Review: 2022 Specialized Status 140 - The Slope-Duro-Cross Weapon

Jan 25, 2022 at 10:31
by Matt Beer  

When Specialized originally launched the new Status in 2021, we saw BMX superstars like Chase Hawk, blasting dirt jumps and skateparks on it. After harnessing the intentions of the Status 140, it became clear that this was more than a mini enduro bike. You might call it a "BMXer's first mountain bike". It was built to eke out the simple pleasures in mountain biking: boosting jumps and ripping turns, but the components don't cut it off from deep singletrack adventures either.

The 140mm of travel would typically put it squarely into the "trail bike" segment, but a slack head angle, mega-short chainstays, and a 29/27.5" wheel combo across all frames sizes set it free from any classification.


Specialized Status 140 Details

• Wheel size: 29" front / 27.5" rear
• Travel: 140mm / 150mm fork
• Aluminum frame
• 64.2 or 63.7-degree head tube angle
• 426 mm chainstays
• Sizes: S1-S5
• Complete Bike - $2,999 USD
• Frame kit - $1,399 USD
• Two unique colors for both the complete bike and frame kit
• Weight (actual, S3 w/o pedals): 15.15 kg / 33.40 lb
specialized.com

The Status 140 will become one of Specialized's first direct-to-consumer model bikes. It will also be available in a 160 mm rear wheel travel option and as a frame kit. Both the 140 and 160 are spec'd with the same components and cost just $2,999 USD. SRAM Code R brakes take care of the stopping duties with 200 mm rotors on both wheels, and suspension is handled by Fox with their 36 Rhythm fork and Float X shock, while Specialized rubber handles the traction duties with Butcher tires in the sticky T9 compound. The parts are a well rounded package and deliver an unassuming amount of performance on the trail in a world surrounded by bikes with five digit price tags.

Further Specialized branded parts include the wheels, saddle, bar and stem, which aren't just cookie cutter catalogue pieces. The stem in particular had some thought put into it with a zero-gap top section of the face plate, paired with a carbon headset top cap and spacers. As for the saddle, the Bridge is a model that has found its way to my personal bikes with a wide nose and flatter contour.

That's impressive considering there are other entry level bikes out there for similar prices that don't include wide range gearing or dropper posts. Geometry won't hold the rider back either. The geo chart shows how long and low the numbers go with the head tube angle dipping below 64º.


bigquotesWhether it's backyard jump sessions or your first group trail ride, the Status is eager to pop off the ground and rail corners. The geometry puts the rider in a safe place without being nailed to the ground by a huge wheelbase. The switch to a snappy bike with less travel was rejuvenating and encouraged me to seek out more creative and less direct racer lines. Matt Beer


Frame Details

I'm sure there were battles between the marketing and graphics teams before the paint scheme was decided on, because the only sign to identify the bike as a Specialized is the "S" on the head tube and the "Status" logo under the downtube. Regardless, the silhouette doesn't stray too far from previous Specialized models with the yoked linkage wrapping around the seat tube to actuate the shock, a design they've worked with for years.

A single bearing size is used across all of the sealed pivots with 8 mm hex heads and a hand-operated lever allows for tool-free rear wheel removal. This can be upgraded to the flush-head axle found on the Stumpjumper and Stumpjumper EVO to avoid unwanted contact on technical trails or while walking on the non-drive side of the bike.

At the yoke, Specialized implemented a flip-chip for an ultra-low geometry setting and the front shock mount serves as a nice platter for strapping down a tube. Another add-on for a budget friendly bike is a chain guide and the inclusion of ISCG tabs. A skid plate as standard equipment would be worthwhile, especially considering how low the bottom bracket can sit, but that's another simple add-on if required. Along the chainstay, there is a decent chain-slap protector, but it doesn't have the same wavy rubber pad found on Specialized's higher end full suspension models.

The internal cable routed is cleanly executed and the housings are barely visible until the BB junction. You'll notice there is no need for zip ties to secure these lines either - just a clamp at either end of the downtube, followed by a guide that snaps into the main pivot. Running the housing across the main pivot on FSR bikes reduces the amount of movement the housings undergo as the bike cycles through the travel.

The sleek and quiet cable routing is mainly internal. A short portion of the brake hose runs along the top of the chainstay. Single-use zip ties are not needed to secure the housings either.
All of the pivots run on the same size bearings and use 8 mm hex key pivot hardware that is has a built-in seal.





Good geometry doesn't cost more.
Geometry

If you're going to get a mullet, you may as well go all out - gel up the front, shave the sides, and let the back flow wildly. Business in the front, party in the back. The head tube angle in the low BB setting is out there at 63.7º, and that chainstay is so short that it almost feels like you are standing on the rear axle. If you were able to smash together a dirt jump bike and enduro bike, this is what you'd end up with.

Specialized offers the Status 140 in five sizes that should work for a wide range of rider heights. At 178 cm tall, I chose the S3 size with a reach of 465 mm - a perfect match for the intended purpose of the Status. That kept the wheelbase in check to easily nose into sniper landings and flick the bike around on command. The balance of front to rear centers meshed well on the S3, but I do wonder how that stubby chainstay would play with the longer S4 and S5 reaches that stretch up to 515 mm.

Don't mess with what's not broken. 140 mm of FSR suspension travel keeps the wheel on the ground when you want it there and is predictable to launch in the air.

Suspension Design

As you'd expect, Specialized has implemented the use of their tried and true 4-bar, FSR design. The Horst-Link is a widely used system suspension throughout the industry because of its performance characteristics to packaging constraints tradeoff. The rear brake and axle are mounted to the floating seatstay and the kinematics can be altered somewhat independently of each other. For the Status, that means a rocker-driven shock yoke wraps around a full length seat tube and retains real estate for a water bottle.

Typically, this layout makes for a forward axle path with minimal rearward travel and holds true for the Status. The trade off here is a bike that can be easier to predict every move and gains maneuverability at low speed, which complements the Status' intentions compared to some ground hugging high-pivot machines.

Specifications
Price $2999
Travel 140
Rear Shock Fox Float X
Fork Fox 36 Float Rhythm
Headset Specialized
Cassette SRAM NX 10-50
Crankarms SRAM NX 170
Chainguide Specialized top guide
Bottom Bracket DUB BSA
Rear Derailleur SRAM NX 12-spd
Chain SRAM NX 12-spd
Shifter Pods SRAM NX 12-spd
Handlebar Specialized alloy 800 mm
Stem Specialized alloy 40 mm
Grips Diety Knuckleduster
Brakes SRAM Code R 200 mm
Wheelset Roval Traverse Alloy
Hubs Roval Traverse
Spokes DT
Rim Roval Traverse
Tires Specialized Butcher Grid Trail T9
Seat Specialized Bridge 135 mm
Seatpost X-Fusion Manic 150 mm






Carbon cranks or a purple anodized stem won't make you a better rider. The Specialized Status 140 focuses on the basics first, like quality rubber and aggressive geometry, but doesn't forget about the finishing details like internal cable routing and comfortable contact points.








Test Bike Setup

Getting the suspension on the Status dialled in was simple because there were less fancy clickers to fuss with. I quickly settled on 190 psi in the rear shock, just under 30% sag, and pumped up the fork to 104 psi. I preferred to rely more on spring force to hold the front end up with quick rebounding action and the compression about four fifths of the way open. Halfway through testing, I played with adding a fifth volume spacer in the fork after one particularly large impact, but reverted back to the stock setup for more comfort, chalking up the harsh bottom out to user error. For the rear shock, I set things a degree slower on the rebound and found the stock volume spacers controlled over-enthusiastic lifts on the handlebars just fine.

I chopped the bars to 760 mm and ended up stacking 25 mm of spacers under the stem to put my hips in a relaxed position and to take some pressure off of my hands. I toyed with the low BB setting, but since I didn't visit any lift-assisted parks, I favored the high BB setting for more ground clearance when climbing.

Atmospheric rivers washed away trails and even highways through late autumn in British Columbia, so I took off to Northern California for a few days filled with sun and logging air miles. When I returned to colder temperatures in North Vancouver, snow and ice blanketed all but the lowest elevation trails, the perfect territory for short repetitions on low angle singletrack and sessioning features.



Matt Beer
Location: North Vancouver, BC, Canada
Age: 35
Height: 178 cm / 5'10"
Inseam: 79 cm / 31"
Weight: 78 kg / 170 lbs
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @mattb33r


Climbing


Let's be honest. No one would pick the Status 140 to tackle an Everest climbing challenge, but the lower front end and reasonable seat angle get the job done. That 150mm fork under the 115mm long head tube means there is a need to stay low and forward to simmer down any unwanted wheelies while attacking quick, uphill punches. The climb switch is easily located above the water bottle, which is handy since I used the cheat mode on the shock more often than gulping H2O, even during my time in the sun. Weight shifts are pronounced by the short chainstay, so I used the climb switch frequently on the Status to keep my center of gravity forward and eliminate the shock from sagging further into the stroke.

Without that climb switch on, you'll have to be mindful of your pedal positioning in tech climbs. It doesn't have the low dynamic ride height like the Stumpjumper EVO (in the stock geometry settings), but Status could be a good candidate for 165 mm cranks, keeping in mind the target market may be beginners who are still learning how to perfect their climbing tactics. The low bottom bracket wasn't a make or break deal, keeping in mind that the bike is intended to enjoy descending to the fullest.


Descending


Lately, I've been riding a lot of long travel 29ers that are absolute brawlers when the going gets steep and rough. Those bikes can have huge wheelbases which are safe and stable, but aren't the most responsive. As much fun as it is approaching downhill race speeds, taking a break from survival mode is refreshing and shredding the Status through turn tracks and jump lines is where it comes alive - basically the perfect tool to light up your Instagram reel with.

Small bumps are handled decently with minor feedback on the chatter and it remains composed on the big hits for a bike with 140mm of travel. That rear wheel feels like it has to work a touch harder because it is right underneath you, especially compared to the Stumpjumper EVO - the traction master. The rider's attention should be drawn to the Status' responsiveness rather than focusing on compliance. You do feel slightly on top of the bike, rather than "in" it, which does give you that leverage to pick the bike up off the ground and snap to get on the gas.

That extremely short rear center corners on a dime, but because so much of your weight hinges over the rear axle you have to put your weight a little lower and farther forward when you really start to open up things at high speeds, otherwise larger impacts on the front wheel can cause it to leave the ground. You might say that's more dependent on the rebound speed of the fork, but that slight shift in weight bias is a better compromise than slowing down the fork's rebound.

As for that Fox Rhythm fork, it actually performed above my expectations. I did tend to prefer a higher air spring pressure and the damper controls fairly open. Striking a balance between low speed support when diving into the corner and being a bit overbearing if closed much further on repetitive, high frequency bumps was a fine line. With that said, the Rhythm 36 can accept the highly regarded Grip2 damper should you want to puzzle away.

Clawing back at the Status' technical capabilities, the 29" front wheel and slack head angle do wonders for trucking over bomb holes, finding front wheel traction, and generally keeping the rider from going over the bars. The high BB setting is going to be for riders that want the most responsive ride for tricking jumps or need the clearance on slower, technical trails. If you're heading to the bike park for a chair lift or shuttle bump, the slacker setting only takes a second to flip the chip and will promote safer travels at high speed.

Does the Status remind you of the Enduro SX, or is it just me?


Call me crazy, but I would even be tempted to see what this bike would ride like with a 27.5" front wheel, especially for the super shredders out there that want the most responsive bike to tuck into steep landings and move about in the air. Obviously an external lower cup or raised crown race would be necessary to compensate for the smaller front wheel.

