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Review: Michelin's Wild Enduro Racing Line Tires Are Tough, Tacky, & Heavy

Feb 1, 2022 at 12:44
by Matt Beer  
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Michelin have slowly been expanding their mountain bike range in both directions, and the line now includes everything from heavy duty e-MTB options to featherweight cross-country tires. Lately, they've come into the spotlight with success under freeriders like Carson Storch and Cam Zink, to name a few, as well as the GT Factory Racing and MS Mondraker gravity teams. We've even noticed certain teams blacking out their tires for specific conditions, which says a lot when top racers choose them without any obligations.

Wild Enduro Racing Line Details

Wheel Sizes: 29"
Width: 2.4"
Casings: 4-ply, Down Hill Shield
Compound: Magi-X DH
Weight: 1459 g - front, 1350 g - rear (actual)
Price: $106.99 USD each
More info: Michelin Tires

You may recognize these treads from the Wild Enduro series, but the flashy blue and yellow hot patches dictate the "Racing Line" version, which are feature laden with technologies designed for the rigours of downhill, e-MTB and enduro racing. This means the tougher carcasses weigh in at some 150-grams more than the "Gravity Shield" casing that has been around for some time. At the moment, the Wild Front / Rear Racing Line combo is only available in a 29" x 2.4" option and their weights measured 1459 and 1350 grams, respectively.

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Bomber 4-ply protection in a foldable, yet firm casing with tacky Magi-X DH rubber.

Design & Construction

Another brand, another round of tire nomenclature to decipher. This time, Michelin has brought together the compound, support, and puncture resistance of their downhill tire construction while borrowing the tread patterns previously found on the lighter-duty Wild Enduro options. All of the blue and yellow Racing Line tires use the Magi-X DH compound, which feels a lot like Five Ten's Stealth rubber - it's firm, yet tacky.

You could mistake the Wild Enduro Front for a mud-spike, and it's not far off of that. It's designed to be versatile in all conditions and clear debris. While the Wild Enduro Rear features a similar shoulder knob, the grip down the center of the tire is optimized to restore rolling resistance. Michelin's star-rating scale places the rear tread in this pair as the faster wearing tire due to the amount of time it will take to burn through the shorter center blocks.

Construction technologies include a "Down Hill Shield" aimed to deter sidewall tears and a 4-ply "Double Defence" layer. Along the top is sheath of high density puncture protection to ward off sharp objects that may find themselves landing between the tread blocks. Additionally, the sidewalls feature a reinforcement that tapers upwards from the bead along the sidewall to prevent pinch flats and add stability under low pressures.

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Wild Enduro Rear
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Wild Enduro Front

Performance


INSTALLATION

The Wild Enduros tires were installed on Bontrager Line 30 Carbon wheels without much wrestling or the need for any tire levers, despite the rim's protective plastic strip that can make other tires difficult to fit. The tires popped into the seat at pressures around 30 psi with just a standard pump. Some folded tires can lose air like a leaking sieve, but that wasn't the case with either Wild Enduro, even after two more swaps to different wheelsets.

In terms of sizing, I took the hot tip to leave the tires inflated at a higher pressure of 45 psi for twenty-four hours to allow them to fully stretch out to their full capacity. After that, both the front and rear, despite its smaller appearance, measured at 2.4" wide across the casing and 2.5" from edge to edge.

TRACTION & CORNERING

Immediately, the effort required to turn these tires over on pavement due to the weight and tacky compound is noticeable. You can feel the tank track-like tread turn over knob by knob; granted, testing primarily took place through the back half of a damp and cold autumn.

A quick rip down a concrete stairs set revealed the high level of damping that both the slow rebounding rubber and thick casing provided, even on a 24 kg eMTB. That squared-off, open tread and supportive casing did look promising once things pointed downhill on trail though.

After the first outing in a mix of sloppy organic dirt and slime covered bedrock, you could have fooled me if you said these Wild Enduros were filled with tire inserts. The grip levels were adequate with pressures close to what I would run on a bike without the extra heft of a motor; 23 psi in the front tire, 26 psi in rear, but the support was next level. I incrementally lowered the pressures over the course of two laps and my confidence in the security of the casing and traction of the tread grew.

Typically, a tire with such an open tread doesn't perform well on bedrock or roots, but the Wild Enduros were predictable in those scenarios. The front carries similar mud-shedding qualities to the Schwalbe Magic Mary, however, finding the shoulder knobs was an easier task. There is a ton of bite in those shoulder knobs and when the right pressures are found the casing is stable and doesn't feel flimsy. They are savage diggers when you get them on edge in soft terrain.

That does mean you need to lean marginally harder to corner on hard-packed dirt. They're consistent when you steer the bike, but they do have an earlier breaking point. Compared to something like a Maxxis Minion DHF on the same 30mm rims, you need patience in firmer soil, letting the shoulder knob touch down and weighting the lug to slightly depress into the casing. Only then you can push further into the turn, otherwise you may start to slide if you're overzealous.

