Review: Pinnd CS2 Pedals - Made in Scotland to Survive the Slop

Feb 7, 2022 at 18:16
by Matt Beer  



Where else on earth would you expect pedals with a superior sealing design to be born? The deepest, wettest trails in Scotland of course. Pinnd CS2 pedals are a product of their environment, manufactured by a family run business north of Edinburgh. Pinnd operates under their primary company name, Contract Solutions Scotland, with engineering expertise that has produced equipment for the medical, aerospace, motorsport industries, as well as the oil and gas sector. Built on twelve years of operating five axis CNC machines, the CS2 pedal's machining work stands out from the crowd in terms of looks, but also in design that shows they aren't afraid to stray from the usual bike industry ways.


Pinnd CS2 Details
• 13 customizable pins per side
• 1x needle, 2x cartridge bearings per pedal
• Titanium spindle
• No weight limit
• 5 year warranty
• Platform dimensions: 110 x 105 mm
• Colors: black or silver
• Weight: 420 grams
• MSRP: £195.00 - $265 USD
pinnd.co.uk

The Scottish-made pedals run on a special oil seal to withstand the toughest elements backed by a five year warranty, similar to the system used in the output shafts of motor vehicles. They've aimed to strike a balance between the durability of the system and the platform height, boldly stating that there's no rider weight limit. A 3 mm bearing is in place instead of the 1mm thick bushing that is more commonly seen, which makes the body around the axle thicker than most. A strong titanium axle comes at a higher cost, but offsets the increased weight of the bearing.

The aluminum platform measures 105 long by 110 mm wide. The pins have a foot print of 90mm long by 85mm wide at the largest distances. The CS2s are supplied with 6mm tall 303 stainless steel pins and their adjustments are limited to adding or removing the four pins near the center. For £20 you can upgrade to alloy pins that weight just 0.1-grams each and come in the usual rainbow of anodized colors to spruce up the look if you fancy that.

The footprint of the pins measures 83mm wide by 90mm long - 40mm behind the axle and 50 in front.
The edge of the platform runs tight to the cranks to alleviate the feeling of your foot falling off towards the inside.
Pinnd CS2 pedal review
Shin pads are advised. Tall 6mm pins are sharp as needles and provide a secure concave feel.

Performance

As a flat pedal rider at heart, there are some key attributes I look for and the Pinnd CS2 pedals nailed a couple of those. First would have to be the concavity. A side view reveals how deep the distance from the top of the outer edge pins to the axle body is. This really lets the shoe's sole flex and reduce the contact surface. There is one caveat to that, though. You need a sticky but stiff-soled shoe like a Five Ten Impact. I first tried the CS2s with Five Ten's Crosstrail shoes and found that the extreme concavity made my foot cramp on normal descents - something I've never experienced before. The 6mm tall pins have a sharp outer lip and stand tall, away from the rest of the pedal body with immense traction, so you'll need to run the four center pins and distribute the load if you're a fan of riding in skate shoes.

Secondly is the grip. I've explored various types of pins and found their traction is not due to the height of the pin, but the bite. This also plays into how they are dispersed. Lining the edge of the platform makes the most of the grip and concavity - think of a bed of nails. The less distributed the load, the more each pin bites in. If you don't like a totally locked in feel, add the central pins to keep the shoe from sagging into the middle of the pedal body.

The platform size and the CSs are fairly substantial in the lateral and vertical directions. The body also sits tight to the crank which allows you to find your footing solidly in a pinch. Where the CS2s falter slightly, and this is due in part to the platform height, is their lack of security. The rear half of the pedal is on the short side and requires you to accentuate the practice of "dropping your heels". Descending is not so much of an issue as returning to the top.

However, climbing up punchy bits of trail is already a challenge on flat pedals for most people. Your foot doesn't have the locked in benefit while cycling through the six and twelve o'clock positions of the pedal stroke. It's during this moment when the tall ride height and short back half of the pedal can cause your foot to loose traction and roll off of the pedal, backwards or forwards. Flat pedals are essentially a seesaw and need an even force applied to each half of the pedal. A longer platform and lower body height would reduce the tendency for your foot to come off of the pedal.