As a firm believer of n+1 being the perfect amount of bikes, I've always wanted to replicate the dual slalom bike I bodged together and used as my trail bike back in 2009, before dropper posts and wide range cassettes existed. It shouldn't come as any surprise that my time spent on the Status has resurrected my craving for slalom bikes, however, with much more versatility this time 'round.


Specialized Status 140
2022 Santa Cruz Bronson XO1 AXS Reserve Carbon CC MX
Santa Cruz Bronson

How Does It Compare?


You might wonder why I choose to compare the Specialized Status 140 against the Santa Cruz Bronson, two bikes that sit on either end of the pricing spectrum. The Bronson does sport 10mm more travel at each wheel, plus the materials differ; carbon versus aluminum. How they compare directly is that they are both purpose built mixed-wheeled bikes, and when I ventured out on either of these bikes, I found myself focusing less on tackling gnarly trails or pinning the straightest lines and more so looking to get creative on the sides of the trail, turning features I used to avoid into something to play with - up and around instead of straight through.

Both mullet bikes deal with bumps via different suspension designs, but have similar traits. The small impacts are noticeable, but the big hits aren't an issue and when asked to hammer on the cranks the power is delivered and not lost to soggy feeling suspension. As expected, the Bronson's carbon frame and wheel construction have more muscle in the big compressions, but not every rider will want such a firm ride. Either way, it's no surprise to hear that mixed wheeled bikes turn quicker than full 29ers and strike a balance between agility and composure.

Both the Status 140 and Bronson cast angles within a few tenths of each other at a moderately slack 64.2º and 64.7º, respectfully. Lowering the BB height of the Status drops that number to 63.7º, well below the Bronson, which only changes by 0.2º.

Reach numbers and BB heights don't stray too far away from one another either, but it's the chainstay length that really sets the Status apart. At 439, some 13 mm more than the Status, that rear center number makes the Bronson more comfortable in a wider range of riding segments - like an "all-terrain snowboard" whereas the Status reminds me of surfer-style board with their super-short tails and wide nose, for the least serious days out.

The new T9 rubber from Specialized makes a huge difference over the previous Black Diamond compound. Tried and true, the Butcher tread pattern offers a consistent feel to lean over and reach the side knobs. The braking traction also delivers, considering the Butchers are not front or rear specific.
Even with minimal adjustments, the Float X did an excellent job to keep the rear wheel tracking well.
Technical Report


Fox Float X: I've ridden the Float X on a few of bikes this year and have been impressed throughout the sample size. Although it's not as sensitive of a ride as the Stumpjumper EVO linkage, the Rx tune developed by Specialized on this Float X, suits the Status perfectly.

Specialized tires: The Butcher Grid Trail T9 label doesn't make deciphering the hot patch nomenclature any easier, but it is friendlier on your wallet. Listed for $70 USD, that saves about $20 over the equivalent Maxxis tire. This new rubber formula wears well and offers a predictable transition to the side knobs with consistent grip in both warm and cold climates. At 975 g, the carcass has been reliable and is decently supported in corners. A lot of the rider's weight is placed over the rear wheel of the Status which led to a few minor burps with pressures around 26 PSI.

Dropper post: Specialized's "S sizing" lets you choose a frame based on length, not seat tube height, but the S3 Status is deserving of a post with more than 150mm of drop. I had to raise the post about 40 mm above the seat post clamp to achieve a reasonable climbing position - a post with more drop would have eliminated this issue. Swapping to a quick-release seat clamp is a cheap solution for riders who don't have room in their budgets to upgrade to a longer travel post.

SRAM NX derailleur: I gave the SRAM NX derailleur a chance, but it wasn't quite up to the task of stretching across such a wide range cassette and the weak clutch could have been the reason for the paint damage on the chainstay. Without taking any hits, the derailleur developed a lean quickly and made tuning the shifts challenging, despite the hanger remaining straight. It may have made more sense for the NX range to be a 10 or 11-speed system that had less finicky indexing.




Pros

+ Extremely playful bike that doesn't fit in a particular category
+ Suspension kinematics and Fox Float X make it a solid base to build upon
+ Specialized T9 tire compound is impressive, especially considering the price differential


Cons

- S3 frame needs a 170 mm dropper post
- NX derailleur lacks reliability
- Chainstay would benefit from Stumpjumper rubber frame protector





Pinkbike's Take


bigquotesWhether you want to join your friends and see what this whole mountain biking activity is all about without spending a load of cash or you are looking to update that tired freeride bike that was hot decades ago, the Status 140 is an affordable package with a ton of character. Riding baseline parts put things in perspective; once you have your basics like geometry, tires and suspension covered, more expensive components only get you small, incremental gains.

Riders on the two largest sizes may find the super short chainstays unbalanced, but the rest of the geometry shouldn't hold you back from railing turns and cruising through jump lines. If you lean towards serious play time versus racing seriously, then the Status 140 is a worthy contender.
Matt Beer






411 Comments

  • 212 2
 A BMX background you say??
  • 11 2
 A Flo rider would benefit
  • 18 11
 Not with a wagon wheel up front ot aint
  • 28 1
 @naptime: you can flow a penny farthing with enough effort
  • 18 5
 @naptime: You've either got flow or you don't, no matter what the wheel size. If you can't flow a 29, a 26 is just a crutch
  • 4 1
 @kiddlivid: that's funny I've heard the same thing said about any wheel size :'D
  • 4 16
flag mhoshal (Feb 2, 2022 at 4:25) (Below Threshold)
 @kiddlivid: tell that to almost every Redbull rider and watch them laugh in your face.
  • 4 2
 @mhoshal: Goldstone, Finn, Loic, Tahnee, the Athertons, Laurie Greenland, Kade Edwards, Danny Mac, Brook Macdonald, Vali and Pom Pom would argue otherwise. Wheel size doesn't really seem to affect them in any way. If you mean Freeriders, wheel size has to do with wheel base for spins and tricks, not flow.
  • 2 1
 @kiddlivid: I think he means 'slope' riders.. being that this bike is labeled a "slope-duro"... what ever the fk that is....?
You can also add to slope, dj an free ride.. so make a list of all the DJ, slope a n free riders on 29........
I won't hold my breath
  • 1 0
 A bike made for fun instead of stability?
Please let this be the new trend. More BMX pros on MTBs are also welcome. We all came from BMX. Whose first bike was a road bike?
  • 81 4
 I've been trying to buy a Status frame for a while now, and it's beyond irritating that they're essentially vaporware. The bike itself looks great, but doesn't appear on Specialized's website and my local dealer only has a complete bike and no way to order a frame. Why release and promote reviews for a thing that doesn't exist?
  • 210 2
 Your local dealer has a bike in stock?
  • 34 15
 I really doubt Spec created the Status, a price point bike, to be sold as a frame only. There are other frame only bikes you can buy that are as good or better, such as the Canfield Tilt. Super short chainstays, 425 mm on my Tilt, love em!
  • 13 1
 They exist in droves in certain areas. I believe Specialized sent a bunch to priority dealers. Not that it makes it any better, but just noting I have seen a ton of them around me. On the trails and in the store.
  • 8 0
 @nurseben: several shops got the frames. I picked mine up from Wooden Wheels in Delaware. Great value at our $1,300 for the frame and shock.
  • 13 0
 @nurseben: the tilt frame is $1000 more for frame and shock, and the shock price difference is hardly any between the cc db air and float X perf. the stumpy evo alloy frame is $250 less, and its hard to say which one is better between the tilt and the stumpy evo. the point is you have a very solid full suspension bike frame with a very good shock for under $1500, which is a really competitive price. there's arguments to be made about how easy it is to get, but that's a different topic.
  • 3 0
 I had the same issue with Norco's aluminum Sight frame offering. Advertised but none available, none to be ordered, and "likely to be discontinued" said all dealers I spoke to. But here we are 2 years later and its still advertised. Sucks because I planned my whole build around it.
  • 5 3
 @pisgahgnar: specialized doesn't make big margins with this bike and in the current shortage crisis they probably pushed all resources towards the high end ebike stuff.
  • 1 0
 Was going to buy one for my son... only available in the US it seems right now... can't get it to ship to Canada.
  • 1 0
 @nurseben:

Was told just last week by the main S. shop in SA that for the upcoming shipments they are getting Status & Stumpjumper Evo alloy as frames only. Almost no full builds…
  • 1 0
 Thanks, that was going to be my first question.
  • 3 0
 We bought an S2 frame from Fanatik last spring. Built the 160mm version for my wife. Absolutely killer bike. Pedals well enough for all day efforts. Jumps and plows really well for her at 5’5”. The rear end is too short in the larger sizes. It is my understanding that it was originally going to be offered only in Europe. Then they decided to let a few US dealers sell them.
  • 2 0
 They've been available frame only or build on Fanatic for ever? (granted they go in and out of stock and sizes available)
  • 1 1
 @islandforlife: makes friends with someone who will ship it for you?
  • 6 1
 A) this is a review for the whole bike, which does exist.
B) this is the state of the world currently. Stuff is slow to get made and slow to get where it's supposed to be. There are Status frames out there, just happen to not be where you are, yet.
  • 4 0
 Bought a 160mm last year as a full build based on friend's recommendation. There were 5 dealers in Cali and one in Oregon that sold the Status. The Oregon store wanted $500 more than list which ruled out a trip to Oregon.
Kind of wish the geo on the 160mm was closer to the 140mm version. 63.7° is the high setting and I still get pedal strikes like crazy. The bike is a blast to ride, but needs shorter cranks.
  • 3 0
 Lightning Cycles in Hickory, NC has a few I think
  • 1 0
 welcome to the last 2 years?
  • 12 2
 About 15 in BuySell. Not bad for vaporware. Things that don't exist can become popular--see Pizzagate
  • 1 0
 @jhennebu: The discontinued comment is disconcerting. That's a strong and popular model for Norco .. what would replace it?
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: S4 and S3 Status 140s in Oak Green in stock at Russ Hays Bikes in Sidney BC
  • 7 2
 I live in 3rd world country - UK. Wanted this bike /frame in August 21. Specialized told me it it would be available, maybe in Dec 21, full bike only, no frame option. Went to Europe same month, August, and bought it outright in bike shop in Poland! Just like dat!
  • 14 12
 @ekho: The UK isn't a country
  • 1 0
 @gordoncomstock: Nice! Need and S2... will have to call around.
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: there are some in Squamish if you come through this way. Corsa and the new specialized shop had them last time I was in.
  • 3 2
 @nurseben: I'd second this for anyone looking for these characteristics but also prioritizing the ability to pedal everywhere with the shock wide open. In that case the CBF is worth the $. I suppose the same can be said for most name-dropy suspension designs.

Full disclosure - I own a Canfield Balance as my only suspension bike and its absolutely stupid how versatile that 170mm alloy coil sprung mini-tank is...
  • 2 2
 @nurseben: Interestingly the Status is no longer on Fanatic Bike. But you have been able to build them from the frame up for at least the last year. (also had full bikes, but not sure if they were instore only?) Granted they went in and out of stock/sizes. But I just looked at it 2 weeks ago and it was still in the builder.