Transitioning from the center to the shoulder knob on the rear tire is not as drastic as a full semi-slick. You do have to pay attention when trail braking because the rear tire can cake up with organic earth occasionally. For adverse weather, Michelin does suggest doubling up on Wild Enduro Fronts and using it on the rear wheel for really mucky conditions. Martin Maes did just that during the La Thuille EWS, but I never found the need to try this option, given the amount of grit in the soil on the North Shore. The grip on the front wheel was able to handle the majority of the hard braking, while the Wild Rear stayed consistent enough and allowed me to perceive troublesome places where it might break free momentarily. I would happily take whatever relief from the faster, lower tread on the rear tread I can get.

Firm, heavy, slow, tacky, open, mixed rear tread - who are they good for? E-bikers, riders who flat frequently, and those who frequent demanding trails with easygoing vertical access. They conform much better when it's warm, like most other tires, but the Wild Enduro Racing Line in particular are firm enough to support heavy loads at low pressures without the carcass or tread wiggling around.

At slower speeds on a traditional bike, with final pressures hovering around 18 psi in the front and 22 out back, they do seem over-damped. The harsh sensation is amplified by the cold weather and can impede you from going forwards over stutter bumps. I even had to alter my suspension settings by dropping some spring force and opening the damper to compensate for this. As a constant tinkerer, I do wonder what a slightly larger volume might do to overcome this trait. The four-ply, burly carcass could be the one mountain bike component to have a minimum weight limit.


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DURABILITY

There is something to be said for their durability, though. "I haven't flatted yet" are famous last words, but I have faith that I could roll out on the Wild Enduro Racing Line tires with zero pressure and still make it home in time for dinner anyways.

So far, all the knobs have worn evenly - they're just starting to show signs of wear, but none of them have left unexpectedly yet. There are signs of the lugs on the rear tire starting to crack slightly along the base of the outer edge. That's nothing out of the ordinary for the amount of aggressive riding they have been subjected to, although the brutality of multiple days in a bone dry bike park might say otherwise.

They've also retained their shape just fine after a few installs and there was one horrendous case on a sizeable, log-framed gap jump. Not only did the tire survive, but it didn't lose any air or show any signs of the impact. No rims were harmed during this test session, thankfully.

WEIGHT

A friend jokingly inquired about how these "car tires" performed on the trail. I wasn't sure that was a reference to the brand's history or if he had tuned into the weight penalty incurred by the Racing Line duo. Michelin is transparent and lists the weights for all of their mountain bike tires, which is something that cannot be said for some products known to tip the scales. The front weighed in at 1459 grams, a little more than the 1400 grams claimed number. Meanwhile, the rear was bang on the stated number of 1350 grams, nearly the exact same weight as the equivalent 29" casing options of a 2.4" Schwalbe Magic Mary.

It is what it is, so if you're worried about weight and don't need the durability, Michelin offers other Wild Enduro Front and Rear tires with a Gravity Shield that are roughly 150-grams less per end.

PRICE

Price aside, it's unlikely you will be tossing out a slashed Michelin Racing Line tire after one ride. Listed at $99 USD, this combo is in line with other top end choices for World Cup and Enduro World Series competitors where the trade off for high wear to all-out traction is foremost. A 3CG Maxxis Assegai hovers around a similar dollar figure and wears at a similar rate, based on my experience between these tires.




Pros

+ Versatile tread patterns work in a variety of conditions
+ Extremely supportive casing, great for e-bikes
+ Front tire is consistently grippy and predictable
Cons

- Support comes at a high weight penalty
- Magi-X DH compound is painfully slow-rolling
- They can feel over-damped and harsh, especially in colder temperatures







Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesIn terms of grip, MIchelin's tacky and slow rebounding Magi-X DH rubber is all about traction, not rolling speed. That means the Wild Front tread pattern is predictable and surefooted on a variety of surface, while the shorter center blocks of the Wild Rear offer a decent amount of grip in the slop, but best suits drier conditions.