A standard 8mm socket required some grinding to open up the CS2s for servicing.
At the heart of the system is a lightweight titanium axle and unique oil seal with a burly 3 mm bearing.
The grease is showing signs of use, but the pedals still feel smooth so far.

Durability

The CS2s are only halfway through a dreary winter filled with a ton of snow, mud, and bike washes. They still look to be keeping most of the elements outside, although I expected the internals to look brand new with all the talk of the special sealing system. The grease has changed color a little, but they haven't increased in rotational speed or started to feel crunchy. A bit of friction from the seal here actually makes locating the flat surface a lesser task than when they are spinning madly.

It should be noted that servicing the CS2s requires a very narrow outer diameter 8 mm socket. You'll have to grind down a chunk of material to clear the threads of the pedal body.

The pins and body also have a few smacks, but haven't been subjected to anything serious since the ground has been extremely soft with all of the moisture lately. Without any direct damage to the pins, I can't say how easy they would be to remove. There is plenty of purchase to get some small grippy pliers on even if the 4 mm hex head did become damaged and the threaded portion of the body looks thick enough to survive jarring rock strikes. I can attest to the strength of the axles too, which survived a savage case and remained dead straight.

Pinnd CS2
Chromag Dagga pedal review
Chromag Dagga

How Do They Compare?

The Pinnd CS2s have a similar feel to the Chromag Daggas in terms of grip and height with their savagely tall pins that bite into shoe soles. The Daggas are aren't a low profile pedal because of those spikes, but they do offer better security from the equal weighting on the platform. Looking at price tags, they're both on the higher end of the scale, but Pinnd's titanium axle makes them even more expensive than the Daggas. That axle does give the CS2's a 67-gram weight advantage, though.

Mid-term longevity has shown that the Pinnd's sophisticated axle seals keep things fairly clean and extra smooth, while the Daggas needed a quick refresh through a similar time frame and conditions. The bearings in the Daggas are also fairly small, so the high initial cost of the CS2s could be worthwhile well down the road. However, that extra height and shorter platform may not be what everyone is looking for.




Pros

+ Strong and lightweight
+ Tons of traction
+ 5-year warranty

Cons

- Tall and short platform can cause feet to roll off
- Expensive, even when compared to other high-end flat pedals
- Oil seal is not as impermeable as promised





Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesFrom a design standpoint, the Pinnd CS2 flat pedals bring a lot to the table. There's no shortage of traction, and the bushing-free design plus the titanium axles sets them apart from many of their competitors. However, those features do come with a hefty price tag. In addition, the tall platform height and the shorter fore and aft measurements means they're not going to be everyone's cup of tea. Matt Beer



174 Comments

  • 183 2
 Stopped reading at 265$, Are you guys serious ? These are just flat pedal, riders are not milky cows !
  • 14 174
flag joshslewis1 (Feb 16, 2022 at 8:50) (Below Threshold)
 I missed the part where that's my problem. Stop complaining.
  • 6 1
 My favorites have been the e13 alloy pedals. I've tried about 7 different pedals alloy and composite and the e13s just have the best placement, feel, concave shape, stance, grip, and size. And as someone that only rides flats in the winter....I'm picky about pedals!
  • 3 3
 @foggnm: i ride flats year round for all disciplines, the deity t mac pedals have had the best grip, but ive gone through like 4 or 5 sets of deity pedals that have failed prematurely, they have great customer service but enough was enough. the hope F20's have lasted 2 full seasons so far and have zero play and show no sign of needing a rebuild yet, not the grippiest pedals ive ever tried but they stay on the spindle! quality costs money, cant complain about price if its a quality product.
  • 24 0
 Same. The prices in the bike industry get crazier each day.
  • 21 8
 And here I was thinking the $185 tenet pedals would be the most out of touch with reality product that I would see this week.

