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Pinkbike Poll: Why Don't We Wear Full-Face Helmets More Often?

Feb 28, 2023 at 15:26
by Matt Beer  
Bell Super DH Photo Bell Paris Gore

Not every ride warrants wearing a full-face helmet. Frequently, I end up riding gnarlier trails than I initially set out for. I’ll often toss two helmet options in the truck because ride plans can quickly escalate from the parking lot. Chill rides can turn into wild ones depending on who tags along. Friends can egg you on to “show them how it’s done” when nearby features can lure you in.

If you like challenging yourself, chances are you’ve taken a biff that either left you with scratches on the jaw piece of your full-face, or spitting blood. We’re always thankful when we do wear the extra coverage and disgruntled at best when we don’t. That begs the question, why don’t we wear full-face helmets all of the time?

Henry Quinney wrote an op-ed last year where he expressed his split devotion to either a half-shell or downhill race worthy full-face. “Why compromise?” was his baseline, suggesting that if your ride warrants wearing a full-face, it should have the most protection possible. That holds some weight, but I’d like to counter that. Yes, I agree with his statement that high-speed downhill racing warrants the most protection possible, but most of the terrain that we ride in the Sea to Sky is slow and steep, in comparison to bike park speeds. Plus, not all puckering steep trails are easy to access. You’ll need to drag your bike and bucket to the top under human power.

Moto track and enduro riders never venture on without them. Motorcycle trials riders opt for an open face because they are going uphill, against gravity. We enjoy the opposite. We point our bikes downhill, face-first and grinning our teeth the faster we go. Mountain bikers ride down hills fighting gravity. You’re GOING to fall forwards at some point. Any bit of jaw protection is better than none.

By increasing the security of the fit with the addition of the jaw piece, the manufacturers can add more volume to the sphere meaning more protection. Take a look at the lightweight full-face helmets out there, like the Fox Proframe RS, which have a multi-layered sandwich of spheres that rotate within one another upon impact. You’ll be hard-pressed to find a half-shell helmet that contains an equal level of technology.

photo
Fox Proframe RS

Last spring I took one of the quickest and wildest crashes I’ve ever had - face first. No, I wasn’t wearing one of these helmets I’m rambling on about.

I set out to sneak in a lap before dark, with the doggo in tow, on a trail that I’ve ridden a thousand times. A squall came through that day on the North Shore and knocked a few twigs loose. One of those, void of bark - the slipperiest kind - was sitting across the lip of a bike-length gap. The run in was slow and steep on a soft, unmarked trail. I didn’t think much of the polished branch and it all went wrong in the blink of an eye.

Before I had a chance to lift the front wheel, it slid off the narrow lip and lodged in the backside of the landing. My hands didn’t even have time to come off of grips before my face catapulted into the dirt, the kind of OTB where your feet stayed clipped in. I mean full Scorpion King-style, worthy of making the Friday Fails - the seat even hit me in the back. Thankfully, it was soft and mossy where I face-planted, although I thought my nose was broken. I got really, really lucky.

As I sat there spitting out dirt and picking up the pieces of my glasses I’d broken with my nose, my four-legged friend looking at me, wondering why I decided to roll around in the dirt mid-chase. This wasn’t a race, or a huge send, or even a gnarly trail. A crash like this wasn’t supposed to happen. But accidents aren’t planned.

We wear knee pads (also - a “sometimes” accessory) and helmets to lessen these blows, but why don’t we wear more than a styrofoam hat? I’ve heard it all, “No full-face helmet I’ve tried breathes well,” “It’s too hot,” “I’m claustrophobic,” “You can’t wear a full-face without goggles. That’s bad style,” “I’m only riding that trail.” What’s your excuse? What if you showed up to a moto track looking like Ronnie Mac, sans chin-bar? You’d be kicked and laughed off the track pretty darn quick.

If you ask me, all of those reasons are bologna. Then again, I can be just as guilty as everyone else from time to time. So, what’s the solution? Make them lighter. Yup, that’s a start. Add in some additional ventilation and magnetic strap closure. Now we’re getting somewhere. Fast, light, just the way we all want our mountain bikes to ride.

Detachable chin-bars weren’t a bad thought. But what do you do with the second half of the helmet when it’s not needed, drape it around your bars or wear it as a scarf? There’s still a part of me that doesn’t fully trust that the chin-bar will stay on either, since I’ve seen one or two detach prematurely in crashes.

Goggles and a half lid give a false sense of security. They do offer that breathability on the way up, but possibly at the cost of your teeth on descents. The opposite, and equally kooky opinion of rocking glasses and a full-face again improve ventilation, yet don’t totally lock out mud splats. Plus, they give you an awful headache.

Ok, let’s add the goggles back in, but cut holes in the top of the goggle frames. That’ll reduce the greenhouse effect somewhat, although it’ll bring in the occasional clump of mud or mosquito.

There must be some way to have all three desirable traits; full-face protection, ventilation, and decent eyewear packaged into one elegant solution. One creative enduro motocross rider invented this system that lifted the google frame away from the rider’s face, but that didn’t catch on with the enduro MTB crowd.

What if… the goggles didn’t have a strap at all? Integrating a pivoting lens, something like a street motorcycle helmet, could be one way to achieve that. Too kooky? Too costly to manufacture? With all of the integrated components on bikes these days, I wouldn’t be surprised to see some variation of that in the future.

Does the perfect solution exist? Sure - don’t crash. Never challenge yourself, never take any risks, and never gain that experience of overcoming a trail feature. To each their own though. Mountain biking is inherently dangerous, so if you’re already playing that game, why not double down and buckle up with full-face coverage?

Why Don't You Wear A Full-Face Helmet More Often?

Select all that apply.



Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
378 articles

503 Comments
  • 278 1
 5 surgeries and $500k of facial reconstruction in 2020 from a slow speed fall where a log was exactly where it shouldn't be. Full face every ride since then.
  • 8 1
 Exactly!
  • 258 1
 User name checks out. #soundslikeheknowswhathestalkingabout
  • 41 1
 Username checks out.
  • 23 0
 Reputable source.
  • 114 14
 $500k of surgeries... you must be American! Hopefully not out of your pocket.
  • 3 0
 @jkwilliamz: he looks like he knows .
Only joking shredly
  • 6 1
 So sorry you had to go through that man! Had a similar experience a little lower down on the body - broken patella in 2019 from a very slow speed fall during a climb. Haven't ridden my MTB without kneepads since. And yet, I'm still only wearing a full face when I shuttle (rare) or ride lift-assisted park (extremely rare). Probably time to reconsider that.
  • 3 6
 @jkwilliamz: hahahahhaahhahahah brilliant
  • 13 0
 I wear one too. As a moto guy, I've had the chinbar of the helmet kiss the ground in some nasty terrain more than once. It's likely just a matter of time before the same thing happens on the pedal bike, and I'd rather not record that statistic with my face.
  • 11 0
 Serious questions, was your username changed after 2020? Can we see before and after pics? IMO this warrants its own PB article. Readers need to know.
  • 13 0
 Thank you for you service
  • 18 50
flag DRomy (Mar 3, 2023 at 22:10) (Below Threshold)
 @billbouv: It’s always out of somebody’s pocket, quite possibly your own since you pay for it in taxes over your lifetime.
  • 43 3
 @DRomy: Without wanting to get into politics America spends (a lot) more on healthcare per capita than anywhere else in the western world- so whilst you might argue it's fairer for people to take care of themselves it is also very bad economics: www.statista.com/statistics/236541/per-capita-health-expenditure-by-country/#:~:text=The%20United%20States%20is%20the,U.S.%20exceeded%20four%20trillion%20dollars.
  • 34 1
 Do you now have Nicolas Cage or John Travoltas face?
  • 5 0
 I think the norm of wearing a half shell for most trails is severely under-recognised in the survey results.
  • 16 35
flag ChrisNJ (Mar 4, 2023 at 5:23) (Below Threshold)
 @billbouv: Good thing too! He'd still be waiting for his surgery if he was canadian.
  • 1 0
 @bigtim: Better off leaving his unconstructed. Wink
  • 7 1
 @Clifflane3: the NHS is not a good example of a public healthcare system and could arguably so with more investment to bring it in line with other western European countries. That does not make the US system good value for money though at 19% of GDP.
  • 8 1
 @hatchleader: didn’t use it as justification for our healthcare system. Just pointing out there’s funding issues on both sides. We’re almost 20% now and 40% of global spending. Insurance companies in America are one of the biggest rackets in the world. They push curing treatments instead of preventative because they get paid. It’s all F’d
  • 17 32
flag Diarmuidbikes (Mar 4, 2023 at 10:24) (Below Threshold)
 How to get upvotes on Pinkbike:

Step one: complain about American healthcare system.

Step 2: under no circumstances should you say that tax payer funded healthcare has limitations

Step 3: do not acknowledge any benefits of the US system even if you still think the cons outweigh the pros. Much shorter waiting times and lower personal taxes have absolutely zero relevance. Only look at the negatives. Waiting 1-2 years for minor surgery is much more acceptable than paying lots of money through insurance for it...
  • 6 20
flag Mtbdialed (Mar 4, 2023 at 11:39) (Below Threshold)
 @billbouv: shit isn't much cheaper other places, you just make your neighbors pay for it.

also, the vast vast majority of people in the US have insurance. I know you have been lead to believe otherwise. even a low level plan, you would only be out like $10k on average for $500k in face rebuilding costs.
  • 12 2
 Mmmm yeah but by this logic, I should wear a helmet to walk down the street. Yes safety equipment makes you safer, but there has to be a balance of risk. It's unfortunate that you smashed your face in, but I'm still happy to rely on statistics - ie it's extremely unlikely I'll need a fullface helmet to ride XC
  • 30 2
 @Diarmuidbikes: moved from the US to DE, heard about the long wait times. The first time I called to make an appointment, they asked if I could come the same day. Never waited longer than three days for an appointment. Scheduling surgeries or an MRI takes about the same amount of time. The US system is crap.
You can also get private insurance here, which can be faster and you get some other benefits like your own room in the hospital, and it’s cheaper if you don’t need it, but after dealing with insurance companies in the US that are not incentivized to pay your bills, I wouldn’t even consider it.
  • 23 1
 @Mtbdialed: and how much time would you have to spend on the phone convincing them to pay it? And what if you were in your network hospital, but an out of network doctor did the work? Who are you kidding? The US system is crap. It’s only good for insurance companies.
Here you wouldn’t even be out 10k. In patient surgery cost me 100€ for four nights in the hospital, but mostly it’s free, plus you don’t need to take vacation for the work days you missed. You are brainwashed.
  • 3 0
 @bigtim: what a fine piece of cinema...face off!
  • 5 1
 @hatchleader: our health system was at an all time satisfaction level in 2010. I wonder what happened after that?
  • 3 3
 @Diarmuidbikes: can I buy you a beer?
  • 2 23
flag Mtbdialed (Mar 4, 2023 at 19:21) (Below Threshold)
 @FatSanch: zero, doesn't matter, no one, nothing is free it's just cost free to the user at point of service. I m not brainwashed, you are drunk on other peoples money....and since you are German....how does Putin's oil dick taste? LOL
  • 4 17
flag Mtbdialed (Mar 4, 2023 at 19:22) (Below Threshold)
 @kipvr: I lived in the UK. your healthcare system is a drunken f*cking clown boat......

it's 2023 and I could not be happier with the health care I now get in the US.
  • 5 2
 @Mtbdialed: totally agree it is now. Privatisation isn’t the answer though.
  • 2 0
 Completely sympathetic to the "be as safe as possible" principle, but these are all points on a spectrum. Taken to its logical conclusion, why wouldn't road cyclists wear full face as well? There are valid reasons to have less weight and more ventilation along the spectrum.
  • 8 0
 @Mtbdialed: just curious, I broke my knee last summer . Went to A&E , was seen by a doc within an hour , had an X-ray then a CT scan then casted up and left . Over the next 3 months had 2 more CT scans and a few X-rays plus 2 recasts . Was given a pair of crutches and a knee brace .
All free but payed through my tax contributions.
What would that have cost me in the US ?
  • 4 0
 @Matt115lamb: I think that no matter how your treatment is financed, US prices are simply very very high, don't know what's the reason for this, I can say from my experience, that this what you described in Poland done completely privately would cost you like say £1000, and if you would add a surgery of that knee it would get you ~ £5000 (total).

My FF story from I think 12 years ago was as follows - I took part in an eduro race and of course did not wear FF. On the second stage I face planted straight onto a rock, completely smashed my nose (so it was like flat/flat) and was like 1cm from loosing a god damn eye! Of course it was handled 100% by public health system, but it was quite "funny", I remember surgeon saying something like - "well, I need to cut out this little piece of your nose, It will not be pretty, but you know, a plastic surgeon will have easier job afterwards than I have now". All in all I have a nice straight nose, but you can spot a few scars Smile
Wear FF kids, plastic surgeries may not be free in your healthcare system Smile
  • 1 0
 @kipvr: ran out of other peoples money And left the EU.
  • 2 2
 @Matt115lamb: that’s really tough to say. It would depend on your health insurance plans. For example on mine if I were to go into an urgent care or specialist for what you described I would pay $50 co pay, then probably another $300 all in for X-rays etc. But I also have good health insurance and I don’t pay anything for it; my plan is 100% covered by my employer.

On the other hand if you’re not insurances it would be absolutely outrageous, would put someone in finically debt for years if not life. But as of recently health care debt in US is not allowed to be reported on credit reports.

