Powered by Outside

First Ride: Reserve 30|HD Carbon Wheels Can Take Serious Hits

Feb 14, 2022 at 17:36
by Matt Beer  
photo

Remember when Santa Cruz sent out Danny MacAskill to detonate their beautiful carbon rims? Well, Reserve's most recent carbon wheel, the 30|HD, is equally impressive, and I quickly put them through the wringer on some torturous North Shore trails. Situated between the strengths of the 30|SL and 31|DH, the new lower profile rim is aimed at aggressive trail riding and enduro racing, weighing in at 1800 grams with Industry Nine Hydra hubs.

The 30|HDs will replace the current model 30|30s starting at $1,799 with Industry Nine 1/1 hubs, with the option to upgrade to the Hydra hubs with a whopping 690 points of engagement. Santa Cruz also builds a handful of bikes that exclusively use mixed or mullet wheel bikes, so if you're looking for the latest incarnation of 27.5" carbon hoops, you're in luck.

Reserve 30|HD Details

Intended use: Aggressive trail and enduro
Wheel sizes: 27.5" & 29"
Rim: 30 mm internal width, carbon fiber
Hub specs: Boost spacing, XD or MS12 driver options
Spokes: 28x double butted spokes J-bend w/aluminum nipples
Disc mount: 6 bolt
Weight: 1879 grams - 29" w/Hydra hubs, valves and rim tape (actual)
Price: starting at $1799
More info: www.reservewheels.com
Like all Reserve wheels, the original owner is backed by a lifetime guarantee that includes free shipping and returns for US customers. There is no rider weight limit for the 30|HDs and they are approved for eMTB use.

photo
The new 30 HD has a revised profile replaces the 30 rim.

HyperFocal 0
HyperFocal 0

Features & Construction


Reserve didn't just throw more carbon to tag the HD title. Well they did, because they are thicker and wider externally, but there's more to it than that. The height of the 30mm wide profile rim has been revised and now sits lower for increased impact resistance. More vertical compliance and yet improved lateral rigidity are claims we hear frequently, but we've seen a trend in deep dish carbon hoops slimming down in order to improve the feel out on the trail.

If you take a closer look at the 480 gram rim (29") you'll notice the rim bed is identical to the current 30 | SL model, which is optimized for 2.3-2.5" tires, and features a bead bump for less cursing while seating tubeless tires. Other familiar characteristics are the square reinforcement shapes around the 28 spoke holes that lie offset for greater symmetry and equal spoke tension.

As for the hubs, 6-bolt is the only rotor mounting option and for drivers there is the choice of a SRAM XD or Shimano Micro Spline 12-speed cassette interface.


photo
Our wheels came with the new Fillmore valves. They inflated a variety of tires with a regular pump and the resilient rim tape endured multiple installs.
photo
The new Reserve wheels are available with SRAM's XD driver or Shimano's MicroSpline freehub bodies.


Installation & Setup


Tubeless tire setup can be a messy hassle, but 30|HDs posed no issues with common Maxxis Double Down tires and a standard pump. I didn't need to pull any special tricks, like removing the valve core, since the Fillmore valves let plenty of air through in a single burst from the pump.

The rim tape was also well adhered all the way down in the channel and butted up right to the inner edge of the rim. I've found that some tires can pull the tape down into the rim bed if it's not properly applied, but there were no air bubbles in sight and it survived multiple tire changes. The rim bed holds the tire tight enough that I didn't have to deal with sealant leaking out of the tire before the bead was set, nor did the folding bead tires require levers to install.


photo


Initial Riding Impressions


I like to think I'm relatively kind to my equipment. It gets used, but not abused. Well, it didn't take long for that thought to disappear from my head when I came up well short on a sizeable step down gap during my first ride out on the 30|HDs. I thought I would be sending an apologetic email back to the folks at Reserve that evening, but much to my surprise, the rim survived without a hiccup. Even the spokes remained intact and evenly tensioned.

It's likely that other carbon rims may have failed here, or at least some spokes, while an aluminum rim would have surely left me walking out with a wheel looking like a pie with a missing slice. That evening I inspected each eyelet and the inner channel for any signs of cracking, but it still looked brand new. The flatter profile rim promotes more vertical compliance and those square reinforcements around the spoke holes do their job.