$10 nylon pedals are so good these days that there is no reason for over engineered and overpriced cnc aluminium pedals to exist.
  • 22 0
 Who buys a dentist bike and then does the sensible thing when it's time to put on some pedals?
No, when you buy a dentist bike, you also get yourself a nice pair of dentist pedals.
  • 1 0
 @whitebullit: I've had several pairs of Deitys and I love them as a company. I ran their black kat pedals last winter. I was going to try the t-macs but now they've gotten fairly pricey. Also have tried their deftraps but they seemed to have a very wide stance/q-factor that I couldn't get used to. My e13s feel like my foot was made for the pedal and the pedal my foot. I guess that's all you can want in a flat pedal. I haven't had any need to rebuild them or pedals that I have thousands of miles on....but I live in the desert!
  • 25 1
 @joshslewis1: So what would you suggest someone do to express their feelings if not in the comments section of a news article? Unless someone's holding your face to the computer screen and forcing you to read the comments, you're right, it's not your problem. stop complaining.
  • 1 0
 @foggnm: ive had multiple pairs of skyscrapers, bladerunners, decoys, t macs and even the composites on my dj, when i lost my drive side pedal cranking out of the gate in a race run and had to ride full gas on a spindle, i just couldnt do it anymore lol, i still use the pairs i have that havent failed, and for the money the composites are definetely the route to go. im always looking for a better pedal though and youve caught my interest with the e13's, ill have to try a pair, thanks!
  • 10 1
 @whitebullit: I have a set of F20's that are now 7 years old... never been serviced and still running smooth with no play.

These look like F20's that have developed a fondness for Tennents super and deep fried haggis suppers
  • 4 0
 I've been in the same set of Chromag Scarabs for about 10 years. Ride a couple times a week year round. Never serviced. I keep thinking I should order a service kit because one day they’re going to come apart on me mid ride. But I’m pretty well converted to Chromag at this point!
  • 3 50
flag joshslewis1 (Feb 16, 2022 at 11:58) (Below Threshold)
 @Spencermon: Once again, not my problem. I literally don't care if you can't buy these
  • 1 0
 @IntoTheEverflow: when you just can compromise on that bite power.
  • 15 1
 @joshslewis1: just buy it then, and be happy with it , not my problem neither
  • 7 1
 $50-60 for a good nylon pedal, lasts a few years with routine care. I tend to break pedal bodies long before I wear out a set of bearings.

$250 for a set of pedals is pretty expensive.
  • 23 0
 @joshslewis1: careful now, you keep responding to things you don’t care about and folk might think it is your problem
  • 21 0
 @joshslewis1: I'm just imagining a few teenagers arguing
"not my problem"
"then don't insert yourself into the conversation"
"like I said, not my problem"
"Fine"
"Fine"
  • 3 0
 @Afterschoolsports: I run Raceface Chesters or OneUp Composites. I thought those were a good deal comparatively. What are you running for $10?
  • 17 0
 'Not My Problem' with Joshlewis1, the latest podcast brought to you by Outside.
  • 11 1
 @joshslewis1: then why are you commenting if you don't care lol people that truly don't care don't comment, making it clear they don't care. You commenting twice makes it sound more like you care a lot.
  • 1 0
 Senses just dropped a $249 set. I thought $90 (pre-covid) was a lot for a Stamp 7 set.
  • 1 0
 @FaahkEet: Covid changed the flat pedal game up.
  • 1 0
 $265 for sure if they were ePedals to go on my ebike. I mean money eees no issue for E.
  • 2 1
 @nurseben:
Exactly. These $50-60 nylon pedals are lighter and work great, and you can buy 3 pairs for the cost of most metal pedals. Really not clear to me why all these other options exist
  • 1 0
 @railbender: scudgood. The comments section got me onto them. They’re tough as hell. I am heavy (240lb) and will frequently case jumps and drops. No bent axle or broken bodies in just under two years using them.
  • 1 0
 @foggnm: yeah agreed like the shape of Black Kats but needed longer pins.
These look a bit like Vaults in that they are thick and very concave.
The extreme concavity seems to reduce the actually footprint on top.
I much prefer the feel of squarer, thinner pedals now. Deity/E13/One Up etc
  • 1 0
 @mhoshal: haha this is bang on! Well said
  • 1 2
 @Afterschoolsports:
You dont know what your talking about
  • 2 2
 $265 is fine for pedals your living in 2013, #Ebikes have set the precedent and PCP is coming. Win Win
  • 1 0
 gotta love the mtb industry. Slap any price on it and people will convince themselves that they need it and clearly the product is superior bc it is more expensive.
  • 85 0
 Cons- Too thick, heavy, overpriced and guaranteed a ton of pedal strikes.