Overall healthcare in US is about $5,000 / yr than UK for a payer. But there’s cases like me where it’s probably less since I don’t have to pay a tax every paycheck and have free health insurance.
  • 5 0
 @Clifflane3: I thought it would be a hard question as so many variables ! Ours isn’t perfect be any means but the fact a homeless person with zero cash will get the same service as me is a good thing imo .
  • 5 0
 @Matt115lamb: I totally agree. I don’t think our system is ideal by any means. It works great for me, but I’m one of the fortunate ones. Other problem, insurance companies have soooo many lobbyists in government that we’ll probably never actually see change.

Google- “health insurance CEO bonuses in the US” it’s criminal.
  • 2 0
 @hatchleader: You make a fair point. There are pros and cons, like all things in life. Funny thing, I was never arguing that one system was better than the other. I simply addressed the fact that “free” healthcare isn’t free, despite what politicians try to convince us. Interesting to see how triggered we’ve been made feel if anyone points out something deemed unfavorable to one social/political viewpoint. Troubling that so many of us have unwittingly been sucked into this divisive, closed mindset. It’s unnecessary and unhealthy.
  • 1 2
 @kipvr: but it was always going to be too......see, once people notice they can overuse a service with zero impugnity, they will. humans are greedy apes. The only governor on the system is that people pay their own way(for the most part. voluntary catastrophic insurance pools should exist), and that they system has a robust competitive market place of private suppliers to compete and keep prices as low as possible and have a strata of quality so that everyone can afford care at the level they can afford it.
  • 1 9
flag Mtbdialed (Mar 5, 2023 at 12:52) (Below Threshold)
 @Matt115lamb: do you make over £300k/year? if not, it would take multiple years of your personal tax contributions to the NHS to pay for that care....so lots of your neighbors also paid for that.


anyway, if I did that here in the States, I would have similar speed, better doctors, and higher quality follow up care. if you don't beleive me, have a google. my out of pocket would be under $100. which is a bargain to not beg at the teet of the state for my well being....
  • 2 0
 @billbouv: It was about $5k out of my pocket. My awesome cranial reconstructive surgeon got himself a new boat.
  • 2 0
 @Mtbdialed: better doctors and follow up care , you sure ?
Multiple years is fine as most people don’t need that care very often !
  • 1 0
 @dresendsit: It's noticeable if you look at before and after photos. I broke nearly every bone in my face, and the cut went from my eye down through my lip. But if just meet me, you wouldn't know.
  • 3 0
 @Mtbdialed: Luckily I have good insurance, and it was about $5k out of pocket. If I didn't it would be bankruptcy for sure.
  • 1 0
 @dresendsit: My username was a premonition!
  • 3 0
 The best part is my mates made stickers of my Cat scan. Where you can see every bone in my face broken. The face did it's job, cushioned the blow so my brain was fine. I actually rode out. Straight to the hospital of course.
  • 1 0
 I feel so sorry for you my dude.
  • 8 3
 @Mtbdialed: you know, I remember being a kid in line at the grocery store with my two other siblings, my mom was using food stamps for our groceries because our father that left when I was two was only paying $100 per kid a month in child support. The man in line behind us said to my mom "you know we are all paying for your food". So maybe think twice before you come down with your arrogant, shortsighted crap about " your neighbors paying for your health care".
  • 1 3
 @Matt115lamb: yes I am sure. facts do not lie. the best health care on the planet is in the US....why do you think people with money in the UK, Canada and most of asia come to the US when they need care?
  • 1 4
 @goldmund: that man was correct though. instead of being a shithead later in life with a chip on your shoulder, try being thankful and saying so next time.
  • 1 0
 @Matt115lamb: my acl reconstruction cost 2k after insurance
  • 2 0
 @Mtbdialed: right, forgot to mention my monthly contribution was about 100USD less than in the US when I moved here 10 years ago, where costs were increasing about 10%per year for progressively worse coverage.
  • 1 0
 @dbullmtb: I'm totally fine now. Face looks good. I still have slight numbness in my upper right lip, teeth and cheek, but it's not nearly as bad as it could have been. Plus I got my deviated septum fixed on my last surgery, so I sleep better Smile
  • 2 0
 Even with the shitshow of a social healthcare system here in Slovenia it cost me exactly 2 car rides to and from the hospital to reconstruct and titanium reinforce my checkbone after a crash. Yeah, I pay for it with every paycheck, but it makes a lot more sense that way (my healthcare would cost me A LOT more than it will with this system than if I had to pay for it myself).

As for a fullface? Since the crash I've worn it for 8 total days. Enduro2 in Les Arcs and Megavalanche in 2021. Everything else is with a half-shell. And I just made a slight shitstorm asking when the national enduro series will finally give up the mandatory fullface helmet rule.
  • 1 0
 @ShredlyMcShredface: the numbness sounds like you broke your cheeckbone and in the process damaged the nerve behind it. I know that feeling, shaving with a numb lip/cheek was very weird.

When was your crash? I regianed full sense in the soft tissues fairly quickly, but the affected quadrant of teeth (same side, upper jaw) are fairly numb, especially the first 4 teeth, the molars are fine.
  • 1 0
 @Matt115lamb: We just went through this in our family. My wife had a tibial plateau fracture last year after she crashed on a rock garden. She is under my insurance and it cost her (us) $5500. That is the annual cost of our deductible. Oh yeah.. we both work in health care.... and that doesn't matter anymore.
  • 1 0
 @teo7z: That’s quite a lot then . Hope your wife is on the mend , luckily I didn’t need surgery ( pics of break in my dash ) and back on the bike !
  • 1 0
 @Matt115lamb: Tibial plateau fractures are a long rehab.. about a year. She's back on her bike but taking it easy at the moment.
  • 1 0
 @teo7z: mine was the TPF plus stretched ankle ligaments . Trying to take it easy when riding Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @teo7z: hospital I use to work at offered free MRIs and surgery to employees. Was amazing. Now I just get free health insurance with similar deductible as you. I’m sure they’ll restrict it more and more. My DRP surgery though was only $800 (not including ER and X-rays).
  • 1 0
 @dresendsit: Agree entirely. They should do a feature story in it if the story teller is willing to share.
  • 1 0
 Ditto, but zero cost. Trail day, kissed a tree and broke it all. Now only wear trail helmet for the climb, and snap in the chin bar for every descent. Full DH helmet when required.
  • 171 48
 I know you bike journalist love your pants, full face helmets, knee pads, ride wrap, fanny pack, 30 pc toolset......but some of us ride bikes with shorts and short sleeves and a regular helmet and have done so for decades and seem to have survived.
  • 36 4
 Deffo, but personally I feel like I push way harder with my full face on.
  • 17 50
flag cuban-b (Mar 3, 2023 at 13:05) (Below Threshold)
 @DG370: good for you
  • 82 6
 Hmmm sounds like survivorship bias. Wink
  • 22 7
 @rickybobby18: seriously lol. Comment above with $500k in bills begs to differ with this comment.
  • 38 7
 I had the same thought the other day when I learned that I can't possibly work at PB unless I put double downs with cushcore on my bike. Im not sure how to explain why my EXO+ casings have managed to survive all this time...
  • 3 0
 @DG370: Same here. I feel like I ride harder with the full face and pads on. Like back in the day when I was skating. I felt more daring when I had all my pads on.
  • 12 9
 Good for you, but what's you point? Nobody said *you* have to wear a FF helmet. Wear one or don't, it's personal preference.
  • 66 5
 @DG370: Id wear my more but one of the options not listed is peer pressure.
I know its really sad and its my issues (!) BUT wearing a full face sometimes is asking for a world of shit aimed at you!

Its either
1 - who is this clown, does he think he's Greg Minnaar ? Hes riding the same shit we're riding in our regular helmets
Or...
2- whose this loser what the hell are you pedalling around in a full face for? Next step is elbow pads over your hoody!

Unless its legit DH territory, it's always safer to put the open face on.

And I feel very sad about that.

And that's my fault.
  • 4 3
 @slow-cal: cause you ride like a fairy, but sting like a bee
  • 4 2
 @cuban-b: wtf. dbag. lol
  • 18 1
 30-ish years on bikes with plenty of crashes and half shells have served me well. Full face for lifts or shuttles, but there's no f-ing way I'm pedaling uphill in one. I don't care how many holes they poke in it, they're still friggin hot.
  • 15 3
 @toast2266: I know 2 pack a day smokers that lived into their 90s. I think anecdotal evidence is good to an extent but I kind of wish there was better crash/injury data out there so that us nerds out here could look at it.
  • 44 1
 @YukonMog: I don’t ride in a FF except for the bike park for various reasons, but I have never judged any of the folks I’ve seen on my trail rides who opt for one.

If one of your friends teases you for wearing a FF, get better friends.
  • 10 0
 @DKlassen8: I'm not denying that full faces are safer. But there's still no f*cking way that I'm going on a ride with significant pedaling in one. I've done it. It sucks.

If I've gotta pedal uphill for more than a couple hundred vert, the half shell is gonna have to do.
  • 7 1
 @toast2266: At the end of the day its personal choice. I have done many 1000 plus meter climbs with a full face BUUUUUT most of those big climb days are spent climbing fire roads and I inevitably end up taking my helmet off for the climbs. I don't know if I end up being safer overall.
  • 14 4
 @YukonMog: If your peers are giving you that pressure you need to change up your peers!
If it’s self inflicted pressure of what others *might* be thinking about you then you need to chill.
I’ve had looks for sure, but I don’t give a feck, I came to ride not be cool at school.
Get out and ride hard… for yourself Wink
  • 2 0
 @slow-cal: agreed. i ride hard rocky trails with exo+ and haven't gotten a flat on them in over 3k miles. I run lightweight inserts but more for rim protection than flat prevention
  • 8 5
 "Well I survived, so it must not be dangerous" is something I expect people who refuse to wear safety belts often tell everyone.
  • 7 0
 @jayacheess: if safety belts made people so hot and sweaty that driving a car became an entirely unpleasant experience, then I expect less people would wear them.
  • 7 5
 @toast2266: Modern enduro helmets don't really do that, though.
  • 4 0
 @jayacheess: we'll just have to agree to disagree on that.
  • 8 0
 Yup, I have too, but I've also crashed real bad with and without pads, and you know what? It hurts a lot less if I'm wearing pads, so I tend to wear it all now.
  • 2 0
 @dylananderson: it just feels good to have my shameful secret out in the open now lol
  • 7 4
 FF are mandatory for nearly all DH, Enduro and even DS races. No problem, I love my FF and am secretly stoked when it's mandatory or at a bike park, but NOBODY wants to look like Ricky Racer on the local trail - bottom line.Not gonna happen. Not even worth a PB Poll. We're not smart enough to wear them all the time.
  • 15 7
 @jayacheess: "Well one guy out of millions got hurt badly (which is unfortunate), so it must be so dangerous that it's crazy not to wear a full face all the time" is something I expect people who overreact and don't use logic and statistics to make reasonable assessments to do. If a guy fell asleep watching a rom-com on his couch and tipped forward into his glass coffee table and botched up his face badly, would you forever wear a full face watching movies on your couch? We all make individual assessments regarding safety, and not wearing a full face for trail riding doesn't make someone a reckless idiot.
  • 5 0
 @rickybobby18: the voice of the dead is seldomly heared.
  • 1 0
 @sfarnum: I know I know you're right but still..
  • 1 0
 @DG370: cheers for the words dude. You're totally right but you know what it's like!
  • 1 0
 Not a journalist thing, many people here come from DH and full face helmet is the first thing you take. It took me 5 years to start thinking about an other kind of helmet for enduro sessions
  • 1 0
 I think this is probably the main reason.. It is just what you get used to and becomes your habit. As kids you start with half face and you continue you that as you get older then it becomes harder to change. Humans don't like to change their habits.
  • 3 1
 @YukonMog: Let's talk about peer-pressure when you have to get your jaw fixed or when you see the dentist bill of that little otb which wasn't planned. What a bunch of BS.
  • 2 0
 I think it’s also worth noting that a full face is typically 2x the price of a comparable half shell. And half shells are often in the $200 range these days. Lots of people don’t want to shell out that kind of cash every time they need a new helmet.
  • 1 0
 @pugafi: I suspect you’re at least half right haha
  • 3 1
 @robw515: It's not one guy out of millions. I suspect the rate of facial injury in mountain biking is startlingly high. The incorrect assumption, as I've already pointed out, is thinking that because it hasn't happened to you yet, that means it won't ever happen to you.
  • 7 1
 The best thing you can do to prevent injury is learn how to crash. Go lap a step-up a few hundred times. Learn to roll out of crashes and dismount the bike in weird ways. Buy a crappy DJ if you’re worried about wrecking your bike, but practice falling down. I’ve seen so many crashes where the rider knows they’re in trouble, but freezes up and hits the ground like a bag of meat.
Build that muscle memory. Learn how to gtfo when things go sideways. It won’t save you in every crash, but neither will a $900 wünder helmet.

Also stretch before you ride. Who cares if you look like a dork in the parking lot. Limber up. Pulled ligaments are no joke.