Under normal riding conditions, the wheels have a blended feel; firmer than alloy rims, but without the unwanted shock that resonates up to your hands or feet from overly rigid carbon hoops. I didn't find their predecessors, the 30|30 wheels, to be overbearing, but the new model does feel comfortable while plowing down rocky trails at high speeds. I would place them along the lines of a We Are One Union, a rim that I've spent plenty of time on. Both rims hit objects with more of a thud than a ping, and have less feedback than Race Face's Next R wheels. Diving into turns hasn't caused any sudden redirects when the stored energy is released after hard cornering, and across long off-camber sections of trail they don't do anything out of the ordinary.

Moving down to the hubs, the Industry Nine Hydras are known for the buzzing bee-like noise, and that's because they have an exceptionally high number of engagement points - 690, or every 0.52-degrees to be exact. That means if you prefer to ratchet up and over some steps in a technical climb, the power will be almost instantly transferred from the pedals to the wheel. I never found them distracting on the trail and their sound is more of a low hum than a loud tick. For riders looking for a quieter hub, the Industry Nine 1/1 has a still-quick 4-degrees between engagement points, and it's less expensive.

I have noticed on multiple sets of Hydras that the friction can cause the cranks to ghost pedal if you are on foot and pushing the bike. In the bike stand, the hubs spin for a decent amount of time, but may not run as freely as a DT Swiss system.

All in all, the Reserve 30|HD wheels have proved their might as a hard hitting rim for all sorts of pedal worthy bikes and shown improvements in construction and ride quality to the already popular 30|30 model. If you're counting grams or need the utmost in security, you can step to either side of the fence with the lighter duty 30|SL or bomber 31|DH rim options, but the characteristics of these new Reserve wheels are a comfortable and solid choice for all out trail riders or enduro racers.






Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
378 articles
Must Read This Week
Sign Up for the Pinkbike Newsletter - All the Biggest, Most Interesting Stories in your Inbox
PB Newsletter Signup

174 Comments
  • 140 22
 Whew...eBike approved! Be safe be well, Incognito Robin
  • 10 0
 Yet no mention of them being Gravel Bike approved? Might have to look elsewhere Incognito Robin
  • 7 0
 If it’s not Aggro-gravel rated then it’s too flimsy for me@thebradjohns:
  • 108 7
 It's a carbon wheel review. Lets get the comments ready

1. OMG The price. Who the F would buy these. Response: Apparently a lot of people, they must be selling well if they're making more
2. Why would you ever buy carbon, Aluminum is cheaper. Response: On the cover, but Carbon comes with a lifetime warranty, requires no upkeep and is less likely to fail/have a dent that requires a rebuild, etc. so they may be cheaper over several years. If you're light, slow, ride smooth trails AL makes lots of sense.
3. Why would you buy anything but We Are One. Response: You want them to match your SC bike?
  • 44 44
 4. All these carbon components are causing climate change unless the company buys offsets and packages it in recycled box made from an old trail feature which make it ok.
  • 103 9
 Last I checked, aluminum refining is especially chemically disgusting, as is recycling. If you ride a bike, between your dope whip, the car you drive to the trails, and the tools for the trail itself, you're not carbon neutral no matter what. Meanwhile over 140 private jets left the superbowl within 5 hours of it ending. Each is adding more pollution to the world than I may add over the next several decades. Sorry not sorry, my carbon emissions are nothing compared to the larger world out there, and trying to make people feel bad is kind of an old shitty trope. These rims look dope. 480g is a bit portly for me, but if I needed something more beefcaked, would be interested.
  • 30 4
 @sherbet: breath....didn't say I believed it. Just posted it as a sarcastic comment along the lines of the first 3.

Sorry for triggering you.
  • 11 0
 @sherbet: lol I think he was being sarcastic sherb. Dont kill him yet.
  • 3 0
 Bargain those , saw a zipp 454 nsw rear wheel 1900 rubles from rim 1400 rubles for the front that’s nearly double the cost of these and those lightweights made by a European cuckoo clock maker in his shed 4500 shekels a throw , we really don’t know how good we have it
  • 2 0
 @Compositepro: I think you need to check your shekel/ruble to USD exchange rates. Those are all really good deals!!!
  • 4 0
 You forgot to imply jealously because you can't afford them.
  • 10 0
 Fuck, sorry lads.
  • 4 4
 @sherbet: Its OK, I didn't think Americans knew what sarcasm was, so it's an easy mistake...
  • 2 0
 @sherbet: those guys who left the Super Bowl in their private jets , these wheels are theres
  • 2 0
 @kylar: I’m practising for when the Russians overrun europe my 1 ruble a year salary won’t see me exiting the ranks of the poor
  • 6 2
 @sherbet: I'll stick to bad puns I guess.