Whoever chooses paint and graphics for Canefeild must be color blind... they got like 2 out of the 10 OK, the rest are just train wrecks... also they are heavy and short chainstays are not as great for tall people. Revel geo is lacking. So nomatter how great everyone who owns that linkage says they are I'm saying meh... Smile
  • 1 0
 Dude look in the buy sell, a size large frame sold brand new for $1000 yesterday..
  • 2 1
 @KalkhoffKiller: ebikes are a scourge
  • 1 0
 just search in status on their website, had the same thing
  • 1 0
 @ads10: there’s no trace of it on the Specialized Canada website. Maybe that’s why it seems so odd. My local dealer does a lot of volume in Specialized and couldn’t even give me any idea what’s going on. I checked in again with them last week, and nothing.
  • 3 0
 @islandforlife: I think Jack's cycles in Chilliwack has some in stock
  • 3 0
 @husstler: I think they were supposed to do the direct to consumer thing last year, as they released the Jett kids bike and Status, but the shortage hit them hard and any bikes they had ended up being used to fill holes that formed in dealer orders for bikes that just weren't showing up and just weren't put online. I know some shops had half their specialized orders cancelled by specialized in canada last spring so they needed something to send them.
  • 6 0
 @islandforlife: ship to “Ship happens” or other such places just on the other side of border. Fill bike box with a complete bike, in parts (use a sprayed in the right colour) wal-mart frame. You’re going riding for the weekend in Bellingham (Can confirm, excellent riding, stop in at Transition, have beer, great guys)
Pick up new frame, ditch old one, cross border with little to no issue…..
Can confirm, works flawlessly

Good Luck
  • 2 0
 @jhennebu: I remember when it was like 1900$, 2 years ago! I couldn't believe it, thought it was an error but no, it was the good price! I finally decided not to go with it but the year after I thought about it once again but it was already a lot more.....now 2500$! :S
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: We have a Status 160 available (S3).
  • 1 0
 @comoxbikecompany: What's Canadian pricing like on the 2022s?
  • 1 0
 AFAIK you can only get it by asking a Specialized dealer to "special order it" (thats why it's called a status no?)
It's not a bad bike, a friend has the previous model. No issue with the NX derailleur also. The equipment is pretty decent. The only issue is the weight, its heavy af. Does otherwise pedals well, descends well, etc.
  • 4 0
 @Mayzei: that's a bit of a nit-pick. UK of GB and NI...much easier just to type UK, and the rest can be assumed
  • 2 1
 @Tambo: I think Nicola Sturgeon must have a PB account.
  • 2 1
 @Mayzei: who told you that? Nicola Sturgeon?
  • 1 0
 @chakaping: ha - just read your comment - same idea Smile
  • 1 0
 I see you are from Calgary, Revolution Cycle in Edmonton has 140 and 160 versions in stock ( or at least had all summer long )
  • 1 0
 @njcbps: Not discontinuing the Sight model, just the aluminum frame as an individual offering. ie: Would not be available as frame only in aluminum.
  • 1 0
 @Timo82: Same, I believe it was even less when I was looking, something like 1600. Was frustrating when they wouldn't sell/order it for me lol. Like you said its still on the site, for a lot more $$$$. I wonder if you can even buy it lol.
  • 2 0
 @jhennebu: Ah that's funny because I wrote 1600 at first and then said to myself nahhhh that's impossible...it was 1900, maybe 1600 was the price I thought it would come if I sell the shock...but maybe it was really 1600 if you also say that! loll Maybe 1900 was the second year and now it is 2500? But yeah, last fall a friend of mine wanted to buy that frame and was said their was none and they would not sell it anymore so he bought a Transition for a lot more money..

P.S. Was it 1600usd maybe and 1899 cad? Anyway, it was a f*cking good bargain!!
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: We don’t have this version in stock, but if you’re interested we do have the Status 160 in stock in S2, S3, S4, and S5!
  • 2 0
 The bike is basically a sub brand of Specialized. It has its own website. Statusbike.com (I believe). I bought one and it took a while looking for info on it to realize it had its own site. Brilliant marketing from the big S. A bike for "core" riders that is (from a brand/culture perspective) distancing itself from the big corporate vibe that many riders find off putting (weather they realize it or not).
  • 1 0
 You can view all our bikes we have in stock on our website at www.jackscycle.ca.
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: freedom bike shop has quite a few!
  • 79 5
 Last time you review it, you thought that the Status 140 feels like it has much more travel than 140mm. Just to find out you tested the 160mm version. Did you make sure it's the 140mm version this time?
  • 40 0
 Lol the review that shall not be named.
  • 8 0
 It was the other way around
  • 21 23
 Funny that, No mention that shareholders in Outside co also work for Specialized. Yes, that is legit. Not some weird conspiracy. I thought they would have a little asterisk clause down the bottom or something at least.
  • 17 0
 @Brasher: They talked about this on the last podcast. Apparently levy wasnt even aware of it
  • 4 1
 @KennyWatson: It was gone so fast. Just vanished in a few hours.
  • 12 0
 @kiddlivid: Along with Levy as a bike reviewer lol.

I wish I'd saved the page before it was taken down.
  • 5 0
 @Brasher: what's with downvotes for that comment?
  • 11 3
 @sonuvagun: because everyone is bored of the "specialized control outside/PB" sh1t.
  • 2 3
 @Tambo: It sounds like you're saying the prevalent thinking is, I'm paraphrasing: who cares if he's got a point; we don't like it.
If I misunderstood what you're saying then it's not intentional.
  • 7 1
 @sonuvagun: no, no. He doesn't have a point; Specialized don't have a single bit of say about what PB does or says in reviews etc. We're tired of hearing it brought up still, when there's zero proof that some behind the scenes investment equates to any sort of control.
  • 2 3
 @Tambo: if you're serious then we may as well be disagreeing if people are always honest or not.
  • 2 2
 @sonuvagun: invest in PB > force PB to publish false reviews > devalue investment. It makes no sense for them to do it, even if they could.
  • 2 3
 @Tambo: I agree, that would be a dumb way to do it; but would it be the only way to do it?
The term "conflict of interest" describes an age-old practice, so it's never a mistake to look at what may be going on beyond the pale.
  • 2 2
 @sonuvagun: fair point. But if they're controlling it in a way that's not detrimental to their investment (read; better for us consumers), what's the problem?
  • 1 2
 @Tambo: I have no idea to what degree, if any, the reviews of Specialized products are biased (control being exerted through rather simple channels).
Perhaps we just see things differently when it comes to what people are willing to do for short-term gain (see all of recognized history). Best regards.
  • 2 1
 @Tambo: I've seen so many errors and omissions in pb reviews. On top of reviews not even attempting to do any quantitative analysis, we rarely even get kinematics charts. It would not be surpassing at all if some of the omissions we're for their investors, owners or advertisers. Without them using any kind of bench testing or standardized quantitative methodology why would anyone take them at face value? They can literally just write whatever sounds good (or bad) and never have to write a correction.
  • 2 1
 @Purpledragonslayer: Sorry, I guess you didn't get the memo - PB is primarily a mountain bike industry newsfeed site now.

In the future, you should adjust your expectations based on this.
  • 80 14
 Slopeduro. shut the fuck up
  • 11 1
 It's the next wave in mountain biking: www.youtube.com/watch?v=ciyjnkLfmf4
  • 9 1
 Fine fine. How's downcountrystyle?
  • 27 2
 Unlike Downcountry, Slopeduro does not encourage riding chicken lines. Make air time great again.
  • 1 0
 I live and breathe slopeduro. Still need work on my barspins
  • 5 4
 Slopeduro is about purposefully riding French lines, but in a way so that tires don’t touch the ground while you are cutting the trail. The person with most air time per trail wins. Props for manuals too. Basically keep the front wheel of the ground wherever you can.
  • 60 0
 Why is it so hard to fine bike spec'd with shimano drivetrains? They seem rarer than sram drivetrains, which don't seem to offer the same bang-for-the-buck on low end drivetrains.
  • 66 3
 Shimano's supply chain is F'd sadly. They had a factory fire, and had to shut down production for a bit. Now they have a big backlog. They're working to meet demand, but can't keep up (like a lot of companies).

Everyone knows Deore is 10x better than NX, but bike brands can't count on Shimano right now for supply, so they stick with Sram's shitty offerings.

It is funny because I think GX is quite good... but NX is a massive step down in quality. While I find little difference between Deore and XT.
  • 7 0
 I think Sram has been pumping out NX /SX for longer, so their supply chain issues aren't as drastic as Shimano, which launched Deore amid the pandemic. I think it will even out more in a year or so.
  • 6 1
 @bonkmasterflex: I noticed a difference between Deore and XT when I swapped them. XT just feels more precise. Its not as big of a difference as NX vs GX though.
  • 15 0
 Maybe because they make more money on their fishing reels?????

$1100 for a Stella and stores can't keep them in stock.
  • 8 1
 I struggled to find a 12speed Microspline cassette.
  • 2 0
 SRAM's pricing for frame builders/brands allows for a bigger margin when they are sold to dealers, or in this case, consumers. Shimano got better recently, especially with Deore 12, but I think you'll continue to see SRAM as the dominant groupset on bikes that brands are positioning as 'entry level.'
  • 2 0
 @bonkmasterflex: that fire was in 2018, wasn't it? If that is still affecting them, then yeah they're hosed.


I'm guessing builders get a significant savings if they purchase everything for the bike from Sram (drivetrain, suspension etc), rather than Shimano, Fox and mixed stuff.
  • 5 0
 @swellhunter: fishing is one of the hobbies that makes MTB seem pretty cheap by comparison. A guy I work with was telling me how much he had into fishing poles alone and it blew my mind.
  • 7 6
 @HB208: That is because GX is as whatever as it gets. Not sure why. The first X1 was an actual middle ground to X01. When they had 10sp X7,X9, X0 you knew exactly what you were paying for. Now they have nearly identical pairs: NX and GX then X01 and XX1 with SX and AXS being... outliers.