Pro’s- Can’t find one.
  • 6 0
 Perfect
  • 11 0
 Pros: If you have my flavor of OCD and love to spend time using a toothpick to dig little bits of mud out of machining grooves, you're in luck.
  • 2 0
 @number44: toothbrush works the best
  • 7 0
 @whitebullit: dental floss FTW
  • 1 0
 You forgot the foot cramps.
  • 2 0
 @whitebullit: That's like doing your climbs on an e-bike. Far too fast and easy. I like my suffering to be protracted.
  • 2 0
 @housem8d: pins that can sheer off..no thanks.
  • 2 0
 You forgot the pins that'll make hamburger of your legs.
  • 8 0
 Yup. Crazy weird review. Not sure what Beer was smoking when he tested these...This pedal literally looks like something Shimano put out 8 years ago.....Thick and a small platform. The exact opposite of what everyone else is doing.....And "Lightweight" in the strengths? At 420g? Lol....
  • 29 0
 “ The edge of the platform runs tight to the cranks to alleviate the feeling of your foot falling off towards the inside.”

Is that a thing?

Would love to want a set of these. “Support local” and all that, but then I look at the Deftraps I currently have and can’t find a single reason I’d want the actual product
  • 8 0
 My flat pedals also have platforms close to the cranks, and the only noticeable effect is greatly enhanced heel rub on the cranks. Might be my bagged-out Freeriders from 2014 causing that issue, though.
  • 5 0
 My thoughts exactly. I’ve never felt like I’m “rolling off to the inside” but with long feet I do have to watch out for heel rub. I saw how close the platform was to the crank and it was instant deal breaker for me.
  • 29 0
 So they can survive Scottish winters, but can they survive the pb comments?
  • 27 0
 Stop trying to make $265 flat pedals happen.
  • 23 1
 I watched Ali Clarkson's You Tube video on how they are made and respect the hell out of the tech needed to produce them, but man, they simply missed the ball from a design perspective right from the very start.
  • 6 1
 you say that but the tech has been around in industry for many years and its the exact same as most other manufacturers use only difference is the automation the fact that they can make them lights out un manned etc should mean it saves on the production costs cheaper power during the night no guy being payed to stand there machine minding i genuinely can't fathom why they are so expensive nothing they are doing is groundbreaking in terms of pedals
  • 3 0
 @pedaladdictioncollective: The one thing that actually stood out for me, was the use of needle bearings instead of bushings. Proper bearings makes a huge difference instead of just going the cheapest way and selling it high priced because of the colour....
  • 8 0
 @Phipu: Using needle bearings doesn’t cost all that much more than the Igus bushings most pedals use, couple of £ maximum.

Needle bearings do mean a thicker pedal though and the chance the bearing will eat your axle if it’s contaminated (the needle rollers are a lot harder than the axle or an Igus bush)

Bushes get a bad name often due to poor implementation - Hope pedals last years and use a bush and I imagine quality items like Pembree will too but decent tolerances and seals are a must and pedals like the vault and the HT made stuff don’t do well there.
  • 5 0
 @Phipu: bike marketing has you thinking bearings are waaaay more expensive than they are.
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: Agree completely. Roller bearings are used for high speed/lower friction loss, not static capacity.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: @RonSauce: i know that they don't cost so much more to justify the price. All I am saying, is that often brands take the cheapest possible way and sell it high priced only because of colour and brand name. This often includes bad bushings, wrong material combination of bushings and pedal/axle, bad tolerances etc. I see it my self every day how ignorant some companies are regarding tolerances. The recommended tolerances for bushings and bearings are there for a reason, but many companies just ignore them or accept that their part is out of tolerance because they want to reach the market asap instead of finding a proper solution.
I still get the impression that they were taking it pretty serious and tried to make the product as good as they can get it before the launch instead of just making something...
  • 5 0
 @Phipu: its literally a block of aluminum with a stick through it. There isn't any crazy r&d, or a team of genius minds working around the clock to solve a problem. Its literally a bike pedal, dont let marketing cloud your judgment.

