DH Bike Review: Canfield's Jedi Masters Rough Terrain

Feb 13, 2023 at 16:05
by Matt Beer  


Canfield Bikes have not only been building long-travel frames for decades, but properly sending them as well. Their owner, Lance Canfield, even entered the first Red Bull Rampage in 2001 aboard his own creation, so they know what it takes to build a dependable bike.

The Jedi name has evolved over nearly 10 years, gathering a cult following of privateer downhill racers and bike park lappers. The latest Jedi has 29” wheels, downhill race geometry, and 203mm of travel via a dual-link design. An idler wheel is incorporated to counteract the chain growth of the rearward axle path as well - a design that Canfield has stood by, even well before the Jedi was born.
Canfield Jedi Details

• Frame: 7000 series aluminum
• Wheel sizes: 29"
• "Formula 1" dual-link suspension design
• Travel: 203mm
• Suspension packages: DVO, Ohlins, RockShox, & more
• 62.5-degree head angle
• Reach: 450, 475, 500mm
• Chainstays: 427mm (static) / 443mm (at sag)
• Weight: 18.29 kg / 40.3 lb
• Price: $6,900 USD ($2,339.99 - frame only)
canfieldbikes.com

Canfield has evolved their “Formula 1” dual-link suspension design over decades of experience between the tape and sending sizeable hit, perfecting the pivot and idler placement for unmatched rear wheel tracking.




Contents

bigquotesThe comfort, tracking, and carrying speed that the Jedi proved through rough sections was seriously impressive. I dubbed the Jedi the “speed couch” in my head after the first lap through what was left of the driest bike park seasons in years. Matt Beer





Photo Satchel Cronk

Photo Satchel Cronk
Photo Satchel Cronk

Frame Details

The raw aluminum shows off the welds that piece together quite a few CNC machined sections. Complex shapes are used to position the pivot precisely for the Formula 1 suspension design and put aesthetics lower down the priority list for the Jedi. Two short links ride on 20mm pivot bearings, connecting the front half of the bike to the square-tubed rear triangle. Those provide 19mm of horizontal rearward wheel travel that really helps to eat trail chatter and give that seriously supple suspension break away. Down towards the drivetrain components, the chain passes along a high route to an idler, keeping the chain growth to less than 1mm, and then through a custom MRP chain guide.

You can tell that Canfield has been to a race or two because all of the components are easily accessible and there are no complicated axles, pivots or hardware on this workhorse frame. Changing the spring takes less time than smashing a slice of pizza. A robust gusset at the head tube, and at the BB junction, doubles as a cable guide for the brake and derailleur housings which run externally across the bike. A rider who is critical about silencing their bike will want to add some foam tubing or use additional zip ties to lock down the housing around this area, though.

Photo Satchel Cronk

Suspension


In terms of anti-squat, the Jedi has around 170% which is mega-high and means it pedals very firmly, but the idler drastically reduces the pedal kickback that is associated with a number like that. When you have to hit the brakes, the bike remains quite neutral and doesn’t pitch back and forth wildly, again attributing to the way the Jedi tracks so well on rough sections of trail.


photo

Geometry

On paper, the Jedi has a notably short 427mm chainstay, but that’s because it lengthens considerably, by about 15mm, depending on the 28 or 33% suggested sag.

The DH-race oriented bike is equipped with dual 29” wheels that come in three sizes. Starting out on the medium with a reach of 450mm, that measurement grows 25mm as you go up in size to the large and XL frames.

A head angle of 62.5 degrees is plenty slack and the size large we tested had a stack of 644. Coming in at a touch under 1300mm, the wheelbase lies at 1279, falling in line with the other bikes in the test


Photo Satchel Cronk

Specifications

Canfield might have the largest pool of suspension components to choose from when building a Jedi, whether that’s a complete bike, frame only, or fork and shock combo. Pairings from Fox, RockShox, Ohlins and DVO are on tap, plus the inverted Manitou Dorado fork and coveted EXT Arma rear shock.

Pricing begins at $6,299 USD with the DVO suspension at either end and your choice of three colors; hot rod orange, matte black, or a brushed aluminum finish. Our Ohlins equipped test bike rang in at $6899.99 USD with the standard TRP DH Evo brakes and E-Thirteen alloy wheelset.