As for the construction, lighter riders in cool climates should steer towards other options from Michelin that won't burden them down and will conform to trail surfaces without harsh feedback. The robust four ply casing requires more effort to rotate and manipulate, best suiting e-MTBs, high speed bike parks, or for riders who want to forget about flats.
Matt Beer


Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
380 articles

180 Comments
  • 498 31
 But are they as tacky as inserting links nobody wants to paywalled Beta articles in the news feed?
  • 25 5
 I mean this is the best, most cutting comment ever. I'm standing up applauding it.
  • 10 1
 select reader view at the top right side of your browser to circumvent the pay wall Smile
  • 14 20
flag Larkey1 FL (Feb 4, 2022 at 19:58) (Below Threshold)
 Just don't click them?
  • 1 4
 Are you writing this from your truckers convoy Che Guevara?
  • 4 0
 @danstonQ: Look at you, mixing up Cuban history and Canadian current events. Neither reference makes any sense in this context, but good on you for trying! Maybe pull it back a bit and call me a Poopyhead or something a little more in your wheelhouse next time, eh?
BTW, how many ads for Beta do you see posing as articles in the news feed since this post?
  • 1 2
 @CarbonShmarbon: ha ha!!! Your teenager reaction shows that I was right. Breathe...
  • 3 0
 @danstonQ: Huh? I enjoy a good barb war, but you just make no sense.
So, yeah. It's just not working out. I wish you the best in future comment section duels.
  • 82 4
 $106 is for both tires, right? ..... Right?!
  • 95 1
 Just the right. No left.
  • 19 4
 Not bad for Michelin. Wait, these aren't car tires? smh
  • 18 3
 @noapathy: nope, but they go on something as or more expensive than alot of people's cars. That's the case for me.
  • 7 1
 @Beaconbike: And use like 10% the amount of rubber
  • 6 0
 Check out delium tires, proper rugged tires for $55
  • 25 3
 Tires on the bike: $106/ea
Tires on the car: $65/ea
Priorities: Questionable
  • 4 0
 @Beaconbike: Still doesn't justify the price... anything MTB-related is automatically upcharged.
  • 12 5
 @SacAssassin: $65 car tires are garbage. comparable to a $20 CST MTB tire. $106 bike tires are the bike equivalent of R-comp racing tires.
  • 8 11
 @GTscoob: No, they aren't. R-comp racing tires are actually good and have real engineering behind them. MTB tires are a joke, in comparison and have very little change over time.
$106 MTB tires are like Sumitomo all-season tires: better than the cheapo tires, but not amazing.
  • 1 0
 @SacAssassin: are you slapping those puppies on your car at home?
  • 10 0
 Still cheaper than an Ouside+ membership
  • 3 0
 @nickfranko: Pay to play!! I'd try these and had 3 really warped DD Maxxis. The DH casing much better quality so far.
  • 41 0
 Here's my review...

If you can get them, current Michelin mtb tires are f*cking fantastic. Be honest with the conditions you ride and tire model selection, and they will reward you.
  • 5 0
 When the article said "the Wild Front / Rear Racing Line combo is only available in a 29" x 2.4" option" my first thought was available where? I put myself on every waiting list for these tires I could find and haven't seen a pair yet.

I got a set of 27.5 wild enduros (not race line), Magi-X front and Gum-x rear last summer and totally fell in love. So much speed and traction. Got the 29er versions, both Gum-X since couldn't find a Magi-x front, for my new bike and they have been great too. I do a long steep road climb from my house to ride local trails and they aren't a problem.

I will definitely get a pair of these to use for my races this summer, if I can find any.
  • 8 0
 Both of your comments are spot on. I went from maxxis to these and now back to maxxis because it's all I can find. I run dd and dh casing and thrash as hard as I'm capable of. Those wild enduros last longer and were the most predictable tire I've ever been on. I'll run them exclusively if I can source them.
  • 1 0
 I really rate them if the ground is soft. However, I find the front a bit pingy over wet roots
  • 1 0
 @mtb-thetown: I don´t know why Michelin has no stock left for months on DH and Enduro tires. In many places it looks like stock come in June.
I got a DH 22 barely used for cheap and it is the best tire I test by far for pure grip downhill.
  • 1 0
 And your abilities - if you are not proper fast (in real life not your imagination) then you will do better with Gum-X Enduro Casing than the Magi-X DH casing tyres.
  • 31 5
 I'd love to try these if they were $60. With bike tires firmly above the price of car tires now, tire companies need to give us a compelling reason to put down our tried and true DHR/F/Dissector + Assegai setup.
  • 18 0
 is that us? cause in europe i can get the maxxis for 50/60€ in decent chasing and 40/50 each for the michelin
  • 5 1
 My favourite german online store has many tire brands available for around $60.00., and not the lower grade ones. Continental trail king 2.8 Kenda , Schwalbe, Bontrager, WTB.
  • 31 4
 I definitely won't willingly pay $100 for a bike tire, but I've learned to stop comparing that to my car tires. I'm looking for high-performance tires for my bike, and the equivalent high-performance tires for a track car or an offroad vehicle are $500-1000 each
  • 1 4
 @showmethemountains: Yeah but you can also buy Milestar Patagonia MTs from Discount Tire or Walmart for $135 each in my truck's size, so........
  • 5 1
 Spec Butchers in BLK DMD casings are only $18 on their website. I bought $100 bucks worth.
  • 4 0
 @DJ-24: Some of the best German sites still don't ship to Great America
  • 2 0
 Their 3*33 tpi casing tires are hella tough and usually available at bike stores/online for 70 canadian.
  • 27 2
 @piratetrails Michelin have given so much more reasons to move on from Maxxis tires including the cost of tires even though you pay double initially!!