Shimano has more balanced grading system, although there are some question marks. For instance I do not understand the point of buying SLX rear mech over Deore, XT cassette and cranks over SLX, XTR brakes over XT. But if you buy stuff aftermarket you can make highly reasonable and well performing mix of things from Deore to XT without breaking a bank. Having11sp XTR I got myself XT shifter and Deore rear mech for the second bike. Quite honestly I do not feel the difference. I am only a sucker for XTR cassettes, light and shift like a dream.
  • 12 0
 @HB208: agreed - Deore is a reliable bssic drivetrain, and stepping up to SLX or XT makes it nicer. NX/SX are dog shit. The review is being unreasonably kind on that front.
  • 2 0
 Feels like part of the (mulitple) reason(s) could be that they're far more prolific on road bikes than complete mtbs these days. Sometimes i forget they make mtb components since theyre so rare these days.
  • 23 0
 @swellhunter: I borrowed a friend's Shimano fishing reel and I thought it was amazing. For fishing I go with the cheapest gear I can get, but this must have been the XTR level reel. And I swear I caught more fish with it. I think they (the fish) can tell too. Like they appreciate the effort someone put into the topside presentation of the bait or lure.
  • 2 0
 @monkeynaut: Try to find a 12 spd ms lockring and washer. $53 from ebay and over $40 shipped to NY from elsewhere. I finally got some knock-offs that seem to work for $13.
  • 4 0
 SRAM can offer bundle deals that make it far more appealing to manufacturers. SRAM is more than drivetrains when you think about what brands they own. So while a model like reviewed here has Fox suspension, there were likely RockShox suspension on other models that were baked into the negotiations. When it has been a sellers market for the last couple years, and manufacturers have to spend more on Shimano while sourcing other components, then hope Shimano's supply issues don't effect them, there's little incentive.
  • 5 0
 In addition to what everyone else said - SRAM's lower end groupsets (SX, NX) use Hyperglide freehub. You don't need to source microspline or XD driver hubs. Probably cuts considerable cost since there are a billion OEM HG hub wheelset suppliers to choose from.
  • 2 0
 @EstebanPablo: Thank you for this.
  • 5 1
 @office: To add to that, Shimano has now shot themselves in the foot with Microspline. The most expensive freehub body in existence. All to show SRAM that they too can make the “I have more megapixels than you” decision of running 10t Cog. If they made HG Versions of Deore and SLX cassettes it would repair some of the damage.
  • 2 0
 @Puntas: hardest part to find when I built my new bike, but eventually found one from a small shop willing to ship, which I think often isn't allowed (at least that's what other shops said).
  • 2 0
 @calmWAKI: sram and shimano have issues with their cassette games. Sram is srupidly overpriced (at least the good ones) and shimano is heavy as af if you dont go xtr. If garbaruk can make a wonderful 11-50 11speed monoblock cassette for 190€ why cant the big boys do it. A Deore 11 speed cassette weighs 600+ grams costs 90€ and you cant even get it.
  • 2 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: I haven't tried Garbaruk but Sram and Sunrace are not in the same ballpark as Shimano when it comes to smoothness. It is a niche thing as I would guess not many really need it (experience it at all) but it does play a big role on steep technical climbs or in ondulating terrain with loads of rocks around when there is no good moment to get off the power. 12sp Shimano cassettes are the benchmark of shifting performance. 11sp were already ahead of the game. I am now afraid though that 12sp Shimano is as sensitive to rear mech alignment as 12sp Sram. I agree though, Shimano cassettes weigh a lot. HG2 cassette in 10sp 11-42 would do me.
  • 2 0
 @calmWAKI: I own the said Garbaruk cassette on my Enduro /Freerider and its perfect for getting to the top of mountains but the 11spd Shimano casssette on my Hardtail shifts better and would always be my pick on terrain where fast shifting under load is key. Dont get me wrong the Garbaruk shifts fine and does not care if everything is adjusted perfectly, it just takes its time. I think it just has less steps. Reading your post, the Garbaruk would not be for you. After the 12 speed GX on my previous Endurobike i wanted something robust and easy to live with with a good range and not too much weight. M5100 + Garbaruk does this although i am wondering if a xt or xtr mech would make shifting faster.
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: I also think Garbaruk doesn't shift as well as Shimano 12s ms, but is on par with GX & X01 (never tried full XX!). That said, I notice significant improvement when I use Boeshield lube on my chain in terms of skipping and hard, weird shifts w/ Garbaruk.
  • 3 3
 @calmWAKI: Haha welcome back but do I need to post the video again? We both know those cheap monkey metal stamped shimano cassettes don’t shift anywhere near as well as srams high end machined cassettes. Wink
  • 2 1
 @thenotoriousmic: Again, the difference presents itself when power is applied. If they redo the video on a trainer when someone is mashing at serious resistance you'll see and hear the difference. Preferably keep cranks in the frame. for most people in most cases - not an issue. If you climbs lots of steep - you may consider Shimano over other options. For me that's all I have in the area.
  • 5 3
 @calmWAKI: Agreed under power is when you really notice the difference in quality between a high end sram cassettes and cheap stamped cassette. I can shift down in a corner and confidently pedal out of the turn mid shift, try that with my xt and it’s going to slip and I’m going to knee my stem.

Sram clearly know Shimano exist and how they make their products. They wouldn’t be spending all this time machining cassettes out of high grade steel when they could just put a sheet of mild steel in a hydraulic press and stamp out 100’s, if we’re to listen to the deluded shimano fanboys better performing cassettes for a fraction of the price. The reason they go this extra effort and expense is because it’s a vastly superior product hence why it sells so well when things like £99 XT cassettes exist.
  • 2 1
 @thenotoriousmic: agreed! The old sram PG-1130 cassette I'm still running is bombproof as it gets. I have a second bike with a full SLX drivetrain with smooth shifting, but tons of drag on the cassette. Also, the Shimano SLX derailleur is super vulnerable to snapping in half without too much force, I've done it twice. GX derailleurs win the durability challenge hands down.
  • 5 4
 @thenotoriousmic: arguing with you about it is like old marriage that should have been a divorce long time ago. I am happy that your cassettes suit your riding style, expectations and wallet. I have 3 cassette brands on different bikes, and used almost anything from 9sp X5, through 10sp 1099, 11sp 1199 to 12sp GX and virtually everything from Shimano produced in last 10 years. I’ll make my own judgements thank you.
  • 3 0
 Even before the supply chain mess, companies were taking the NX/SX discounts (and not really passing them on to us) rather than spec an SLX or Deore drivetrain. Its BS. Polygon showed that you can do an affordable bike with Fox Rhythm and SLX for 2350 (now 2500$). But the big companies can't seem to figure that kind of math out.
  • 1 2
 @Svinyard: I’ve got loads of bmx mates that have recently got into mountain biking and they’re all on entry level full suspensions and they all come with deore / slx and since they’re all brakeless bmxers it’s sort of my responsibility to keep their bikes running smooth or at least attempt to teach them how to fix it themselves and it is utter trash especially the deore 12 speed rear derailer and the deore brake levers. I’m no fan off NX / SX and wouldn’t waste my money on it but it’s still better than the deore stuff and lasts longer than slx. I’d happily pay the extra not to have deore / fox rhythm because 6-12 months down the line your drivetrain is going to be in the spare parts box and your crowns are going to be creeking.

@calmWAKI I disagree, I’ve missed our chats. Where have you been?
  • 6 2
 @thenotoriousmic: Uh, there is absolutely no way that NX/SX lasts longer than SLX.
  • 1 4
 @HB208: I’m not really talking about the dumb parts more stuff with moving parts like shifters and mechs. Next time your in a bike shop go grab a deore / slx mech by the bottom jockey wheel and give it a wobble and look at all that flex and play from new and then go do the same with a NX mech and see the difference in quality. Now imagine how much worse that deore / slx mech is going to be after 6 months of being rattled around hanging of the back of a swing arm. I still wouldn’t buy NX though as it’s still trash.
  • 5 1
 @thenotoriousmic: I have closely inspected both and NX is crap. I burned through a cassette in six months and the shifting quality was bad.

You work for SRAM or something?
  • 1 0
 @HB208: Wow, I agree with you that NX is crap, but how the heck did you burn through an all-steel cassette in 6 months? With a fresh chain per year, I'm going on my third season on mine, with tons of miles on it. Some finish has worn off the cassette, but it still only looks around 50% worn in the highest gears.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I got a Deore 11 Speed mech (m5100)did not shift crisp new, does not shift crisp after 7 months but never slipped a chain no matter how bad it was adjusted, thats all i want from a mech on a Freeride bike.

Best mech on the planet is still the 2008 xo dh, shifts like a dream after 14 years, every part is replaceable and does not wobble even wihout clutch.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: The teeth kept braking off if I shifted under force. The XT on my new bike doesn't have this same issue at all.
  • 1 0
 @HB208: Wow, that's insane. Glad your XT is holding up, but I'd say with a little work on timing the shifting, you could be getting a whole lot more life out of your cassettes. If the XT is 12spd, then it's HyperGlide+, and that would makes sense why it's more forgiving to shifting under load.
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: couldn’t agree more along with the 10 speed XTR best shifting mechs ever. That X0 mech was actually made by sachs in Germany I think. I’ve still got one. And yeah when I rode downhill I always ran slx / zee mechs because I’d just tear it off before it had chance to wear out anyway.
  • 1 2
 @HB208: I agree it’s crap but it’s still better than deore / slx. Shimano knows there’s an issue with corrosion in the new clutches and yet they haven’t done anything about it. The clutches on sram mechs have always held up better and have a much lighter lever pull when you shift and sorry but the 12 speed mechs aren’t fit for purpose especially the deore, you’ll find higher quality steel in a meccano set and even though NX is shit it does actually work which makes it the better buy. Also srams warranty department is way faster and ask less questions. And no haha I don’t work for sram. I ride both, Mainly XT on one bike with GX mech and X01 on the other.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: I know I can't just grind gears. I am talking about medium pressure causing teeth to blow up. If I didn't want to burn through the cassette, I would have had to apply nearly zero pressure while shifting.
  • 1 1
 @thenotoriousmic: haha sure, NX and SX are Alivio or Acera or Tourney and not meant to be used for bike riding.

Deore and SLX and GX actually works.
  • 1 0
 @HB208: Not that I don't believe you, but I've found the steel NX cassette to be extremely strong. I'm blown away that you're ripping teeth off.
  • 1 1
 @mammal: I broke multiple teeth. Its pretty soft metal if you really inspect it.
  • 1 1
 @HB208: The steel used for the NX cassette was chosen so they could include it with ebike groups, so I'm assuming it's rated for some pretty high watts. The broken teeth probably from shifting motion.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: I mean, ok, but who cares? If I am breaking teeth because of the shifting motion on NX but not other groupsets, I am blaming the groupset.
  • 1 0
 @HB208: Sure, I guess one final thing is whether you moved from NX directly to a 12spd shimano setup. And then, whether you've run a previous Sram or 11spd Shimano setup in the past without issues. If it's yes, then no, the cassette failure may be due to shifting prowess, and it may be shimano's shifting-under-load tech that's helping you now, as opposed to a stronger cassette. If you've got a long history of long-lasting cassettes throughout the past, and it's only the NX that's been an issue for you, well, I guess you're putting a whole lot more stress through your drive train than I do. But because I seem to be getting 5 times more life out of my cassette (or more), it makes me suspicious. No offense intended, just interested, so I'm digging into the situation a bit.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: I have had zero issues with XT and it shifts underload way better.
  • 1 0
 @HB208: We upgraded the b bolt on my son’s NX (on his Status, no less) since no GX was available when the invariable slop developed. Did the trick for a mere $30 and a little labor on our parts. Also put a GXshift lever on a a crash replacement. Nice improvement all in all, and this is coming from being primarily Shimano users prior to this bike.
  • 2 0
 @calmWAKI: There is Microshift as well. Installed a complete 1x10 Advent X drivetrain on my sons Banshee for $200 brand new. Can confirm, Microshift is legit. Honestly, when I ride his bike, I dont miss Eagle12 at all. Esspecially for $200.
  • 1 0
 @HB208: I'm glad you found a group that works well for you. My only point, and maybe this was too much of a roundabout way to get to it, is that 12spd shimano chain/cog combos are the only group in the history of mountain bikes that allows you to mash gear changes under load (Hyperglide+). If that's what's keeping you from breaking teeth off of your XT cassette, it doesn't necessarily mean the NX cog set garbage in comparison (your original point).
  • 1 1
 @mammal: hyperglide+ is just feeder ramps or groves for when moving into smaller gears. Sram cassettes have had them since the 11 speed era which is why the 11 speed sram cassettes shift so much smoother going into smaller gears than the 11 speed shimano cassettes.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: The shape of the HG+ ramps and chain help with shifting under load in both directions, which is very well documented. You can mash into an easier gear, under load, much smoother than previous Shimano or Sram designs..
  • 1 0
 @jason475: yep. I’m sold in the advent x too.
  • 1 1
 @mammal: Yes sram cassettes and others have had feeder ramps in both directions for years. Just shift through any eagle cassette and see for yourself.
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I know you can shift both directions on both brands' cassettes, and that they all have ramps. The design of the ramps and shape of the chain for HG+ are unique however, and that improves the shift-under-load performance quite a bit (both directions).
  • 1 0
 @OCSunDevil: Oh dude - offshore fishing is stupid expensive. I
  • 1 0
 @calmWAKI: Microspline isn’t the same as your describing. The main issue with regular free hub bodies, is that the cassette will dig into them more, because the load is less spread out over the free hub body, the more splines they add, the more it’s spread over the whole body. Which helps save any dings and dents which you may see if you take a well used cassette off an older style. Definitely expensive, but it’s for a reason. Hope this helps!
  • 1 0
 @ChanceFuller: I can buy that. But I can also run a steel body weighing 50g more that is as hard or harder than the cassette spider. I am not planning to change the world. It's here, it will stay, I have more worries than this Smile
  • 55 1
 Why do you think that the target market is beginners? It seems like that decision is made just on the cost, which, lets not forget, is still $3,000USD. That's more than one months salary for a median income person in Canada. There are many, many experienced riders out there for whom this would be a major and difficult purchase.