Less common, but equally sufficient components round out the build. TRP’s DH7 shifting mechanisms ride on the extra wide E-Thirteen rear hub with, you guessed it, just seven cogs. Canfield also makes a few of the machined bits bolted to the Jedi as well, such as the 45mm-length stem and 165mm crank arms.






Test Bike Setup

All of that time at the races shows that Canfield is in tune with bike setups and the wide range of rider preferences. When ordering a Jedi, considerations for rider positing, spring weights, and even pedal choice (flats or clips) are taken into account.

Ohlins has built a suspension setup guide to consult as well. However, there was some disagreement in regard to the rear shock spring weight.

I looked at Canfield's “firm” spring options for my body weight; 350 or 375. Ohlins spring increments jump in 23 lb/in steps, so I started with the 365 rate. That was slightly less than the 411 spring that Ohlins suggested, but I banked on Canfield knowing best.

In the parking lot, the sag was around 30% out back. I gave the 365 spring a shot, but quickly moved to a 388 spring after the first run when a few surprise tire buzzes on the seat let me know I was using too much travel through corners and smaller compressions.

photo
Matt Beer
Location: Squamish, BC, Canada
Age: 36
Height: 5'10" / 178 cm
Weight: 170 lb / 77 kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @mattb33r

The Ohlins DH38 fork was a familiar sight for me and knew I’d be bumping up the pressure to around 130 in the air spring and 230 PSI in the ramp chamber. Only minor diversions were made to balance out with the rear suspension.



Photo Satchel Cronk

Descending

Have you ridden the Whistler Bike Park post-Crankworx? Yes? Then you’ll know the trails are blown to pieces with a sprinkling of dust and marbles. Well, add on another month without any rain or trail maintenance. It was rough out there to say the least, that made it perfect for testing downhill race bikes - I actually loved the conditions, in fact, even more so on the Jedi.

I knew the Ohlins DH38 would be the most forgiving amongst the other forks on our test bikes, but was totally shocked by how the kinematics of Canfield’s Formula 1 suspension carried speed through destroyed berms and ate up braking bumps. Riding the Jedi made me question whether or not I had lost the chain. The bike tracked extremely well and was extremely comfortable because there’s a very low amount of pedal kickback built into the design. In a straight line, the Jedi was unmatched at keeping the wheel on the ground, even on the brakes.

Negotiating the Jedi through corners and changing directions isn’t a chore, but it’s not exactly an X-Wing fighter either. On paper, the rear center measures 427mm, yet quickly grows to about 443mm under the rider’s weight, which isn’t long by today's standards. When you load the bike through corners, the level of grip increases as the rear center lengthens, adding confidence in loose, unsupported turns. Through tight chicanes though, that can be a bit laborious to push and pull the bike through. The weight loaded on each wheel of the Jedi is well balanced, but it’s the changing position of the rear axle that exaggerates this feeling, epecially with the larger diameter rear wheel that takes more effort to tip side to side.

At the helm, there’s a few characteristics that could be improved to calm down the steering. A simple change would be to select a shorter fork offset. The 54mm offset crowns can literally get out of hand if the front wheel hits an object while turning. It simply throws too much leverage through the steering unexpectedly, making the handling slightly nervous. I had a small detour off trail when I bounced through a cobbled turn. I couldn’t correct how much “swing” was being loaded through the handlebars. More attention and caution is needed with this offset, but again, that’s an easy fix.

I’d also like to play with slackening the Jedi even further. I know - on paper, 62.5 degrees is aggressive, but the Jedi's head tube angle rides steeper than expected. I’ve noticed that on bikes with strong rearward axle paths can push your center of gravity forward at times.

All of that traction and floating feeling of the axle path does want to keep the Jedi on the ground. Pulling the bike into a manual or off the ground requires quite a bit of effort. Launching high-speed jumps is straightforward, whereas taking off of steep-lipped jumps takes some adjustments that never came naturally to me.

On occasion, some of those landings ended with a metal on metal bottom out from the otherwise strong-performing Ohlins coil shock. That wasn’t the only mechanical clunking coming from the Jedi either. In terms of cable management and chain slap protection, the frame lacked the necessary pieces to hold those noises at bay, but the chain never skipped a beat on the idler. Adding a few homemade solutions to these areas would add to the Jedi’s ability to sail over the nasty bits.




