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Review: 3 of the Latest Burly Tailgate Pads from Dakine, Fox, & Send It

Apr 26, 2024 at 14:28
by Matt Beer  
Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad

Indisputably, the most convenient way to load your bike in a pickup truck is by resting it on the tailgate using a specifically crafted pad, although I’ve seen everything from folded cardboard bike boxes, blankets, and floor mats used as improvisations.

Tailgate pads are enticing due to their short loading time, plus they cost less and allow for a better departure angle than hitch-mounted racks. Of course, they reduce the truck bed’s cargo capacity, but tradeoffs exist with every type of bike carrier.

As these seemingly rudimentary bike cushions have improved, truck bodies have evolved in shape too. They now feature rounded-edge profiles, back-up cameras - even built-in ladders have been introduced. Heavier, bulkier e-bikes add stress to their own frames and the tailgate edges too. No doubt, all of those factors have caused frustrations for tailgate pad designers.

Here are three of the latest and greatest tailgate pads from Dakine, Fox / Race Face and Send-It, which incorporate deluxe materials and shapeable functions to solve such headaches.




Dakine Universal Pickup Pad

Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
Tropical patterns and colorful stripes have been dropped in favor of just one matte black finish with a straightforward grey logo.

DETAILS

As the name suggests, Dakine’s Universal Pickup Pad has been designed with those shapely tailgate profiles in mind, as well as maintaining a sleek fit for straight profiles too. The main panels are connected by velcro strips to alter the contour of the tailgate edge and adjustable straps cinch tight when the preferred shape is met. Behind the exterior panel lies a fleecy material to avoid rubbing the truck’s paint job.
Universal Pickup Pad Highlights
• Bike capacity: 5 mid-size, 7 full-size
• Metal security eyelet
• Velcro inside pocket
• Flip-up backup camera window
• Drop down hooks connect main straps externally
• Price: $295 USD / $425 CAD
dakine.com

Like most of the tailgate pads out on the market, there are two sizes; one for mid-size trucks that holds 5 bikes, and one for full-size trucks to carry 7. In terms of coverage, the mid-size measures 140cm wide and 40cm (55.1 x 15.7”) for the mid-size pad and 155 x 40cm (61 x 15.7”) for the full-size.

PRICE

Kick me for saying it, but inflation seems to have hit the truck tailgate market too. $300 ain’t cheap. $295 USD / $425 CAD will get you either a mid or full-size Pickup Pad. A two-year limited warranty applies to Dakine’s tailgate pads.

Granted, the performance has been increased with features like the rubberized cradles, a velcro pocket, security eyelet, and metal hooks on the straps are welcomed, but all of that is reflected in the higher price tag.

Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
Pads and panels aplenty.

Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
Grippy rubber bumpers inside and out.
Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
Long velcro downtube straps with plenty of mounting points.

FIT/INSTALL

Dakine reversed the orientation of the strap system securing the pad to the truck for a speedy lace up - just throw the pad over the tailgate opened at a 45-degree angle and let the dead end of the straps fall through the gap between the bed and tailgate.

Next, close the tailgate, position the pad accordingly and feed the metal hooks on the strap ends through the eye on the bottom, exterior edge of the pad. This means that you don’t get covered in dirt during installation either. A slick, spring loaded strap cinch buckle takes up the excess length and an elastic loop cleans up the folded, excess strap length.

Strapped up to a 3rd generation Tacoma, the Dakine Universal Pickup Pad falls a bit short on coverage from left to right. It took a bit of wrestling for it to sit flat since the Tacoma’s tailgate pad has just a small curved lip on the upper edge of the tailgate. Adjustments can be made to straighten out the wrinkles and increase the camera window coverage by repositioning the velcro connection points but this will likely take a few tries.

Similarly, the camera window has a short overlap too, so if you find that a bike’s fork or tire lands in the area, be sure the flap is positioned accurately and strapped securely.

FUNCTIONALITY

Looking back to the upgrades Dakine implemented, the resting area for the downtube is well protected with a thick rubber bumper for E-bikes. Lengthy downtube straps are held in place by velcro and can be placed at various degrees to line up with the contours of any frame shape. Similarly, the outside to edge features the same bumper for the fork area, although you’ll want to pay attention to its position; sitting on the stanchion is not ideal.