The geometry makes this look like a bike for those riders to me. The combination of slack head angle, long reach, and short chain stays this bike has make it seem likely to need quite advanced body positioning that will make it better suited to those performance riders. I'd imagine a beginner rider, with a tendency to lean back too far, would be constantly washing the front end on something like this. I'm betting any release video Specialized put out will show it in the hands of advanced riders slapping turns, not beginners enjoying their first trail rides.
  • 54 2
 You can’t be an experienced rider unless you’re dripping in kashima
  • 4 0
 As a beginner I found learning to ride on bigger bikes with a slacker head angle much better. I started with an older Nicolai with a 66° head angle, went to a 64° on my hardtail and noticed a massive improvement in handling - then now with the 62° on my current Curtis it's almost too good to be true.

I feel it's more foregiving espeically in steep sections. The washout is a problem yeh, but much easier to manage than OTB stuff.
  • 2 0
 Yes, but it is still good for beginners in the smaller sizes. Got my GF one as a first full suspension in year 2 of riding, she's progressed on it rather quickly.

Reliable components, small rear wheel for clearance, and geometry that will resist OTBs were the driving factor in going for this bike over a stumpy. I think those reasons would be why it would make for a great entry level type bike- "safe" geo to start that will turn into fun/aggressive geo as you progress and be jibby and fun for someone that rides a lot. They also show that kind of riding for all their stumpy ads, so. I have ridden a bit and even though it is 2 sizes too small for me, it is a ton of fun. You are right about the larger sizes though.
  • 1 0
 @Greyfur: Thanks for that perspective. Rather than just the slack head angle, it's the combination of slack head angle with short chainstays (relative to the reach) here that I'm looking at. In my experience that combination needs a really strong effort to keep weight over the front wheel, and newer/cautious riders tend to want to put their weight back already. If you're riding a more balanced f/r bike with a slack head angle though that's quite a different matter, and I can definitely see how that could give you the confidence to move around on the bike more safely.
  • 1 0
 @Jdorph: Good point, those stays don't look so short when the reach is just 415mm!
  • 17 3
 Sad thing that 3k is now “cheap”.. i guess it’s cheap to the reviewers who never bought a bike with their own cash in the last 20yrs
  • 2 0
 I kept shaking my head at the consumer marketing on this as well...I've been riding a long time and have owned a lot of high end bikes, but I'd like to have this bike, even if it is "cheap"!
  • 1 0
 I have the 2021 version of this bike, since April, riding on average once a week, and I think all of this is right. It’s not great for pedalling up (most rides for me), but down steep tech and jumps is great. But requires a conscious effort to be forward enough to be balanced landing and to keep the back end from becoming squirrelly on berms.
  • 1 0
 You've hit the nail on the head here @danprisk - though I'd say it's mainly the short chainstays that could make it a something of a niche option.
@mattbeer did a superb job of explaining how the bike feels to ride (kudos Matt), and is obviously a very skilled rider, I wonder if he thinks the bike might be a bit lively for a beginner, as it sounds like it demands an assertive riding style?
I'm mentally referencing the Kona Entourage I briefly owned, which also felt like you were standing on the rear axle, cornered telepathically - but felt twitchy AF on rougher trails.
Anyway - I'd love to see Specialized develop a 170 / 180mm version with the Enduro's geometry.
  • 2 0
 If you watch Jeff Kendall-Weed, he initiates his turns weighting the front wheel, but shifts his weight rearward near the exit of the turn/berm like he's ready to manual out of it. It's either an advanced move or just his habit or tendency, but it works for him. A bike like this may suit riders similar in style and may be easy to learn but probably hard to master.

All of this is plain conjecture on my part tho...
  • 5 0
 @danprisk I hear your concern about the balance and it's certainly something to keep in mind. The key word was it "may" be for beginners, due to the lower cost.

I mentioned the short chainstay may be a concern for the larger sizes. On the smaller frames, it will allow the rider to move the bike with ease. Newer riders are probably not pushing the limits of the tires just yet. The larger front wheel helps with the stability and traction, but ultimately adds confidence to push through the chunky stuff.
  • 2 0
 @chakaping: Cheers! I gave a brief comparison to the more stable and balanced Stumpjumper, so there are options there.
  • 41 6
 Bought a S5 Status, sold a S5 Status. 426mm chainstays do not work on L & XL bikes. But if you're a medium, this bike is great.
  • 2 1
 Yeah no way you can keep weight at the lenghty fronts with that chainstay
  • 5 1
 I had the same issue with a Kona Process 153. XL was 515 reach with 425 chainstays. So unbalanced. I couldn’t jive with it. If the L and XL Status had 435 or so chainstays I’d be interested in one for sure.
  • 11 4
 It would be great if they made "SX" seatstay for it with exchangeable drop outs so that one could choose between right kind of stupid short and let's say 440 and 450 stays, preferably with raised drop out to be able to install 29" wheel with no big change to geo. Would make for a perfect budget E29.

Cascade components: a job for you? Custom stays for status? Five CNC elements and two pipes? Big Grin
  • 4 0
 @schwaaa31: perfect geometry for apes like me (long torso, short legs), useless für people with a leggy build.
  • 4 0
 I have an XL 111 Process (485reach/430cs) and find it awesomely playful.. maybe not for a longer travel bike I guess.
  • 3 2
 Owner of s4, fit like glove, super poppy, easy to manual and catch air;

Could not be happy with mine
  • 1 0
 @nickmalysh: i couldn’t agree more - great bike b S…
  • 1 0
 @DownhillDoozy: Went from an XL 111 to a L 134. Feels as fun and tossable in the twisties, while being more capable/confidence inspiring and more efficient uphill. I do wonder what a new 111 could be like, with all the lessons they've learned that went into the 134. That might just be my dream bike...
  • 1 0
 I fit a 29” (semi slick ethirteen) on the back of an s3 and had enough clearance ,it came pretty close to the seat tube but didn’t make any contact under full compression. A hard case or bottom out might cause enough flex in the frame (if it flexes at all) but i didn’t have any of that during my experiment. I built mine as a SS w/o a dropper its a weapon for urban stuff @calmWAKI:
  • 1 0
 Lower your bars!
  • 1 0
 *Handlebars, that is.
  • 1 0
 Wtf would i do that 4 ? im a pretty lanky dude and prefer a tall stack on my setup I’ve actually upgraded to 40m bars and ditched the vert o/s stem imo it’s easier to get the front end up for manuals and whatever putting weight on the front is As easy as leaning forward a bit more so I guess will have to agree to disagree on that subject I am worried my HT isn’t CV gonna be as fun as the status though when i finish putting it back together @CobyCobie:
  • 1 0
 @Crankhed: It weights the front more. I too am lanky and have a 5mm offset stem with 35mm risers. IMO short CS are fine and even preferable, you just have to get the weight distribution right thru tuning riding position.

Little tired of people saying bikes need longer CS when they should just buy one with longer CS. I personally would not buy a mullet but why complain about short CS on a mullet when the whole point is that the rear end is supposed to be smaller and more flickable.

EDIT: It's literally 15-20mm between "short" and "long" CS. Your CG needs to move a whopping TEN mm to stay centered. Why not deal with this and benefit from the shorter WB.
  • 36 2
 What's the inventory Status?
  • 7 2
 I too am looking for a status update
  • 2 0
 @pdxjeremy: looks like a full run of both the 140 and 160 on the website. Shhh, don’t tell too many people, I’m working on the wife now. Sounds like she’ll be getting a new treadmill.
  • 2 0
 @pdxjeremy: good one
  • 1 0
 I'm surprised so many people are interested in this specialized status information.
  • 22 0
 12 speed NX should get in the sea. 11 speed GSX or SLX would be a great complement to this bike.
  • 9 0
 I built up an Enduro last year, used 11 speed XT. Waaaaayyyy cheaper and shifts really well. I'm happy with it.
  • 2 0
 @rockyflowtbay: Getting 12 speed Shimano parts at the moment is a nightmare, good choice Smile
  • 7 1
 @korev: I got 12sp XT and after the installation and first ride I am already looking over my shoulder at 11sp . When a functioning gear setup with no skipping chain is within quarter of a turn of a tension preload barell at the shifter and half a turn of a B screw, you know you are up for a lot of swearing in the future.
  • 4 0
 @calmWAKI: exactly! I'm thinking about going back to 1x11 or even 1x10
  • 1 0
 I like 12-speed setups, they're selling well when taken off of a new bike.
  • 19 0
 Describing this bike as "basically the perfect tool to light up your Instagram reel with." is what will probably turn me off from PB forever.
  • 19 4
 So a USD $3000 bike is entry level and people are queuing to throw money at it? These days mountain biking ain’t much of a sport for people with families and responsibilities.
  • 5 2
 Its a sport that leans upper middle class for sure. But you can buy a $1,200 hardtail if you would like.
  • 23 7
 Oh, so Specialized did plan on undercutting their independent shop network after all. Color me surprised.
  • 18 3
 Wow. NX drivetrain aside, The price point is pretty good for this build. Even if you have to upgrade the shifter/derailleur it's a pretty outstanding value.
  • 14 0
 Yep, I threw on an SLX shifter and derailleur, and they play very nicely with the stock NX chain and cogs.
  • 6 3
 Yeah NX is unrideable, rest of the spec is nice.
  • 3 2
 @mammal: probably because the NX cassette is on a Shimano HG free hub driver design. I had a GX setup call into my lap but I was planning on going 11 speed XT when the rest of my drivetrain wore out.
  • 6 0
 @sjma: I'm pretty sure cog spacing is the same between all Eagle groups, so a shimano derailleur should work just as well with the other Sram cogs/chains
  • 1 0
 @mammal: since my GX derailleur works with the NX cassette I believe you’re right. Getting a 12 speed Shimano derailleur right now is easier said than done though
  • 2 0
 @mammal: Indeed it does. Deore* mech with SLX shifter on GX cassette with XO1** chain is mint: shifts the same (since same cog-chain interface), but the Shimano mech is way more stable for less clickety-clacks and partial-ghost-shifts in the rough stuff.

@sjma: Cog spacing is unrelated to driver interface.

* (only thing I could find at the time, but it's way better than SRAM's low-end, and lower cost!)
** (gotta have the XO1's extra hardening, GX chain is so soft it wears stupid fast)
  • 1 0
 @sjma: I haven't had any issues with finding derailleur stock where I am, but YMMV.
  • 2 0
 Yeah, glad that Pinkbike wasn´t shy about the NX derailleur.

My Speci Enduro also came with NX, it lasted 15mins and one bike park lap before it ended up in the spokes. Feels like a Shimano Altus from like 2004.