I will reserve judgement until they are raced head to head by Henry and Jason against Koozer XF2046s with Mike Bears as control tires
  • 14 0
 As an engineer I would like everyone to listen to my opinion on these wheels.
  • 5 0
 @sherbet: wait until you find out how much damage animal products do to the environment...no more beefcakes for you!
  • 1 1
 @inked-up-metalhead: it’s ok I’ve noticed as the kids have moved out of their parents basements which means they’re obviously working for a living now
  • 4 0
 @stayonyourbike: But do you have a BMX background?
  • 1 0
 @sherbet: you have a point but the finger pointing “they’re causing more emissions than me” won’t get us very far I feel.
  • 5 0
 @dkendy1: I have a BMX engineering background
  • 3 2
 @pink505: Koozer? You mean Poozer? Those hubs are made of cheese - like epoisses - soft and stinky.
  • 2 0
 You missed, Why would you pay that much for wheels that heavy...
  • 3 0
 @stiingya: that is the worst one too!
  • 2 2
 @privateer-wheels @pink505 : koozer literally the least reliable Hubs out there. I destroyed a set riding XC in the prairies
  • 2 2
 @privateer-wheels: no koozer they are Chinese copies of Chinese copies. Perfect match for mike bear tires.
  • 2 1
 @hatton Well said. Most of naysayers are the same people that think the only reason to run inserts is pinch flat and rim protection. Are aluminum rims great? Of course. Are Reserves or WAO's better? Absolutely.
  • 1 0
 @pink505: most of human related activities in the world cause " climate change", you know that right, right? They even approve that cow's fart can be harzard to the environment, oops.
  • 6 6
 A good friend of mine committed suicide when we were teens. I am using him as my personal carbon offset, so we're good. I would not kick these rims out of bed for eating tacos, but the price is a bit steep still for me due to competing hobbie$. Also, anyone using crypto to buy these is the La Brea Tarpits of the MTB world.
  • 3 3
 @pink505: Koozer, yes. I am being facetious, calling them Poozer.

I have seen three sets where the the ratchet ring has stripped free of the hubshell, in the pawl and tooth version. Usually leaves the rider walking back to the trailhead/car/home. Pretty crappy performance. Hence the nick name Poozer.

A Chinese copy of a Chinese copy, lol.
  • 1 0
 @DK00: I make a sarcastic climate change joke and the pilling on continues. Making the shipping box out of recycled trail features is serious business. Cow farts are now refered to as natural natural gas and you can request it when you fill your tank at any Costco.
  • 4 2
 @pink505: dont say your sorry for triggering anyone on here. f*cking trigger them. lol
  • 4 0
 @jason475: Sorry for disappointing you. I will try harder next time. A Trump joke maybe? Or a pun. Yes a pun.

I need to get a micro spline and stop saying I am sorry. This will boost my confidence and help prevent me from becoming the double butt of people's jokes.
  • 2 0
 @suspended-flesh: That's just F'd up...
  • 1 0
 @pink505: Puns really are the way this can move roll forward at this point.
  • 19 0
 Laterally stiff, vertically compliant.
  • 11 0
 And climbs like a scared monkey
  • 2 4
 @lenniDK: really? climbs like a scared monkey at almost 1900 grams? Don't need that weight for that price on my aggressive trail bike... On an enduro ok - but this is not a climbers wheelset.
  • 3 0
 @trillot: once they're strapped to the ebike they're approved for they will
  • 17 1
 So cheap I'll take 4
  • 15 0
 Will my exhaust melt these?
  • 7 0
 Ha. I know someone who had that happen to them. Found out at the trailhead after a 3 hour drive.
  • 2 0
 @mtbschrader: damn that sucks. How did the warranty claim go down?
  • 17 9
 Hmmmm, I have had no issues with my carbon rims that weigh almost lb less, cost $1000 less, and are NOT e-mtb approved. As Michael Scott would say Its a win-win-win situation.
  • 23 2
 Do they have a lifetime no-questions-asked warranty? And if so, please tell us the brand.
  • 9 10
 @slow-burn: Lifetime... with all the standards changing every 6 months, what is the realistic lifetime of any bike part these days? 4 years before it's incompatible with your next build?
  • 16 3
 @slow-burn: No, he likely ordered them from China. I am personally not going to take my chances on a no name Chinese made rim. $1k is very quickly eaten up in medical bills and pain and suffering if your rim blows up.
  • 3 0
 @slow-burn: Agreed. Sounds too good to be true.
  • 2 0
 Well if you don't need heavy duty rims then no one does
  • 3 0
 Chances are if you're counting grams enough to buy wheels 1lb less than these, you're not riding anything hard enough to break components anyway. So the lifetime warranty probably doesn't matter for the dirt-paved highway trails these wheels will see
  • 2 1
 @HB208: Very reputable brand. I have/had their rims on road, gravel, xc, trail, hardtail, enduro bikes. Never had an issue. I ride hard enough that it should break if it was cheap.