Photo Satchel Cronk
Photo Satchel Cronk


Technical Report

TRP DH-Evo Brakes: Simple, effective, and powerful. These brakes appeared on a few test bikes this year and I wasn't the only editor left impressed with their performance. They could slow down a train with the tap of the lever, yet modulation is plentiful and there’s no sign of fading either. The only downside that I can find is that they don't have a pad contact adjustment like SRAM's Code RSCs, however you can create a shorter throw by carefully pulling the lever without the rotor to stop the pads.

TRP DH7 Derailleur and Shifter: Drivetrains are usually a boring aspect of bikes, so it's refreshing to see a unique spec choice here. TRP's DH7 shifting combo gets the job done just fine. The Hall Lock works similarly to the clutch on the cage, but clamps down on the B-bolt to keep the derailleur from rotating more than necessary. The shifting itself is crisp, but the ergonomics of the paddles take time to adjust to. There was also more play in the downshift paddle than expected. If you do find yourself on this system, carrying a spare derailleur would be worthwhile because it's not as commonly found in shops as the main staples from SRAM or Shimano.

Ohlins TTX22M Shock: Exchanging the Swedish gold nickname to yellow butter might do Ohlins more justice. The combination of this damper's control with the Jedi's rearward axle path and kinematic handled almost everything we threw at it. The only minor downside was the occasional top-out clunk. Otherwise, I sat nearly in the middle of the damper range and could easily feel the changes in each click. Ultimately, that allows a rider to figure out what works for them in a shorter time frame. I also appreciated the shorter rebound knob that eliminates the need to remove it when swapping springs.




Photo Satchel Cronk
Canfield Jedi
Antidote Darkmatter - photos Satchel Cronk
Antidote Darkmatter

How Does It Compare?

Against another bike with a rearward axle path, like the Antidote Darkmatter, there were two large differentiators: overall weight and comfort. No other bike touched the Jedi in terms of isolating the rider from the trail and keeping the wheels on the ground. The suggested setup runs a bit softer than the others, however, it never did cave in the middle of the travel and there was enough progression to save all but the heaviest of compressions. The pedalling performance isn't affected by the plush suspension either due to the high-anti squat that the idler positioning provides.

While you could change the high gearing choices with a custom build, you're not going to win any pumptrack races on the aluminum workhorse. The weight is significantly more than the carbon Antidote, as is the price for that matter. There are no other adjustments to run a 27.5" rear wheel or modify the geometry either. The rearward axle path, weight, and larger rear wheel mean that the Jedi takes more work to accelerate back up to speed or carry speed through jump lines against the likes of the Darkmatter.

As mentioned before, the long offset crowns did cause require more attention to the steering. Jumping back and forth between the short, 48mm offset crowns on the Darkmatter and 54mm crowns on the Jedi presented the night and day difference. On the longer offset, the leverage inputs to the steering and confidence in traction at the front wheel felt dated and uneasy. That's not so much a bike characteristic as it is a specification choice. That also added to the feeling that the Jedi wasn't as slack as the geometry chart stated, especially considering the Darkmatter sat 0.5 degrees steeper at 63.




Photo Satchel Cronk

Pros

+ Eats square edge bumps as if it's chainless
+ Carries speed through rough terrain
+ Solid construction and simple to work on

Cons

- Not the most agile bike at low speed
- Steering quirks: rides steeper than stated and long fork offset is unwieldly
- Additional chain slap protection and head tube cable guides would add to the Jedi's smooth and stealthy operation


Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesJust like those Baja race trucks, the Jedi shines when hauling straight over, or through anything in its path. Whipping through tight turns and doubling up rhythms on the trail aren't its strong points. If you hold it wide and keep the speed up, the Jedi’s buttery suspension and rearward axle path will slice right through the roughest sections of bike park bomb holes.  Matt Beer





Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
375 articles

165 Comments
  • 252 0
 A DH bike review?? I thought this was pinkbike!!
  • 35 5
 The DH bike for the average Joe or Jill! It’s nice to see a budget minded DH package. My question is aluminum making a mainstream come back?
  • 15 12
 ...saw the weight but couldn't figure out where they hid the battery and motor... just joshin', looks awesome!
  • 47 1
 @rivercitycycles: ugh, I can't believe $7,000 is now budget minded, but I agree. I caught myself thinking "hmmm, I mean that's not stupid expensive". How did we get here folks? How?
  • 24 0
 @ElDebarge: I agree, I based my statement on the $2399 frame prices which is in line with what Turner and Ventana were selling their aluminum DH frames back in 2012.