Grid Trail tires also aren´t up for the job with their paperthin tread base and just a tiny bit better sidewalls, but that´s probably normal for sub 1000g tires. You just shouldn´t spec "trail" tires on the 170mm Enduro...
  • 1 0
 @mammal: It would be nice if SRAM would update SX or NX in response to Deore but that seems to be slow in coming. When I bought my 2800.00 dollar bike, the SX lasted about a month before a SLX shifter and derailer came on board. Fortunately cassettes are cassettes and it's still cheaper to do the upgrade than buying the next bike model up. It's just sad that SRAM is knowingly selling crap.
  • 2 6
flag thenotoriousmic (Feb 2, 2022 at 5:31) (Below Threshold)
 @Sscottt: have you actually hand any hands on experience with deore / slx 12 speed mechs? I wouldn’t use NX ether but a cheap as it is it’s still better than deore / slx. SLX mechs are fine for about 6 months and then it goes floppy at the pivots and the clutch seizes which is fine if your constantly ripping mechs off and don’t have them long enough to go floppy but the deore mechs are a complete disgrace. There’s no excuse for making something that cheap and poorly designed. I suggest you go into a bike shop grab the bottom jockey wheel on a brand new deore mech and give it a wobble and watch the whole thing flex and see all the play in the pivots from new then go do the same with a NX mech.
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: what deore mech are you talking about ? I read yor comment and went to check the m5100 on my bike ( 7months old) there is only minimal play, the nx on my sons bike is definitely worse, although he has been "using" his bike for a year now.
  • 14 2
 I have one of these, stripped the paint and polished the aluminum, fitted a coil and a zeb and it’s amazing.

I find it weird that a bike this playful comes with basic components. They only offer in one build kit and a lot of time you end up exchanging practically everything and upgrading.

So it begs the question; why not have it come with mid range components?
  • 3 0
 multiple builds would be cool
  • 11 2
 Spesh is pretty serious about their market research. My bet is that the target customer for this bike also wants to tinker and upgrade, and they know that. They’re going to sell a bajillion of them
  • 4 4
 @VtVolk: "They’re going to sell a bajillion of them"

They'll sell out alright. Sell out of the couple hundred(MAYBE thousand if I'm being generous) initial stock worldwide. Then we all wait 2 years for a restock and once those that ordered these 18 months prior get theirs and pay for it, a new version will be released. And the endless cycle continues.

Cycling is becoming like the sneaker game, minus the obscene resale prices(for now).
  • 1 0
 Heyyy, we would like to see a photo of this project, it sounds freaking amazing! Upload some photos of this please!
  • 1 0
 This bike is all about the price point. If you want midrange, they want you to buy a Stumpy. They'll even sell you an extra link if you want to make that a mullet build and give them even more money.
  • 1 0
 Any chance you’d be willing to upload a pic of your stripped Status id like to see that. I saw somewhere that someone did this to all the pivots and linkage and it looked pretty sweet w/ a maroon colored frame. I ended up w/ Forest green which is kinda nyaa ok I guess
  • 30 18
 Just a heads up, one of Outsides biggest investors is Specialized(or an investment firm that's made up of current and former Specialized employees that work out of the Specialized corporate office). This review should have an Asterisk next to it.
  • 8 13
flag Saidrick (Feb 1, 2022 at 10:19) (Below Threshold)
 Pinkbike really needs to do a podcast about this. This is not okay…
  • 15 3
 @Saidrick: It was discussed in the last podcast, if that helps.
  • 7 2
 @Saidrick: They addressed this point in the previous podcast.
  • 3 4
 It’s not that deep
  • 9 1
 @henryquinney: Quinney, just listened and it was basically you guys saying that you guys don't know what's actually going on with this and change the subject to Influencers not being transparent. Maybe better safe then sorry and toss up the asterisk?
  • 3 4
 @blazersdad89: Safe about what? Just because you think it is a conspiracy? What would an asterisk prevent from happening that otherwise will happen if they don't add one?
  • 18 2
 @blazersdad89: I mean, you're right. An asterisk probably wouldn't hurt. To be honest I'm sorry if that rant did detract away from Brian's more serious points. I'll pass it on. However, I think also the rumour is often more salacious than the truth, and it feels like the tantalising conspiracy theory here is what's getting everyone a bit hot under the collar. The truth is actually quite boring in that I don't know about/care about any links (in a sense of outside interference, not that I don't take your concerns seriously) and am very motivated to always say whatever I want and what I consider to be the honest truth. I feel very confident I can make the same assurances on behalf of my colleagues.
  • 3 0
 @henryquinney: oh, it's going to be boring, no doubt about that.
  • 1 0
 Pinkgate!
  • 3 2
 @henryquinney:

So, I listened to that podcast, heard you guys mention it and not really explain anything. Then you guys started talking E-Bikes…

When E-bikes get mentioned, I lose interest in a podcast and really would like a mention of that in the title or maybe in the press
Release.

My comment still stands, I would like a podcast about Specialize’s ownership in pinkbike, moderated by a 3rd party like RC.


Also, please consider doing a E-bike only podcast.
  • 11 1
 "I would even be tempted to see what this bike would ride like with a 27.5" front wheel"
^ As a Transition Scout owner, I can assure you it works.

These mini-enduro bikes are a blast and the Status is super well specced for the money. The alloy Scout w/ very similar build is a whopping $900 more.
  • 5 0
 Customer service is world's better with Transition. It's mind blowing how hard they work to support their customers. I've never experienced anything like it. Also, the transition trunnion mount isn't going to side load and destroy shocks like the spesh yoke will. That being said, I built a s2 status 160 for my girlfriend and it's a rad bike at a great value.
  • 2 0
 @Muchogusto: Transition Scout FTW!
  • 1 0
 @Muchogusto: Trunion and yokes are both bad for shocks, just saying. ( there is a recent Vorsprung vid about it). Yokes increase shockbending, trunion reduces flex at the eyelet- combine both and create a recipe for disaster.
  • 1 0
 @Muchogusto: thinking about it a bit more, yokes probably dont increase sideload as the shock can actually rotate sideways in the eyele. The main problem of yokes is vertical bending, which is actually visible on bikes with not very rigid shocks ( the Formula Mod for instance makes me freak out watching it bend in a bike with just a 3 cm yoke)
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: would you say that trunnion is the lesser of two evils? This is my understanding.
  • 1 0
 @Muchogusto: i think it depends, a 3cm yoke is not a big deal the yokes on some specialized or marin bikes are. So probably worse than a little yoke and better than a big one.
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: seems pretty scientific.
  • 1 0
 @Muchogusto: No matter the content it all comes down how it sounds. In fact its more or less a quote from the Vorsprung vid, or at least my take from it.
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: status 160 yoke is about 76mm, which increases the total effective length of the shock by 33%. It increases side loads.
  • 1 0
 @Muchogusto: not sure, the shock can rotate to the side in the lower shockmount and it does. I can see this on my bike which has a yoke. But it- without a doubt- increases vertikal bending wich is bad too. In fact it does not matter if the shock gets bent horizontaly or vertically one is as bad as the other because the shockshaft has a round diameter.
  • 9 0
 Finally, someone else having problems indexing their NX derailleur. I hated mine for the couple months it was on my bike. Would start the first half of the ride great then spend the second half the ride messing with the barrel adjuster to stop the crunchy shifts.
  • 6 0
 I think NX derailleur issues are pretty common. My clutch was completely ineffective after 2 months of use.
  • 1 0
 Riveted pivot pins on the NX vs bushings/clips on GX also make the NX a bit sloppy and inconsistent. It definitely takes work to keep them running smooth.
  • 4 0
 try replacing the hanger bolt with one from an XO1. When i had the chain off i noticed massive derailleur play, a $20 botl later and it was located better and my shifts stopped wondering.
  • 8 0
 @Snowrydr01: what did they wonder about?
  • 2 0
 @Snowrydr01: Yeah, agree, it's the hanger bolt that causes issues. My GX got so sloppy after just a season, even with frequent hanger checks and even an aftermarker extra-burly hanger, I realized it was the crap pivot causing the problems. Switched to Shimano mech & shifter on SRAM cassette & chain (since I didn't want to buy a freehub, a cassette, a chain, and a chainring just because of a shitty mech) and everything is sweet again.
  • 2 0
 Yeah, my Speci Enduro also came with NX, it lasted 15mins and one bike park lap before it ended up in the spokes. With no damping at all it feels like a Shimano Altus from like 2004.
  • 1 0
 @Snowrydr01: You can also fix it with Teflon tape, washers and\or o-rings and quiet things down at the same time. Same for GX slop. XO1 bolts really hard to get right now. Just need to make sure the resistance to the mech rotating back on the bolt from an impact is not too strong. Same idea as a Hall Lock on TRP.
  • 16 6
 Direct to consumer only? Hard pass. My LBS supports me so I Support them.
Good luck getting anybody at corporate Specialized to answer your calls when you have a problem with the bike
  • 9 9
 Still available at Core Shops Globally.
  • 3 2
 @AC-Fabz: You mean the shops owned by Specialized? Which is a whole other crap situation
  • 4 0
 @Justajack: Direct Consumer hard pass, at a bike shop still a hard pass. lol can't please everyone. They are offering direct consumer to adapt to the times. The fact they are offering both is great.

Not everyone may have the same luxuries as you and have a bike shop or dealer close by. Some may be hours away from a bike shop. Think outside your bubble and look at it from different angles.
  • 1 3
 @tonggi: Glad you know about my situation/"luxuries" so much that you can tell me what it is. I am an hour from the bike shop I use. Maybe try not to assume so much eh?
  • 11 0
 Like.... I get why the Bronson is listed as a comparable.... but noone is cross shopping these two... unless they are deciding between 2 Status' and 1 Bronson.
  • 6 2
 True. But you get what you pay for. I have an old Bronson Mk2. I was out riding with a guy on a Status on descents I know like the back of my hand. We swapped bikes. I know exactly how fast I can ride those trails on the Mk2 but The Status' terrible small bump sensitivity and choppy braking in the rough was a recipe for disaster - many 'Oh shit' moments. Could not wait to get off the thing. I see why Mr Beer only talked about the big hit capability of both bikes, because comparing any other aspect would have made the Status look bad. The Status is definitely good bang for the buck, but that's all. Just note my XC bike is an Epic Evo, which is the best XC bike I've thrown a leg over in 30 years, by far. No hating on Spesh.
  • 13 2
 Is anyone else tired of the marketing dribble where manufacturers and media call bikes "weapons"?
  • 23 1
 Yes, but I'm also tired of the malapropism of using "dribble" instead of "drivel".
  • 4 0
 @barp: just trying to keep the English majors honest
  • 4 0
 @thebigschott: driveling dribblers dribbling drivel. Dead ringer weapon, Australian English variant
  • 6 0
 My personal trigger words are "quiver" and "playful"
  • 9 1
 I recommend immediately after leaving your LBS after just purchasing any bike with an NX Drivetrain to turn back around and go right back to the service center and say "I'd warranty my derailleur".
  • 9 1
 SRAM. NX is just not up to any kind of harsh riding Deore is so much better, and let's be honest a wide range 10 or11 speed cassette is much more sensible and just as useable
  • 1 0
 yes!
  • 1 10
flag GZMS (Feb 1, 2022 at 13:48) (Below Threshold)
 But why would you want 11sp over 12sp?
  • 7 0
 Can confirm that throwing the 27.5 on the front was fantastic. Allowed me to up-fork from 140mm to 160mm of travel increasing the capability in the front. At the same time i also long stroked the shock to 55mm. Throwing the flip-chip in the high position minimized pedals strikes on the low BB, but i was also running 165mm cranks...
Both upgrades made the ride much more cushy for the "oh shit" moments while still maintaining its playful temperament. 10/10 would recommend
  • 7 0
 Yeah I always think its weird when "jib/slope" oriented bikes come with 29ers.