Y'all need to get over your xenophobia and stop letting the marketing team tell you what to buy.

As far as warranty is concerned, it isn't lifetime, but 2-3 years and honestly, if I break one I can just buy another set and still have money left over. If I am breaking more than one set of wheels I need to look long and hard at how I ride and maybe trying to get better at riding.
  • 2 1
 @Vvltom: I am sorry you can't count. I would think counting grams would be easier for you than a podunk American like myself since you are on the metric system.

You can be a ww and still ride hard. Not mutually exclusive. Even my dirt-paved highway trail wheels get taken on the single track. They hold up just fine.
  • 2 0
 @yourrealdad: Then say the brand. I don't know why that needs to be secret information.
  • 1 0
 @yourrealdad: Weigh a pound less and have the same ride characteristics? I'm also interested in what you may be riding. I haven't been on a wheelset under 1700g that ride very well, they never seem to track as well and/or they deflect too much. Also, you use the same wheels on all those different bikes (road, xc trail, enduro...) or your bike does all that type of riding?
  • 1 0
 @HB208: Farsports. Zero Issues.
I have also used Nextie and Carbonfan. I would say zero issues with those too except I had a bead break on a tire causing it to burp and crack the rim on the Carbonfan in the middle of a rock garden during a race. No wheel aluminum or carbon at the weight of that rim would have survived. Off the top of my head it was like 280g for the rim.
  • 1 0
 @zarban: I can't comment on if the ride characteristics would be similar as I haven't ridden the Reserves as I haven't ever needed to. Tracks great and doesn't deflect.

The wheelset on my enduro bike is well under 1700g and is 34mm internal width laced with DT350 hubs so you could easily dump a few more grams just buy going to the 240 and a 30mm ID, but then price jumps up a bit, probably to $1000 for the set.

Also I assume you understand that I have different wheels on different bikes?

I have used their wheels on a road bike built for racing. 50mm deep dish laced to gasp "Chinese" Bitex hubs. Some of the smoothest wheels I have ridden.

Used a pair of plus wheels on a HT that would climb and descend everything. Zero issues.

Have two gravel bikes with their 40mm deep wheels laced to DT350 and Carbon-ti hubs. Take them on single track pretty regularly no issues.

Have a pair of 28mm ID laced to DT350 on my FS XC Sniper. I believe they weigh in under 1400g and it gets raced hard and still hits jumps. No issues

On my enduro bike like I said above. No issues.

Not affiliated at all, don't get discounts, can show you receipts for all the purchases if you are skeptical. Just a product that has worked and can fit the bill of light, strong, cheap (relatively) pick all three.
  • 1 0
 @yourrealdad: It doesn't appear like they even sell MTB wheels now.

Regardless, I was referring to ordering random Chinese carbon wheels from ebay or amazon. That feels sketch to me.

www.farsports.com
  • 1 0
 @HB208: Here is their web store. They do mtb wheels. You can also order just rims and even somewhat customize your order.
wheelsfar.com

Also I could tell you about a $350 set of Carbon road wheels I have used off Amazon, but that’s neither here nor there since we are talking mtb.
  • 2 0
 @yourrealdad: Can I interest you in a $124 suspension fork.... www.youtube.com/watch?v=aEIzbI1A-TQ&t=66s
  • 1 0
 @sngltrkmnd: I assume you think that because I buy cheaper wheels (which have great reviews and a following) that I will just buy cheap crap? That would also imply that you only buy expensive kit.

Can I interest you in the $1000 suspension fork I am selling in the buy/sell.... www.pinkbike.com/buysell/3219711
  • 1 0
 @yourrealdad: It was not a serious response. I hope you watched the video. It’s hysterical.
  • 17 7
 Bet reserve were glad Paul Aston has gone freelance!
  • 6 3
 I my experience (had a set and several friends with them) the Reserve wheels are pretty damn good. No cracks/issues with multiple seasons at bikes parks, trips to Moab, etc.
  • 5 3
 @bman33: A friend broke them during our Finale Ligure trip on the first day after landing on a rock. I guess it depends on the rider. As always
  • 10 0
 @bashhard: Or dumb luck and circumstance.
  • 1 0
 what you mean by that?
  • 1 0
 @bashhard: And what's the wty worth there far away from home where guys like us have to ride to get some thrill. Nothing, unless Reserve would drop ship a replacement next day to the hotel or you get a set fo two pairs initially that you then carry in the car all the time.
  • 9 4
 @2pi: One can always take an extra DT rim for a trip. A rim is easy to pack with the rest of the bike, even if you fly. They all have same ERD, so you can buy E512 for 44€ As a spare to your ex471/511 or xm481. Then you have a chance to find a spare in a shop too. You wreck a carbon rim in Europe it may as well be made in China, you’ll wait 2weeks+ for replacement. Ut Americans don’t have that issue hence most of folks applauding lifetime warranty come from US or Canada.