Through the review period, I found that the rubber surfaces gripped better and caused less chafing than the other pads. That could be because the rubber is tacky yet smooth, helping to shed sand and grit best.Those rubber bumpers inside the bed are specifically placed to cradle the downtube which does limit how confidently you can squeeze an extra bike into the truck, although that’s not recommended.

One minor inconvenience about the Universal Pickup Pad is that the downtube straps must be fed through a tight fabric loop. The Race Face T3 pad uses plastic loopholes which expedites the loading process.

Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
There is one metal loophole for locking it down and a velcro pocket for tools, beers, or where 99% of people will stash their keys while riding.
Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
Spring-loaded cinch straps and elastic keepers for the dead ends.

Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
More overlap on the backup window would be appreciated.
Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
Mind the chafing on the paint.




Pros

+ Full-size pad holds 7 bikes securely
+ Rubber fork and downtube bumpers don’t chafe surfaces as easily as fabrics
+ Easy install: main straps connect via hooks on the outside


Cons

- Coverage width-wise is on the narrow side for popular mid-size trucks
- Downtube straps take time to feed through fabric loops versus plastic eyes
- Expensive




Send It High Roller Tailgate Pad

Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
Big blocks cover the entire tailgate. Sender approved.


DETAILS

Like the rest of the bunch, the High Roller comes in just black and holds 5 or 6 bikes depending on truck size. Following the others’ lead, that choice won’t cost you more either.

The branding isn’t subtle but the High Roller does its intended job well, protect your trucking and hold your bikes in place. Hopefully you can take constant verbal abuse because you can count on people badgering you with the phrase, “Did you send it bro?”

High Roller Tailgate Pad Highlights
• Bike capacity: 5 mid-size, 6 full-size
• Expanding downtube pad for universal fit
• Sliding backup camera window cover
• Metal security eyelet
• Zippered inside pocket
• Drop down hooks connect main straps externally
• Price: $225 USD / $313 CAD
senditco.com

Built into the top edge are accordion-like rows of expanding padding to contour to any tailgate shape. The 45-degree panel creases on the outside add to the universal fit and take up slack without extra straps to cinch it tight. The front side is that same heavy duty rubberized-nylon while the flip side is covered entirely in the commonly-used fleece. You’ll also find 5 or 6 velcro straps on the top edge.

Four straps loop from the inside of the bed out and connect via metal hooks on the exterior of the tailgate. That may not seem like a huge deal, compared to the reverse fashion of feeding them up through the gap in the bed, but for those that remove these bike-carrier systems frequently, you’ll appreciate the reduced frustration of this attachment method.

The mid-size measures 144cm wide and 53cm tall (56x21”) (exterior vertical panel) while the full-size is 160x60cm (63x23.5”).

PRICE

The High Roller comes in at $225 USD / $313 CAD, making it a little cheaper than the two other long-time players' goods. Send It also backs up their product with a lifetime warranty and 100% customer satisfaction guarantee.

Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
Plush pads everywhere.
Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
The expanding accordion-style top edge padding.

FIT/INSTALL

The High Roller fit the Tacoma tailgate perfectly, running wider than both the Fox /Race Face and Dakine. Each pad and panel is thick and tough - there are virtually no thin spots for your bike to bash into the tailgate. There’s minimal messing around involved when installing the High Roller pad, no matter what profile your tailgate has. Those accordion-like pads stretch out where needed and negate getting tangled up with any velcro strips or extra straps.

Like Dakine’s offering, Send It’s tailgate pad attaches with those handy hooked straps. Just drop them through the gap between the bed, hook the strap loop and tighten.

FUNCTIONALITY

Next to the funky, expanding ribs, the High Rollers stand-out feature is the back-up camera window which slides up and down. It’s a novel concept but I found the panel didn’t drop low enough to get full view out of the camera. Rotating the pad down the tailgate further didn’t help as it wanted to curl under the truck’s panel, behind the bumper. More coverage is better for a universal product versus not enough, though.

Durability, serious padding, and universal fit are the key takeaways with the High Roller. A slight miss is the narrow, rectangular downtube strap eyelets. Larger or rounder slots would be less tedious when strapping the bikes down.

Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
The sliding window is trick but it didn't slide down far enough for a fullscreen view with the backup camera.

Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
The metal hooks drop into place from the inside of the bed and attach quickly - no jammed fingers or floppy ends here.
Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
Narrow plastic eyelets take some fidgeting to thread the velcro ends through.

Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
Lock'er down.
Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
It's got it in its pocketses.




Pros

+ Accordion-style top edge covers most truck shapes and frame angles
+ Substantial padding throughout
+ Easy install: main straps connect via hooks on the outside


Cons

- Camera window didn’t slide down far enough for full view
- Narrow plastic eyelets for downtube straps to feed through
- Loud graphics




Fox Mission / Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad

Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
I bet they had some extra forks lying around to design those cradles with.

DETAILS

Adaptability and custom fit is what the new Mission pad from Fox (or T3 in the case of Race Face) is all about. Three separate PVC tarpaulin panels feature fresh materials and are laced together with four main straps. The width on the mid-size comes in at 134cm and the height has a wide range of adjustment.

All of that seems a bit confusing when unboxing the Mission / T3, but thankfully, Fox / Race Face have put together an installation video to ease that process. The end result is a pad that becomes tailor-fitted to any tailgate profile.
Mission / T3 Tailgate Pad Highlights
• Bike capacity: 5 mid-size, 6 full-size
• Highly adjustable fit
• Hinged downtube pad for tonneau cover fitment
• Cushioned fork cradles
• Metal security eyelet
• Price: $259 USD / $269 CAD
ridefox.com

Highlighting the security side of the redesigned tailgate pad is the monstrous downtube pad that hinges out of the way to completely close a tonneau cover, and the soft, yet durable fork bumper grooves.

Choices in color are limited to black, but both brand names are available in either truck size. The mid-size carries 5 bikes and the full-size officially fits 6.

PRICE

Both brands sell the Full and Mid-Size for $259 USD / $269 CAD, which includes the comical strap installation tool. You can buy those separately for $4 to lace up previous models.

For those who might need space for vehicle accessories or camp gear, there’s a 2-bike option for $130 USD / $145 CAD as well.

Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
Is your tailgate bowed from hauling around a snowmobile? The Mission is probably adjustable enough to still fit elegantly.
Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
This sliver of orange plastic pulls the main straps through the gap in the bed. Check out the video below to watch the installation process.


FIT/INSTALL

The Mission / T3 does tighten down well without bulking up but it’ll take some trial and error to perfect that. Between all of the straps, velcro panels, and installation tools, there’s a lot to manage. You’ll want to give yourself time to dial in the fit and coverage. The camera window is quite large, which is why three extra pieces are provided to close the gap. Velcro strips match up behind the main panels, all of which are backed with micro-brushed fleece lining.

Oddly enough, like the Dakine Universal Pickup Pad, the Fox Mission / Race Face T3 is on the short side when fitted to a mid-size Toyota Tacoma. This is where taking time to stack the bikes in and properly place the downtube straps is necessary.

Depending on which direction you turn the front wheel of the bike will dictate how bikes are spaced, so it’s worth checking their positions with a full rack of bikes before thinking you’re ready to rock.

FUNCTIONALITY

There’s no arguing the Mission / T3 is a tad narrow, but it does hold the bikes securely and gently. When positioned perfectly, the generous downtube straps have no trouble holding even the most chonky frames solidly in place. Adding to its stability, the fork cradles do a swell job to keep the bikes from twisting, but I’d still like that piece of mind knowing the entire tailgate panel is covered.

Another point in the coverage department is the camera window; the personalized panel placement does the job, but compared to a flip up or sliding door, they’re not the most convincing. They did stay in place during the review and I never lost any pieces, however, larger sections of velcro holding them in place would be more assuring.

Finally, it may have come to a trade off to design an adaptable fit or reduce the price, but the Mission / T3 pad still uses the annoying bottom-up lacing method - aluminum buckles are a nice touch since they’ll outlast plastic bits. If you only install this once a season, it’s not a huge ordeal, but seeing how other brands are catching on, I would have guessed Fox / Race Face would have followed suit.

Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
The downtube straps have plenty of slots to arrange them across the generously thick and dispersed padding.
Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
Tonneau cover friendly.

Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
Eye spy.
Dakine Universal Pickup Pad Send It Highroller Tailgate Pad Fox Race Face T3 Tailgate Pad
The Mission includes three of these panels.




Pros

+ Downtube pad folds into bed for a flush fit with tonneau covers
+ Well padded in the critical areas (downtube and fork contact points)
+ Fork cradles help to keep bikes from twisting


Cons

- On the narrow size for popular vehicles
- Lots of straps for universal fit mean tedious setup
- Main straps feed up through the bed/tailgate gap




Overview

As one of the originators of the tailgate pad carrying system, Dakine’s latest version is burly and installs quickly - just keep an eye on the coverage around the camera window and outside edges. Plus, for full-size owners, they can confidently squeeze in a 7th bike, whereas the others state 6 is the max.

Fox / Race Face’s offering is slightly more complicated to install but that’s made up for in its long list of features and thick, yet retractable protection.

Newcomer, Send It, slides in with a solid contender in a busy market. Simple installation backed by ample padding gets the job done swiftly, barring the slightly narrow downtube strap rings.

All of these tailgate pads do an admirable job of transporting your bike gently and securely on your truck. Each one has their own unique benefits but also small niggles which may not fit your needs, or truck. None are inexpensive, but then again, what’s the price of protecting your prized possessions? They’re more dialed in and less smelly than an old piece of carpet too.




Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
378 articles

119 Comments
  • 53 1
 prices are fkd, world gone mad
  • 34 0
 If a velcro pocket doesn't justify those prices I don't know what will. There's just no pleasing you people.
  • 20 1
 "All these work much better than a piece of cardboard" but no better than a pool noodle and a blanket.
  • 3 0
 @BrianColes You are clearly not the intended audience for a Truck Maxipad. Pool noodles are hardly trailhead fashion!
  • 6 0
 @BrianColes: Pool noodle, scrap carpet, cardboard, and one jumbo role of duct tape. $20 total. DIY rad graphics with a jiffy.
  • 5 0
 In a mad world, I decided to buy a Hyper Tough tailgate pad (half sized one at walmart for $39) and it's worked great. Has a pocket, straps work well. Can't ask for much else (wish it was a bit less ugly tbh)
  • 23 2
 Cue people with $20,000 worth of bikes hanging off their tailgate saying a blanket is just fine and way cheaper.
  • 16 2
 Ok but it is?
  • 9 0
 I watched the wind get under a moving blanket and toss the blanket and a Rocky Element C90 off the back of a truck on the highway outside Calgary. Bike flew up higher than the cab then went cartwheeling in the fast lane. Straps matter.
  • 5 1
 @dalambo: pics
  • 8 0
 @dalambo: The use of a blanket to protect the bikes and straps to hold them down is not mutually exclusive... Secure your loads people
  • 11 0
 Try Mexican brand KMA, they are really good and affordable. Been using one for 3 years with no issues whatsoever. They also have a really cool feature to lock your suspension bottles which secures the bikes even more.
  • 16 4
 Where is the Eurobro saying "SILLY NORTH AMERICANS, GET A PROPER VAN!!" ?
  • 3 0
 ID Buzz isn’t for sale in North America yet, give us a couple of years to catch up to European vantopia.
  • 2 1
 @sfarnum: VW been teasing those for a decade and mericans still don't want fulltime EVs
  • 3 2
 @suspended-flesh: I mean, I’m an American with an EV, and there are 3.3 million others out there.

You could say “Americans don’t want $100,000 EVs” and I’d agree with you.
  • 3 0
 :waving:

British too. So its - "Just buy a Traaasnit you caaaants"
  • 6 4
 It Ok, im here. Sorry im late. Pickups are stupid, buy a van. More space for cargo, more space for passengers, your stuff doesnt get wet and stolen.
  • 4 0
 @OllyR: Thanks for filling in. I don't think your the same guy who was having a Euro-spaz about pickups (he was from NL or somewhere), but you did an admirable job of defending Vanland.
  • 3 0
 I'd respond: real men drive minivans.
  • 1 0
 @Chuckolicious: I was a real minivanman when I had kids. Now I drive a 25 year old 4runner and sleep in the back alone in the desert with a shotgun by my side. USA
  • 1 0
 @sfarnum: True RE: price. I live in the EV spiritual motherland and they are many, but nationwide it's not much over 1% yet...
  • 1 0
 @Chuckolicious: soccer mums are trying so hard to not look like soccer mums they are all looking like soccer mums with their SUV and Trucks as they don't realize mums do not drive vans anymore.