Carbon is nice but if aluminum gets a rider competing then this is an all around win.
  • 15 2
 @rivercitycycles: It is, and has been for a while. Ill take an ally bike over plastic any day
  • 8 1
 @rivercitycycles: Only problem is that price is "shock free". If you want the Ohlins like tested, it's $3000....not so nice anymore. Specialized Demo Race with Ohlins is the same price, and can accept 29 or 27.5 rear wheel.
  • 2 0
 @rivercitycycles: you know that winning DH bikes like Commencal, specialized, trek, have been aluminum for a while right?
  • 148 1
 Stoked on the review—thanks, Matt! Definitely some personal preference when it comes to fork offset for different riding styles and terrain. We have a variety of forks available on the site currently, most with shorter offsets than the Ohlins we had available when we sent the test bike out. Looks like where the stanchions were set in the crown may have contributed to the "steeper" feel, but also an easy adjustment.
  • 96 0
 We also haven't experienced any clunks at bottom-out in our testing with the Ohlins. Looks like the seatpost is extending at the bottom of the tube a bit in the photos, so upper link might be tapping it. We recommend finding your preferred saddle height and trimming the post so it doesn't stick out on the bottom at all to ensure proper clearance at full compression. Cycling it without the shock also makes it easy to adjust saddle height/position to avoid any rear tire contact.
  • 3 0
 @canfieldbikes: I've found cycling without a shock makes the bike more clunky...
  • 119 1
 Only 2 pounds heavier than Henry's 'trail' bike. lol.
  • 28 0
 It doesn't need a dinner plate
  • 23 0
 @Dogl0rd: Nor a reclining seat
  • 21 1
 @hamncheez: nor does the canfield include fender, pump, multitool, bottle & cage, and pedals. maybe inserts as well...
  • 42 0
 I had the 26" and 27.5 version of the Jedi. Definitely one of the best downhill bikes ever produced. Super plush and super durable. I sold my 2010 Jedi to a friend 8 years ago. He's still tearing up the trails with it. Zero issues with the frameset.
  • 3 33
flag Leviathandive (Feb 27, 2023 at 9:28) (Below Threshold)
 What was the head and seat tube angles on that one? 62.5 HT for this is kinda crazy even for a dh bike.
  • 3 0
 @Leviathandive: My 2015 Jedi had a 62.5 HT. The reach was about 50mm shorter though.
  • 13 0
 @Leviathandive: no its not dude
  • 3 0
 @Leviathandive: what do you mean by saying "crazy"? to steep? I'm not up to date with modern dh bike geometry. My 2018 bike has 63 so just curiousSmile
  • 1 0
 @Leviathandive: do not look at a specialized status, your head may explode.
  • 1 1
 @Leviathandive: 62.5 is probably to offset the rearward susp since the bike doesn't squat on itself making it steeper under travel.
  • 1 5
flag bill-curran (Feb 27, 2023 at 19:13) (Below Threshold)
 BeerGuzlinFool I wish there were still zero frame issues. I’ve been hearing things cracking since 2015.
  • 2 0
 @bill-curran: I just sold my 2015. I beat the hell out of that bike for 7 years. Zero issues with the frame Or Dvo suspension. I went through 4 sets of wheels and 5 rear derailleurs though.
  • 1 1
 @BeerGuzlinFool: me and 7 buddies got the balance when it first came out in 2014-15. All of them ended up cracking except for one, not all of them ridden that hard either. Ever since then I’ve been hearing and seeing frames that have been cracking. It’s a shame because it’s probably one of the best suspension systems out there.
  • 2 0
 @bill-curran: That sucks. And your right . The suspension on those bikes are second to none. Maybe that's why they shut down for a while and changed from Canfield Brothers to just Canfield. And Chris moved on to Revel.
  • 2 0
 @RonSauce: wait till he hears about the grim donut
  • 1 0
 @Wojciek0: I dont know I drink a lot
  • 38 0
 mark the date: someone finally went with the superior trophy truck analogy instead of the nonsensical monster truck one!