But back to Paul Aston, we have to be fair. Just because Enve sucks balls doesn’t mean Reserve do. (In fact Luescher temnik cut through LB amd Enve and demonstrated that Lb are better built) These look good as they have xtra thick walls and thicker they are, the more durable they are. It took Paul a few months to waste Newmen rims aimed at XC/Trail.
  • 4 0
 @bashhard: Ha, i've got the same experience. I cracked my gen1 reserve 30 on the first day of my MTB trip to Oaxaca, sent in the warranty request on December 20, 2021, still nothing, radio silence from SC going on two weeks now
  • 4 0
 Aston does amazing bike reviews now. Best I've ever read.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: where can I read them?
  • 1 0
 @calmWAKI: sorry to be mister "sEnd Me A LiNk" but looking through his youtube page, and searching for the video of the wheel disection. I cant find it. do you know where i can find this?

thank you
  • 2 0
 @calmWAKI: I love how something posted in 2016 is held constant. Apparently continuous improvement doesn't exist.

In addition, Where do you think Santa Cruz learned how to make carbon wheels? Do you think they stood idly by when ENVE sponsored The Syndicate all those years.... doubt it. Bet they learned a thing or two.
  • 1 0
 @spinzillathespacelizard: Googlge this: Luescher temnik ENVE
  • 1 0
 @calmWAKI: LOL, watched the video at no point did he say that the Chinese rim was built better. He even made disclaimer statements at the end of the video to not mislead.
  • 6 0
 @TCarl11 Sorry to hear this news. We had some internal delays early in the new year and are working diligently to get this resolved for you. Thank you for shining a light on this and we'll get you sorted ASAP.
  • 4 2
 @porkchopsandwich: mate if you pay 800$ fir a rim it better not have voids, which Enve had. Raul making a disclaimer there was an extremely generous attempt at trying to sound objective. After seeing this rim cut out and Astons test I call a fool anybody paying Enve any money. My buddy broke M60 on one of first rides on front. They should have dropped the price in half or get out of business.