I switched over to Michelin to give them a try after getting so frustrated with Maxxis, due to tyres leaking and failing, and sidewalls not holding up...

And to my surprise this is what I found:
- I destroyed 5 sets of Maxxis in 1500kms. Michelin I was getting 800-900kms per set
- Every ride I would need to reinflate the Maxxis to ensure I had the correct pressure. Michelin's I'd done over 400kms before I first needed to reinflate to maintain the correct pressure for every ride
- I tore the bead off the sidewall on 3 of the rear Maxxis (I was running DD casings). Have not had this happen yet with Michelin.
- I was was struggling to get the sweet spot pressure wise with the Maxxis DD casings holding the tyre shape (folding over) in high load corners vs being too jarry, loosing traction at the pressure needed for they tyre not to fold. I even tried Cush cores, which didn't make a lot of difference
- Michelin enabled me to drop 3 psi from the lowest pressure I could run with Maxxis and the Michelin would hold shape in the same corners I was having trouble with. And this was without cush cores in the Michelin
- Because of a combination of the above (ability to hold shape and thus give more confidence) and the huge traction the Michelin provide over the Maxxis my average track times dropped by between 3-4 seconds depending on length of the trail
- I tried Assegai and DHR 2s and a variety of their compounds to try get it to the bottom of it with Maxxis. I guess it just the life span of Maxxis, which I suppose helps them sell more tyres??
- I also tried the Vittoria eMazza before the Michelin for another option to try and get to the bottom of the quality, durability, shape, and wear issues. They were on par with Maxxis
- The edge of the tread blocks of the Michelin wouldn't chop out as quickly as the Maxxis either
- Yes the Michelin are heavy, but they definitely make up for the weight

So overall Michelin has given me more confidence, lowered my tire costs and given me more time riding. I'm running the DH34 racelines front is 23psi, rear 25psi
  • 11 2
 @suspended-flesh: Calling Milestars "high-performance" is generous
  • 5 0
 @SentaCruz: 100% agree!
I've been running the original Wild Enduros, then DH34's and my latest bike came with DD Maxxis so I thought I'd give them another shot.
I lasted exactly 2.5 rides before I flatted in a pretty unassuming rock garden.
Overall grip was the similar but felt vague in comparison, the Michy's give way more cornering bite and confidence.
They weigh more in the beginning but I guarantee the last Maxxis tyre I wore the tread down on weighed more at the end of its life because of all the patches I had to install inside!
  • 2 0
 @SeanMurr123: agreed only problem is getting hold of them everytime I see them available now... I buy a pile just in case can't get them next time
  • 2 0
 @DJ-24: The prices for mtb tires in the US are ridiculous. I thought that my LBS tried to sell me some fake Maxxis (the price was like 40% less than at Jenson), but then I checked r2-bike as well as other German sites and calmed down.
  • 1 0
 @thustlewhumber: I did the same, bought a shit ton.
  • 2 0
 @Beskyd: I used to buy a lot from Jenson, a few years ago but now there are no deals. The Germans have the best value and selection.
  • 2 0
 @SentaCruz: Glad to hear they've returned to former success.
The Michelin DH16 was the best DH tire out there back in the day. Unfortunately they stopped producing them in like 2009 or so. I always wanted to try their newer ones, but every one who rode them said they were trash... plus I didn't like the new profile and the names were kinda shit too. Worst marketing ever.
It's a shame they stopped producing the DH16, because I would've never run a different tire ever again. It was better than HR2 or the old Kaiser back in the day. Very durable, great control and breaking grip, hardly ever got a flat.
  • 1 0
 @DJ-24: Do you have to pay duty if you buy them from Germany?
  • 2 0
 @KiithSjet: Funny enough I've never been charged duty or tax and I've ordered 3or 4 times.
  • 1 0
 @DJ-24: Buying all my tyres via German stores and ship them to SA. Great options & pricing!!
Freakin’ only place I can get 24” DHFs & DHRs for my kid…
  • 2 0
 Deleted
  • 1 0
 If you compare like for like, car tyres are multiple times the price of MTB tyres; Michelin racing slick is like £400ish, Michelin MTB tyre is under £100. Even the Michelin tyres on my car are at least £120 each, and they're nothing special.
  • 1 0
 @thustlewhumber:

Thanks for the heads up! The Slaughter and eliminator are about $16 on their website too
  • 2 1
 Didn’t know that car tires are so incredibly cheap in the U.S.