I have a status 160 that I plan on going 170 in the front, 27. 5 front wheel, then putting a 140 linkage in the back and swapping to 26.
  • 2 0
 @Bkims Honest question: why not buy a longer travel bike in the first place? Did you try to get to some very specific geo?
  • 4 0
 @endoplasmicreticulum:
- Bike availability for a new mid travel 27.5 bike in my area. I bought the bike with immediate intention of going full 27.5 instead of mullet.
- Experimenting with fairly progressive suspension so the bike wouldn't dive through its travel, yet having an excess of suspension as a insurance policy for rougher moments. While longer travel bikes have gotten more efficient, I like to think that bikes designed around smaller suspension are undoubtedly more efficient. If i long stroke a shock, or run a longer air spring on the front, I find smaller travel bikes more or less stay true to their efficient/snappy nature with the benefit of more suspension. Just my armchair opinion though!
  • 11 2
 This is the bike to buy used, because it looks awesome but you don't want to give the brand your money.
  • 6 1
 Slope style. Where's the 26 inch wheels ? Steep HtA .? bmx ? That's funny.
Not sure what this bike is .
I know what's it's not.
Does slack and long work for slope style ? Hmmmm.
What's the Status of this bike?
Confused.
  • 3 0
 @VtVolk: remember the intense SS and s
SS2
  • 1 0
 Looks to me that they had some old Stumpy tube sets, that they could repurposed?
  • 6 2
 The spec on this looks very comparable to the Stumpjumper Comp, but with Codes instead of G2s and Roval wheels (Which I think are a step up for the unnamed "Specialized 29"s on the Stumpy?). And for that spec upgrade you pay ... $600 less?

Or the better comparison is probably the Stumpy Evo Comp Alloy. Similar travel, almost identical spec, but the Status is $1,000 less.Thought they'd be more subtle about screwing the dealers.
  • 5 0
 I guess they used existing tooling for this one to lower the price. Chainstay, seat tube, downtube look like they were taken from the old X-wing enduro.
  • 3 0
 It used to be $2500 too, even at dealers before all the bike prices went up recently
  • 4 0
 I brought a 160 in August 2020 after demoing one from my local shop.
I rode a nice carbon Canyon 150/60 and this bike rode so different over familiar trails. It just wanting to go up and slide sideways so I brought it right away.
It's my silly bike. Its a laugh to ride. It's not the lightest and not the best spec but it's cheap, strong and fun.
I'm not a beginner but I'm also not a racer.

I've upgraded a lot of parts but I money to do not spending it all on a higher end bike and I did it over time when I needed to/could.
I also went on a few bike holidays because I didn't just spend all my money them some on a new bike.
  • 9 2
 What happened to the original review of the Status?
  • 6 0
 Status changed to “taken down”
  • 6 0
 Slope-Duro-Cross.. It is not any one of these characteristics individually or collectively. Someone please explain
  • 1 0
 It's a new category. Everyone will once again be fooled into believing the idea that their current bike suddenly has square wheels and needs to be replaced as soon as possible.
  • 4 1
 I find this review really confusing. 16.75” chain stays were on virtually every mountain bike made from 1995-2015 (except for 29ers).
This review makes that length seem extreme, revolutionary and bizarre, when even a contemporary similar bike is only 1/2” different. (And I agree, 1/2” difference in chain stay is noticeable, but the superlatives used here....?)

And reach, wheelbase, and bottom bracket height are within 2-3 millimeters of dozens of 2021/2022 bikes. Whereas the reviewer calls out each of them as crazy and surprising.

I also know a bike is more than the sum of its numbers, and yeah, for sure I’d love to try one of these. But the idea this bike stands alone, designed for a new paradigm of biking, is..... odd.
  • 1 0
 Those older bikes with the short chainstays didn't have reach numbers anywhere near the 515mm S5. That's a weird FC:RC ratio, but I'd agree with you, other than that, nothing seems really unusual.
  • 6 0
 Slope-duro- cross? "Only"$2999 (aka 3000)?
Oh how I long for the days of Dirt Rag and what this sport used to be...
  • 4 2
 would be nice to know if it is coil compatible, but I guess not

you can't build a Levo, Levo SL, stump jumper and Kenevo with any coil shock because it will break / leak in no time. shame to make a free-enduro bike build to ride anything but without having the possibility of a coil shock which is more reliable and more efficient ...
  • 1 0
 I ran the new stumpjumper with a coil shock for about 6 months and the front triangle broke before I had any shock problems. Can't speak to the rest of them though.
  • 1 2
 The SJ Evo *shipped* with a coil from the factory in 2019-2020, so clearly you can use a coil.
  • 3 0
 The 160 is compatible. It's got a shorter yoke than the maximum recommendation by fox at least. I've been riding with one for about a year and just did the rebuild about a month ago. I ride 3 times a week and bike park every week during summer so it got some abuse. I'll also say I love it with a coil. It bottoms a little easier but not so much that I'd change it. The sensitivity with still being poppy and predictable is worth it for me.
  • 3 1
 You absolutely can, they just eat them.
  • 2 0
 It’s not all coil shocks, mostly just Fox. Their shaft it too weak and thin. Fox called out some other bikes along with Specialized since it’s more an issue with their shock than the bikes/frames. You’ll notice they changed the shaft to be
Much thicker on the new DHX Coil shock to fix the problem and make it stronger. Ohlins TTX coil works just fine on those Specialized bikes you mention.
  • 4 2
 I’ve had my status 160 for a year now and it’s been an amazing bike, which has helped me progress my riding loads.

I’ve raced enduro on it, flogged it at Revolution and Inners and taken it for some big moorland rides too.

Currently setup with a bomber coil and it feels unreal. I’d definitely get a VHS chain protector or similar. It’s a mint bike especially if you’re a S3 sized guy
  • 2 0
 "That's impressive considering there are other entry level bikes out there for similar prices that don't include wide range gearing or dropper posts." - that may be true if you look at the boutique brands, but there's a solid field of value bikes out there with decent specs (as PB's field test showed last year).

Profile looks very similar to the Polygon Siskiu T8 I bought last year, but the Status is $500 more expensive - would love to hear people's thoughts on the differences. Looks like the status is better on fork (Fox 36 vs 34), shock (piggy-back vs no piggy back), brakes (SRAM Code R 200 vs Tektro with 180 rotors), and the status has a flip chip. Status also has 4-bar suspension vs linkage-driven SP for Polygon. On the other side, Polygon has SLX drivetrain and more travel on the dropper. Prefer the Status colours, but that's subjective.

I'm no expert on specs but my gut says the Status would probably be worth the extra $500 over the Polygon. Not that I could've afforded the extra $500 at the time, and it based on other comments the Status may not even be a great choice for a tall guy like me (short chainstays).
  • 7 1
 BMX and a 29 inch wheel in the same sentence?
  • 3 1
 It's weird that they can't seem to consider geometry/fit as a whole. They fiiiinally increased the reach to match the steeper seat angle but for the S6 riders this still doesn't make sense. The STA should be a degree steeper, the reach a little longer and chainstays a little longer. Do they not understand that S6 people are taller? Or can they only address that one thing per model year? Next year we'll get the ESTA. The year after that the chainstay length. Make sure everyone keeps being a little disappointed and hoping for the next new bike.
  • 4 2
 This bike is a relatively good deal, but also a niche player. I’d say it’d be a good 6th or 7th bike if you’re a ripper who wants a play bike.

Based on the number of Pinkbikers who don’t break frames, parts or carry flat repair stuff, guessing their Instagram vids are just poorly dancing to bad country music in Kansas or Indiana.
  • 2 0
 I tried to get one last year because I saw the 160 as the perfect park bike. Only one dealer in the state said he was selling them and he was quickly out. I assumed spesh was making it for either R&D reasons or a pro wanted one built and they didn't want to cut into sales of the more profitable enduro. But here we are in year two with the same weird dynamic.
  • 5 1
 Whenever I hear status I think of this video
www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPnP_zlYU44
  • 2 0
 Getting the 160 for my son…
He still needs to grow into it a bit, but given bike supply issues in general and SA at the back of the supply chain queues… Too good a bike to pass on if available…
  • 5 1
 Might be me, but I don't see where the hype for this is coming from. It's really not that exciting tbh.
  • 4 0
 Over here the Ripmo AF would be in the order of 30%+ more expensive. F&£$ knows why…
  • 1 2
 because mullet baby
  • 1 0
 i bought a Status 160 in july 2020, was a brilliant bike, proper sturdy do anything bike, it didnt pedal that great though, it bobbed around around, but it only really lives for downhill laps in my eyes, id have another if i get an oppurtunity, build it up single speed and use it in bike parks
  • 1 0
 I live in GA where there’s more single track and xc than there is dh. There is dh but you gotta climb a lot for it and there will only be one bike park in 2022. Needless to say I ride low elevation xc about 50% of my riding, the rest is soent on DH and jump trail. Is this bike a terrible idea for me? Cuz it’s tempting me.
  • 1 0
 Does this mean Specialized will finally have sum info GEO/specs on the 140 posted somewhere on there website? Or a link that doesn’t disappear or become no longer found like the other prev link. Statusmtb bla bla bla
I love my 140 status no doubt about it but my frame came w/a 160 manual and geo chart which made it a bit difficult to preorder other components like the front fork ATC and finding info anywhere else was SOL
  • 3 2
 If you want one bike to that can handle Enduro, Dirtjumps, Bikeparks, Singletracks and even backcountry touring you are at the right place.

It is a ton of fun at downhills and it is surprisingly good at climbs.
If you have a limited budget and you cannot afford 2-3 types of bikes and you need a swiss knife type of bike, this is it.

I used to have an SX trail 2009 and I loved that bike, but it felt a little bit too bulky and blunt at climbs.
Later on I had a Propain Spindrift 2017 which was a better climber, but at downhill lines it was more about the attack and speed and it was not as funky as the SX was and also not as stiff as it was.

When I figured out there is a New status carrying the good old SX DNA with a modernized GEO coming as mullet from the factory it immediately caught my attention.

I eventually bought one and despite the NX groupset I immediately fell in love with the thing.
I dropped the NX derailleur and shifter after the first ride and swapped to Shimano (based on my past experiences with GX and NX groupsets).

The bike feels stiff, nimble, comfortable, long and stable from day0.
The suspension is in perfect balance too. Nothing disappoints.

This bike rides like heaven. It loves the dirft into corners and loves the air times. Very very funky and versatile and it is able to do pretty much anything.

It was hard to believe that some 'cheap bike' (at today's measures) can be this good (and a lot better than a high end Propain Spindrift).
But yepp. This bike is that good. And I am not a Specialized fanboy.
  • 1 0
 Alright, tall people have the reach now on xl's. let's talk about stack height. Low stacks suck on this kind of bike. It's not an xc bike. I don't want to eat up a bunch of reach using a million spacers in order to get 50mm rise bars high enough. The
Stack should be 50mm taller at least. From a small to xl, the riders might be over a foot different in height. But they only have the bars an inch and a half higher between sizes. Why do the tall people have to be all hunched over??? Maybe one day....
  • 1 0
 I just bought one from Specialized directly. Shipped it to my home and it was amazing. I live too far away to buy one at a bike shop so I ordered it online. Super easy! www.specialized.com/us/en/status-140/p/199765?color=320385-199765&searchText=93722-7101
  • 4 0
 It's great to see local grom Lingemann featured in a Spesh promo video!
  • 1 0
 I live in a generally pretty tame part of the world. There are a few small parks, some off the map freeride spots... I can't justify a big bike. A sort of medium party bike... could be a ton of fun.
  • 2 1
 Seams like in the South East this is the most popular bike among the teenage shredders. Cant go to Windrock or Kanuga without seeing several of them being destroyed by fearless kids.
  • 6 5
 "The switch to a snappy bike with less travel was rejuvenating and encouraged me to seek out more creative and less direct racer lines."