I stick to my opinion: just because Enve sucks doesn’t mean Reserve or WeAreOne suck too. Enve still sucks.
  • 1 0
 @porkchopsandwich: thank you for the help. wrong key word. I led with Light bicycle
  • 1 1
 @porkchopsandwich: Does ENVE pay your salary or something?
You are defending some company making overpriced and shitty products, like your livelyhood depends on it.
  • 1 0
 @Losvar: Nope. Just trying to be a voice of reason in a sea of masculine chest beaters. I have ridden a lot of different product and can tell you the ENVE wheels are really really really good. Yeah that get the hate for being the pricy as hell. That price is not for everyone, but to call them shitty while having no personal experience with them is just wrong. Commenters on this board take on point of data for something they have no experience with and call that fact. Not how I work.
  • 3 1
 @porkchopsandwich: you're like people who claim that Shimano brakes have no wandering bite point issue because they have never experienced it, yet there's tons of anecdotal evidence that it is a god damn issue. Newmen or We Are one or Reserve were sent to as many reviewers as Enve, yet we know which cracked with stupid "this was a prototype" explanation. I ma of course happy that you have not had problems and you are happy with your choice.
  • 4 0
 @calmWAKI: Im saying that one review does not make a trend. In addition the likelihood of someone with a perfectly performing set up wheels taking to social media vs someone with an issue is a very large gap. Disgruntled people will yell the loudest, they need to feel validated
Also not arguing that the rim cracked. But reading deeper into Pauls review he was looking for any carbon product to take the fall for his soapbox. Not saying it didn't fail, we all saw that. But I do question the circumstances and how they were told.
All wheels will fail... like all product. Manufacturers build in AQL and Confidence and Reliability levels for this. It would be interesting to see the actual warranty/complaint data from these manufacturers. That's the real indicator, not he who yells loudest.
I will admit that Shimano brake points wander.... that is fact.
  • 10 2
 This is all well and good, just wish I knew why my bike shouldn't have come with a dropper post
  • 2 1
 Because it makes good clickbait.
  • 2 0
 Too much LOL's fir that one... just bleeds their holier than thou bike snobbery that ruined Bike at the end...
  • 4 1
 "Santa Cruz also builds a handful of bikes that exclusively use mixed or mullet wheel bikes, so if you're looking for the latest incarnation of 27.5" carbon hoops, you're in luck." Huh?
  • 2 0
 I haven’t experienced that ghost pedal issue on my Hydras at all in three years but it reminds me it’s a good time to do some service on that rear hub. Cool to see that these hubs are available on the newest Reserves. I rather like the hub engagement and overall performance though I do wish they were a little quieter.
  • 3 0
 Check put I9's tech video on hub sound. Drop a bit of Dumonde Tech Freehub Grease in there and they become close to silent. I can barely hear mine over the sound of my tires.
  • 4 0
 Interesting that they are 6 bolt only, while Chris King has moved to Centerlock only.
  • 11 0
 Interesting is that bike industry even after all this years can't decide over just one standard. Like with discs diameter.. do we really need 200 and 203!??
  • 2 3
 that's because of the Industry Nine Hydra hubs....they only make them in 6 bolt. I'm sure the wheels are available in centerlock if you downgraded to the DT Swiss option
  • 3 0
 @SATN-XC: Nope, Industry Nine makes both the 1/1 and Hydra in either 6 bolt or CL, I'm sure it's just a matter of how many options/SKUs Reserve wants to deal with.
  • 1 0
 @saauuwce: you sir are correct...I redact my statement.
But to your second point... when I was shopping around the only hydra's that were available in the complete wheelsets I was looking at were the 6 bolt (not waiting 2 months for a custom build).
  • 3 2
 Almost bought a pair of Reserve 28's when I was shopping around for XC wheels last month. Price drops into the 1,500's for DT Swiss hubs but the Industry Nine Hydras are the way to go. For a wheel with a lifetime warranty, this is a great option and priced the same as WeAreOne though it likely comes down to what is available. I know there is a lot of focus on weight and cost but nice carbon wheels will make a huge difference in how the bike feels and its responsiveness.
  • 5 0
 Do you know how much weed I can buy for the same price? jeez!
  • 2 1
 having cracked 7, from various manufacturers, SC, Enve, Bontrager (suprisingly lasted the longest), Roval. i find it difficult to want to spend that amount on wheels again, they were all replaced under warranty, but it is a pain having to send them off, they do feel nice i guess, but ive yet to see any last as long as they claim they will. although the WeAreOne rims seem to be doing ok?
  • 6 0
 I sent a pic of my blown Reserve rim and I had a tracking number the next morning. Reserve rims for life over here, that's a completely acceptable response time in my view.

and: the one I cracked was a v1, they sent me a v2 as replacement. Still coming up short on all jumps two years later LOL
  • 3 0
 What grade rims do you ride? I think I'd start speccing downhill rims if that was happening to me often.
  • 3 0
 Maybe, just maybe, there's a spec selection or air pressure issue?
  • 4 0
 @mdinger: theyd all come stock on the bikes i bought, all enduro bikes, Roval on my Enduro, Reserve on a megatower, Bontrager on a Slash, so id sort of expect them to be able to be capable of enduro riding/races? Enve i got second hand, M7', so theyd potentially had a hard life before i got them. Im heavy i suppose, 92kg, Run 25psi front 28psi rear DD tyres with rimpact inserts, i wouldnt say im aggresive on them really, more.. uncareful. i have moved to DH rims now, ex511, and at £92, and 530g', i cant see the advantage of paying £720 for enve m9 rims
  • 1 0
 Someone do the maths please. Cost of these with lifetime warranty/crash replacement v a set of decent alloy rim wheelset where you have to pay for a new rim - usually only a rear rim, every now and then. I suspect you're still being ripped off for carbon. Also not all carbon rims have the same kind of warranty. Recent experience of a woman rider friend - 55kg body weight - rides endurance event, not enduro - cracked a local reputable brand rear rim after 11 months. Best she can get with their warranty is a Canadian $500 (half price) replacement. It seems to me she'd have been better off with a set of good DT rims which undoubtedly would still be going without any cracks and can be had for far less than the carbon rim if they did actually break. i think most people buy carbon wheels because they want the bling. Just be honest.
  • 1 0
 So I was thinking about this last night as I have a pair of Nukeproof Horizon V2 wheels on a bike I just bought. They are about 200g heavier than the above listed weight of the Reserves. However, that weight appears to be for the Hydra's which actually makes the cost $2200 US.
Also the NP have 32 spokes and so if you say that the spokes are on the Sapim Race level at 6g then you are looking at an increase about 50g and closer to 60g if they are using brass nips.
So really the wheels are only about 150g heavier all things being equal.