Well at least it makes sense in my head.
  • 2 0
 @opignonlibre: Ha, totally! But I still love the stigma, means nobody pays me any attention. I get the ride and mileage of a car, stowe the seats and room for 4 bikes and gear, easy. Everything inside, nobody notices. Stealth pickup truck, IMO.
  • 7 1
 To date the Sensus Tailgater / Taco Pad is the best I've owned, Honorable mention to the Thule Gate Mate.

But a lot of this depends on your truck's particular tailgate thickness and your bike frame's head tube angle. Regardless, your frame should have some sort of shuttle guard on the downtube if you decide to go this route.
  • 4 0
 Oh, and Ride Wrap won't hold up as a shuttle guard. Lastly, I still use a piece of styrofoam pipe insulation on the fork upper where it contacts the pad.
  • 2 0
 @krka73: However, the Ride Wrap shuttle guard is a nice piece of kit.
  • 3 0
 @krka73: checking in as a dummy that thought ridewrap film would be sufficient. Burned a nice hole in the downtube of my one year old evil offering Frown

I love ridewrap but its definitely not enough for shuttling. Have a proper rubber protector on there now. Dont be like me.
  • 8 0
 One of these will fit my 1990 Ford Fiesta Ghia (tilt AND slide sunroof if you must know), right?
  • 5 0
 While the installation process for the Mission/T3 pads may be a tad complex, it's essential for ensuring a snug fit and complete coverage tailored to each truck. With universal tonneau pad compatibility, our goal is for riders to install it once and enjoy season-long convenience and optimal protection. Also, the pad is height-adjustable to provide full vertical coverage on all trucks, while also allowing more room for the back-up camera.
  • 6 0
 I need kashima coating for my tailgate please
  • 2 0
 I've been quite happy with my half size mission tailgate pad, took me all of ten minutes to get it fitted. Although I did install clear protection vinyl over the area it covered, it can stay on year round without worrying about the paint.
  • 1 0
 i'm quite happy with my mission pad. i just wish the straps ran from in to out, like the send-it pad it replaced. if anyone has a tonneau, i suggest checking out the mission.
  • 1 0
 @savagelake: Are you running a tonneau cover are you running with it? if so, which one and how well do they work together?
  • 1 0
 @packfill: bak x4s, and they go great together.
  • 7 0
 The other issue is pickups are so dam tall these days it is a pain to lift bikes above your head to get them in the bed.
  • 34 0
 If the lip of your truck bed isn't at eye level, how could your truck possibly survive the many speed bumps and potholes on the paved road to the trailhead parking lot?
  • 1 14
flag JamesPBlaw (Apr 30, 2024 at 9:47) (Below Threshold)
 @MTBorris: where are you from....? In the mountains we ride the trail heads are often miles and miles on really rough roads
  • 14 0
 @JamesPBlaw: *whoosh*
  • 1 0
 @JamesPBlaw: And by that you mean the same we all use with small hatchbacks in the rest of the world.
  • 1 0
 @opignonlibre: lol no not at all. I mean real off-road that a hatchback wouldn't be able to make it through the rocks let alone river crossings and high clearance water bars.
  • 9 1
 A tailgate pad should not cost more than $150 CAD.
  • 7 2
 Can we just all agree to call these truck diapers instead of "tailgate pads". I think it conveys the image better.
  • 3 0
 I saw a Rivian pickup today that had a tailgate pad. Custom made so that the LED strip wasn't covered up. Pretty slick. Let's see the price....$200...hey that's not too bad.