congrats to all
  • 28 0
 The TRP DH-R Evos have become my favorite brakes, even on "trail" bikes. They're like what Shimano brakes should be these days, but aren't anymore. Transition has also started to spec them on a few builds.
  • 26 1
 I'm gonna put in a plug for the Hayes Dominions. Seems like Shimano and SRAM has been relying on OEM stuff, while the competition blows past them in quality.
  • 2 0
 Picked up a Spire immediately when I saw this. Also came with the new RockShox stuff.
  • 8 0
 I tried the TRP DH-R evos, they had great stopping power, but I did not like the ergonomics of the levers. Honestly I felt like lever shape and size were the only issue that I had, I wanted to like them but when I went back to the shimanos, it just felt better. I tried Hayes as well and liked the dominion A4's a lot. I ended up selling that bike, but I'd give Hayes another go for sure.
  • 8 8
 @ratedgg13: I found them to be good, but not really above in Quatliy compared to Maguras or TRPs or Formulas. Also they use DOT fluid - there really isn't any use for DOT fluid on MTBs and its a pain to deal with.

If you want something long lasting, I recommend Formulas as they are fully rebuildable.
  • 5 0
 I still love my Saints (even on my 'trail' bike), but would be curious to try the DHR-Evos. Hear great things.
  • 3 0
 I would recommend the updated Hope V4’s. I had built up a really nice set of Shimgura with synchro M9120 levers and they were great but modulation lacked some.

The updated Hope’s feel like they have as much overall power or more with slightly more lever pull as a result but much better modulation. Highly recommended…
  • 16 10
 Nah guys, Sram Guides are where it's at!
  • 11 1
 @bashhard: A downvote? Apparently, someone doesn't appreciate fine sarcasm.
  • 3 0
 @8a71b4: Formulas are rebuildable and generally more reliable than shimano from my experience, but they are not problem free. I rebuilt my master cylinder lever with a new mc piston and reservoir bladder, only to discover the mc body is twisted and off by about .05mm on each side of the lever bolt. It leaks inconsistently across the ports and has a slightly variable bite and a long throw as a result. My fix was to over fill, then slowly retract the caliper while burping at the lever.

They aren't bulletproof. Further, this would have been much better to fix by buying an entirely new lever body anyways. Also, i have had a phenolic piston crack and 3 speed lock lines develop a leak. I might move to Hope. I liked the new tech 4s on a buddy's i set up for him
  • 9 0
 @R-trailking-S: damn dude "phenolic piston crack and 3 speed lock lines" I feel like I've never pulled a brake lever in my life after reading that
  • 1 0
 @Bro-tato: Can confirm, the lever upgrade is necessary. I love mine. Hats off to Gwin and the team on designing a great brake and lever that works for them and many other people, but the lever design just wasn't for me. The Freedom Coast levers look great, tidier for single finger usage, and do their job. Win.
  • 1 0
 @Bro-tato: Can't forget the shift in reach adjustment. That was actually the biggest reason for purchasing, i like running my levers much closer to the bar then the factory levers allow.
  • 1 1
 I bought a pair of trickstuff brakes last year and they're awesome. Highly recommend.

Bonus: by the time you wait 18 months and with rapid inflation, they aren't really even that much more expensive than the competition!
  • 3 0
 @Daray: I had to buy the freedom coast levers. Which is dumb. But now they are my favorite.
  • 1 0
 @Bro-tato do you find They have a softer initial Hit than shimano's?