You can buy 4 full sets for the price of the Hydra reserves and have cash left over, or 3 of the 1/1 version with cash left over, plus you would have all those hubs and rims that you could keep making sets out of.

From the sound of it I would get my wheels from across the pond quicker than getting a warranty replacement (in general, not just Reserve)
  • 1 0
 This is how wheels are tested when manufacturer says "Kill them"

Watch entirely to the very end for your curiosity:
www.gmbn.com/video/how-strong-is-a-mountain-bike-wheel-blake-sam-reynolds-mtb-wheel-wrecking-challenge
  • 2 1
 So with a lifetime warranty, why wouldn't I just run the SL wheels and replace every few months?

The article doesn't mention anything about performance difference that these wheels offer over the lighter model..
  • 1 1
 They are probably great wheels. But, at ~$1600 more than the 10 year old, 10,000 mile, still running perfectly, aluminum wheels that weigh almost exactly the same, currently on my prime bike, I don't think I will be flexing the credit card any time soon.
  • 1 0
 This is how wheels are tested when manufacturer says "Kill them".
Blake from GMBN testing Spank wheelset:
www.gmbn.com/video/how-strong-is-a-mountain-bike-wheel-blake-sam-reynolds-mtb-wheel-wrecking-challenge
  • 3 0
 I have a pair of the Reserve 30 rims. 5 seasons and still going with hardly a wobble. I feel like I got my money's worth
  • 12 10
 Why would you buy these when you could get the same warranty with WeAreOne for less cost and pretty much the same weight?
  • 16 0
 Living in CA is a big one. I have broken two different Reserve 30's, and both times, I had a brand new wheel on my doorstep within 48 hours of contact.
  • 6 2
 Maybe you would rather have your wheels manufactured in Asia rather than North America?
  • 2 0
 Pretty sure cost comparison with WeAreOne is the same assuming hub choice is similar. Cross shopped these with WeAreOne and main factor was simply availability. WeAreOne wanted a month+ to ship and my LB had a wall of these available and in stock.
  • 5 0
 While I'm a big fan of WR1, the warranty is not the same. WR1 ships a new rim, which then has to be laced to an existing hub. Requiring dissassmbly time, re-assembly time, new spokes (recommended) and an existing hub. Reserve sends an entirely new assembled wheel, w/ new hub and spokes.
  • 2 2
 @MegaMatt5000: People are afraid of dodging human feces and used rigs on the way to a CA UPS office for warranty shipping. People need to look into the sewage situation in Medieval London and cut Cali some slack. I heard Snoop is going into the carbon rims business, too. I shop at the Snoopermarket.
  • 3 0
 Next up: Megatower refresh.
  • 2 0
 i think i'd go with nobl tr37s. more hub options, cheaper, and lifetime warranty. i9 hubs and i don't get along
  • 4 0
 Nobl>reserve
  • 2 0
 Pricey for 1879 gram wheelset. Rather just get an aluminum set for less than half.
  • 1 0
 At just over $1 USD per gram. My bike would be like $15000 at that price point.
  • 1 1
 If they were the same $/gram, but half the weight and half the price I would consider them though.
  • 7 5
 Do any enduro racers use carbon rims?
  • 2 1
 Yes
  • 2 0
 How many rims did Danny actually break in hat video?
  • 3 2
 Give Moi Moi a pair and a brick to repair them trail side and see what he has to say Smile

youtu.be/XTvhc5AsYh8?t=938
  • 2 0
 How many carbonzo beans does it take to manufacture a single rim?
  • 1 0
 Coloured RESERVE decals available for these rims here:

Filter on Ebay by seller ID: bicyclebitz
  • 17 16
 nearly 1900 grams, what is the point of buying carbon anymore?
  • 46 8
 to not die a slow death over time of dings and wobbles like alu does
  • 22 2
 the warranty
  • 9 20
flag wobblegoblin (Feb 15, 2022 at 9:16) (Below Threshold)
 So that when your rim cracks it becomes un-rideable. . . 6 miles from the trailhead.
  • 15 2
 never need to true, no dings
  • 12 6
 @unrooted: Fully disagree. I've cracked carbon rims and rode them out just fine. You would 100% have a catastrophic failure of aluminum long before carbon.
  • 8 1
 The way they ride to be fully honest. The warranty is a huge bonus.
  • 4 2
 b/c they are bomb proof with a lifetime warranty. If weight is a concern, lighter options are available Reserve 30 SL or Reserve 28's
  • 3 0
 solid points
  • 1 0
 Well to be fair it’s a bit stiffer and looks nice when you wash your bike
  • 2 1
 @SATN-XC: No they're not bombproof. I've got a broken Reserve 30 rim in the shed that proves it. Result of a pretty standard OTB by a 68kg rider. No other damage to bike or rider.