My current set of car tires cost EUR 460.- while my current set of bike tires was EUR 100.-
  • 2 0
 @seadug: Totally true. I was merely comparing the ridiculous general disparity between auto and bike tire cost irrespective of manufacturer's inherent inability to leverage production scaling. Most of us are not top 10% racers, either, so stop paying extreme money for an advantage you cannot use.
  • 1 0
 @mazze: The DH22 AND DH34 ARE WAY BETTER (A former DH16 rider)
  • 1 0
 @SentaCruz: Not really a fair comparison, a wire bead downhill casing vs a folding bead 2x 120tpi casing. Maxxis do wire bead downhill tyres too.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: sorry yes the Maxxis were definitely wire bead also, I must have got DD/DH around the wrong way
  • 1 0
 @SentaCruz: fair enough. I’ve never torn a wire bead dh Maxxis so can’t really call it an issue personally but that’s just me.
  • 1 0
 Several reasons:
Better casings
Better grip
Lower rolling resistance
Better wear characteristics

Wild Enduro FRONT Gum-X is about as grippy as an Arseguy MaxxGrip but rolls faster, wears a lot slower and the casings last until the tread has worn out.
These are the first tyres I have ever run that will last for 900-1000 km and grip almost as well on Day 30 as they did on Day Two.
  • 1 0
 @mazze: I rate the Wild Enduro FRONT as good as the 'old' DH16 which was my favourite tyre 'back in the day'.
I agree Michelin appears to have gone absent for several years (2005 - 201Cool but they are back with some outstanding tyres now.
  • 9 0
 Still waiting for the Schwalbe Magic Mary 2.4 Ultrasoft Supertrail, the old 2.35 SG was already the best maxgrip tire:
- superb grip everywhere ( except maybe super hardpack)
- decent rolling
- super damping
- completely true ( unlike most maxxis and e13 tires)
- easy sealing
- good in the cold ( maxxis is still crap below 0)