I have mine setup with the stock blue pads, The initial hit is quite soft and then it gets into the power when you pull a bit firmer... They slow me down quicker on the "big runs" once they start to get some heat than shimano's.
  • 3 1
 @sspiff: I run Shigura setups on 2 of my Canfields. It's the closest I can get to Trickstuff performance with a price I can afford. LOL. The leverage ratio of a Zee or Saint lever coupled with a 17/17 MT caliper is pure magic.
  • 1 0
 @Bro-tato: Thanks. Those look great. If I ever buy a bike that comes with TRP's again, I'll give those levers a try.
  • 1 0
 @Ososmash: I'll check them out if/when I buy a bike that comes spec'd with TRP's again. not sure when that will be, but they are becoming more popular
  • 19 0
 I wish jumping was still a factor in DH bike design. I've never felt my bike is what holds me back from going faster. That's the last thing I care about. Race bikes have their place but not every DH bike needs to be for racing. Would be really nice if pinkbike reviews could focus more than a sentence on how a bike handles jumps. In enduro bike reviews its not even on the radar lol.
  • 5 0
 Go fast over some very rough terrain on a bike with a lot of rearward travel. Most bikes differ here little so you never felt the difference. You would feel one here.
  • 8 0
 I'm really hoping banshee comes out with a new Darkside. The legend is their race bike, so the Darkside was like their "fun" park bike. It was also stupid cheap with a solid build kit which made it very compelling.
  • 20 0
 We also have the ONE.2 as a downhill bike with a more traditional axle path and all the magic of CBF suspension. The Jedi jumps great, just a little different feel than a bike without a rearward axle path. ONE.2 is a great option if you prefer a more traditional feel and gravitate toward jumps and flow in the park. Hard to beat the Jedi when the going gets rough, but the ONE.2 is no slouch in the chunk either.
  • 3 1
 @canfieldbikes: Cool, looks like its still just sold a 29er though so I would never get one as a park bike, would definitely consider a jedi or one.2 if there was full 27 options
  • 8 1
 @luckynugget: you can build it as a mullet or full 27.5, but we don't currently have those options on complete bikes.
  • 2 4
 @canfieldbikes: they are both beautiful bikes and I'm in the market for a new DH this year but probably go with one that doesn't require me to buy a whole new wheelset right after buying a new bike just to take it out of grandpa mode Frown
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: Legend was uber fun in bikeparks too. I had one for a decade. It cornered like on rails and it was so incredibly stiff it drifted like a dream.
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: in XL too! I still love mine for freeriding but at 6'2 the L has always been tight...
  • 16 0
 Hell yeah to a Canfield review!! My Lithium is my favorite bike I've ever owned!
  • 6 0
 yes, would love a PB review of that bike. Can't believe how well that rear suspension performs.
  • 15 0
 Where's the climbing part of the review?
  • 13 0
 Pending. It's a slow grind, haven't made it to the top yet
  • 13 0
 Someone doesn't eat their pizza fast enough.
  • 9 0
 Saw a lot of these this summer in CO and NM parks. They look fantastic in person
  • 6 0
 Yeah angelfire was loaded with the neon orange ones. All rocking dorado forks as well. Nice looking rigs for sure.
  • 2 1
 @Struggleteam: Funny enough Canfield moved away from speccing Dorados cause they were failing left and right blowing fork seals and leaking oil on the brake/rotor. Ask the Angelfire bike shop dudes about it.
  • 5 0
 한국에서 유일하게 나만 가지고 있는 기종 ......^^
리어휠트레블이 늘어나서 코너링이 매우 좋다 작은충격에 잘 작동하는것도 마음에 들고~~~
The only model I have in Korea ......^^
The rear wheel travel is increased, so cornering is very good. I also like that it works well on small bumps.
translate.google
  • 9 0
 Nice light weight all rounder.
  • 8 0
 Oh man...another DH bike review, another day where I wish I did enough park and shuttle riding to justify owning one.
  • 7 0
 Honest pricing from the boutique brand! I got no skill to handle this hot stuff, but she is for sure pretty!
  • 7 0
 HOW DOES PINKBIKE’S AUTO-PLAY VIDEO MANAGE TO EVADE EVERY BLOCKER I THROW AT IT?!?
  • 1 0
 For mobile, if you use the Brave browser with autoplay disabled you can be victorious.
  • 8 0
 With Outside help. First login for 5 years to make that gag.
  • 2 0
 Including the option in the profile Frown

The combination of autoplay and mute is seriously stupid. Even if I want to see the video I haeto enable sound and rewind.
  • 8 0
 Canfield bikes are rad, I rode a Jedi years ago and was super impressed.
  • 7 0
 I bought one of these in July. Here's my one sentence review:
I like it so much, I'd buy another one.
  • 6 0
 Really hoping the sagged chainstay will become a geometry standard in the years to come.
  • 1 0
 And sagged front center, and front to rear center ratio static and at SAG, and ... problem is, most people don't even understand Reach (in the real world, not in the Pb comment section) so not sure it will take on lol.
  • 7 0
 Great to see a Canfield review. Nice work on the latest Jedi, Lance!!
  • 3 0
 ",,,the Jedi shines when hauling straight over, or through anything in its path."

