothing I would call exceptional. Being able to service them at home, if you want to, is cool.

Nothing beats a good custom tune however. But that’s different price point lol
  • 5 1
 Besides the flip chip and the little twist, what are the differences from the Fox Float X?

I want to know pratical differences between this, float x, and rockshox super deluxe select +.
  • 6 1
 At the current rate,$479 is 429€.
Someone is putting 210€ in their pockets on each of those selled in Europe.
  • 2 0
 US pricing is always quoted without sales tax because it differs state to state. UK and Europe pricing includes it because VAT is more consistent in Europe and is always included in the price. EUR429 + 20% VAT = EUR515, which is a little more consistent with the stated Euro pricing.
  • 2 0
 @cotic-bikes: even then it is still 20% more expensive. Ridiculous. Another overpriced fox product in the eu
  • 1 1
 @cotic-bikes: 27 countries = 27 different VAT rates :-)
  • 1 0
 @zoobab2: True, but they're close enough that most brands quote a Euro price with the VAT included, especially with the new One Stop Shop VAT rules. All I'm saying is that in the USA that isn't the case.
  • 5 0
 whats up with the euro pricing
  • 2 1
 I ran a Rocco Air Tst R back in the day...it was super user friendly to set up. Say what you will about the reservoir but i'd rather reach my hand down to the shock and find both adjustments in one spot while riding than find one and fiddle around trying to find the other one.
  • 6 0
 I loved the TST Air. My current DVO Topaz is very similar and I believe made by some of the same guys?
  • 4 0
 @slabba53: designed by them. Made by Suntour and very similar to the TriAir, except bladder instead of IFP
  • 6 0
 You adjust rebound while riding? Madman.
  • 1 0
 It’s 98% the same as you the rockshock monarch @slabba53:
  • 11 6
 For half the price, you have a Suntour triair2.
  • 6 1
 are those any good tho?
  • 5 2
 @hamncheez: basically a RS monarch plus
  • 28 1
 @mtb-scotland: So no then
  • 3 2
 @hamncheez: does the job TBF and can be tuned easy enough.
  • 8 1
 @hamncheez: The new Triair is an old DVO Topaz minus bladder.

And DVO is essentially the real Marzocchi successor

www.pinkbike.com/news/dvo-suspension-birth-of-a-brand.html
  • 2 1
 @JohSch: Yes, elsewhere I commented "DVO" in response to "Nothing beats a serviceable monotube shock for value"
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: Absolutely. Incredible value for the home servicer. Given the cost of the TriAir2, it probably provides even better value. The only difference is an IFP in place of the bladder.
  • 3 1
 @mammal: Suntour and Manitou are two of the most underrated suspension brands. It's a shame they are hard to find and find parts for in the Netherlands. Everything is Fox or RS with the very occasional DVO or Öhlins (not counting the budget Suntour stuff).
  • 1 0
 @mammal: Avalanche already has custom tuning for the DPX2 and the Marzocchi CR. While the MSRP on this new marz air shock is pretty high for "entry level", I'm guessing it will be easy to find it for much less. I'm wondering if Avalanche will have a custom tune for this as well that would "unlock" its full potential, and make it competitive with DVO for the custom tuner.
  • 4 5
 @JohSch: Lol @ the "DVO is essentially the real Marzocchi successor" myth Big Grin No they're not. DVO founders were just Marzo sales people for the US market. AFAIK, exactly zero actual engineers from Italian Marzocchi moved over to DVO and the suspension has nothing in common with older (good) Marzocchi. The only thing it does have in common with newer (bad) Marzocchi is being made by Suntour. Of course Suntour/DVO is alright, but not as special as some seem to think. Don't believe random taglines like "we're the successor to X" just because someone's marketing tells you so.
  • 2 1
 @bananowy: The article literally explains all the team members that moved from Marz/Tenneco, including a designer and an engineer, you can look them all up on Linked In. The designer and Engineer may not have all been a part of the original Italian Marzocchi, but you can't say they weren't the Marz successors.
  • 3 2
 @bananowy: "The only thing it does have in common with newer (bad) Marzocchi is being made by Suntour."