The new 2.4 SG weights 1400g though. The tire is already in the schwalbe lineup and even was on the bike of a female EWS racer. Coming out probably 2023.
  • 2 0
 It's a 2022 tire, 1150g and will be available sometime in May-June this year in Europe.
  • 2 0
 Schwalbe has been killing it with rear tires recently (NN, HD and BB all in soft) but haven't found anything nailed for the front yet. MM a bit too squirmy on rocks and roots for my taste. Been rocking Barons and Griffus and wild Enduro fronts with great success.
Haven't tried assegai yet, never found minions anything special in my applications
  • 1 0
 @kanasasa: found the same with my soft MM, good everywhere but on wet rocks and roots. Would like to get a Ulta soft super trail. Hans Dampf in the rear ain't bad either, can be a bit slippery in the wet mind you
  • 1 0
 @kanasasa: hmm not very rocky here so i have not noticed that weakness, but its always neen a tradeoff between blocky tires like the DHR II and spiky tires like the Magic Mary. One is better on hard surfaces the other one is better on soft soil simply by design. I am currently running a e13 mopo which is great everywhere but gets overwhelmed in deeper mud. Not surprising as it is a DHR copy with different rubber. The Magic Mary is still very easy to get along with, the whole year round and thats nothing ypu can say about Maxxis tires, at least in regions with cold temperatures.
  • 1 0
 @kanasasa: It may sound crazy, but has anyone tried the Big Betty SG ultrasoft on the front ? Could be worth a try. More blocky and faster than the Magic Mary, same rubber and good overall quality. The DHR II also started as a rear tire..
  • 1 1
 Is Schwalbe rating all their tires for Ebike now because they all seem kind of heavy.
  • 1 0
 hibike had them in stock a few weeks ago! Mary ultrasoft super trail!
  • 1 0
 @nzandyb: although 1150gr is a bit of a fantasy weight, my 29x2.4 mary super trail, soft stands at 1310gr
  • 1 0
 @DJ-24: they're very heavy because they are very durable and stiff, i think a current DD is like a super trail Schwalbe these days, i love them
  • 1 0
 @NicolaZesty314: crap i searched it everywere ( i thought) missed em. Hm if they weight 1300 + the difference to the available SG is not that big, maybe i get those.
  • 1 1
 @kanasasa: what stops you from using the BB in the front and rear? I was actually considering this... I've never been riding Schwalbes, because the quality with nobs ripping off was just shit. But I heard they're pure awesomeness since they get their rubber from Continental.
  • 1 0
 @NicolaZesty314: For 2022 the Super Trail is 8-10% lighter (depending on model). The weight drop is due to the switch from a 50 to 67 thread count casing, also making them a bit faster and more supple. The drop in durability from the 50 thread count carcass is not overly significant either. Just gives a better differentiation between the Super Trail and Super Gravity. So if 1150g is your fantasy weight, then here we are.
  • 9 0
 Scanned the comments. No mention of it so I’ll say it. Nice writing Matt! Keep up the good work. “ , the effort required to turn these tires over on pavement due to the weight and tacky compound is noticeable. You can feel the tank track-like tread turn over knob by knob;” #wordartist
  • 12 2
 God damn. That is an expensive tire. And it doesn’t even come with a maaxis logo.
  • 12 8
 Tried to buy Michelin tires some time ago, but simply gave up. No stock, expensive, why would I even try? The sad reality is that in Europe you can buy Maxxis or Schwalbe and that's it. You spend so much time trying to get other tires, that they are certainly not worth it even if they would make you coffee and did a blowjob in return ...
  • 5 3
 can get the wild enduro tyres in UK no problem
  • 2 0
 Michelin, Schwalbe and Vittoria tyres are out of stock in Europe for quite a long time. Schwalbe are coming back slowly, but I haven't seen a Wild Enduro or a Mazza in stock for months...and getting a single normal DHRII 29x2.30 is a pain in the arse.
My motto right now is: don't skid and brake less... so I save brake pads and keep my tyres longer Wink
  • 3 0
 I buy em off Chain/Wiggle in the UK no problem. However these seem to be 29" only so I'll stick with DH22 and DH34s.
  • 9 9
 @suspended-flesh: Great, however UK is not Europe Razz
  • 8 5
 @lkubica: it is, just not the EU.
  • 21 4
 @lkubica: yeah we got voted out of Europe and we now identify as asian.
  • 3 1
 @lkubica: Huh? where did I mention either? I know UK is Europe but not EU. Been there in both eras. Maybe I got /Whooshed - need more coffee.....
  • 3 0
 I buy at bike24 ,it is a German website and it works really well. For a few months they had free shipping to any country in EU. They got Michelin,Maxxis,Schwalbe and Specialized tires in most flavors. It is true for a few months it was hard to find some brands. I still had my stock of tires free shipped from Germany hahaha,had a very good deal on two pairs of Assegai DD and butchers T9.
  • 3 0
 @lkubica: If you buy Maxxis or Schwalbe in Europe, coffee and BJs come standard? That's a good deal so long as their rubbers aren't too thick and overdamp the experience.
  • 2 0
 @homerjm: r2-bike seems to be even cheaper than bike24. Just my 2 cents.
  • 1 0
 idk what they do in your country for fun, but a tire that makes coffee and gives you blowjobs...sounds worth it to me.
  • 1 0
 @mtb-scotland:Chain Reaction ships to the US...
  • 1 1
 Well in Germany you just ride your bike to the brothel and then coffee shop after. All that rubber smell will stay in your nose tho@Staktup:
  • 4 0
 You might as well get a set of DH22s and/or DH34s. They are also cheaper if you can find them. I was hoping for something slightly lighter than their DH wire bead tires, but 1400 grams for foldable tires is ridiculous. Maybe something to bridge the gap between their 1000 gram AM2s and 1450 gram DH tires. But nope. These weigh nearly the same as their wire bead DH tires and have the same compounds so they're all painfully slow rolling. I ran as set of the DH34s(racing lines) on my enduro bike and that compound is the stickiest I've ever felt in corners, but soooo slow rolling. It gets noticeably better rolling as rear center tread starts to wear out. So I swapped the front to the rear and put a fresh one up front, when the rear inevitably wears out. Even with actual wear and tear on the knobs, the DH34s still grip like they're new. That's really the only way to run these on a pedaling bike, unless you just like pain and exhaustion.

But I guess in this day and age, you take what you can get. I have DH34s mounted on my bike park/enduro racing wheelset and I run AM2 Wilds and Forces on my trail/daily driver wheelset.
  • 4 0
 Stuck a dh22 on the front of my Rise, absolute beast of a tyre, never taking it off
  • 4 0
 The comparison to car tires (price wise) seems illogical. I drive a performance car, the equivalent performance tires are wayyyyy more expensive than MTB tires. For a performance bike, it makes sense that performance tires will be more expensive. Still not happy shelling out 200 for a set, dang.
  • 3 1
 Pretty sure they listed it wrong. I've paid 104 for the set.
  • 1 0
 @shakazulu12: sounds great to me
  • 6 0
 I find it funny when people say Michelin are for car tires when the company originally started on bikes and actually invented the removable bicycle tire.
  • 6 1
 on an unrelated note, what happened to Dan Roberts? He's been more absent than Mike Levy
  • 9 0
 He's returned to his engineering roots, but he'll still be doing analysis and reviews for Pinkbike as well.
  • 3 0
 Problem solved, just buy some Spec Butcher BLK Diamond for $18 although only in 27.5 size..https://www.specialized.com/us/en/butcher-blck-dmnd-2bliss-ready/p/157756?color=237113-157756
  • 2 0
 I do not understand why Michelin has chosen these huge distances of the shoulder knobs for their enduro front tires. The distances are as large as full mud tires. The rear tire (which does not have such a large spacing) has 4 shoulder knobs on the same length, while the front tire has 3. Even the DH22, which Michelin says was the inspiration for the Wild Enduro front tire or a Magic Mary, has much closer spacing. I do not understand why Michelin makes this mud specific thing for a tire for all conditions.
  • 1 0
 Sorry, I'm not totally sure what you're saying about the edge knobs - but whatever they've done it works really well for sloppy UK trails.
  • 1 0
 Mine were 104 in US dollars ordering from Bike24 for the set. Not per tire. Haven't had a chance to ride them due to injury though, so I can't offer any more info than that. They are chunky as hell and super tacky, just to the touch.
  • 3 0
 @michelin 27.5 version would be nice please. You’ve already got the rear version because of all the EWS mullet bikes you sponsor. How about Releasing some for the public?
  • 1 0
 It seems like a lot of people in the comments aren’t understanding that these are racing tires - they’re gonna be heavy and 29.