But there’s no way to sell practice and stretching so you won’t see articles on it…
  • 2 0
 @jayacheess: statistics are for suckers
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: it sure is. We all use such bias every day. I ate properly cooked chicken breast tonight but I have a buddy that won't eat it because seriously bad luck made him seriously sick one time.
  • 1 0
 @jayacheess: I think your suspicion that "the rate of facial injury in mountain biking is startlingly high" is wrong and just your unsupported opinion based on nearly nothing. I have not seen any data that would suggest that is true, and my own observed data (from the ~40 mountain bikers I know well and the several hundreds I've met over the years), not one of them has had a biking related facial injury worse than a few stitches on the chin, and they all (or at least ~99%) wear a half shell or less when trail riding.
  • 2 0
 @robw515: Could be where and what we ride? Either way, I agree that neither of our anecdotal experiences are great for making a general argument about the risk factors in wearing or not wearing full face helmets. Maybe we'll see statistics at some point.
  • 1 0
 @jayacheess: Fair enough. Local terrain, trail types, riding style, etc are certainly going to affect individual experiences and safety risks.
  • 1 0
 Yep, and some riders go a lot bigger on a regular basis than you ever have dreamed about...
  • 1 0
 @Lylat: yup! I never seem to crash the same way twice so maybe that means I learn from my mistakes or I'm an inconsistent rider. Either way I protect my head with a half-shell because I'm hoping its enough if I hit my head. I can't predict if it is or isn't and I can't predict if I'll snap my neck or puncture a lung. Too many factors. Two years ago I had a big crash bouncing off a tree and the result was two hematomas in my skull. I didn't actually hit the helmet on the tree, it was whiplash induced. The doctor said I'm too old to be riding those trails its time to slow down and get a different hobby. Sorry, no. I did buy a new half-shell just in case that one was damaged.

Learning to fall is invaluable and will help as much as a spine protector or knee pads or full face. Or rabbits foot.
  • 90 0
 Where's the options for "the chin bar blocks my snot rockets"?
  • 14 0
 and spit loogies!
  • 19 0
 Where is the option for “FF makes me look like a more advanced rider than I am but I also want to not loose my teeth”?
  • 8 0
 @jkwilliamz: I have definitely been mid race run and forgot I was wearing a full face and just spat right into the helmet. 10/10 don’t recommend
  • 1 0
 I Spit in my FF when I really have to. Didn’t die from this so far.
  • 2 0
 Just work on your aim.
  • 76 0
 I just switch it based on bike. Unless I'm only doing XC trails with no rocks, I wear a full face pretty much every time I ride my enduro bike. With my hardtail, I generally go half shell. Really it's a function of how fast I'm planning to go. I wear a full face on my bigger bike because even if the terrain isn't crazy, it will always encourage me to take risks.
  • 20 0
 Same.
For local ‘exercise’ loops I go open face, as soon as I go anywhere proper I’m full face (I have to go to work on Monday vibe).
If there’s a lot of fire track or easy single track to begin with I ride with my lid on my back/pack.
  • 5 0
 Same here. The full face goes on if I'm riding my enduro bike. I've had too many rides where I get distracted and go hit a much harder trail than I intended, so I find its always better to bring the full face.
  • 18 24
flag wolftwenty1 FL (Mar 3, 2023 at 12:49) (Below Threshold)
 You look insane on multi-use trails is part of the issue. People around here already hate bikers enough.
  • 8 1
 I have never once in my life seen a person riding moto with a half shell, even when they're 'enduro' riding in the woods going slower than me on a mtb in those same woods. Weird how mtbers wear half shells, myself included.
  • 56 0
 I don't wear one cause it keeps putting out my smoke when I'm riding my ebike.
  • 5 0
 @DG370: Same here. My full face is actually very comfortable.
  • 3 0
 Yup. XC bike has a Proframe lid. Enduro has a IXS Trigger. DH has a D4. It is always cold here so never have the overheating problem.
  • 6 0
 @Jvisscher: True, I also love my FF for winter riding, keeps your ears warm and head a lot dryer Big Grin
  • 21 1
 I find the biggest reason I don't wear a full face is because when I don the goggles and the full wrap around helmet, I have zero perception of what the hell is happening outside. I feel so insulated and invincible from the world that I always make dumb mistakes. Of course heat is an issue when I'm pedalling (there's no way I'm climbing a few thousand feet wearing a full face) and weight puts a good strain on your neck, but loss of perception is the weirdest factor for me.
  • 2 0
 @Tmackstab: can’t tell if this mega sarcasm and a trap so. I’m falling for it with the incorrect reference by using ‘enduro’ and now think you have genuinely never seen trials bikers who only wear open face helmets e.g our lord and saviour Dougie Lampkin or his mate Robert Warner. In a real quandary
  • 2 0
 @wolftwenty1:
Actually that‘s a point - people think you are an „extreme DH Rider“ and betone eben more unser and opposed to mtb in my area.
  • 1 0
 @james182: crazy, that's the same problem I had. But I ride a hobo- Harley 2 stroke conversion specialized evo.
  • 1 0
 @BrianColes: I feel you, same for me when I put some goggle on, when it's getting colder or if really wet. I always want to take them off but after a bit (maybe an hour), I'm getting kind of used to it! If not cold or wet, I just put my sunglasses and it's fine, just feel a bit the extra weight for some time but not feeling like I'm riding akward and making dumb mistakes like I do with the goggles. lol

I was always putting my ski goggles on my forehead until those big window goggles arrived! Woww!!! I only wear those now and it doesn't bother me while snowboarding or fatbiking. I don't think somebody is doing goggles like this for motocross/mtn biking, and would probably not fit with a fullface but that would change everything!
  • 1 0
 @Tmackstab: I have, though a good few years ago (80s and 90s) and i remember once a "motorcycle expert" coming riund to our school and telling us how much structurally stronger a full face. Good point though.
  • 1 0
 @fella87: Not really sarcasm, more of an observation.
  • 79 11
 Don't know why this is not an possible answer, but where i live in germany there are a lot of shared trails with hikers, people walking their dogs and so on and i can say, if you wear full face, they get scared because they feel you look scary or unfriendly, which is not good for our image as bikers
  • 20 6
 In the list of trail users that look scary or unfriendly, mountain bikers are pretty far down it
  • 7 2
 I agree100%.
  • 16 0
 @fewnofrwgijn: For us mountainbikers, yep, true that. Thing is, even with a half shell, and even in fairly non-aggro/non-moto looking clothes, by the time you wear knee pads and are riding down the hike and bike path on the way to your local trails, folks seem to perceive you as going three times your actual speed and coming across as aggressive.
  • 10 3
 Lets compare friendly "hello" from a fullfaced mountain biker vs no greeting from a halfshell mountain biker. Would it be reasonable to assume the way the biker interacts with other trail users has a greater impact on image than the gear?
  • 1 0
 --
  • 3 1
 Same situation in Colorado. The Karens already spook easily, and the full face spooks them even easier.
  • 8 0
 I value my safety over however they "feel" I look
  • 1 0
 @m-t-g: Isn't that a good thing?
  • 9 1
 Well, with your face hidden behind body armor and (often mirrored) goggles, looking down on them from up on the bike, you don’t look human anymore and there is no eye contact. Of course people can get scared, no matter what you say or do.
And that’s intentional. In order to look “cool”, moto and DH gear is carefully styled to look aggressive and menacing.
  • 1 0
 @DKlassen8: Think you nailed it!
  • 34 1
 Im quite happy wearing a full face in terms of weight/ heat/ breathability.
Problem is; I've never really properly understood the balance between protecting my beautiful face and the increased risk of rotational forces on the neck and brain. I'd love to read something that quantifies or academically clears the matter up.
  • 6 4
 I agree. While chin bars can protect your face from sharp rocks, it also increases the rotational force on your neck in a crash.
I was considering wearing my Fox Rampage for downhill skiing for many reasons (safety, more wind protection, and its warmer than a half shell). However, after some research I learned that full face helmets are generally a bad idea for skiing because in a crash they dig into the snow and can snap your neck. Now I'm curious about whether this is the same for MTB.
Also interested about whether a neck brace can prevent this.
  • 26 0
 Studies on motorcyclists have found pretty conclusively that full face helmets do not lead to an increase in neck injuries (rather they were associated with a reduction):
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7264075

The analogy to mountain biking isn't perfect, but the worry about helmets and neck injuries has long been passed around the motorcycle world as well and the best data we have suggests that it is misguided..
  • 7 0
 @eebz: I can anecdotally vouch that a full face with mips can protect your neck. I faceplanted off a drop landing sideways a couple years ago. It was a weird sensation feeling the compression of the chin bar and feeling the helmet rotate around my head on the impact, no twisting forced on my neck. I somehow walked away completely unharmed aside from scratches on my legs. Promptly got another helmet after that one.
  • 4 0
 I actually think my detachable full face might've really helped me in this regard. *Anecdotal evidence that I was partly unconscious for ahead*

I had one really bad crash where I faceplanted otb, scorpion style. Broken vertebrae t4-t6 and mild concussion, but my facial wounds were just bruises and scrapes that cleared up within a week.

It appears that the chin bar absorbed the initial hit and then detached cleanly at the attachment points. I didn't suffer any type of whiplash, sprain, or any other type of rotational injury, which given the way I fell and ragdolled seems unlikely if the bar remained attached. So maybe there is something like that at work and maybe that style of helmet, detachable full face rated for "Enduro and light downhill" could be the best option for trail riders looking for the best balance of protection and weight. I never even took off the chin bar I always liked it better on
  • 5 1
 Smashing your face up isn't just cosmetic. Teeth are a thing...as is brain damage.
  • 1 0
 @mchance: Interesting. The detachable chin bar acted in a kind of sacrificial lamb way. Makes sense, although it might not have been designed this way intentionally.
I think this article gives a short shift to the detachable chin bar helmets. I have one and and I usually climb up with it off, and then put it on for the descent. I'm lucky that I live in a mountainous area where most rides consist of a steady uptrack, and then a descent with minimal ups. It's definitely a lot cooler with the chin bar off, specially in the summer. I keep the chin bar in my backpack, joined with my other protective gear for the climb up in hot weather.
  • 2 0
 @MarcusBrody: Thanks for the link, but these results are strictly about road accidents. With road helmets.
Which is an entirely different environment. It would be scientifically unsound to simply transfer those results to MTB.
  • 1 0
 @Fill-Freakin: exactly, I view it as similar to a crumple zone or breakaway panels on a car. Id definitely wager that the bar was designed to detach in one piece as opposed to snapping under pressure.

I might not recommend that style of helmet for the more extreme downhill rides but there's certainly good applications for it
  • 35 5
 A good enduro helmet is only slightly hotter than a halfshell. I've worn them through grueling climbs in the middle of summer, and I've never felt compromised.

The main benefit of a half shell is just that it's less stuff on your head. It feels nice not having stuff against your cheeks. I would love to wear one, but I've had too many close calls that would have resulted in serious/permanent face injuries.
  • 5 2
 They can feel claustrophobic at first when doing gruelling climbs but that’s just familiarity.
New full face lids are very well ventilated.
  • 18 2
 You're in Canada. Slightly hotter is too hot in the southeast summers. There's a lot of days I don't ride at all because of the heat.
  • 4 0
 @jeremy3220: I don't ride in July and August because of the heat and humidity here in Texas. It turns a hobby into a chore that I don't enjoy.
  • 5 1
 @jeremy3220: Tell us about it in the interior.
  • 3 1
 I will see 110*+ (45+ for everyone else) routinely during the summer on my bike commute (hour each way).
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: I would die. Most of my riding is done between -5 and 15C. By 25 I overheat. When I lived in Cali I quit riding almost entirely for 4 years. Now back in Squamish I ride every day I'm not away at work. Perfect temp range for me here.
  • 7 1
 @jeremy3220:
You realise Canada gets got too, right? Interior BC literally has a desert.
  • 36 0
 @notthatfast: Yeah it gets so hot here in the summer I have to wipe the condensation off my igloo with a seal fur
  • 13 1
 @notthatfast: you realize a desert is not characterized by temperature but by precipitation or lack there of, right?
  • 4 1
 @misterkslays:
Yes, google it.
  • 3 1
 @jeremy3220: Its kind of weird to comment on weather while only referencing the country as a whole. The southern end of Ontario is almost parallel to the Utah/Idaho state line. BC ranges from full on rain forest climates (vancouver) to semi-deserts (okanagan/nicola valley) and everything in between.
  • 2 1
 @jeremy3220: Our summers here in BC have been hitting the 85-95f range pretty regularly. But yeah, I take your point. I would probably avoid a hard climb in the direct sunlight at the higher end of that heat range, regardless of helmet.
  • 2 0
 @Jvisscher: I’m back on the East Coast after 4 years in SoCal and the thing that used to happen to me regularly out there where I would have to take long breaks mid ride to stop feeling like death hasn’t happened once here, where all the trails are in the woods
  • 1 1
 @notthatfast: The Okanagan desert actually sounds lovely, average 25°C in the summer and low humidity...sign me up.
  • 2 0
 @jeremy3220: Lived in the okanagan for 4 years. Its worth a visit at least! Lots of lakes, wineries, and biking (uphill lifts too!)
  • 4 0
 I remember going on a ride in Moab with friends. I asked if I should wear the chin bar on my convertible helmet. One of the guys asked me, “Are you going to crash?”

Good point.

You never know when this stuff is going to happen, and that one time you go without a full face could be the time you wish you hadn’t. It’s not that much hotter — wear the full face.
  • 2 0
 @jayacheess: Lytton hit 49.5C/121.1F a couple years ago. It is west coast wet on the West side of the Frasier river, and the east side that Lytton is on is the beginning of the desert that stretches over to Kamloops and kinda down to Osoyoos.
  • 1 1
 @jeremy3220: We have been getting temperatures of up to 104*F the last couple of summers. Two summers ago we hit 108*F.
  • 1 1
 @jeremy3220: If you take into account the humidity of the area I live in, those temperatures are very dangerous for any outdoor activity. Very high risk of heat stroke when the coast gets hot.
  • 1 1
 @gnarnaimo: And you always wear a fullface helmet right?
  • 1 0
 @jeremy3220: lol... admittedly no. I did have a pretty scary crash a couple of years ago that has me wearing an enduro full face on the local 'enduro' trails. But in the networks were there is a lot of undulating terrain I don't. I know I should, but I like to rack up the km's, and a full face adds too much to the struggle.
  • 31 5
 Should wear a condom all the time too.
  • 24 0
 Yes - Much like a fullface helmet, if something goes wrong, you'll be riding a less less for the foreseeable future.
  • 3 15
flag vinay FL (Mar 3, 2023 at 12:53) (Below Threshold)
 Nah, a womens condom could be inserted well before action but a male condom should only be applied once one has an erection. So, first check what you have down there and then base your decision thereupon.
  • 3 0
 No, only when you’re riding.
  • 7 0
 My dick doesn‘t seem hard enough to warrant one
  • 4 0
 Got a vasectomy for a reason. Haven't worn one in 15 years.
  • 29 0
 Definitely wear one if you're in unfamiliar territory or riding something sketchy. You can probably skip if you're in well tested and familiar terrain.