That's a typical line from any dh-oriented bike review. Which makes me think now--PB should release their worst reviews. The one that comes to mind was a review of a Jamis AM/Enduro bike where the reviewer said something like "I'm scared going down this bike."
  • 7 2
 can it be set up as a mullet? That would probably help with turning tighter.
  • 17 0
 We have some shorter riders doing it and seem to like it. You lose a little of the rollover/momentum of the full 29 and obviously lowers the bottom bracket and makes it a touch slacker.
  • 3 0
 I'm running my Jedi mullet. I'm also running Canfield 150mm cranks. I love it. Frame size medium. 5'10" 150 lbs.
  • 7 0
 @Philphun: 150 lbs is kind of a lot for a medium. I'd suggest going full 27 and upgrading some small parts. Might be able to get it down to 146.
  • 4 0
 @ThatOneGuyInTheComments: nah, haven't you heard! Heavier is better!
  • 5 0
 So if you're not wanting to forcefully push it on the jumps this is not the bike you're looking for.....
  • 13 0
 Have you heard the story of Matt Beer the wise? I thought not. It's not a story a Jedi would tell.
  • 10 0
 We also have the ONE.2 as a downhill bike with a more traditional axle path and all the magic of CBF suspension. The Jedi jumps great, just a little different feel than a bike without a rearward axle path. ONE.2 is a great option if you prefer a more traditional feel and gravitate toward jumps and flow in the park. Hard to beat the Jedi when the going gets rough, but the ONE.2 is no slouch in the chunk either.
  • 2 1
 @canfieldbikes: for a brand that named a bike after a star wars thing your marketing guy sure is bad at picking up star wars references.
  • 8 0
 @j-t-g: oh, we got the references...
  • 3 0
 @canfieldbikes: the ONE I had (before it was stolen) was a true beast of a bike! I set it up for a while as a light DH rig and it was awesome - then altered the set up and it was a great enduro ride (pedals so well for a heavy ass).
  • 4 8
flag luckynugget (Feb 27, 2023 at 19:38) (Below Threshold)
 @canfieldbikes: stop trying to sell people 29ers as jump bikes. 200mm Rearward travel is fine for jumps as long as it isn't limited by 29 wheels on steeper transitions. Giro effect of 29 also makes whips and tricks more difficult. There's a reason you only see 27 and 26 at rampage.
  • 7 0
 @luckynugget: doesn’t look like Matt had any trouble doing whips. Maybe this is a you problem rather than a 29er issue.
  • 3 0
 @luckynugget: Hence the One.2
  • 4 3
 @mknott9: I've owned all wheelsizes and the 29'ers suck up half the radius of the transition and extra giro effect makes them feel shittier in the air. You can still whip and flip if you don't f*cking suck but if I'm spending 7-8k on a bike I'd rather get one with the wheelsize I want rather than compromise because some enduro riding engineer thinks going fast over chatter is the most important thing for a freeride bike.
  • 2 3
 @chriskneeland: still sold as 29 only. hell naw.
  • 2 0
 @luckynugget: I've only seen them built up on 27.5 in the wild. Got mine currently on pre-order and have a 27.5 freeride build planned out for park days.
  • 1 0
 @canfieldbikes: yeah i was really just riffing on the Star Wars here. With DH bikes you either get plow-ability or pop-ability...you don't often get both. I rode an older Jedi and it was an awesome and serious bump eater!
  • 5 0
 I think a raw finish suspension link would look better.
  • 4 0
 Soak in oven cleaner for an hour, done
  • 3 0
 Yah you need a buddy with the orange frame to swap out for his silver one. Big Grin I did.
  • 5 0
 Next bike this or the ONE.2
  • 1 0
 >Ohlins has built a suspension setup guide to consult as well. However, there was some disagreement in regard to the rear shock spring weight.