Talk with your wallet, unless you are actually buying these i dont see why you're defending the price. I say its a way overpriced item and back it up by not buying it. Put your money where your mouth is.
  • 3 0
 @Phipu: I think you over estimate the amount of brands actually specifying aspects such as axle or body material type and tolerances.

Most high end pedals are made by either HT or Scada - they make the axles and spec tolerances - look on Scadas site, they have the off the shelf axle designs available.

If you want something that may last longer then go for a smaller brand like Pembree, Burgtec, NS Billet or Yoshimura.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: i don't say it's any sort of crazy r&d, it's all pretty basic stuff. But there are many companies who already f*ck up on things they can straight copy out of the catalogue of e.g. a bearing or bushing manufacturer.
And no, i won't put 260£ pedals on my 8 year old 2000£ bike...
  • 1 0
 @Phipu: Bearings and bushes are not f*cked up by the brands - problems often arise in that as I say they all use the same handful of manufacturers.

Poor sealing helps to kill bushes and the manufacturer itself often fails to hit the quite tight tolerances required for an igus bush to operate correctly and with longevity - An IGUS bush needs a 2 micron tolerance on the bore housing it and a 3 micron tolerance on the shaft - pretty tight if you are manufacturing in the huge numbers these overseas companies will be at the price they are offering them for.

As I will say again, if you want a pedal that will last a long time, go for a smaller domestic product - NS Billet, Pembree, 5Dev, Yoshimura.
  • 3 0
 @Phipu: but why wouldn't you put them on your bike? If its a quality product the longevity should pay for itself. How expensive should a bike be to warrant these pedals?