Wait, we're still talking helmets right?
  • 12 0
 @JSTootell: A true weightweenie,bravo.
  • 4 0
 @JSTootell: Seconding this. Its been firehosing ever since, best $20 i ever spent (not kidding, it was $20).
  • 5 4
 Condom + face mask + full face helmet and you'll be safe from everything or nothing depending on what is considered acceptable thought at the moment. Follow the science!
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: amen brother! It's been 20 years this year and mine was maybe $200?

Hooray for being environmentally friendly, full on weight weenie and ladies man all in one ;-)
  • 4 1
 @BarryWalstead: Correct: not having kids is the single most ecologically friendly thing you can ever do these days. And is that weight weenie or wait, weenie?
  • 19 1
 I wear one at the pump track and at the bike park, but I can't climb with one here in LA, can't breathe man
  • 6 0
 I got this thing called the half-clip that lets me attach it to my handlebars for the climb, it wobbles a little, but it's worth it sometimes
  • 2 0
 @Dogl0rd: dang, link me man
  • 6 0
 @mariomtblt: thehafclip.com
You have to fiddle with your spacers a bit. It can go underneath or above the stem. Below, it can rub on the tire sometimes depending on how you set it up
  • 1 1
 @mariomtblt: never even had a half shell when I lived in LA. Full face only. No climbs are tech or even have downhill sections so never had a helmet on for the climbs. The only bummer was the road climb around Rocky Peak, but people drive real nuts around there so I guess it was a good thing.
  • 4 1
 @Johnnie8: no climbs are tech? no downhills? haha now I know you live on the west side. try riding something other than runyon.

climb this trail and tell me we dont have tech climbs
www.trailforks.com/trails/cheney-ranch-lower
  • 1 0
 @Dogl0rd: That requires a lot more steerer tube that most people have. Would be better if it somehow goosenecked out of the top cap.
  • 1 0
 @mariomtblt: I was riding Rocky Peak, Sui, Mt Wilson/Sunset/El P, Laguna gnar/Santiago Oaks/my home trails near Sequoia National Park.

I meant not a single climb was tech and there is literally no intermittent down hill on any of those climbs. Sorry I forgot there are people in LA that actually like climbing or aren’t on e bikes haha
  • 2 0
 @Johnnie8: I see I see, thats legit yeah haha, el p is like half up and down but granted in short bursts. but props to you if you pull off a full face year round. I sure as hell can't
  • 2 0
 @mariomtblt: never wore it once on those climbs. Couldn’t handle it. Knee pads around ankles too. Was mostly out in laguna or shuttling Mt Wilson in the summer. Moved to New Mexico and have a chin scrape to prove I mostly wear a half shell now haha. Those trails you were talking about always seem rad but I lived like right in the middle of LA and could in ride weekends so I only explored around there once. Good stuff though.
  • 2 0
 @mariomtblt: here you go. Here is the link. Www.thehafclip.com

It is now available in allow and bezel led edges. Very useful, works really well and excellent customer feedback.
  • 1 0
 @vapidoscar: that design would protrude too much and could definitely hurt in an OTB. Many riders have commented about the low steer tube. Working on a solution for that.
  • 1 0
 @Dogl0rd: glad to hear you enjoy using your Haf-Clip
  • 11 0
 ever since I broke my jaw last summer...I haven't ridden without my full face. Get a light weight trail full face with DH frontal crash rating and good airflow and you're golden. IXS trigger mips is the bomb. Holding up well after 1 year of use
  • 10 0
 No one mentioned mouth guards.
They prevent expensive dental work, and concussions as well. A friend had a concussion from falling backwards during a manual and hitting his tail bone. Clenching his teeth, the shock traveled to his brain. You can get custom ones at your dentist, or just go to Walmart and get the Wilson brand ones for $1 that you boil. The custom ones made by glidewell labs have different levels of protection and actually mention they are rated for MTB. I wear mine MTB, snowboarding and even surfing when the waves have some size.
  • 1 0
 Second that. The custom ones made by dentists are expensive but I don’t even notice it while riding, neither up nor down. One could probably race XC wearing it.
  • 12 0
 Impressed by the honesty of those who admit they are deterred by peer pressure, solution is to learn not to give any fucks what others think.
  • 9 0
 Last summer, I had a massive OTB riding a trail that I knew well. I was wearing a half-shell and came down and compressed my neck, causing C4/C5 nerve and brachial plexus damage that resulted in an 8-week partial paralysis of my right arm and shoulder. I've mostly regained use of my arm, but the atrophy from the paralysis has made a mountain for training and rehab.
I feel like if i had been wearing my full face, the extra coverage of the helmet would have helped to prevent at least some of the compressive load that my neck took when I crashed.
That said, I'll also be adding a neck brace and jacket for my park days.
  • 10 1
 I have a feeling that the trend to wear full face will eventually become the norm. Much like snowboarding/skiing, when I started 20+ years ago it was never a thing. Left for a while due to living in hot/flat places and after coming back a few years ago, everyone is wearing a helmet now.

I wonder at what point if we get our kids to wear one as they grow older it is just the thing that we do, vs getting the awkward looks now for ripping on a local trail where 99% of people wear a half shell only
  • 9 0
 The one obvious answer is missing - at least for Austrians.
The trails I‘m riding are illegal (as there are almost no legal trails around) and shared. So, acceptance of bikers is low combined with a big bunch of prejudice.
Fullfaces, where the hickers can’t even see your eyes or your smile, push the notion of „the reckless racing bikers“ … and that doesn’t help at all in changing the situation
  • 9 0
 I often feel like I should be wearing it for the harder trails where I live. It’s just hard to justify wearing it for a 45-60 minute ride when it only feels like it’s needed for 5 minutes.
  • 2 0
 that's where the clippy chinbar helmets come in
  • 2 3
 @dontcoast: yea but none of them are great.
  • 1 0
 Not too hard to strap to a pack or even handlebar. I cannot at all wear a helmet up (even 1/2 lid) on climbs, even gentle uphill terrain - coupla ski-straps for the bar or toss it on the pack & bang: good to go. I see tons a riders doing this in my area (Pisgah) tho most do not.
  • 1 0
 @dontcoast: I did used to have an awesome Bell super DH which I used for bike park and some bigger days. Definitely a good option
  • 1 0
 For fire road climbs I just hang my lid off my handlebars. Im only going about 6 km/h on these climbs anyways
  • 2 0
 @wolftwenty1: sure they're not perfect, but they're better than a few years ago, there are more options than before, and they offer a half-shell for 45 minutes and a fullface for 15 minutes. so pretty much ideal for the use-case.
  • 1 0
 Some of my worse injuries were caused on the easier trails. Most of them not my fault. Like hikers hiking up a downhill only bike trail that has plenty of signage warning them that the trail is a bike only and downhill only trail. I will only wear a full face helmet unless I'm just riding in my neighborhood(I live in a remote neighborhood where if you are in my neighborhood you either live there or you are delivering something. We have very few cars).
  • 10 0
 I wear glasses with a full face all the time. Looks dorky but I haven't had great experiences with contacts or over-glasses goggles.
  • 1 0
 Check out the goggle inserts made by Youzee. I have a set and they’re downright amazing.
  • 8 0
 Let's adjust this article for the desert southwest, and not just in the middle of winter when you guys like to come down to do your bike tests. A full face is dangerously hot. And goggles for the mud splats? What's that?

I'd consider something like the Proframe RS in the pictures for part of the year, but it would have to be sunglass compatible. Goggles would just be stupid here.
  • 1 0
 My rule is if it’s too hot to ride in a full face, I go up in elevation until it not.
  • 2 0
 What would make a helmet not compatible with sunglasses? They fit fine on the proframe and stage at least, and i think the only reason people dont is because they dont think it looks cool
  • 1 0
 BC interior here, and I don't understand how people ride with goggles. Unless you're just putting them on for the downhill. They would be nice for dust if you're in a group ride.
  • 1 0
 Phoenix here. Ride summers. Bell Super 3R (don’t remove the chin guard) & sunglasses.
Don’t care what people think….
  • 2 0
 As someone who used to ride in full helmet in Phoenix during the summer, it's not that bad provided you know how to deal with it. I still live in Arizona and only ride with full face helmets. Rocks vs face, the rocks win.
  • 9 0
 Missing poll option: actively mocked by other riders on the trail for wearing one.

I keep wearing it, but this has happened more than once.
  • 3 0
 they already have ugly mugs, envious of our beauty
  • 4 0
 Try responding with "your mom has worms"
  • 2 0
 Depends where you ride. I think you're more likely to be actively mocked for not wearing a FF where I live.
  • 2 0
 If you get into an accident with a half helmet where a full face would have saved you, those people aren't going to pay your bills. Until they pay your bills and everything associated with that, they don't get to decide what you wear.
  • 2 0
 @Psicko23: for real. When I was a kid I saw a guy ask his macho friends if they were gonna come wipe his ass if he ended up in a wheelchair (they were egging him on to jump off something). That line always stuck with me: "you gonna come wipe my ass? You going to take my kids to school? f*ck you!"

Luckily I haven't had to use that in a while, my friends are mostly adults.
  • 9 2
 Missed the option of “I’m a trend whore and let other people decide what’s best for my health”

And let me help help you with your excuses:
It’s too hot. The weather doesn’t give a f*ck about you.
I don’t ride terrain that justifies it. If you go over 15 mph it justifies it. Speed doesn’t care about you.
It’s uncomfortable. So is hitting a rock or tree or stump with your face.

But do what ever you want. I really don’t care.
  • 8 1
 I have a family, a career, the tailend of a mortgage, and an apparently selfish desire to have full mobility and my own teeth and jawline into my 50s.

At the same time I ride as hard as I can on great trails.

I always wear a full face and armour, because the opposite idea, that you might buy into some ridiculous meme that hurting yourself more than necessary if you make a small mistake is cool and desirable is actually stupid as f*ck.

It’s great to see a lot of people admitting they don’t wear protection because of peer pressure and other reductive ideas about self harm and being ‘hard’ because; admitting is the first step, and, let’s face it rationally; Any judgement of behaviour that encourages unnecessary harm as a reward for exploration doesn’t sound great to me. You literally have one brain and face in this life. One spinal cord. People make amazing devices to protect them. Choosing to ignore a chance not to be injured and limit damage to both yourself and people who love you is frankly backward.
  • 7 0
 Ive been wearing a bell super dh on pretty much every ride with the chin bar on. Now im curious, what helmets have you seen the chin bar come off of? Makes me interested in a 1 piece full face
  • 5 2
 I think the convertible is a compromise that isnt worth making. A 1 piece FF is lighter less bulky and should be stronger for a given weight. Ive been really happy with my first gen proframe, and itll be between the newer proframe or the TLD stage when its time to replace it.
  • 4 0
 @Torbo24: Love my Stage light, cool and dh rated. I don't use it in the park i still have a D3 for that but any hardcore trail rides it's great
  • 1 0
 I used to have a convertible. I virtually never put the chin bar on. Was a waste.
  • 3 0
 I have a giro switchblade and the chin bar came off on a crash at the Squamish enduro. I was taking it off for the climbs and made the mistake of installing it (or trying to) while still wearing the helmet. I then had my front wheel slip off a tiny bridge that was wet and binned it hard and fast with no time to put out my hands. The chin bar was on enough to save my face, with just a small scratch where it gave free on the one side that wasn’t connected properly. I think I then put it back on half assedly and finished the stage (with significantly less confidence in grip and helmet).