Sorry Cybertruck owners
  • 4 0
 what. the. hell. i never knew the fox pad had those strap guide/puller things. i need those now!
  • 2 1
 The Send It is much better than the Fox/RF T2 it replaced, if you're the sort who doesn't leave the tailgate pad on year round. My fingers love drop-through straps, and make installation a breeze (~1 min).

My only complaint is the straps are too short for fat ebike downtubes. I replaced a handful of them with OneUp straps (Voile straps would work too), and they're long enough, hold the bike better, and are quicker to cinch down.
  • 2 0
 Britt from Send It here - we made our straps so that you can put two together to accommodate thicker downtubes. Here's a quick video for reference: www.senditco.com/blogs/news/send-it-tailgate-pad-for-ebikes
  • 1 0
 A poor dude would just make something to suit. Old yoga mats, sleep roll mats, tarp, poncho,
seatbelts out of them junked cars lying around and a lesson from Granny and use her sewing machine,
oh and learn something new in the process of it all : )
  • 1 0
 Living in the desert, the sun destroys these pads too quickly for that price, and they are a pain in the butt to take on and off all the time. I keep a moving blanket and ratchet strap in the backseat. Then I'm prepared for a ride or a move at all times.
  • 3 0
 Why no love for the Princess Auto Tailgate pad? $32cad on clearance right now.
  • 3 0
 The rest of the world does not need any pads. We have vans and racks. Are we wrong?
  • 1 0
 Yes.
  • 1 0
 How do you introduce a new tailgate pad that blocks the Tacoma backup cam? I don’t drive a taco but its malpractice to roll out an MTB truck accessory that isn’t Tacoma-friendly.
  • 1 0
 For a little more money people should check out Latchit Rack. It supports the bike at a much better spot (close to headtube), doesn't scratch the crap out of your truck and frees up a ton of bedspace. Love mine!
  • 1 0
 That thing looks legit. I needed this info a month ago before I got a raceface pad from Amazon for 100, a week before they released their new version. lol
  • 8 5
 Oneup for the win. Tailgate pads kinda suck for many reasons
  • 7 1
 By far the most secure method when the going gets rough though. Oneups, or Northshore etc are great, but cant handle the same level of roughness and convenience of tailgate pads. I have both and choose to rock the tailgate pad.
  • 1 0
 @maestroman21: Bikes do "stick in" the tailgate pads pretty good. When I am with friends with pads on long drives or dirt roads I use microfiber rags on my fork stanchion and lowers to prevent abrasion. Personally, I just dont want a tailgate pad. I have a modified pipeline rack in the bed and Oneup. Suits my needs Smile
  • 2 0
 Five bikes in the truck bed while towing a travel trailer. What sucks about that? Except the MPG.
  • 7 0
 OneUp = Bars and droppers

1Up = Racks
  • 2 0
 The Dakine one looks awful with the straps tightened creating a bunch of pressure points and makes it look old/stretched.
  • 2 0
 the Con for Fox pad was - Main straps feed up through the bed/tailgate gap. dont all the pads do that?
  • 1 0
 Up instead of down. On the others you drop the straps from the top and gravity is your friend. The Fox one you have to feed it up through with the little tool.
  • 1 0
 Yeah I don't get that. Some might do it different but my RF one is the same design and I don't need special toolz. Just have the gate resting at 45 degrees and feed it from the underside up. It's really no hassle at all. I guess if you had super-short arms that could be a problem, but otherwise....
  • 1 0
 @ktpnw: ah i see. my old Dakine is fed up through.
  • 3 0
 mexican blanket from the thrift store = $5
  • 1 0
 Moving pad from HF, under 5 and has yet to fail in 10 years. I think I will try your blanket. Should look sweet.
  • 3 0
 it still amazes me that $5 US is $7000 Canadian
  • 8 7
 A real pick-up bed is long enough to fit a bike without hanging it over the gate.
  • 3 0
 damn it... foiled again. The guy I bought it from said it was a truck..... scammers everywhere.
  • 2 2
 Only 5 butthurt Taco owners downvoting? I expected much more hate from Taco owners
  • 2 1
 A real truck fits in the garage where the methheads can't steal or vandalize it.
  • 1 0
 At least for me, the pad is to help them stay put, not because they don’t fit.
  • 4 0
 @southshorepirate: I have a 1st gen Tacoma and 3 bikes fit nicely in the bed. Front-wheel toward the tailgate and turned a little. I had some issues with my friends XL DH bike, but otherwise solid.