Michelin also makes a slightly less burly casing’d 3x33tpi tire in both gum-x 3c and magi-x 3c.

Magi x lugs are a lot stiffer than gumx, i’ve heard from harder riders than myself that you really have to be pushing it to get good performance and ride feel out of magix.
  • 1 0
 Well written and very thorough. You can tell Matt is incredibly in touch with his bike and what it’s doing while he rides. I’ve been getting tyre curious as stock dwindles on Maxxis, these or the DH22/DH34 are the next on my list to try. I normally run DH or DD maxxis with cushcore, and love the feeling of cushcore but would love to drop that weight - these sound like they might be up for the task.
  • 3 0
 Been running these tyres for a few months. Front tyre is incredible on greasy Irish winter trails. Rear tyre is decent but doesn't have the braking traction of a DHR II.
  • 2 0
 I've just been riding the Wild Enduro Rear and DHR2 back-to-back on greasy English trails, I probably agree about the braking traction - but I've found the Michelin holds a muddy off-camber a lot better. Which makes it an easy winner for me.
  • 1 0
 Been running the wild enduro gum X on my enduro bike all last season. First time I ever had a pair of tires last all season without a single flat. Enduro races, DH races, bike park laps, general riding etc. Not problem one. Absolutely great tires!
  • 4 0
 These sound perfect for my CRF250.
  • 1 0
 29er CRF....?
  • 2 0
 I remember my dh22's I had the same experience, the hefty sidewalls supported 5 less psi then maxxis to have similar compliance
  • 2 0
 Climbing with those tires would not be easy weighing in at 1459 grams and 1350 grams. Personally, I would only use them for lift access bike parks, shuttle runs or ebikes.
  • 1 0
 Soon every manufacturer will be making all their tires Ebike suitable and they'll all weigh this much.
  • 1 0
 Looks like a great variable conditions tire that won’t leave you walking back to the trailhead with a sliced carcass.

Wonder if they’ll do a more dry conditions version.
  • 4 0
 Won't be far from the car tho
  • 3 0
 But how do that compare to the Mike Bears? That is what the youtube crowd wants to know
  • 1 0
 Might have to try these since we can not find any DH22's or 34's other than park casing. If anyone has any leads, we need 4 DH22's and 4 DH34's.........Season is quickly approaching.
  • 2 0
 flowtyres.co.nz/search?q=Michelin stock here at the mo - note NZD
  • 2 0
 @SentaCruz: Even they are sold out on the DH22's! Bit pricey but they are literally the only ones in the world that have certain tires! Thank you for the link.
  • 1 1
 @MPYeti: Smile they still had stock before I posted the link lol
  • 2 0
 winstanleysbikes.co.uk In the UK have some stock, or are expecting more to arrive in the next week! I got 3 pairs of racing line tyres from them two weeks ago!
  • 2 2
 Just bought 4 new Michelin tires at Costco 205-60-16. Paid $480 with tax installed and setup “tubeless”. The tires I got are rated 80,000 miles. Car tires sure seem a lot cheaper considering duration of use and performance - I don’t think you could even buy these tires for per unit installed. Last time I bought performance touring tire Michelin Primacy - they were rated 60,000 ended up lasting 75,000 of hard driving. I love Michelin cars they perform great, just cut price on these by by half and I’ll accept 1000 miles of hard riding. I can’t believe price of Maxxis and Schwabies these days. I’ve been buying specialized tires direct when they are on sale as result of “inflated” tire prices.
  • 1 0
 wish theyd do an inbetween casing for the normal versions, because the sidewalls on those are absolute pish. theyre already heavy, and very foldy under 26psi, inserts helps but id rather not if it can be helped to be honest
  • 3 1
 Do the side knobs rip off super easily? I loved the last ones I used until this started happening.
  • 2 1
 Same...I found the overall tire longevity was half the life of say, Maxxis Assegai's.
  • 3 1
 Ran into the same issue with the knobs on my wild enduros. Starting happening within the first 10 rides. Like riding on velcro which was awesome in the corners, but no where else
  • 2 0
 Guess ill keep praying my $60 exo maxxis don't puncture until I hit the lottery.....
  • 3 0
 Good news! They are available in a 33" 10.5x15.
  • 2 0
 "Car tires". Friend must be a newb not to remeber the amazing Michelin DH 24/16 combo.
  • 1 1
 Been trying them for years but they end up in the trash. Tried these also and had to pull them off they felt so bad. Similar to their motorcycle tires, they take away all the confidences in riding.
  • 1 0
 The big weight question. Lighter tires with inserts which makes them heavy or just heavier to begin with so you don’t need inserts ??????????
  • 2 0
 I've gone for the latter because it is less hassle.
  • 1 0
 Cons
When they’re available
only available in. 29”
A little more than
a little expensive