I’ll be picking up the new pro frame and making it my regular go to lid for most rides.
  • 2 0
 @djyosh: best word in a long time …half “assedly”
  • 4 0
 @djyosh: this comment makes the convertible come off well! The error was user based, and despite this error it still probably saved your face. Not sure why you lost confidence in it after this crash?
  • 1 0
 @lloydfletch: for the rest of that run, is what I meant.
  • 6 0
 I ride 3-5 days a week. Lot of my riding includes 30-60 climbs, some single track some fire road. I always wear a full-face. This is why The Haf-Clip was invented. For those that need to climb, want a full-face but don't like wearing the helmet on the way up. Great solution, full-face, chin-bar, even pads or other gear. Www.thehafclip.com
  • 1 0
 I get this but you can just strap a FF to the bar w/o that clip...seems like just one more thing to add. Been using a rubber ski strap for 15 yrs...just figure 8, done. However: it does not have a slick marketing page like yr item so cast me into the flames Wink
  • 1 0
 @Mtn-Goat-13: there is a really good review on NSMB. Each to their own. Customer feedback, easy of use and the fact that it allows for options are selling points. But good on you for finding a solution that works for you.
  • 6 0
 Getting my teeth straight was a long and relatively expensive process, no trail on this planet is worth needlessly busting teeth over and facial reconstruction wouldn't be fun or cheap either. Full face all the time and fuck anyone that has an issue with it. Also see face plants into trees, rocks and ground every week on Friday fails.
  • 7 0
 I wear my full face and neck brace all the time, and you'd be surprised how often I get made fun of for by full grown adults lol. Amazing that someone would talk down to you for...feeling safe?
  • 9 1
 @Pinkbike instead of "Poll" you need to call these "Data Mining for Profit"....... Dont be shy.
  • 3 0
 pinkbike crypto mining for prophet
  • 6 0
 What I don’t get is I see guys riding gnarly trails we were riding 15 years ago exclusively in full faces that now are riding in open faces. The trails are still gnarly with big consequences, what changed?
  • 5 0
 My opinion is that the perception of mountain biking changed. The soundtracks for all the 90s mountain bike films were either heavy rock, metal, punk, or aggressive hip hop. Those soundtracks still show up in todays films but there is also a lot off really mellow music being played in the background now too. Mountain bikers used to be seen as edgy, hardcore adreline junkies. Now every comment section talked about dentists.
  • 6 0
 @DKlassen8: dentists are probably being talked a lot about because…. wait for it…. everybody is wearing open face helmets and they need dental work
  • 2 0
 The sport overall has changed so much in 15 years, back then there was only like 5 percent of weekend warriors were hitting drops and gap jumps and those were the guys wearing full face. It was guys on dirt jumpers and DH bikes riding spicy trails and everyone else kept 2 wheels on the ground. Hitting a gap jump just seemed a lot ballsier back then but now with dramatic improvement in bike tech, trail building, and half helmets, almost everyone is popping and dropping and ripping berms.
  • 2 0
 Skill levels, bike tech and trail building have improved dramatically.
  • 4 0
 For me, it depends on who im riding with. My daily before work ride is with mostly older guys, and its an hour at a solid pace, but not shredding by any means, and we usually avoid the gnarlier lines. If im riding the same trails with a different set of friends, i use the proframe. Full face is a great idea and its hard to go wrong wearing it. Also full face and glasses is just fine, its really silly to not wear the right helmet just because you dont want to wear goggles. For me, goggles are much less often needed than the FF
  • 5 1
 Pinkbike is not really telling the whole story here. The real version should read: If you’re hitting gaps, and live some place gnarly, like Whistler/ North shore, THEN why aren’t you wearing a full face more often. Most riders on Pinkbike don’t hit gaps, unless they’re at a bike park, which is where most of us wear a full face.

They’re are some who wear one all the time, but in warmer areas it’s not a good combo with asthma.
  • 3 1
 Plenty of other natural features you can crack yr egg on than gaps - that's just one of tons of options. Near me there are 2500-3500 ft drops full of babydoll, drops, slabs & chunk, seeps, creeks, hits & chutes that can wreck-yr-cranium if ya get off line and none of that has to be a gap at speed. Just going off line or hitting a small rock wrong can do it and bam - face damage...especially when you're most confident and not even thinking about wiping out.
  • 4 2
 @Mtn-Goat-13:

It sounds like you live in a “gnarly place like Whistler or the North Shore.” You should wear a full face. Risk in life is unavoidable at a certain point: the most dangerous thing any of us can ever do is something we do every day, drive a car or be a passenger in a car. Let me know when you start driving with your full face on…
  • 2 0
 @Saidrick: Pisgah (32 yr rider) and it can be pretty gnarly or at least, that's what I look for still. Even then: guilty of riding 1/2 lid too often b/c stapping the full face to the pack or bike seems like a dirge. At park however, not a question. Anyway - point was just that ya can wipe at even on a smooth trail section and impale your skull or whatever...but even then I'd never wear FF on mellower trails. I"ll fax you when I start wearing FF in the truck.
  • 1 1
 @mtn-goat.
false equivalency. In any case an airbag actuation would rip your head off if you’re wearing a ff.
  • 3 0
 No idea what yr referring to as a false equivalency (but read up on intended humor...and faxes). I'll page you for the FF truck attempt
  • 4 0
 I used to ride half-shell for trail riding with my full-face only for pure DH days....well after a very minor crash I fell just the right way and broke my orbital bone. If I had been wearing a full-face I would have walked away with nothing more than a scratch.
Needless to say I wear a full-face 100% of the time now, and with the surge in lightweight full-face helmets (mine personally is a Smith Mainline) there really is no excuse for the extra protecting they give.
  • 1 0
 Wow. Your orbital bone comment makes me wonder if goggles should be part of this discussion too. I wear them about half the time on my half shells and always with my full face (TL Stage).
  • 1 0
 @WasatchEnduro: yeah, I wonder if a nice middle ground could be some kind of half shell (even with some extra ear coverage, but plenty of ventilation) and an actual chin bar (think the field goal kicker’s helmet in a football game, or this Oakley ski helmet www.oakley.com/en-us/product/FOS900588?variant=193517279066&cid=PM-FGS_000000-5.US-Oakley-SmartPLA-AFA&&&&&ds_rl=1293048&ds_rl=1293048&gclid=Cj0KCQiA0oagBhDHARIsAI-BbgfmACvFmpESnPEoahGufte9S7F4XLwgIrKHRacXS40GWbeT-DH4qygaAqo2EALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds ) and well ventilated goggles. Goggles and chin bar could provide teeth/ nose/ orbital bone protection while still being close to the weight/ bulk of a half shell. Might be safer from the standpoint of not creating any excessive spin or leverage on twisting your neck vs a normal full face with the long chin bar and visor, too
  • 2 0
 @RileyMarmesh: curious about his also. There must be a reason why nobody's done it yet.
  • 6 2
 I am guilty of not using the full face enough.
I hate it when people say "I am on my xc/enduro/shorter travel bike" and riding the same stuff they ride on their bigger bike. Aren't you taking more risk by riding a less capable bike, thus a full face may make more sense in some situations?

First enduro I raced at Plattekill, an experienced DH racer was there and with a half shell, someone asked why not a full face and they said I am not on my DH bike. We were literally racing one of the same trails that a DH race was on a few weeks prior, this person had less gear and less bike.
  • 3 0
 I also have some Plattekill stories. Lotta crazy goings on there.
  • 5 1
 I rode over 30 years with a open faced helmet. Last year my carbon bar broke at the left brake lever mount on a fast trail just as I hit a water bar jump. I crashed into the side of the hill with my face making contact instead of going to the right into a steep valley. I was really fortunate that I did not split my face open and knock me out like what happened to my son a few months earlier. I then decided to buy a Kali Invader 2.0 as a crash replacement. The helmet is not much hotter than my previous helmet. I cannot ride it with goggles and I am that guy that wears it with sunglasses. I figured I was lucky with just a few scratches, and that I should be a good example. I rode nearly half the days of last year and riding that much just ups the odds of something happening. I would rather ride more and heal less, despite what others may think. I don't ride carbon bars anymore, either.
  • 1 1
 I was about to say something about that carbon bar but you finally talked about it in your last sentence! lol It never happened to me but it did to my friend and read a couple of stories like yours.....and seriously I just want to go back to an aluminium bar! But in 31.8mm. Razz I would have done it before but am now on front and rear coil so my alu bike is pretty damn heavy now....will probably still do it lol
  • 2 0
 @Timo82: I had a bar to bar impact with a ebiker a few minutes before the bars broke. Brake lever pushed into the bars and I did not notice it till it was too late. Make sure you check the integrity of your carbon bars if you crash with them. Though, I probably would not have seen the crack even if I looked it since it was under the brake lever clamp. I'll take the extra weight for the confidence. Though, I am still running We are One rims and have a carbon frame.
  • 4 0
 From experience, I’d never wear glasses with a full face again. The full face saved my face, but the leverage on the chin bar pushed the glasses into my face just below my eye socket.

So it’s goggles always with a full face for me now.

Also re knee (and elbow ) pads, there’s really no reason not to wear them these days.
  • 1 0
 Never thought about that... :S But I would never wear goggles all the time, too hot during summer + tunnel vision! I guess there's less chance of being hurt by your sunglasses with a FF than being hurt without a FF, goggles or sunglasses on or not. lol
  • 4 0
 I don’t ride without a full face - I don’t even own a half shell, but I do have five full face helmets.
I rather like my new teeth, and I intend to keep them that way. Learnt my lesson with that as a kid.

Basing what helmet you wear on the perceived terrain being somehow ‘safer’ is a bit odd to me…I know plenty of people who have slipped in the car park or when hopping kerbs in the street, or on a mild local or green trail and been injured in the face, and on the flip side I know plenty of people who have stacked on fast double blacks at bike parks and walked away without a scratch. They are accidents, and by definition, you don’t know where or when they are going to occur.
All I can do is protect myself to ny own minimum acceptable level, and that for me is a full face.
Each to their own
  • 4 0
 Wearing a full face helmet and a chest / back protective vest safe me of literally mayor fanfare after a stack on my own trails at home.. fast enough to see the clouds moving but ends with 10 TI screws and a plate on my collarbone... so, looking like a cool person is not going to safe from a 10km hour accident. Wearing as much protection w8ll keeps you riding more.
  • 3 0
 The angle of how someone looks wearing a certain piece of protective gear amuses me. Who cares what someone says about what you're wearing, odds are they are more insecure about themselves anyway. In regards to having more protection, you should wear the adequate amount you feel is necessary. I went down hard on a ride I do all the time, split my Fox Proframe and would have ended up with major surgery if I didn't have a FF. You tell me what sounds worse, the random guys chirping on the trail or sitting on an OR table.
  • 5 2
 I bought the lightest carbon neck brace and leatts enduro helmet and don't ride with anything less anymore. You don't notice either once you've worn them enough. Having good gear helps. I just can't be asked to take those risks with my face and neck anymore. Unless I am riding along a flat gravel path on my cruiser bike or commuting the half shell stays at home.
  • 7 0
 It all depends on the current trends viewed on Pinkbike...
  • 5 0
 I always wear my full face and honestly it's not too bad (100% Trajecta), drawbacks are insignificant against the protection I get.
  • 6 1
 I can't afford a nice one, and the cheap ones are all too hot and heavy. Is there anything out there that strikes the sweet spot of the price-comfort-protection matrix?
  • 11 4
 What is your brain and teeth worth? I'd bet if you looked at it like that you'd be happy to spend the extra to get a good one.
  • 2 1
 You can find nice ones on clearance. You might not like the color or something, but then you are just making excuses for not having one. I got one, nice one, pretty cheap on clearance. Still in the bag though.
  • 6 0
 @jkwilliamz: Check out the IXS Trigger FF,a friend just got one and it looks like a good deal: 600 grams,160€,DH certified.
  • 1 1
 @hhhanson: I think he just answered that question for you.
  • 2 0
 @nozes: I had a fox Proframe. Swapped it out for the IXS Trigger. Unreal light and breathable. Its my only helmet, even though spend way more time pedalling than at the park.
  • 1 0
 Price is relative, what is your range?
  • 6 1
 some of us live in phoenix.... no one wears one when its over 100 degrees (5 solid months a year) but we still ride year around
  • 1 0
 I wear a full face helmet all year round in Phoenix. I'd rather not face plant on a rock or a saguaro. Yeah it sucks, but coming from motorcycles I dress for the crash, not the ride.
  • 3 0
 I was already familiar with full face helmets for riding motorcycles which helped me go full-face. But also, the full-face helmet I went with is super duper light (IXS Trigger FF MIPS) and kind of disappears in that sense. If I did downhill I'd get a beefier one. I honestly forget (to some extent) that I am even wearing full face now. I can say it would be nice if there was a magic way to get water bottle water into my face without tilting my helmet upward or removing it...
  • 3 0
 The big reason that is missing from the poll is cost. A comparable full face tends to cost twice as much as an open face, and then I'm always going to want to have an open face lid around as well. It becomes hard to really justify spending another $400+ on a second helmet.
  • 3 0
 Never understood the need for a faster strap closure. It's not time on the clock in any race, and when I put a helmet on it usually stays on for hours, so it's not really a matter of convenience either. There are few (maybe none) systems safer, easier to adjust, or stronger than a double D, so I don't really see the point in magnetic stuff.
  • 5 1
 If the UCI forced everyone to use it in XC, then we would see amateurs using it more, even in more aggressive modalities than XC. Also remembering that the UCI XCO is increasingly dangerous.
  • 6 2
 My problem with it is sound. You don't hear the forest anymore. No birds, no creeks, no wind in the trees. Just the sounds of the helmet. How depressing. They should build one with free ears.
  • 1 0
 Tld stage fits the bill, i think the 2nd gen proframe as well
  • 4 0
 I always wear a full face helmet. Anything can happen at any time. Whenever I think "maybe I don't need to wear one because its hot" I see someone face plant and then i remember why I do.
  • 6 0
 I am going without a Helmet in 2023 until the advent calendar winners are announced. If i am injured it is on you PB.
  • 3 0
 After clipping a tree ripping thru a mostly flat local park trail, I impacted the next tree head on. I actually leaned as far as possible with my left temple grazing the tree and my left hand being smashed. I was fortunate to "only" have a plate and six screws in that hand with no serious face/head injury but I knew what might have been. The next ride was with a full-face helmet which I've worn every ride since then, (nearly 13 years ago). I don't get wearing a full face "sometimes" anymore than I get wearing a seatbelt sometimes. Even falling forward on your face from 0 mph can do serious damage.
  • 3 0
 It's about risk management. Consequence x probability = risk. Each individual has to decide the level of risk they are comfortable with and introduce appropriate mitigation measures (helmet type) as they see fit. The important thing is to understand both the possible consequence and the probability of that consequence.
  • 6 0
 In Sweden we use full face all the time. Half-shell are our walking helmets..
  • 3 0
 Sorry Matt but you are 100% wrong when you suggest slow and steep = you can wear a non full on DH full face. Last fall I had a crash. An awkward double drop/step, each of them maybe 1.20m, cought it with my pedal but I was going rather slow. First run on the trail.