They obviously didn't do crazy r&d, they would have realized its too fat, platform is too small, people's feet don't fall off the inside of pedals, ti axles break, they arent light...
  • 22 2
 £200 & 420g with a ti axle. Nothing redeeming about those pedals at all.
  • 16 0
 So they're heavier, thicker, and more expensive than the competition, don't perform noticeably better, and can't be serviced with normal tools without having to grind the tools down? Yeah hard pass from me.
  • 2 0
 You can buy short allens, but grining one is free. Both are cheap solutions to service your two hundred and many more dollars pedals.
  • 2 1
 @RonSauce: Nobody who spends $265 on pedals should HAVE to do that, is my point.
  • 1 0
 @rbeach: Exactly. My $100 Tenet Occult pedals came with the required "proprietary" 8mm socket. That being said, hope pedals don't come with the required thin 8mm socket either....
  • 1 0
 @rbeach: L shaped allens have a long side for these specific circumstances. Rotate tool 90 degrees... no special tools needed. A t handle allen will have zero issue. There are also driver/socket attachments that are about 4 inches long that would work fine. A 1/4 hex drive ratchet will even fit inside the pedal body if you want to keep it difficult.
In my garage I only have one 8mm tool that won't get these apart, ironically a pedal wrench. If this is that big of a roadblock to you, you might be out of your depth mechanically.
  • 19 1
 If its not Scottish, its crap
  • 25 0
 It's pounced 'shite'.
  • 14 4
 "It's shite bein' Scottish!"
  • 15 0
 @VelkePivo: we don’t tolerate that level of Ewan McGregor around here
  • 7 1
 @VelkePivo: Its shite being crap
  • 1 2
 @mashrv1: I keep hoping Scotland gets its referendum and leaves the UK to join the EU. No more "colonized by wankers". Also, wouldn't it be "We don't tolerate that level of Irving Welsh around here"?
  • 2 1
 @soaklord: no because everyone thinks of the movie scene. Also, we’re not colonised by anyone, we signed up for the treaty of union after nearly bankrupting ourselves by being idiots. Entry to the EU is also very far from guaranteed, especially in the short term. That all said, I problem would vote “yes” to another referendum, but not because of any issue with England as a whole
  • 10 0
 Opening section of review reads like PR copy straight from the manufacturer. If it is, it should be noted as such. If it isn't, I would expect much more objective language from a reviewer. I get cheering for the little guys, but this is a really poorly done piece. Fanboying them isn't doing them or the readers any favors.
  • 11 2
 Love the look and construction/features, but baby got back. Some pedals are like pizza slices, and these are like a 3 layer cake. I guess if you're running 160-165 arms that's okay. Comparing the PINND and Dagga to Hustle Labs' Remtech would be a fun comparison. Remtechs do as advertised.
  • 7 0
 Maybe I missed it but pedal height is not mentioned at all? Red flag for me
  • 2 0
 That's the triple stuffed pizza pedal.
  • 12 0
 A very brave entry in a very crowded space. Too many much nicer options at half the price.
  • 11 0
 When will pinkbike start to review reasonably priced (less than 70usd/€) pedals?
  • 2 0
 Soon just reading a review will cost more than that Big Grin
  • 12 0
 1998 called and wants their pedals back.
  • 10 0
 They aint Scottish prices, the soles of my slippers have been glued back on 3 times now,
what does that tell yah : )
  • 33 0
 You need better glue
  • 4 3
 Are both of yer shoes the same brand?
  • 7 0
 @SacAssassin: "You need better glue"
You telling me scots pine tree sap is crap ?
  • 9 0
 Slip and a miss at that price point for no real benefit over several much cheaper options.
  • 11 1
 Finally! Some more flat pedal options!
  • 8 0
 Saw they were from Scotland and knew they would be overpriced and underwhelming. I was not wrong.
  • 5 0
 I kind of feel like with a price tag like that, they should stand quite out a bit more. I still run a pair of Twenty6 pedals (www.pinkbike.com/news/twenty6-predator-pedal-tested-2011.html) that retailed for about the same amount, and they are lighter and have a lot more work done to them in terms of shaving weight and contouring a flat, low profile pedal. I want to like these because they seem like cool guys and their facility is super nice, but I'd probably rather burn through 2 pairs of OneUp alloy pedals before I took the plunge on these.
  • 5 0
 Yeah medical, aerospace, motorsport industries, as well as the oil and gas sector experience is nice, but are these food grade aluminium?
  • 2 0
 A measurement is never given for the height of these pedals and my first thought was 'too tall." It's only the second version they've produced so third time might be a charm. If you want to know more, check out Ali Clarkson's video tour of their workshop. www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlDWM-3CV8g
  • 3 0
 18.25mm at the "thinnest" part of the body (that's very much a relative term here), from memory - they're 22-something at the thickest. I was curious too and eventually found the thickness on a Singletrack review.
  • 7 0
 Thiccc
  • 2 0
 I consider my pedals service items just like my rims. They're gonna get used a lot, they're under a ton of stress, they're super vulnerable to damage and wear, and its quite an engineering puzzle getting them right. Any (what I hope would be) no-questions-asked warranty on something I see as disposable is a huge plus.
  • 2 0
 In 2007 I was given a pair of wellgo pedals by my boss at the time. I swapped all the pins for longer ones immediately, and have run them on every single MTB I've owned since. They're a bit tall, and the platform is quite small, but that's ok for me. I've never done any maintenance on them; literally nothing. The bushings are a bit worn now so they have some play, but I can't tell when riding them. I'm sure there are plenty equivalent options nowadays for well under half the price of these...why pay more for something that's going to be smashed off the ground repeatedly throughout its life? Oh and machining from extrusion might be boring, but it's a far more efficient way to make pedals.
  • 5 0
 Comment section delivering the goods as usual
  • 5 0
 Now with added Outside feature tax
  • 5 0
 Finally. Some flat pedals. Groundbreaking
  • 2 2
 ...flat pedals and carbon wheelsets. Pretty much the last things I want to know about in the MTB universe.
  • 1 0
 @jason475: I'll take pedals over stems.
  • 1 0
 Since when is 420g for a pedal considered light? I guess strong light, cheap pick one eh..
I watched Ali Clarksons vid/factory visit an Man!! How much tech an desighn does something as simple as a pedal need ???
P.S Straitlines are my fave!, simple strong an serviceable in 5mins
  • 1 0
 They honestly look like they came straight out of the 1990s with that platform height. How much and couldn't deliver on the seal as promised and a platform height that is a throw back to the 90's who is actually that mental....
  • 1 0
 No one has mentioned the Syntace number9 two. Definitely should have been the pedal to compare to, 10 year warranty lighter weight, three sizes and no messing around with the price £295 back in 2015. (Don’t think they’ve gone up since)
These things don’t seem to bring anything new to market.
  • 1 0
 there's a lot of machining time in all of these very expensive pedals.... which makes them look super cool, but maybe doesn't add so much in the way of "performace".