So this new Marzo shock is made by Suntour?
  • 2 2
 @mammal: The article mentions only one engineer, Josh Baltaxe, who worked at Tenneco Marzocchi for less than 2 years before that went tits-up. He never worked at actual Marzocchi. He worked at that weird thing that Tenneco called Marzocchi in its dying years. Yes, I can say DVO aren't Marzo successors because, well, they aren't. I know it's sad, I'd love for a "Marzocchi successor" to exist as much as you, but it's just not the case. Apart from Bryson Martin, there's no connection there. And there's absolutely nothing to suggest that DVO products could be treated as such. They're generic Suntour-made products that don't offer anything "marzocchi-esque" or overly unique over stuff from RS, Suntour or Fox.

@zoobab2 I meant "newer" as in still pre-acquisition by Fox, not the new ones. I don't know who manufactures for Fox.
  • 1 2
 @bananowy: DVO is the spiritual successor to Marzocchi. My DVO Diamond was the smoothest, most buttery fork I've ridden since my coil Fox 40 26", and no matter what I did to the compression it dove to bottom out when I even breathed on the brakes.

Just like classic Marzocchi from back in 2005!
  • 2 0
 @JohSch: absolutely true!!! Ive had an onyx sc and topaz on my old bike. They performed flawlessly. Ultra reliable, bombproof, and at reasonable price. Both were superior and cheaper than their « marzocchi » alternatives from today.
  • 1 0
 @bananowy: my friend, have you even owned a DVO product? What about a fox one or a marzocchi one? Just curious, you seem to be pretty confident in your words:
  • 1 0
 @bananowy: Would you be surprised if there was more than one original Marzocchi Italian engineer that works in the SRSuntour Italian eng office? Because there is.
  • 2 1
 "That's neither the fault of the bike or the shock, but a larger, more linear air can might suit this combo with less kick."

Like the CC Kitsuma? But you said you bottomed that sometimes... How many volume spacers in the Kitsuma?
  • 1 0
 Matt is running a Kitsuma Coil on the test bike.
  • 6 1
 So why was the float marketed as a trail shock yet this is a DH shock?
  • 7 0
 Because it says Marzocchi. Maybe also because it comes in longer sizes
  • 4 0
 0.1 cubic inches? Why won't the imperial system just die the death it deserves.
  • 3 0
 Coincidence, or what….The Singletrack reviewer has the same test bike.

singletrackworld.com/2022/06/marzocchi-bomber-air-shock-first-ride-review

Makes you think.
  • 6 1
 Manitou mara pro
  • 5 0
 Fixed negative air spring pressure in the Mara is no bueno for light and heavy riders. Probably works well if you're in the median weight range though.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: true
  • 2 0
 @mammal: true but that's also why there's different air sleeves.
  • 6 1
 @skierdud89: Awesome, $135 USD to maybe find your correct negative air volume. Great design.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: is it really that much different than experimenting with different coil spring rates? Especially considering how many people I see on the trail that have "upgraded" to an SLS spring ($130).
  • 2 0
 @skierdud89: It's similar to a high-end coil upgrade yes, but removes one of the major advantages to running an air spring in the first place (easily set up out of the box for rider weight/preferences).
  • 2 0
 @mammal: assemble in freezer for more negative. Smile
  • 2 2
 @mammal: Have you owned one? Because they are absolutely easy to setup right out of the box and probably easier than any other shock I've ever owned while still giving an insane amount of performance. Also what shocks are we comparing to that let you adjust the negative pressure? Is a fixed negative pressure in theory any different than setting your sag on a shock that equalizes and being stuck with that amount of negative spring?
  • 2 0
 @skierdud89: Yes, because in Manitou you have the same negative pressure no matter how much you inflate the positive chamber, and normally your negative pressure is a function of the pressure in positive chamber. Ergo in Manitou you typically have too little pressure in the negative chamber which means less sensitivity and too high progressiveness. Mara also has a very long reservoir which makes it difficult to fit. They sell parts, but they are hard to come by in Europe, few months ago a short reservoir kit was available in US or AUS, to a bit o no-go for me.
  • 1 0
 @lkubica: yes it's the same negative pressure but the flexible IFP makes for small bump sensitivity that makes it a non issue.
  • 2 1
 @lkubica: it's simple bro, you just assemble the shock inside a pressure vessel to get more negative air.

Such a bizarre choice by Manitou, all they had to do was put a dimple on the air can like everyone else.
  • 2 0
 @bkm303: You could also trap the shock in a plastic bag and just go diving Wink
  • 2 0
 @skierdud89: "Is a fixed negative pressure in theory any different than setting your sag on a shock that equalizes and being stuck with that amount of negative spring?"