Result? Destroyed my full on DH full face helmet. Compression Fracture in my back. So assuming slow and steep is not requiring a dh helmet is wrong. If it's very steep the risk of crashing is higher and some crashes on the steep can be nasty.
  • 1 0
 I was stopped on my bike changing the track I was listening to on my music player and got ran over by a car. There is a million variables, and anything can happen at any time.
  • 3 0
 I picked up a Specialized Gambit, and it's barely different in ventilation from my open face. I hardly do any ride without it. If you can afford one of the new crop of lightweight fullface helmets I don't see a reason not to wear one for most rides. You do have to be willing to do the glasses and fullface thing though, I can't climb in googles and I'm not into scratched corneas.
  • 3 0
 Let's talk instead about certain YouTube influencers who I will not name, who ride trails like Red Bull hardline full speed without back protectors even though their sponsors make some of the most comfortable / best performing back protectors on the market... THAT is incredibly dumb
  • 3 0
 bunch of my friends made fun of me for wearing an IXS Trigger FF on trail rides, until one of them OTB/Knocked out/Broken nose and orbital......Id rather have as much protection as possible than too little
  • 2 0
 I wear a Bell with the detachable chin bar. I coach NICA, and it's not very inviting to newer riders to wear a full-face while coaching, so I went with the most cost-effective option. Otherwise, I always leave the chin bar on. Almost all of the stories I've heard of people who had to have their faces wired back together weren't riding anything that you'd think you'd need a FF for...it's always stuff even tamer than the example Matt gave, just tooting along on some green trail and hit a rock the wrong way.
  • 6 1
 Because Mettalier and Barelli are big and bad influencers and people are stupidly following them! Hahahaha
  • 3 0
 Been riding for 20 years in open helmets, full face feels weird. But I hate gloves to.. When I've worn my full face on lift days I always feel weird untill I end up swapping to my xc lid...
  • 3 0
 I always take time to adapt too - I think it is the loss of peripheral vision (particularly around your front wheel) that bothers me...
After an hour or so I tend to have forgotten about it though.
  • 1 0
 Yeah same for me with goggles! Hate that tunnel vision but after 1 or 2 hours, I get used to it I guess. I only wear those when colder or if ever really wet so always weird when I put them on. Bottom of the helmet is not that bad or I guess it depends of which model you have. You can also feel the extra weight.
  • 5 0
 Hardtail on the shore always needs a full face. Underbiked, over-protected.
  • 7 1
 A lot harder to drink water should have been an option
  • 1 0
 Bigger reason than anything else on the list for me I think, I do wear my IXS Trigger on days I've go a water reservoir, but prefer to just have bottles if I could.
  • 1 0
 I use a water reservoir with no problems.
  • 3 0
 really depends on how high consequence the trail is, not so much the speed. even riding slow if you faceplant a rock or fall far, it really doesn't matter how slow you're riding, the hurt will be enough to warrant a ff.
  • 3 0
 I always ride with my full face helmet. I have the bell super dh which has the removable chin strap. If its a long climb I put the chin strap on my backpack then convert for the downhill. Not worth taking the risk.
  • 3 0
 Finally found a light full face that fits my big head (7idp project23 XXL) and have been wearing it nearly every ride. Ill have to see what happens in the summer but so far it hasnt been too bad hitting the climbs in it.
  • 2 0
 So I will say that I'm wearing my Troy Lee Stage for more and more stuff. Not normal trail stuff ... but even riding the paved pumptracks, bmx track, anything lift access, skatepark, ... I don't wanna smash my face into the ground. With helmets like the Stage there is great windflow, field of vision, its light, ... there aren't to many reasons not to wear it all the time.
  • 2 0
 A week after getting a bell super air spherical thingy what-ever its called – the lightweight one with the removable chin strap. I was riding along a flat fire road towards the chunky stuff, and I swear, out of nowhere the ground suddenly appeared in front of my face. The ground rushing past in a moment that felt like forever, I was a spectator to the wonders of close up geology, somewhat fascinating, like watching a documentary narrated by Morgan Freeman. The dust settled, got up and was absolutely fine. Moral of the story – at least wear a light full face helmet when you can, because you just don’t know when the planet is going to hit you in the face.
  • 2 0
 I voted for "I always wear a full face" but if I don't, it a combination of the airflow and terrain.

Riding with my six year old son, I often don't wear one (though he does) because the terrain is easy and a halfshell makes it easy to talk to you.

I live in Southern NV so summer is hot. In the past, I wouldn't wear my Giro Switchblade when it was REALLY hot out, but I just picked up a TLD Stage with the intention of basically always wearing a FF when riding. The terrain I ride is NASTY in terms of things to fall on and while I rarely fall, the closes I usually come is via front wheel washouts on sandy parts of easy trails, so just wearing it when I am on the tougher, more exposed trails doesn't make sense.
  • 1 0
 What about goggles? I'm also in NV. They seem sort of pointless here, no mud. Dust only if you're following someone close in a race. Gonna check out the TLD Stage.
  • 2 0
 @TucsonDon: I usually wear big coverage sun glasses (e.g. Smith Wildcat) with my Switchblade/Stage. There is definitely less mud, but I like to have lots of coverage just because my eyes tend to dry out as I apparently keep them open all the time as I descend and the dry wind/dust gets me. Plus it's super bright.

I occasionally put on goggles, but mostly if I'm grinding up an access road to descend and wearing my DH helmet and (and that's mostly when I'm riding on really cold mornings), but most of the time I find the glasses do a better job of staying fog free. I think it's more the expectation of pairing them with the DH helmet than anything else.
  • 2 0
 I just got a full face and plan to wear it this season for regular rides. I'm hoping it provides better visibility with eye protection using goggles vice sunglasses with fogginess. In addition to the better impact protection, it should provide better sun protection as well. What remains to be seen is how well I can put up with the heat.
  • 6 4
 Seems absurd to me that some riders don’t wear a full face because they don’t want to upset some hikers.
In Marin county there are a few hostile hikers.
They act like they own all open space and I’m killing the trees by riding a bike.
I wear a full face because I want t keep my teeth, not to make some crazy old nimby happy.
  • 2 0
 The fact that more people aren’t clicking every poll option is disappointing.

A full face isn’t going to make me ride faster or try that awkward drop I’ve looked at the last couple rides. I’m 48 with a house, wife, 2 kids and a dog.
  • 2 0
 ooookay?!

So you're saying that you wouldn't wear a full face because it wouldn't make you ride faster? I don't think that's the goal of a FF by the way.... 48 with a house, wife, 2 kids and a dog should be the reason why you would want to protect yourself.
  • 3 0
 I loved my Speedframe Pro but after wearing the IXS Trigger ff I rarely every grab the halfshell. It's light, breathes well, and gives me piece of mind. Worth the minor inconvenience.
  • 2 0
 Gear up appropriately for your Style, Skill & Send levels.

I wear a full face 75% of the time.
A full face is probably appropriate for anyone actively trying to become a better rider and is riding aggressive.
or anything steep with chance of down trees.

if you could ride the trail with only 1 brake and would be comfortable without knee pads, your probably fine in your half shell.
  • 2 4
 current favorite setup is full face goggles short sleeve shirt and pants…and dun dun dunnnnn no knee pads.
Chest / back protector has been getting more run than knee pads—I’m not sure knee pads are my jam anymore.

Oh yeah of course I’m 97% ebike, climbing fire roads, as is the funnest method. Helmet hangin off bars or high on head if it’s a hotter day. Ebikes rule.
  • 3 1
 i frequently ride a lot of steep and consequential trails, and quite honestly i just feel significantly more comfortable in a half shell. i have a better sense of awareness. its hard to describe beyond that but i feel much more confident with a half shell
  • 2 0
 Since I got my IXS Trigger ff I wear it 95% of the time. The fit is great, it's very breezy and the chin bar doesn't restrict breathing at all. The greek sun can be brutal in summer, but surprisingly I can still wear it no problem. Choosing a light colour helps I a little bit it's the fact that so much air flows around my head that my half shell is actually hotter. Done a few long rides with decent elevation (40-50km/1200-1750m) on the Trigger without needing to take it off apart from snack stops.

My half shell is now used for the daily commute.

There is however a minor psychological issue that I've noticed. When on the ff & goggles I feel I need to push myself to go fast. I try not to allow this feeling to take over because I ride terribly when this happens. With the half shell and sunglasses I feel like I'm just out to enjoy nature without any performance expectations. I tend to ride better when there is no pressure to perform.

This is something 100% in my head that I need to work on.
  • 2 0
 Had a wreck going OTB down a rock garden at speed, landing on my elbows and knees and my face right to the earth. Had a full face helmet on and Fox pads (with the plastic shells). Split the full face in half at the chin and didn't have a scratch on me beside the helmet scraping some skin off my collarbone. The first thing I thought... was "Holy sh*t... My face and arms should be crushed right now." Boy was I glad I had that gear on. Guarantee my face would have needed reconstruction.
  • 2 0
 About a month ago I faceplanted into the street after the carbon fork on my gravel bike broke in half while I was riding it around the city (bs piece of gear from a reputable company...). My front teeth went through my upper lip which will leave a big scar there, along with many other scrapes and bruises and a concussion. Even though this happened during a commutimng ride it made me much more aware of how things can go bad in unexpected ways and I will always wear a full face while riding my mountain bike. Feeling like others are judging you for looking like a kook is not worth having a lifetime scar on your face.
  • 2 0
 I've mashed my face into the ground enough times that I wear full face 99%of the time now.on one occasion on a DH run my Giant carbon front rim exploded and I was sliding along on my face long enough to consciously think how happy I was to be wearing a full face.I know that most of my face plants were caused by me riding DH tracks on a giant trance when I first started MTB being oblivious to what bike I should have had for my trails but none the less it's fox proframe for me thanks
  • 2 0
 Light weight(ish) full-face helmets out there, and how light they are claimed / measured for a medium - in no particular order:

TLD Stage 704gr
IXS Trigger FF 595gr
Endura MT500 FF 640gr
MET Parachute 700gr
MET Parachute MCR 840gr
Fox Proframe 765gr
Fox Proframe RS 836gr
Smith Mainline 770 / 890gr
Leatt MTB 3.0 Enduro 760gr
Leatt MTB 4.0 Enduro 847gr
Specialized Gambit 613 / 640gr
Kali Protectives Invader 2.0 640/650gr
Bell Super Air R 650gr
100% Trajecta 860gr
POC Otocon 680gr
POC Otocon Race 750gr
7IDP Project23 ABS 860gr (large)
Alpina Roca 820gr
Lazer Kineticore 820gr

Some of those are aren't available outside of UK, or Northern America, or whereever. Some are way more ventilated than others. Some have removable chinbar. Some are hard to find at not-dentist pricing. But there are a few to choose from now.

Knee pads are sometimes? A few weeks after slicing my knee open I bought some POC VPD Air kneepads and raced 100km in them. No issues, and didn't feel like they were slowing me much. I have worn knees 99% of rides since, though often it's the Race Face Charge, the super-thin foam on which do approximately nothing other than stopping cuts.
  • 2 0
 I like to hear my friends and the elements. The full face make me feel more removed from the experience. Not a great answer but it is the reason I shy away from the full face most often.
  • 1 0
 I'm not gonna lie, I feel like it does get quite warm in the Sea to Sky area, I was there last year and it was touching the 90's, but I'm from the Southwest US and when it's hitting upwards of 100 you take all the ventilation you can get. Sorry for Fahrenheit rest of the world.
  • 3 0
 Since Troy Lee released the Stages helmet I’ve ditched the A2/A3’s and run the fullface full time. Then at the bike park it’s my D4 carbon.
  • 1 0
 Last specialized light full face has all those...

Do you get punished if not wearing googles? Just use big wide glasses, they look cool too.

Urge did a helmet with some kind of integrated googles.

Cash did integrated lens on the helmets could be use on full helmets.
  • 1 0
 As of about 3 years ago I almost always ride with a full face. Fox Proframe has been my go-to. On long climbs I either take it off and strap it to something or at least take the cheek pads out until I get to the top. Only exception would be sweltering heat.
  • 3 0
 One reason that wasn’t listed was how it looks to other users on multi-use trails. That said, I’m in the market for a light FF right now.
  • 4 0
 I always wear one when my wife is not home and I really want to kick ass at halo multiplayer
  • 6 1
 The most obvious answer is missing from the poll choices, peer-pressure.
  • 1 0
 I had a Giro Switchblade and it was probably my favorite helmet of all time except in hot weather due to the permanent ear coverage. The small chin bar was easy to store in a hip pack. I replaced it with a Fox Proframe after a crash. The Proframe has plenty of ventilation on all but the hottest of days but I don't like climbing with the fixed chin bar because it restricts access for useful things like drinking from a water bottle (Not sure I'll ever go back to a bladder), eating, and wiping sweat. Most of the time I find myself suffering with sweat in my eyes until I stop to rest then I remove my helmet to drink water. For this reason, my versatile full face is really only used on chair lift and shuttle days and would be better replaced with a more protective product. In an ideal world, I'd run a Bell Super DH or equivalent and have a nice mounting option for the chin bar on the handlebar or hip pack.
  • 1 0
 "Most of the time I find myself suffering with sweat in my eyes"

headsweats.com

I shave my head so I don't have hair to absorb sweat. These work great.
  • 1 0
 @jonbrady85: I use something similar. It helps a lot. I have to stop every half hour or so to wring it out, but that's a big improvement.
  • 1 0
 Those headsweats look nice but I'm guessing that once they saturate with sweat you'll still end up with the same problem.

I use the Halo bands (store.haloheadband.com). They have this "gasket" which diverts the sweat to the sides of your face. Works well for me.
  • 1 0
 @PuppyTRex: Halo for me too, with shaved head. After a couple of hours it gives me headache (a bit tight) though so only wearing it when super hot.
  • 1 0
 Last year I decided to not temp fate and bought a full face prior (yes BEFORE) an accident happens.