Pedals with some pins and a reasonable shape should work very well. I'd love to start a company making super generic looking, functional parts hahahaha
  • 5 0
 265 usd ?? Wowza….
  • 3 1
 Love the look but after riding skinny / narrow flats that rip (and cheaper but not cheap) I dont see why this fatass / thick profile is needed (?)
  • 1 0
 Deftraps!!!
  • 1 1
 Quality of engineering and construction are obviously top notch, they just need to make the platform larger and a little thinner.

Pinnd - get a 'MK2' pedal on the go, take a look at market leaders and bring shape in-line with those, maybe add a steel axle option- People pay for top notch parts nowdays with many flats being in the £150-£200 area that are made overseas to much lower specification.
  • 4 1
 1/4” drive sockets have much thinner walls and may not require customizing to fit.
  • 2 0
 Good tip
  • 5 0
 @DHhack That is good tip, but I tried a 1/4" drive from multiple sources and also searched for thinner OD sockets without any luck.
  • 1 0
 @mattbeer: that’s a bummer. I just received my @ridetenet Occult pedals today and they included the specialty thin wall socket (as well as a set of grub screws and pedal pins). Hopefully PINND make a running change to also include a socket.
  • 4 0
 $265 usd for pedals wtf Eek that’s like $320 Canadian lol
  • 3 4
 $320 isnt that bad. The Canadians I've chatted with say everything around BC is 420.
  • 5 2
 There's nothing better than the Chromag Dagga pedal. If you disagree you obviously have never tried them.
  • 2 0
 Preach brother
  • 3 0
 Middle pins are great. Someone please replicate the @konaworld original Wah Wah- best pedals ever as far as I’m concerned.
  • 3 1
 Definitely better then the jack sht pedals
  • 1 0
 If are beating it to rocks, "roots", benches, people's face, need those 5 years guarantee and a lighter wallet? Sure, Ali Clarkson might get the right use of these.

I'm sticking with my enlee.
  • 4 1
 At that price I'm going straight for DMR Vault MagSL, does everything better, half the weight.
  • 2 0
 the DMR bushings last about 3 months tops in my experience.
  • 1 0
 @er043: I find the same. I really like the pedals, but I don't want to have to service them every few months...
  • 3 0
 Too many vowels to be commercially viable. Waiting for the premium model to come from their luxury brand PNND.
  • 2 0
 Pretty sure one of the bikestores in my area have still some Syncros Meathooks on the dusty top shelf in the warehouse.. same stuff for fraction of the price.
  • 1 1
 I’m only going to say this once, 2 years in with the Tmacs and I haven’t serviced them yet, still spin like the day I bought them, and they are beat up.
But congrats to these guys, I’ve seen the Ali Clark vid on YouTube and I would try these based on how they machine stuff out, awesome tour it was
  • 3 3
 They are only expensive if you can’t justify the expense.
They are made in Scotland, probably in small batches and at $265 I doubt that there is much profit when all is said and done.
I work for a company that makes pedals domestically here in the United States. Even with an almost $200 price tag we have trouble keeping up with demand.
It’s a very high quality pedal that we are proud of and we all make a living wage making it.
  • 1 1
 I didn’t know anyone made a pedal in the USA anymore?
  • 1 0
 @tomhoward379: Aaah yea, good shout - Sea Devils being a bit shy.
  • 2 0
 The only thing imeediately north of Edinburgh is the firth of forth, unless you mean Fife. Are these made by the rats of inchcolme Island?
  • 2 0
 Top loading pins despite the ability to have most of them as bottom loading? I'm out. all pedals should have pins that can be removed easily if they get snapped
  • 4 0
 Chicago deep dish
  • 2 0
 What ? no rainbow puke offered as an option . Missed their target market by only offering black and silver.
  • 2 0
 How was the “Pinned” name not already co-opted for a flat pedal. Great name, but the product itself seems lacking.
  • 1 0
 But are they as nice as the Giant Pinner Pro?