Yes, it's super different - in that scenario you're always getting the same ratio of negative volume to positive volume, regardless of your weight or leverage ratio of your frame. On the Mara Pro, the negative spring air is just whatever amt of 1atm air gets trapped when you screw the air can closed. As you inflate the positive spring it gets smaller and smaller, so heavy/aggressive riders and/or high leverage frames get stuck with a tiny negative spring and all the shittiness that entails.

To put this in context, in general people over the years have raved about all the aftermarket upgrades that give you bigger negative spring volume (MegNeg, Secus, Corset, etc), and OEMs have tended to offer larger negative springs over time. Even the mezzer has an equalizing pos/neg spring (although they do it differently than everyone else). There have been systems (like RS DualAir) that let you freely tune pos/neg volume in the past, but they made setup a total pain in the ass, and the self-equalizing designs won out despite some theoretical performance compromises.

Full disclosure, I have not ridden the Mara. But from a "suspension 101" standpoint the negative spring is a big red flag, and it looks like online reviews (blister, bikeradar) confirm this.
  • 2 0
 @lkubica: well obviously if you're serious about performance you're dive-tuning your shock regularly, it goes without saying Razz
  • 1 0
 @skierdud89: I haven't owned one, no, just spoken with people who do, and a friend of mine was part of the development testing for the Mara. Everyone else has explained the advantages to self-equalizing or adjustable neg systems before I responded, so I won't bother. It probably works well for you because you're in an acceptable weight range and frame kinematics agree with it, so good for you.
  • 2 0
 @bkm303: My buddy was part of the testing/development team (and a part of the Manitou for about a decade) when they were testing the Mara, and they refused to absorb any feedback from him about the fixed negative pressure. Really bizarre choice, as the rest of the design seems pretty awesome.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: that's super interesting, what problem were they even trying to solve by not using a self-equalizing dimple?
  • 1 0
 @bkm303: I don't know, to be honest. I may have lost that file from our lengthy conversation about it though.
  • 1 0
 @bkm303: Ya I understand the math I was just making an oversimplified comparison that if you need X pressure to achieve desired sag then your negative pressure will ALWAYS be the same or in other words "fixed". I don't really have a dog in the fight other than to suggest to two people that have admitted they haven't owned one that its a badass shock that's stupid easy to rebuild with 3 separate circuits that can all be shimmed by the end user in their garage with simple tools. At the end of the day that's what a lot people are asking for but PB riders will always find one detail that is an absolute no questions asked deal breaker. My only gripe with it is that personally I think the Mara outperforms the Mezzer but that's a whole different discussion.
  • 3 0
 @skierdud89: It's simply risky. I was considering this shock recently and the deal breaker for me was a too long piggyback (only tiny water bottle would fit) and risk that I will not be lucky with negative pressure. Maybe it works fine, but it's a gamble. A gamble which is totally unnecessary. Air shocks have two advantages, weight and tunability and they reduced the latter for what?
  • 2 0
 @skierdud89: I don't really understand your fixed pressure analogy... if you choose to run 25% sag instead of 30% on a self-equalizing air spring, your negative spring behaves the same and your overall spring curve has the same shape. On the Mara the shape of the spring curve changes (harsher near topout, less supportive at mid travel as you increase pressure - around 7:30 in this video has some graphs www.youtube.com/watch?v=3HeL5NNHbFw).

It's awesome that the damper is super tunable, and I can understand why people like that. I'm not at all surprised that it works great for some people, but knowing how the air spring works would I recommend it to someone who doesn't want to play with shim stacks? Absolutely not. The decision not to just put a dimple on the air can is bizarre and I think ppl who need higher pressures have good reason to steer clear. The reviews I've seen (blister, bikeradar) seem to have exactly the issues you'd expect from this spring design, so I don't think this is a case of nitpicking one little thing about the design.

There are far more people who just want a consistent linearish spring curve than there are people who will actually ever open up a shim stack and mess with it. It makes total sense that people who love tuning would rave about the Mara, but that's a reeeeeaaaalllly tiny fraction of all the potential customers.
  • 3 1
 Dimples in air-cans create dead spots in the stroke that are the length of the dimple. You can have ~6mm of zero spring-rate and the dimple position also forces sag to specific regions.