I hate the dentist and don't run a hot bodily thermostat. In fact, bonus is that full face will keep ears warm in the winter too.
  • 2 0
 I thought helmet companies would make a helmet in the middle. One with face protection, but not full blown full face. Kinda like some ski helmets (POC Artic SL), but they haven't.
  • 1 0
 It would be interesting to see something like this. Up here, outside the handful of downhill bike parks (ski centers) we pretty much only ride on naturally formed trails and footpaths in the forests. Thanks to the very allowing freedom to roam you can basically ride your bike on any path you see going into the woods. This means there's almost unlimited trails available, but with no grading, maintenance or built features. It's almost all about pedaling, but very little of the trails are flowy, so it's either somewhat technical or really technical. Also there are hikers and dog walkers on the trails, plus always some transition bits, also on roads. No way I'm wearing a current full face for that, also limiting my perception (both seeing and hearing) of fellow trail users or cars. On the other hand, I definitely end up walking sections I'm not comfortable risking it which I might give a go had I more protection. Introduce a trail/XC oriented middle ground model and I'll gladly give it a try.
  • 4 0
 What about the "I don't have one because they're too bloody expensive" option?
  • 2 1
 The fox Proframe is light AF and very vented (albeit cheek pads are cheek cheek pads). Does anyone else consider their collarbone as a reason not to wear a full face? My friend has broken his collar bone with a full face several times. I bought a full face with a chin bar that seems less strong than a bone hoping for less breakage of the body. Anyone else think about this?
  • 4 1
 I think if you hit hard enough to break your collarbone it's gonna happen full face or not. I'd rather save my brain and teeth with a full face.
  • 1 0
 @iduckett: it's often the chinbar hitting the bone that breaks it...
  • 2 0
 @therealnobody: Right, yea. I was thinking of shoulder/outstretched arm impacts, but that is true. All the more reason to run a neck brace too, I trust Leatts research on that!
  • 1 0
 @iduckett:
Oh yeah. For outstretched arms the chinbar probably won't affect it.
I trust leatt's info.
Got the Proframe because the chinbar isn't super substantial, and when it cracks/ breaks it absorbs a lot of the impact. it has stretchy rubber inside which holds some of the shape of the bar after it smashes.
Kind of like having the dog bones on an rc car fall off easily so the knuckles, bearings, and wheels don't get broken by the dog one jamming them on impact.
Or crumple zones on a car
My thinking is that if the chinbar is the frangible element relative to my bone, then my bone has a better chance of surviving a run in with the chinbar.
I used to run a DOT approved helmet for BMX, and if that thing made solid contact with a bone it was going to smash, 100%.
Might not be common thinking, but I guess that's why I'm a fit and wear tester for bike gear.
I also really appreciate you writing that out so I could learn your perspective too.
  • 1 0
 There are different aspects for this. One is, that in the Swiss flats (still "Mountains" for the Dutch) trails are usually mellow and need to be pedaled up. If someone in those areas rides by some hikers with a full face and goggles, the dispute between user groups of forests and hills just will get bigger. There are already enoufh trails closed for mountainbikers in one of the most liberal countries when it comes to this. So i don't ride around like a stormtrooper.

The exception is a liftaccess bike park... Then: always full face.
  • 1 0
 The poll doesn't really cover all situations but I get it. I'm 100% unable to go uphill long in any helmet, 1/2 or full so mine lives on the pack while climbing (even technical shit unless there's a cliff or something), but what is confusing me in the comments above is people saying they just deal w/ riding uphill with them (whatever). Last I knew you could strap any helmet to yr bar or pack - have been doing this for 15 years, 1/2 or full. Easy.

Still, remote area enduro / trail riding may or may not call for full face but park: always. Maybe this article should just prompt more FF helmet use for many of us on more rugged conditions...not hard to do.
  • 1 0
 Come on down to Missouri in August and you'll see why we don't wear FF unless it's shuttles at Shepherd mtn. If it's somewhere bike parky in the summer sometimes I will ride with my FF off on the climbs. Heat stroke is more of a danger at that point
  • 3 0
 I'm full time full face now and have ended up with 3 haha. Kali invader for xc, tld stage for trail riding, carbon d4 for enduro/downhill.
  • 1 0
 I wear a full face Bell Super DH on most of my mtb rides. Whether thats with buddies or by myself. I've also worn one commuting with my high speed bicycle... And I always wear it riding park, I think that's a no-brainer. Bike path stuff w/ kids, not usually.
  • 2 0
 To expand on the topic- can we revisit leatt braces? Seemed to be unpopular with the dude-bro moto guys but I didn't see any science. I know the only thing between me and one is the price tag. gooooooooolly
  • 2 0
 Agreed....I keep thinking about it, but I never pull the trigger. I may have to though as I'm getting older now and crashing sucks...
  • 3 0
 Climbing = full face hanging from my backpack.
Descending = always full face on.
Riding with my kids across the park = half lid.
  • 1 0
 The reason I don't wear a full face is that I am a glorified nature and fitness rider- I have a nice but bit older enduro bike and never catch air, although I am good on tech climbs and slow, techy descents. I'm from the time when the ethos of the sport had started to change from my type of riding into what it is today, I got left behind in a long period when I was living abroad and the sport changed. When I came back to mountain bikes, I saw that I'd gone from being in the fastest third or so of riders to being in maybe the bottom fifth. And I'm fine with that. Love seeing your guys' exploits, and think that it's best to err on the side of too much protection, maybe even for myself.
  • 1 0
 my first proper helmet was an endura mt500 full face, i wore it all the time... until i crashed.. then i replaced it... i treated myself to a half shell for gravel type adventures... it became my mostly go to I had no negative to wearing the ff, apart from i couldn't hear people on group rides so well..and it was harder to use a water bottle. If it was more common to see other riders wearing it on my local trails i probably still would, as it is it tends to be mostly ebike riders
  • 1 0
 Option "my bike lacks enough travel for me not to look like a dork wearing a FF helmet" is missing.
Even when riding my Spark on enduro trails I like to wear carbon soled ballerina shoes so it's knee pads at most for me

Remember kids, fashion is temporary, style is forever
  • 1 0
 Horses for courses. I wear both. Open and Full face. I even own one of those 190g POC helmets. Usually in the summer if it’s to hot I leave the full face at home and then I know I just can’t ride as hard as I would with a ff helmet. It also depends on the type of trail and terrain. I know accidents can happen anytime and anywhere, but falling in some trails would have different consequences than others. I guess that’s why we don’t wear helmets while walking down the street.
  • 1 0
 I hate the restricted feeling of a full face helmet and I feel it gives me a false sense of security where I push harder than I should. Sounds mad but with less protection I take less risk. I have stacked in massively and hurt my head badly with both full face and open. I tend to wear full face only for DH/uplift days and open for all the trails I usually ride.
  • 1 0
 Risk compensation is a very real thing.
  • 1 0
 I will never buy a helmet with a detachable chin bar after my wife dislocated her jaw when the mechanism inside the helmet broke on impact and pushed her jaw out. Good idea in theory, horrible in practice. The helmet was a Giro Switchblade
  • 1 0
 After 35 years of riding in whatever helmet, I had one crash on easy terrain that slammed me to the ground so fast, I had no clue what happened. Broke my jaw among other things. Now exclusively FF. Even on my single speed... in the summer. Removed my chin bar only once for an XC marathon race.
  • 2 1
 By the logic of some comments here, I should be wearing a full face helmet on my daily commute.
I have higher avg and max speeds, the likelyhood of having a crash is much higher because of rampant drivers/cellphone-zombies and N00b ebike-riders.
In fact, I have had more incidents on my commutes than on the trails because I am probably a lot more focused & prepared when out for a proper ride.
I do wear a FF when going to parks or racing enduros, because I push my limits a lot more.
  • 1 0
 I have always wanted to pick up a Kali Invader but you don't hear too much about them; everyone talks about the Fox or the IXS (which I never considered). The Kali "looks" so ventilated, but would be nice to hear any first hand ride opinions.
  • 1 0
 Experience will always dictate our actions (good or bad). After riding a specific trail for 10 years in Colorado Springs, then finally going OTB at a good clip resulting in 22 stitches and mild plastic surgery that fixed my face from looking like a Demodog, I went with a Bell Super Air R for my trails in Colorado. I do not notice a difference in breathability. The long climbs on the front range you just flip the goggles up or behind. The flowy tech is not that noticeable with a good MTB goggle (Canyon, Ute, Palmer @ 90deg...not bad). Yeah, you look like a kook, but I have yet to have someone tell me that Smile It is a little to get used to, but easy. Much better than putting yourself, family and friends with an evening (or 2) in the hospital. I scared the S! out of my buds that day, I will never forget that. We will always push ourselves. Nature of this wonderful sport. We are going faster and bigger than ever on trails. Our protection should match our overall progression.
  • 1 0
 My solution is to only have full face, DH certified, helmets so I dont need to choose. I know I dont ride easy ever and have faceplanted few times so FF is warranted, also chest and back plates should reduce likelyhood of the one hit wonders. Aircraft 2 is pretty sweet. Hangs on the bag on fireroad climbs but I can keep it on for enduro races in the summer heat if needed.
  • 1 0
 It depends on speed and trails

On my road bike i can reach 70km/h in descent but i don't wear any full face helmet or protection

Do you see any road bikers wear them? There are more bad crash on road bike.. than mtb..with cara involved.. do i need to ride with motorbike clothings?

Mtb i have fullface and dh protection so i have open helmet, it depends on the type of riding, after years in parks and searching for speed now i'm usually exploring and go slow so i no more need for dh protection.

I'm a motorbiker so when i ride i go full protected...but on a motorbike.

You can crush just going downstairs at home.. home is the worst environment for safety.. i'm not joking.
  • 1 0
 I have the Leatt Endro with removable chin bar. Why? Because on a big day I string 3 or 4, 45 minute climbs together to get to the rad long downhills. A full-face lid is not practical for the climb, especially at 25-35C out.
So I strap the chinbar to a backpack and do the climb with the half lid and convert at the top. It does become more cumbersome with goggles and a chinbar dangling off the back. I wish the companies offering the convertable lids would find a practical way to stow the chinbar while climbing? I I were riding chairlifts, It would be a no brainer.
  • 1 0
 Not that anyone cares, but as someone who has ridden moto trials for a couple decades the reason for the open face helmets isn't because "we go uphill against gravity", it was because the old full face moto helmets had huge chin bars and a lower back so visibility and movement was limited, as well as being much hotter since it's all low speed, and they were heavy AF. The newer full faces don't have the same issues and you'll see a lot of the younger riders wear them since there are a lot of top riders with facial injuries. Faceplants are not uncommon... I'd say it's mostly tradition to keep the open faces now, and some of the heat/weight.
  • 4 0
 Goggles all the time always with a half shell.
  • 4 0
 Always wear a ff on the eeb as I don't exert much energy.
  • 1 1
 Put me in the "I don't want to" category. I have a nice, brand new one in my van. Also have a lot of other pads I never use. And unless it is cold, I don't wear gloves either, even at the bike park.

No good reason, just don't want to.