I cant speak for these "truck" owners with 5 foot beds though...
  • 1 0
 @foreverforum260: what about a 4.5' bed. What sort of breed of vehicle are those?
  • 2 0
 @foreverforum260: Yup. A standard full size pick up box fits most bikes except long WB and XL DH bikes... 1-2 will fit at an angle, but no more. I actually understand why someone would want a mid-size truck - I started truck ownership with a 1st gen Colorado - I struggle to see the point of buying a full size pickup with a measly 5.5' box, just buy a mid size truck!
  • 2 0
 @southshorepirate: Interior space? Squeezing any sort of car seats or just 3 kids in the back of a "mid" size is pretty cramped. The Tacoma and last gen Colorado are literally smaller than a corolla inside.
  • 1 1
 @maestroman21: Buy an SUV then. I dunno, it's obviously just me, I struggle to see the point of a pick-up if the bed is never used for anything but hockey bags, groceries and 1-2 trips to the garden centre per year. To each their own. I'm super glad to have a truck with a regular box, makes it much more useful!
  • 1 0
 @southshorepirate: seems like a truck that can take bikes in the bed and everyone inside comfortably fits the bill.....
  • 1 0
 @maestroman21: Funny that we’re all making a case for the Ridgeline, with an suv interior and a bed with plenty of room for bikes. Most Taco-bros wouldn’t be caught dead driving one though.
  • 2 0
 @sfarnum: Absolutely. I was looking so long for the right Ridgeline but couldnt find the right price/mileage/age combo I wanted. They certainly have a negative stigma to them but they are great. I had a Pilot for years and its basically that... enough offroad ability for most service roads and superior in just about every way except off road ability compared to a body on frame mid size
  • 1 0
 @sfarnum: I think I would have a rack system inside the bed if I was to own a vehicle with a pickup bed.
  • 1 0
 @opignonlibre: So I have a tailgate pad and a 1Up for the hitch. I use the rack when I want the bed free for cargo.

Ive been shocked at how well the single strap on the pad keeps the bike in one place, especially if you rotate the cranks so a pedal is making a third point of contact with the truck. I saw a post where someone with a bike in the bed (with pad) going 40 mph t-boned another driver. The bike didn’t shift at all.

IMHO a bed rack system is the worst of both worlds: expense and fussiness of a rack while also occupying your cargo space at the same time. I could see it if you had a precious $10k carbon wonderbike you wanted to keep pristine and secure, but for a min-maxed Chromag like mine it’s fine.
  • 1 0
 @sfarnum: "occupying your cargo space at the same time."