I would install a Yeti on my Giant Pinner Pros... but I'm not sure if these are nice enough to install a Yeti on them.
  • 2 0
 Now if the dropped the "i" then I might buy some Pnnd CS2 MTB PDLS, But with the "i" it is a no go for me.
  • 3 0
 5-year warranty -great, will the company exist in five years?
  • 2 0
 Yes, they just won’t be selling new ones.
  • 3 0
 Think I'll stick with my Nukeproof Neutron EVO's for 90% less
  • 2 0
 Pedals that look shit, sounds like they ride shit and cost a shit load of money. Sign me up
  • 4 4
 Always thought titanium to be weaker. The dmr vaults ti axle has an 85kg rider limit. Wonder how these can have no weight limit?
  • 2 2
 Designed for a chunkier ti axle out the gate vs a steel one primarily and the ti is a weight weenie option.
  • 2 0
 I trad an article way back that suggested Ti is actually bad material for pedal axles. Something to do with constant high weight flex the axle under, apparently chro mo steel handles that better especially when case hardened?
I have seen (back in the day) a Ti pedal axle snap an slash a riders calf so bad he had to air ambulanced due to blood loss!!
  • 1 2
 @naptime: that's not the ti, that's just bad luck, I've snapped steel axles on every pedal I've tried, some of them would have been nasty if it had hit my leg
  • 2 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: the article suggested otherwise
  • 6 4
 Race Face Chesters....still the all around best bang for the buck.
  • 2 0
 How are those Next cranks not broken?!?
  • 1 1
 Usually a big fan of in-house manufactured products, but that ground down socket pic is definitely enough of a con for me not to buy regardless of the price.
  • 1 1
 As @DHhack pointed out in another comment, a 1/4" drive socket might fit. But even if so, not everyone can be expected to know that.
  • 2 1
 You can also use a t-handle or the long side of the L. Just because one person did it the hard way doesn't mean you have to.
  • 1 1
 @RonSauce: a T handle socket? The long side of the L....of a socket? I'm confused
  • 1 0
 @Tambo: allens, hex wrenches.
A regular allen key is shaped like an "L" there is a short side and a long side. There is a hole on the end of the pedal, you dont need to work inside the pedal platform, you can use a long hex, like a t-handle (shaped like a "T"). There are also sockets made that have a long hex on them for uses like this.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: I guess you're assuming that you can push the axle into the pedal body to reveal the 8mm nut, once the cap has been removed? If so, I don't think that'll be possible with these due to the fancy seals, and you'll still need a slim 8mm to get the nut off and remove the axle. Actually, I don't know what you're assuming. The issue isn't getting the cap off (Allen/hex key), the issue is getting the nut (8mm hex socket) off the axle which is inside the pedal body.
  • 1 0
 @Tambo: my mistake, I thought the picture of the socket was the part that was removed, and I really didn't look into it much more than that.
  • 1 0
 tenet occult, $99,lifetime crash replacement program and come with a socket so no grinding Smile
  • 2 0
 Yep, they're pedals.
  • 2 0
 420 g, nice.
  • 1 0
 Live got so much better since i switched to ht x2 s.
  • 2 0
 The 90's called.....
  • 2 1
 Cons: You will have been conned if you buy these...
  • 1 2
 Strong ti spindle, expensive but cool. Super high quality bearings, awesome. Shape a lot like a gen 1 Shimano DX pedal, yes please!!! Top loading pins-you lost me.
  • 1 0
 I will have boomslangs for half the price thank you.
  • 2 0
 Actually 68% of the price (in USD anyway)... but I think even for the same price, I would prefer the thinner boomslangs
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: bought boomslangs for £80 on sale in UK.
  • 1 0
 @ekho: nice! Are they as good as people say?
  • 2 0
 @AndrewHornor: Boomslangs very nice for 6 months but axles aren't hard enough to cope with the needle bearing at the outer end and once its pitted you can't get new axles.
  • 1 0
 @jpnbrider: These make Yoshimuras look attractive! Moooooo!
  • 1 0
 thicc pedals
  • 2 2
 For that price I hope these pedals have a BMX background…
  • 2 3
 Hope F20
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