Basically everything is a compromise with air-can design. The good bits about trapped air negative is you can adjust shock length and also some negative volume/pressure. the bad bits is you need to reset it every 3-6 months by reinstalling the air-can. It doesn't cause the problems with heavier/lighter riders that many expect as heavier riders need less pressure to get the same ride height and light riders have to be super light to lose stroke. In which case there are spacers that can be modified to increase neg volume and reduce neg pressure.
  • 4 1
 That angled reservoir gets my sympathy. Adding a few random degrees is a simple but nice design feature.
  • 2 0
 It would be if you could choose side of the angle
  • 3 1
 After replacing the clunking RS Superdeluxe with the SR Triair for approx EUR 270 I see no reason for this heavy and expensive shock.
  • 1 0
 Im wondering did RockShox solved that problem with their newest generation of super deluxe...
  • 2 0
 I buy a Suntour Triair earlier this year, new, for 280e. And that's work pretty fine ! Very simple. How Fox/Marzo can be so expensive ?
  • 4 0
 That doesn't look like a £500 shock to me.
  • 3 0
 Why is the air can so small
  • 1 0
 That twist tune was made by a goat who was grazing peacefully in the mountains till he I was bothered Then bam in the midle of the bike
  • 4 1
 Looks cooler than I expected it to look
  • 1 0
 The pricing on stuff like this is utter bullshit.... $479 USD... or £529 GBP? Ok i'll order one in the USA for £396 then...
  • 1 0
 If people are really on a budget they just get a used deluxe select+ on the buy n' sell for $75 plus shipping. $479 is not budget.
  • 8 5
 Shocking news..
  • 3 0
 I'm into it
  • 3 1
 looks like the new float x without a lock out lever
  • 2 1
 Who came up with the pricing on these? How is $479 the equivalent of £529. Europeans are getting absolutely shafted there.
  • 1 0
 No sales tax in the US price
  • 1 0
 Whisxi has something witty to report. I heard of a new brand oswwifu.
Our shit works when it’s f*cked up
  • 1 0
 I looked at it for 5 minutes before reading the article and figuring out that the angled reservoir is intentional!
  • 1 0
 Wait wait wait wait, this costs as much as a super d ultimate and has almost no adjustment?!
  • 1 0
 Can somebody please tell me one bike that this offset piggyback is the make or break to having the shock fit?
  • 6 4
 I’m pumped
  • 1 0
 The Side Bomber Sideways iz the best way
  • 1 0
 Float X for 30 EUR cheaper than CC Kitsuma, make your decision
  • 1 0
 I mean this looks like even worse float x which I really hate while it's attacking cane creek prices, can't really see another use for it than oem for some base models, but I don't really think people will buy it in aftermarket
  • 1 0
 DPX2 just broked his (piggy) nose
  • 1 0
 Fox engineer was trippin balls making this CAD model
  • 1 1
 are marzocchi going to be the new "looks like a session" of the bike world "looks just like a fox"
  • 10 11
 One time I got my DPX2 back from warranty and blew it up in 3 miles. I bet I could cut that in half with this bad boy.
  • 13 1
 Another satisfied Stumpjumper owner? Always curious what the bike is with these stories of blown shocks with such low use
  • 2 3
 @PeakHopper: it's also Fox sucks at servicing their own shit. Factory service ain't what it used to be.
  • 3 0
 @PeakHopper: In my experience working in shops as mechanic whatever that uses a yoke can f*ck up the shock pretty hard, seen lots of stumpjumpers, kenevos, jeffsys and capras to name some models with broken seals and shafts.
  • 4 0
 @Denyer: vorsprung did a video where they mentioned bikes that use Trunnion Shock + yoke is a bad design which destroys shocks.
  • 3 0
 @IMeasureStuff: That's what I was thinking of when I wrote that comment. I'm curious which models out there are eating shocks. I had a trail bike that used a Trunnion shock + Yoke that never blew up on me in ~6 years of abuse (no longer on that bike) so it's interesting to see these modern bikes killing shocks now.
  • 1 0
 @PeakHopper:
The current stumpjumper (evo) doesn’t have a trunnion shock though.
  • 2 1
 Inflated claims
  • 2 2
 I don't think they are going to bomb(er) the review.
  • 1 0
 This shock gave me ocd
  • 1 1
 Fox dpx2.5
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