It's sad that it takes a bike change to encourage creative riding.
  • 5 0
 We seem to be going in circles. I think it would be awesome for a brand to be cheeky and come out with a 140mm 27.5/26 bike that would just be super snappy. Then we start down the road back to full 26 - insert travel of choice. Who knows maybe riding 100mm slopestyle bikes as trail bikes will become a thing.
  • 3 2
 @everest1: Not we, they.

Example: shop where I bought my 27.5 Stumpy didn't stock _any_ non-29er mountain bikes, and the owner tried to tell me that no one bought 27.5. Well, yeah, if that's all they see, that's all they'll buy.

I'm actually quite happy it's coming back around, away from 29er everything, since that means there will be a better chance of quality 27ers, or dedicated mullets I suppose, available next time I need/want a new bike/frame. I'll never get a 29er rear wheel if I can help it, because I need the clearance way more than I need raw speed, and I appreciate frame design not being compromised in order to potentially fit a wagon-wheel in the back.

I'd likely still be on 26 if not for a theft. The last 26er Commencal Meta SX was quite modernish, and I had a nice build that could definitely hold up under me for a bunch more years. But alas, insurance paid (mostly) for a new 27er with pretty similar geo.
  • 3 0
 @everest1: Slopebikes make you ride a trail differant! I used to race DH on my kona bass back in the day lol. Now I have a status that i want to go 26/27 mullet
  • 4 2
 Congratulations to the 13 people that get these. And then congratulations to the 17 people who get the next updated version of the Status 2 years from now.
  • 4 0
 Why is Pinkbike allowed to promote this but dealers aren't??
  • 3 0
 because Specialized doesn't care about small shops.
  • 2 0
 @dancingwhale: Or large shops either apparently
  • 2 1
 I was able to get 3 160 completes. One for me, my son and a frien star d. Was 2600 plus tax. I called specialized and they gave me the shops names in California. Was easy to find and get. So much bike for the price !
  • 2 0
 I don't know...ankle-busting rear axle, yoke-mounted shock ready to self-destruct, affordable. I guess I'm out.

Oh, and NX? I'm staying out.
  • 3 0
 Bike companies need to stop with anything sram lower than gx. Deore and slx blow the fucking doors off sx and nx
  • 2 2
 I hate to say, but unless this is a special colorway, the bike in the pics is a 160 travel, NOT a 140 travel as reviewed. That color was only offered for the 160s. So did this come stock from S or did 140 suspension get applied to a 160 frame with a different size yoke????
  • 2 0
 Spec's website is showing this as a 140 color for 2022. I just ordered one for my kid.
  • 1 0
 @Genewich: Yeah, my bad.... typed without looking at the site. Funny thing is, this review popped up last year, PB had the wrong bike and pulled the review. Now the review pops back up with same pics and all, go figure. Wonder what they even tested? Love mine however.
  • 7 4
 Are you sure it’s the 140 and not the 169 this time ?
  • 6 2
 Looks like a Jeffsy.
  • 2 1
 How is this going to compare to a Marin Alpine Trail 7? Seems to be a similar price point. Maybe better drivetrain in it but worse suspension?
  • 3 0
 shhh - The Alpine trail 7 is probably one of the best suspension platforms for fun and pedaling mixed. low ratio, lots of shock options, Awesome and spot on geo for just having a blast on locals or smashing bike parks all day. - bonus is the price - i honestly regard this as one of the best bikes you can buy if you dont take racing seriously and just want to have fun on your MTB no matter where you are we Own the carbon and XR versions with a spare 7 frame, looking at adding anther to the collection soon when they back in stock.
  • 3 1
 As much as I loathe S, the geo, alloy frame and price point on this bike look pretty awesome.
  • 2 0
 If the price point is right, why does the material matter?
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: Personally I still wouldn't want a carbon frame. Like @Mlloyd550 the fact it's alloy is a big plus for me.
  • 1 0
 Called it back on the DTC announcement almost to the day on the timeline.

I was off by $1000 but I’m happy about that. Still very happy with my 160.
  • 6 6
 "Getting the suspension on the Status dialled [sic] in was simple because there were less fancy clickers to fuss with."

That's not "dialed", that's "best that could be done under the circumstances".
  • 3 4
 "The high BB setting is going to be for riders that want the most responsive ride for tricking jumps or need the clearance on slower, technical trails. If you're heading to the bike park for a chair lift or shuttle bump, the slacker setting only takes a second to flip the chip and will promote safer travels at high speed."

Bike parks and shuttles don't have jumps to trick or technical trails? I think you mean the slacker setting is useful if you want to race down flow trails. And how does that relate with:

"you have to put your weight a little lower and farther forward when you really start to open up things at high speeds".

Slacker head tube means you'll have to move your weight even further forward relative to the bars at high speed to maintain that weight shift.
  • 3 0
 Specialized website lists a 140mm fork on the Status 140...
  • 3 0
 Coming to the direct Specialized website near you!
  • 3 0
 Available last quarter of 2025.
  • 1 1
 @mattbeer "the Rhythm 36 can accept the highly regarded Grip2 damper should you want to puzzle away" - are you sure about this...? i didnt think the Rhythm was compatible with Grip2. Cheers
  • 2 0
 @oilychain Yes, I was actually on a ride with someone who had done this to their Status.
  • 2 0
 So basically, Cam McCaul with his SlopeduroCross challenge video 2 years ago started a new mtb category, right?
  • 2 0
 Give us all the comparison just I want! Status 160 vs Transition Patrol NX… and GO!
  • 3 0
 P.B. should test the Foes Mixer I been riding it and it's something else
  • 3 0
 Does Specialized own a piece of Pinkbike?
  • 2 1
 Why is raising the post 40mm a downside? Are we so bad at positioning ourselves that we all need posts that slam to the frame now?
  • 1 0
 My post is out about 30 or 40 mm. I find myself hitting my butt or the back of my thigh on my seat doing certain things
  • 1 0
 Can status take a dual crown? Thinking of running a dual 180 fork with a 27.5 wheel upfront to keep the geo relatively similar.
  • 2 1
 The pricing of the Status makes me wonder why the alloy stumpy evo comp needs to be so much more expensive. Same spec pretty much. Also, why not offer the Status as a 29er?
  • 1 0
 Wasn’t the status specializeds way of keeping shops in regular custom? You could only get it in store? Now it’s going to be a direct to consumer?
  • 2 0
 Honestly why make the status if nobody can buy it and it's treated like the child nobody talks about by specialized ?
  • 3 0
 Can I run this with a 27.5 front wheel?
  • 2 0
 It's covered in the review.
  • 1 1
 You can't unmullet a mullet.
  • 1 0
 I had a 2021 Status 160 and it rode better imo with 27.5 up front. Also no one would believe me that my brand new NX derailleur sucked but it definately does lol.
  • 1 0
 That's the best looking Specialized I've seen in years. Maybe decades. But then I come from a BMX Freestyle background, so...
  • 2 1
 The Status 160 would be the perfect complement to my 140mm Fuse. Too bad they are near impossible to find.
  • 1 0
 Sounds like supply is bike shop dependent… Some of our Big S shops took almost all, while others did not even bother to get them in…
  • 2 1
 Ready to Ship to your home or order for pickup at your local dealer.

www.specialized.com/status
  • 3 0
 @AC-Fabz: Unfortunately not an option in our part of the world…
  • 1 0
 @SchalkMarais: Not Yet...
  • 1 0
 @SchalkMarais: Not sure where you based but one of our local Cape Town stores has a few Status 160's in stock according to their insta!
  • 2 0
 @headshot:
I meant the direct order part on the Specialized website is not available here…
Already secured one for my son…
Looking forward to him moving up to a larger bike.
  • 2 0
 Nah that there is a Cdale Habit
  • 2 1
 Just picked one of these bad boy's up last week. This review made me even more stoked to ride!!!!
  • 3 4
 Cons


- S3 frame needs a 170 mm dropper post
- NX derailleur lacks reliability
- Chainstay would benefit from Stumpjumper rubber frame protector
- Mulleting the bike makes it look like a Penny Farthing
  • 1 0
 Good to see you coming around to the idea of mullet bikes
  • 1 0
 @stayonyourbike: Said no one ever!
  • 1 0
 What’s the difference between the 140 and 160?
Is it just the shock length/stroke length or is the yoke different?
  • 3 0
 Not sure if the yoke length is different but suspect it might. HA on the 160 is 63.2/63.7. I ride an size S4 and it greatly rewards leaning forward in tight turns. Pops off everything with ease. Low BB height can be an issue.
  • 3 0
 Both: shock is shorter in e2e and stroke, and the yoke is longer to keep the BB height close. 140 also has a shorter fork (140mm on Spesh's site, 150mm here?) so it's a little steeper in the HA, a bit shorter in wheelbase/front-center, and lower in the BB, among other small geo differences.
  • 2 0
 Totally different chassis/geo.
  • 2 4
 Say what you want about the big S but they end up shutting down half of their naysayers almost weekly lately. Any bike brand that is not looking into online sales and less expensive mtbs is probably SC or another brand who hasn’t really come to the table with anything new since forever.
  • 2 0
 Nice. It even comes with an extended yoke off the back of the shock!
  • 2 0
 TFW you thought you'd been riding a 140/140 status this entire time #squid
  • 3 1
 I'd rather get a Primer 29 for a few dollars more.
  • 2 0
 Needs 79° seat angle on s4/s5.
  • 2 1
 “ Whether it's backyard jump sessions or your first group trail ride” cringe
  • 1 3
 If you buy one go for the 160mm version.
You just simply do not win anything by losing 20mm of travel.
Same Geo, same bike. Why not 160mm?

I have one Status 160.
And I believe the bike in the article is also a 160mm version.

As far as I know there was no Status with 140mm of travel in this maroon colour.
  • 1 0
 No, it is a bike I bought from a _shop_ that is a Specialized dealer, hence Shop Bike.
  • 1 0
 I just impulse bought a 160. I'll let you know how it stacks up against my spectral in a few months
  • 1 0
 No one on a L or XL frame will be able to climb anything with an incline with a chain stay that short… terrible design!
  • 10 8
 F*** direct to consumer.
  • 2 1
 I don’t want to need it, but I need to have it, and I have to want it.
  • 3 4
 Can I just give Specialized a little kudos for getting rid of that hideous cross-support that is present on the SJ frames. Make an SJ frame like ^^^ and I'll buy 2 of them.
  • 1 1
 Agree
  • 4 2
 And about 6-8 shocks over the life of the frame.
  • 3 1
 Ah yes Unobtanium
  • 1 0
 Should be compared against the sc 5010
  • 2 0
 This bike speaks to me.
  • 2 1
 No release video by Ian Schiller? I love his work!
  • 1 2
 A capable trail bike in this price point is a straight shot at the Cannondale Habit. I see those all over my local trails in SE PA.
  • 2 0
 ha love I have a 2012
  • 1 1
 Am I the only person that talks about a bikes travel from front to rear?
Aka, fork travel, then frame travel?
  • 1 0
 i have that bike with a motor and it's only like 4 or 5 lbs more
  • 1 0
 I’d prefer the Santa Cruz
  • 1 0
 seems a good priced bike!!!
  • 2 0
 I'm in/on that box. hehe
  • 1 0
 I can 100% confirm they're real.... i've got one arriving on Tuesday Smile
  • 1 0
 Is that Thornhill?
  • 1 0
 Could definitely be! I saw him out riding on Seymour the other day as well.
  • 1 0
 Lynn Valley connector trail right below Breamar
  • 5 5
 It's really getting harder and harder to hate the big S.
  • 1 1
 Make that in 160mm rear and I'll have it!!!
  • 1 0
 It exists.
  • 1 0
 It's called the status 160.
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