Ironically, I am the total opposite on my motorcycle. Fully geared up in textiles on the road with a full face, leathers on the track.
  • 1 1
 Purely because of what people will think. I've had a few nasty face injuries, and would very much prefer to always wear a full face. Unfortunately, people like to make fun even on relatively gnarly trails, and there's nothing worse than being the only one in a ff on a group ride.
  • 2 0
 Because I can't spit or blow snot rockets out of my nose. Latest is quite useful when somebody tries to draft after being overtaken.
  • 1 0
 Heading out for my ride today I was going back and forth on this. My IXS Trigger FF is so light and vented that I honestly forget I have on a FF much of the time, but I still almost never wear it mostly b/c I'm dumb.
  • 1 0
 wore a Fox Proframe for a year here in Thailand on every ride just because. Heat is not a problem with a suitable design. It is the faffing with goggles that i got tired of.
  • 2 2
 Didn’t wear a helmet majority of my bmx career, unless it was mandatory for the skatepark, started out MTB with no helmet either. Eventually got one, it sucked bavk then. I got a full face for riding Vert and DH. Don’t wear a helmet for casual riding whatsoever. Half shell for road and trail/enduro riding (I live in Moab so everything is “gnarly” or whatever, just another trail to me. When I raced Enduro, I would decide half shell or full face based on the amount of climbing and weather (im more likely to crash if I can’t breathe) never once felt I needed a full face to ride trails. I only wear one on big shuttle lap days, freeriding, it chairlift days. If you’re going to your face your don’t know how to crash, go buy a bmx bike and learn.
  • 7 0
 I hope you do wear a cup to protect your huge balls, you glorious strong man.
  • 5 0
 Username checks out
  • 1 0
 @owl-X: freeball to ride free
  • 2 0
 @colemanb: I’m on brand for sure
  • 1 0
 Not worn one since 2010, my rides are all pedalling and I don't want to wear a full face even though I will incorporate DH tracks in my loops, I'm aware of the extra protection and accept that when wear a trail lid.
  • 2 0
 If you don't wear a full face 100% of the time, you just haven't put your front wheel over the top of a berm yet!! Trust me, you will after that....
  • 1 0
 Because of my seatpost trigger I can’t put it on my bars like I used to do. Don’t know where to put it for climbs, that’s the only reason I don’t wear it on enduro sessions
  • 1 0
 I answered that I don't want to wear one, but the real answer is that I don't have one. I wouldn't be opposed to it otherwise. My local trails don't really warrant a fullface but places that I visit certainly do.
  • 1 0
 Endurance.... most my rides are over 1000m and 20+km. A full face would be hell. I've git a bell air so it's got a strap but carrying that around isn't happening... most the time I hit the top or side of the helmet anyway.
  • 1 0
 I wear a Bell Super Air R with the chinbar always on, its super light and vented enough for trail riding. For any DH or bike park stuff I wear something a little more protective Smile
  • 1 0
 Smashed my face into some rocks a few months back. Now wear a full face a little more often, rather than just for racing. And looking at a detachable chin bar for the rest of the time.
  • 1 0
 Switched to a Leatt Enduro convertible helmet after a hard crash last year. At least now I have an option when tackling rowdy sections on a ride and for Enduro races. Chin bar is easy to carry on my riding pack.
  • 1 1
 I'm not sure my issue falls under air flow because its not teh cooling aspect that a concern. My issue is sucking back in my CO2 before it has a chance to escape my facial biodome. Suffocation on climbs is brutal even with a convertible.... for a couple times I left it off for a short climb.
  • 1 0
 Ever since the Proframe came out giving the option of a light and breathable full face i don't wear anything else, i don't run goggle with it so it's really no more hot and sweaty than a half shell so why wouldn't you.
  • 1 0
 How about adding an option for most brands not making Asian-fit full-face helmets so we don't develop an agonizing headache after 30 minutes? Or simply having large enough sizing?
  • 3 1
 I feel like my 140mm Specialized Fuse combined with my riding style doesn't really warrant one.
  • 2 0
 I ride my 135mm rear travel Banshee spitfire at the bike park, I definitely feel I need a full face there.
  • 3 0
 Trail helmet riding trail bike…
Full face riding DH…
  • 3 0
 I wear half shell on trails, full face on jumps and bike park
  • 1 0
 you are missing the option:
"because it's another mountain bike item on my list I need to purchase but I haven't got to it yet. It's a big list"
  • 2 0
 If I'd worn a full covering on my shiny head 22 and 11 years ago I'd have way more more money for bikes now!
  • 1 0
 The only thing not mentioned is the special awareness when riding on shared use trails or roads. My rule of thumb is full face for bike park or pump track.
  • 1 0
 I should, but I'm so ugly, who'd care if I had teeth or not. Honestly, I wore one when I was into freestyle. If I only rode park I would.
  • 3 0
 Bike Park = full face
Daily Drive = half lid
  • 2 0
 Case in point for full face helmets:
www.instagram.com/p/CpQUK2oNNE9
  • 2 0
 After reading these comments I get the idea that PB commenters ride far beyond their ability....a lot.
  • 1 0
 Ixs trigger ff solves all issues. Dh rated, lightest on the market, and super breathable! Wear it everywhere after I saw the guy head face first into barbed wire.
  • 2 3
 I don’t wear one because:

1) If I did, I would just do more stupid stuff and not be as smart with lines, and probably go faster and take more risk with the rest of my body.

2) The worst crash I’ve had was going 0.5miles per hour when I fell incorrectly and triple-fractured my ankle, destroyed the biggest ligament in it, and had to have major surgery. A full face only protects your face.

If 1) happens, then 2) is even more likely than normal.
  • 3 0
 I wear a kali invader year round. Love it, very confidence inspiring.
  • 2 0
 because i'm afraid to look unmanly. If Dale Sr had worn a full face he'd still be hee
  • 1 2
 You clearly don't know anything about Moto do you ? Trials riders barley "climb" anything in terms of elevation if they have open face helmets it is so they can see the ground below them, their front AND back tire contact patch and so on. It is purely for added field of vision. If climbing was the reason then Enduro and Hard Enduro guys would also use open face and they don't.
Now to answer the topic, I can't afford a proper DH Helmet and a Light FF and a open helmet. Also I grew up riding the Switchblade V1 and it was breathable but still warmer than necessary. Maybe if I was living somewhere where heat isn't an issue in summer but I don't.
  • 2 0
 Because huge marketing was made on enduro, with pro athletes wearing open face helmet to look cool
  • 2 1
 Almost impossible to wear a full face with 35 degree heat and 95% humidity for more than one lap. Shuttle days there's no excuse though.
  • 3 0
 Everyone has a plan until they hit their face: Mike Tyson
  • 1 2
 I feel like "because wearing a full face makes it look like my mum dressed me to go mounting biking" is missing from the poll.

It's like wearing a scarf to mountain bike in cold weather. You know what I mean? It's practical but really!?!
  • 1 0
 Need a “ i wear one when the ride dictates “ I’m not going to put on the FF for an easy spin with the boys, but I’m going out to get sendy by myself? It’s on.
  • 1 2
 Can’t believe no one said this, maybe I’m the only one, but it’s mainly appearance and trail appropriateness for me. As in, I don’t want to be “that guy” with a FF riding the whole enchilada. Bike park? Sure, I’ll gladly do a FF and goggles but riding local trails and being the only guy in a FF is not something I’d consider.
  • 1 0
 I'm a victim of this PB campaign. :-/ I bought a light full face helmet just last week.
Basically triggered by Matt Beer's top 10 story.
  • 1 0
 @wos: this is the way
  • 1 0
 Unless I’m out for a very easy ride with my family I always wear my Kali Invader 2.0. I’m 42, relatively new to the sport and I have a family I need to provide for.
  • 1 0
 ive worn a full face ever since i knocked myself out on a small jump and had to miss the second half of my senior year of football
  • 1 0
 I doesn't fit in my backpack or on the bars. Yes, I don't ride uphill with a helmet, I sweat too much even on a cold day. Can't bear it
  • 2 0
 that's not a fair poll.. I wear my Fullface when DH'ing and a normal helmet when riding Trail/XC
  • 1 0
 I once fell off with regular helmet and knocked my front teeth out. Since I got that repaired $$ I always wear full face
  • 1 0
 take a google for "degloved mandible" I run a full face most days, its not much of a hit with a good one nowadays.
  • 2 0
 Uplift then full face. That's my rule of thumb
  • 1 0
 As a Newfoundlander, Matt Beer is a qualified expert at detecting Balogna. Listen up kids!
  • 3 1
 You don't fight gravity descending, you submit to it.
  • 2 0
 Embrace Smile
  • 2 0
 Rip the dust filters out the chin bar.
  • 2 0
 Because you don't ride hard enough to justify it hahahaha.
  • 2 0
 No FF, because I have a BMX background of course! (from the '80's).
  • 2 1
 Where is the option ‘i feel like a dummy wearing one for. 5 minute downhill’
  • 1 0
 Can’t answer. No option for when the trail dictates the need for a full face. Which is about 65% of the time in my case.
  • 1 0
 Because the one I've wanted hasn't been in stock in my size since last summer. PAIN!
  • 1 1
 They're hot. Idk if it's so much the airflow as all that pad pressed up against your face that's the bad part. I've started using a convertible more often though.
  • 4 4
 Why don’t we wear full armour from head to toe then, just in case something happens?

Because just like helmets it’s personal choice.
  • 7 0
 Our brain / face gets a higher level of safety protection concern.
  • 8 0
 Your brain is a lot more sensitive to impacts than an arm or leg
  • 3 1
 Why I don't wear a full-face helmet? Probably because I don't have one.
  • 1 0
 Full face for uplifts and winter 'cause it keeps my head warm. Switch back in summer.
  • 2 2
 Is the average trail rider really at a level that necessitates a full face? It feels at though a half shell is perfectly adequate for the riding most people do.
  • 3 0
 It just takes one fall in the wrong place and bam, your dentist is getting a new SB160!
  • 1 0
 I mostly ride tame trails. I'll wear ff when I start hitting something that's fast or a lot of air.
  • 3 0
 vanity
  • 2 0
 Because a sweat a lot on the climbs.
  • 1 0
 If you live north of Iowa you shouldn't get to comment on this. I don't make the rules
  • 1 0
 Ya bc they never travel anywhere...
  • 3 2
 its a bit annoying to have to lift the helmet up everytime I want to have a drink
  • 1 0
 Just squirt
  • 1 1
 For anybody looking for an easier way to carry around their full face helmet (or other gear), check out the Haf Clip: thehafclip.com
  • 1 1
 Seriously? Heat? I guess living in alaska that's not an issue.. but the venting on helmets now is great. How is the #1 answer NOT visibility?
  • 1 0
 I honestly don’t know why I don’t wear one... It just sits on a helmet rack until I go to a bike park or downhill race
  • 1 0
 If your familiar with the Heinrich The 300:29:1 theory, you understand why people ride without a chinguard.
  • 1 3
 For me the main reason besides feeling hot is the perception by others (mainly hikers) I meet on the trails. I used a full face once on our local (not purpose-built) trails, and the angry (without reason) and/or scared reactions I got were on another level. Normally I would get a comment like „mtbs do not belong here“ maybe five times a year. On that single ride it happened to me five times. Interacting with people is also harder if you are hidden behind a full face helmet and goggles. I dare to say we would not have the level of acceptance and trail access we have today if wearing a full face was the norm.
Also, drinking from a bottle is no fun with most full face helmets.
  • 1 0
 How do you drink from a water bottle at 165HR and blow your nose or spit for 3-5 hour rides without stopping with a FF?
  • 1 0
 This topic is a helmet magnet, pick one and don’t be a BELL end about it.
  • 3 0
 Helmet scmelmet
  • 1 0
 Goggles aren't wide enough for my big face LOL....otherwise i'd wear my IXS Trigger full face more often
  • 1 0
 Always felt like I ride at least 10 per cent better with a fullface . Makes me feel like super man.
  • 1 0
 Open face for pedalling even when the trails get super gnarly. Full face for shuttles. I put it down to pedalling uphill.
  • 1 0
 Missing option for “I wear a half shell because wearing a full face would remind me too much of the actual risks.”
  • 1 0
 There’s really no reason not to wear one on cold days, but hot days are a different story.
  • 1 0
 It's just more convenient to take the normal helmet and leave the chin part.
  • 1 0
 I would but I have to pedal up hills here...no lifts. If I had an eMoto uplift device I'd be in one most rides...
  • 1 0
 I for one don't approach risk 100% objectively. If I did, I'd be wearing an auto racing helmet for driving.
  • 2 2
 No helmet! Lose the lid, free the mind its still safe as long as you keep drinking so it will hurt less in case you crash
  • 3 2
 I don't want to deal with goggles.

Haha what?
  • 5 0
 @boozed: it says "I don't want to deal with goggles"
  • 1 1
 The question wasn't about goggles
  • 2 1
 @boozed: some people believe you can only use a fullface with googles.
  • 1 0
 @boozed: Your quoted answer sure was! Lol
  • 2 0
 @Genewiich:
boozed (22 hours ago)
I don't want to deal with goggles.

Haha what

His answer was about goggles. Who assumed you have to wear goggles? Lol
  • 1 0
 No box for vanity. No box for simple and light weight .
  • 2 0
 Sweat.
  • 1 0
 Because I ride XC or gravel in the flat American midwest.
  • 1 0
 Why there isn’t an answer that says: because I don’t have one… (*-*)
  • 1 1
 Headphones. On solo rides being able to listen to a podcast, an audiobook. My full face pushes up against my ears
  • 1 0
 I don't wear a helmet unless I go on a trip to an unfamiliar trail system.
  • 1 0
 what about road bike going 100kmh bombhill in lycra/light helmet...
  • 2 4
 We never wore helmets or pads as kids and always at shit..the bikes were horrible so there's that..you just learn how to fall..
  • 1 0
 Who says we don't?
  • 1 0
 Condom or bareback?
  • 1 0
 #VivaoSUS
  • 3 4
 I wear one on park days.. anywhere else you’ll look like a cnt
  • 2 0
 Oh I'd like that look
  • 1 4
 Because the potential injury from a full face without a neck brace is far worse than the potential injury from an open face helmet
  • 4 0
 [citation needed]
  • 2 1
 @Genewich: not really, the poll asked for my opinion, I'm giving my opinion, I don't need a source for that and other people are entitled to their own opinion also without a source
  • 2 0
 @chris-brown225: Your opinion is phrased more like stating a fact. As in, you said one measurable thing is worse than another measurable thing. That has a tendency to make people want to ask how you know what you're talking about.

If you just say I think I have more chance of injury from a full face if I don't wear a neck brace as well, that is your thought/opinion on the matter. Anyway, fire back stating that you're standing your ground, because, that's just like, your opinion man.
  • 2 1
 @iammarkstewart:
No no my bad

Because I think the potential injury from a full face without a neck brace is far worse than the potential injury from an open face helmet.

Sorry my English grammar doesn't meet the standards of the Pinkbike comment section!
  • 1 1
 But Genewich brings up a good point, I would love to see the evidence to disprove or prove my opinion. I suspect there isn't any research into this yet, the bike industry could do better there.
  • 1 0
 @chris-brown225: Why would it be worse?
  • 1 0
 @Bunabe: My guess is he thinks the potential for the chin bar to dig in or catch on something during a crash event and cause a bending moment or inertia change in the neck is higher. Which I suppose is possible but the trade off would be no protection to the softer/vulnerable structures of the face in general. As mentioned, would be interesting if someone knew of such research. Given the opportunity though, I'd go with the best ventilated full face...I've had enough dental work and crashed bikes that it makes sense, especially if you're getting a little older or your health insurance isn't what it used to be.
  • 1 0
 @iammarkstewart: I don't think the neck brace affects the lateral forces. So it would have to be about the front to back direction.
  • 2 0
 @iammarkstewart: exactly, my worry is the chin piece digging in and the fact that the helmet is more securely attached could make a whiplash/hyperextension injury in the upper cervicals more likely
  • 1 0
 @Bunabe: looks like he confirmed his thoughts, good call.
  • 5 8
 Because full faces aren’t cool and I didn’t buy these NF pants to look like a trail clone!!!!!







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