The fact you have a few bikes on the bed doesn't mean you can put stuff around them. Apart from the pedals and handlebars areas, bikes are fairly narrow and leave a lot of room around them. And I would say if the bike is on the tail bike, 3/4 of the bike is still occupying the bed.
  • 1 0
 @opignonlibre: I was discussing the choice between tailgate pad (cheap, easy to use, but occupies much of the bed) vs hitch rack (frees up the bed but more work to load/unload and exponentially more expensive).
  • 1 0
 @sfarnum: Then we agree!
  • 2 0
 @sfarnum: Or, have a truck with a bed that fits your bikes and use a simple 2x6 constructed "rack" that holds bikes upright, contained within the box. For roadtripping I have storage containers that fit perfectly between and around the bikes. Everything ice and tidy. Everything inside my dry, lockable cap. When the cap is off bikes load/unload over the side easily.
  • 1 0
 @southshorepirate: oh for sure if you have a cap then the in-bed rack is ideal.
  • 1 0
 How much can you tart up a tailgate pad, my 11 yo Dakine is still going strong, no frame loops but that's ok.
  • 1 1
 I haven't owned a tailgate pad since the earlier Dakine model. Moving blanket for the win now! I'll just ride to the trailhead other times, novel idea huh?
  • 1 0
 Pro-tip for pickup rentals: use one of the floor mats per bike. Pro-tip for everyone else: Mexican blanket from Walmart.
  • 2 0
 A fool and his money are soon padded.
  • 1 0
 I remember when tailgate pads were the norm because they were affordable at $100.... vote with your money people
  • 9 8
 My VW Golf can carry more bikes than these trucks
  • 11 1
 How can you get 7 bikes on a Golf up a bumpy hour long forest service road?
  • 6 1
 @powderhoundbrr: I dont drive up FSR's, I use my legs and bike to climb.
  • 4 2
 You can carry 8 bikes and riders in your VW? Is it a circus car?
  • 6 2
 @NWBasser: 8 bikes? I see room for 4 or 5 bikes on these hitch pads. I dont think many trucks could carry 8 people either. And yes I've carried 5 bikes on my golf, 3 on the roof and 2 on a hitch rack.
  • 5 0
 @arrowheadrush: as an owner of a VW golf and a pickup, you, sir, are going about things all wrong.
  • 2 0
 @arrowheadrush: Good on you for not being another dirty shuttler...but yeah 7-8 bikes per truck is pretty standard for us plus 7-8 people.
  • 1 0
 You could certainly get 4 on the roof and 3 on a hitch, but only 5 inside if keeping it legal. At some point though you might as well just go professional and buy a van and a trailer. 17 people and 17 bikes per vehicle at BPW!
  • 2 0
 @arrowheadrush: I have 8 bikes occassionally on my truck; 5 in the bed and 3 on the roof. If I added a hitch rack that could possibly go up another 5/6 too, but it would need to leave a good space behind the tailgate. Its actually not that practical as I have a small euro-style truck it doesnt leave room for 5 people and all their kit too, but I mostly do it for demos/journo days etc. as I work in the industry and so ferrying more bikes than people is normal for me.
  • 1 2
 @arrowheadrush: What's a hitch pad? One of those tailgate pads can carry 7 bikes. I don't know what remedial math class that you're taking in your high school, but I can tell you that 7 is not less than 5. Seven is more than 5. 7>5. A full-size pickup can carry 6 people if you're on the highway. For a shuttle, a full-size pickup can easily haul 7 people. Now, which is more, the 5 that your Golf can carry, or the 6 that a pickup can carry?
  • 2 1
 @NWBasser: well my golf can actually carry 6 bikes, 3 roof, 3 hitch. But I'll concede, your full size, 6500lb pickup truck can carry 1 extra bike and 1 extra person compared to a 3000lb hatchback. Congrats?
  • 2 0
 @gmiller720: so i should get a 6500lb pickup truck to carry my 30lb bikes?
  • 3 1
 @arrowheadrush: you’re free to do whatever you please, I’m just saying you’ll have a far easier time with 5 bikes and 5 people in a pick up, which is really the number that matters. Carrying more bikes than you have passengers to ride them isn’t common, and if you are doing that your primary concern should be the security of the remaining bikes while you’re away riding. But a golf on its way to the trailhead with 1000lbs of meat on the inside and 180lbs strapped all over the outside of it is not going to be a very comfortable ride. I take my golf for longer road trips because it’s a phenomenal little car to drive and is great on gas. But more than 3 people, bikes, packs, tools, hopefully a cooler for a post ride… it’s just a better experience for everyone in the truck.
  • 3 0
 @arrowheadrush: also if you want to just get into sheer number of bikes, you can put that same roof rack from the Volkswagen on to the truck along with a tailgate pad, and a hitch rack. So… the golf is a wonderful car. But it’s ridiculous to argue you can fit more bikes on it than you could a truck.
  • 3 0
 @gmiller720: That was really my point. You can't realistically state that you can carry more of anything with a small car than a pickup.
  • 1 0
 @arrowheadrush: If you read what I wrote, I stated that "a" full-size pickup and not "my" full-size pickup. You're making an incorrect assumption that I own a large pickup. If you know that a truck can carry more than a Golf, then why did you write that your car can carry more?
  • 2 2
 @NWBasser: to get the truck bros riled up
  • 1 0
 @arrowheadrush: Oh, okay! I understand the great fun in crap-stirring. Good job on it!
  • 1 1
 @powderhoundbrr: I guess he manages that by not being a north american wimp I guess.
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