tup There I fixed it for ya
  • 1 0
 Seriously??? I completely destroyed both my thumbs while trying to mount the tires von bontrager line 30 rims. One week of painkillers! Bad combination!!!
  • 2 0
 Would love to see a Schwalbe Super trail/gravity/dh comparison and review!
  • 1 0
 Nothing wrong with that; some of my favorite people are tough, tacky, and heavy.
  • 1 0
 "Michelin's Wild Enduro Racing Line Tires Are Tough, Tacky, & Heavy"

& also not available anywhere.
  • 1 0
 Or you can buy tires of this guy...LMFAO..https://www.pinkbike.com/buysell/3119540/
  • 1 0
 Why test them on an e-bike when they make another e-bike specific version duh!
  • 1 0
 Tacky like a $40.00/night off the strip Vegas Motel, or tacky like your bike corners like its on velcro?
  • 2 0
 106.99$ each?
Lucky me a bike has only 2 wheels.
  • 1 0
 Personal experience - top grip but extremely slow-rolling, the slowest I have ever ridden.
  • 1 0
 I had a dream that Matt blacked out some minions for this test. I think I need to take a break from pinkbike…
  • 2 1
 Why is the front tyre heavier than the rear? Did you mix up the numbers?
  • 6 0
 There is simply less rubber. The rear runs less pronounced knobs.
  • 1 0
 website still sucks. not buying a render with no specs.
  • 2 0
 Cons only 29" listed
  • 2 0
 No 27.5 though
  • 1 0
 Im' french and i'm ride michelin since they are back to bike industry
  • 1 0
 Bien sur
  • 1 0
 I just wish tires are in stock.
  • 2 1
 "They can feel over-damped and harsh" I think you mean under-damped.
  • 1 0
 6+ pounds of rolling weight, no effin way.
  • 1 0
 Bike could weigh almost 3 kg less without these tires Big Grin
  • 5 5
 Bontrager se5 se6..best tires around
  • 6 1
 Except in the wet - there are better options for slippery conditions.
  • 3 0
 Dick about it.
  • 2 0
 Right. I can't believe I'm saying this but I loving the new SE5 and feel like it an improvement over my go to of DHF or Assegai. It is a great tire for the PNW. Cornering is great and its is predictable. Good sidewall support and so far it has been bullet proof. You know you have great tire when you don't have to think about your tires.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: Have you tried the new one, I'm finding these tires to be amazing in our conditions.
  • 3 0
 @bedell99, yes, they work well in loose dirt / mud, but on wet rocks I didn't find them to be nearly as predictable as Schwalbe or Maxxis' softer compounds
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: That is great to know. That is one condition where I haven't tested them. Really wet rocks or rock slabs. Been mainly riding the normal Seattle East Side trails which don't have a lot of that type of conditions. Thanks for responding. Much appreciated.
  • 1 0
 Agree, the Bonty's are excellent. New SE's are money, for not much money
  • 1 2
 The front and rear photo have a "typo". The front is the rear and the rear is the front.
  • 1 0
 They've got it correct. I also would have thought the center knobs all uniform would have been the rear as well.
  • 1 1
 best way to ruin the look of your bike unless you ride a GT team replica
  • 1 0
 Great review, Matt
  • 3 6
 18 and 22psi wha?! must be 120lbs...that is a little kid rider.
  • 7 0
 No, the casing is just super stiff. Tire pressures vary depending on tire construction - 30 psi in your DH Minions wouldn't feel the same as 30 psi in an XC casing tire.
  • 3 0
 My son is top jr racer and is now on Michelin's, He had to ride 3-4 PSI higher on Maxxis to keep from destroying rims than on the Michelin's as proven at Bootleg, which is murder on tires and rims. Super grippy, very stiff sidewalls and way more difficult to install than DHR's and DHF's. He loves them.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: I have the "normal" ones and run those pressures. Govhigher and you quickly lose grip, I find. I like them but they are so slow rolling I'll be going back to my preferred magic mary front/high roller 2 rear combo
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