Yep. Ohlins recommended fork pressure for DH38 and spring rate are mismatched, spring is soft by an interval. Canfields recommendation is even softer. You either go up in spring one up past what Ohlins recommends, or use softer fork setup.
  • 6 1
 it's a DH bike . nobody cares about how it pedals to the chairlift
  • 4 0
 I love my Jedi 29! Most confidence inspiring bike I have ever ridden.
  • 4 0
 More DH bike reviews please!
  • 3 0
 What a beautiful looking bike! So good to see Pinkbike doing a DH bike review
  • 1 0
 I've owned a few canfields, including a Jedi. The older Jedi was visually more refined but I'm intrigued about what this has to offer. The rearward axle path and idler pulley were quite a combo. How does this compare?
  • 3 0
 Wasn't this part of a DH Field Test or is that still happening?
  • 29 0
 Yep this is one of four DH reviews for a mini fieldtest we're rolling out over the next few weeks.
  • 4 0
 @brianpark: That’s a shame. I was really looking forward to it and checking daily for it to start. I was expecting it to be a proper fieldtest with a decent bunch of dh bikes not just four individual bike reviews by one reviewer over a few week period. That’s not a field test.
  • 3 0
 @mattbeer is the yalla included in this test? Is it? Is it? ……
  • 1 0
 No, it's an Antidot, Orange, Nukeproof and Canfield
  • 2 0
 How is it compared to the commencal supreme? Seem like similar missions in terms of on trail feel…
  • 2 0
 Now that's a well written article. More than just quinney and Stott are good writers here.
  • 3 0
 Do downhill riders care what the seat angle is on their bikes?
  • 3 0
 looks vintage.
  • 5 3
 Needs to be mulleted. Apart from that, it's superb.
  • 4 0
 I absolutely love it as a full 29, but I'm also 6'4" on an XL.
  • 4 1
 I’m 6’3” riding XL - just set mine up mullet on We Are One Strife’s on i9 Hydras using a Works 1* angleset and thus far - it’s felt great. Running low offset 50mm crowns and steering feels great.
  • 2 1
 Would be a dream machine on 27's
  • 2 0
 @luckynugget: Buy the 15' version - 27.5's
  • 1 2
 @luckynugget: Then put some on, quit whining about it
  • 3 1
 Still scrolling waiting for the rear axle path..
  • 3 0
 69 hundred - nice
  • 3 0
 Always wanted to try one
  • 2 0
 Auto play videos are a path to the dark side.
  • 1 0
 Did you really put a dual compound DHR2 on the front?
Why no softer compound?
  • 10 0
 Those aren't the tires we sent with the bike. Guessing testers put the same tires on all the bikes in the field test to keep things consistent.
  • 2 0
 I absolutely love my DVO mullet One.2. Wish I could give the Jedi a try.
  • 2 0
 Good review, I did not know that TRP also makes drivetrain components now.
  • 1 0
 yeah, been riding their 12 speed drivetrain on an E13 Helix cassette. Performs well, maybe a tad less crisp than X01. Clutch is as good as Shimano or SRAMs before they got sued.
  • 2 0
 The on bike footage was so fast it's given me motion sickness.
  • 3 0
 I Love my 2011 Jedi!!
  • 2 0
 "Jedi Masters.." I see what you did there.
  • 2 0
 The important question is does it have the seat in the council?
  • 1 0
 Does anyone know what rear fender is installed? I could use one on my Jedi!
  • 1 0
 DH field test on the horizon??
  • 5 0
 you're looking at it
  • 3 2
 What’s up with that fork? Why does it go up above the head tube?
  • 5 0
 Looks like lowering the stanchions in the crown would have helped with the "feeling steep." I have the same bike and fork/shock. Only a few millimeters of stanchion above the top crown on my setup and steep it is not.
  • 4 0
 You can tune the front end height by sliding stanchions up and down. Makes a difference for handling.
  • 3 1
 Sick bike \m/
  • 1 0
 Miss my old Jedi!! Don’t miss the weight though.
  • 1 1
 PB please pull all your strings and get Valteri Bottas to review this thing!
  • 1 1
 i wonder if you meant to compare it to a Dakar race truck not the Baja ones
  • 1 0
 Sweet bike, I just dont get how LucasFilm hasn't sued them yet.
  • 2 0
 You mean Disney
  • 1 0
 THAT saddle rub against the tyre when compressed!
  • 2 2
 How did positing pass spell check?
  • 10 0
 Because it's a word. Knot the write word, butt still a word. (And that's why spellcheck is only a supplement to actual proofreading.)
  • 3 0
 @barp: learn something new everyday..hopefully, thanks!
  • 2 0
 @jrocksdh: Cheers to always learning!
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