I can't believe Matt Beer brought up the Danny MacAskill video. There's been enough broken Reserve rims with far less abuse for everyone to know the video is horseshit. But hey, Reserve are a sponsor now, so goodbye credibility and hello gushing fanboys.
  • 2 0
 @DeeWheelson: I can't speak to the standard reserve wheels, but I can speak to the reserve DH.
I've cracked one rim in 2 seasons. I'm also a 225lbs rider who rides dh tracks year round. I spend most of my free I've in the summer in whistler bike park, and where I've typically gone through several alloy rims, the reserves have kept going strong. The cracked rim was fully rideable, and to add that Santa Cruz had a brand new wheel at my door in 4 business days.
Keeping in mind this was the beginning of the pandemic, and Santa Cruz County was locked down.
No these wheels aren't bomb proof, but they are impressively durable. They have shrugged off impacts that would have completely obliterated an alloy wheel.
Honestly though, the most impressive part was the ride quality, put all else aside, and these brought my bike to life, making cornering more snappy, and giving a more refined feel to the bike.
I was expecting a bit of a wooden ride, but on the contrary.
I am by no means supported by Santa Cruz, and I am a fan boy of what truly works and has good value and peace of mind.
When it's all said and done, that's the beauty of consumerism, there generally are enough options for everybody.
These might not be for you, but I fully feel my reserves were an investment, and worth every damn penny.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: No, instead to wait for sudden death when it cracks in half due to an invisible fracture...
  • 6 6
 No HG freehub body
  • 3 1
 you can buy a new driver directly from i9 or probably find a take-off one for sale. the $205 is a bit pricey but it is i9 so whos surprised, and selling the driver you got with your wheels would offset the cost greatly
  • 16 4
 Reserve wheelsets aren't for basic poor people sheeeeee like I'd be caught dead with an NX cassette on my reserve wheelset pfft
  • 3 6
 @ltharris: You ever had a driver decide to fuse to a cassette before? $205 is hilariously expensive for a driver, especially if it gets stuck. Nothing like paying a significant portion of an aluminum wheelset for a single piece.
  • 9 4
 @nickfranko: so basically, 1: its i9, these are machined and hand-assembled in Ashville NC. $205 is quite pricey but your paying for the company and craftsmanship.
2: no, ive never had a driver fuse to a cassette, because i use grease and torque things down properly. i also do basic maintenance and cleaning before each season. .
should also be noted that the wheels in this context are $1800 carbon fiber wheels, and i did mention you can sell the driver (i have seen them for around $150) that came with the bike
  • 4 5
 They’re charging $205 because they can. It wouldn’t cost them more than $10 to manufacture them. The idea that there’s any craftsmanship involved in a free hub body is so laughable that it’s actually sad. It’s a small piece of round bar stock run through a CNC turning centre to take the form of someone else’s design. Apart from making it mate with their hub shells, they’re not doing anything magical to it that literally every other hub maker does.
  • 2 2
 @Afterschoolsports: so when did i say that the $205 was reasonable? almost as if i said it was pricey?
  • 3 3
 @ltharris: “your (sp) paying for the company and craftsmanship.” Almost as if you think that makes it alright to charge stupid prices.
  • 1 0
 @Afterschoolsports: "$205 is quite pricey" almost as if i said thats its expensive, and then gave an option on how to lower the cost greatly
  • 1 1
 No HG body is a deal breaker. Maybe this wouldn't be an issue if cassette manufacturers actually started making non-dinner plate versions of their standard cassettes, but apparently that's impossible.,,
  • 1 0
 @Afterschoolsports: You forgot anodising, that'll add a few cents! Would love to see bike AL parts hard anodised (military spec, dull grey colour) but its just not cool...
  • 1 4
 £800 gets you some SILT wheels. Star ratchet hubs, lifetime crash replacement, 1760g, 31mm internal. Had line for 6 months now and they ride great!
  • 6 0
 congrats!
  • 2 3
 Will these be ok for my #Ebike?
Below threshold threads are hidden







Copyright © 2000 - 2024. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.044926
Mobile Version of Website