Review: 3 Unique Carbon Handlebars Built for Comfort from We Are One, OneUp, & Title

Jun 5, 2023 at 16:43
by Matt Beer  
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In this test are just three of the many unique handlebars on the market, but each one has its own spin on the tuned carbon layers; We Are One Composites’ Da Package bar and stem combo, the Title Form 35 Carbon, and OneUp Components’ aptly named Carbon Bar.

There’s more to be gained from riding carbon bars than just saving a few grams and flashing up your bike. Although not all carbon bars are made equally, they can be engineered in such ways to allow for a lot or little flex.

Vibration absorption too is a huge selling point. Compared to alloy bars, which tend to all feel similar, carbon tends to damp the feedback much differently than the ring of aluminum. That’s not true for every carbon bar out there though. It shouldn’t be confused with flex either. Alloy bars can flex plenty yet still without taking the sting out of your hands.

Each bar was used on the same bike, with the same wheels at one point or another, and was cut to a 765 or 770mm width.




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We Are One Composites Da Bar (and Da Package)


Aside from the influx of one-piece carbon bar and stem combinations, there aren’t too many proprietary handlebars out there these days. Da Bar from We Are One Composites’ is one of the few that puts an interesting spin on a 35mm diameter clamping surface.

Together, their carbon bar and 7075 alloy stem make up Da Package. Da Stem can be used with any standard 35mm handlebar (provided it can slip through the two-bolt design) because Da Bar is actually 33mm in diameter. In order to fill the gap, an aluminum sleeve wraps around the carbon bar to alleviate clamping forces. Due to the concept of the aluminum sleeve, Da Stem is the only compatible mate for this handlebar.


• Made in Canada
• 35mm clamp diameter* (w/ proprietary sleeve)
• 20, 27.5, 35mm rise x 800mm width
• 8° backsweep 5° upsweep
• Weight: 252g (35mm at 770mm)
• Colors: raw finish
• MSRP: $260 USD / $325 CAD
weareonecomposites.com

Throughout testing other carbon handlebars on the market, the team at We Are One Composites found competitors' products to have a large number of inconsistencies in the clamping surfaces, compaction, and layering. That led to the two critical design philosophies: uniformly placed carbon layers that flex equally at either end of the bar, and an aluminum sleeve sandwiched under the stem to distribute forces that bite down on the carbon tube.

bigquotesWe have a unique layup process that gives us two clear advantages. Firstly, we are able to precisely place each and every layer of carbon on the bar without any chance of wrinkles or fiber drift when transferring to or within the mold during cure. We are also able to create a laminate in which the left and right sides are perfectly symmetrical to each other. This may sound like a no-brainer but is difficult to achieve using typical layup methods found in the industry. We have tested our handlebars to within 2% left/right stiffness variation, while some competitors are at over 12%.We Are One Composites

This bar flies under the radar with zero logos, paint, or etchings. What makes Da Bar stand out further is the raw carbon finish. Like their carbon rims, the finished product comes straight out of the oven without any filler to hide blemishes.

Hand-laid and tested in their Kamloops factory, Da Bar exceeded their in-house EFBE testing by 25% over the required forces for gravity riding. Although there’s no direct mount stem option, that makes it "downhill rated". As with all We Are One Composites products, Da Bar is covered by a lifetime warranty for the original owner.

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Specifications

Da Package isn’t short on setup options, though. Da Bars come in 20, 27.5, or 35m rises, are 800mm wide and can be cut down to 740mm. There is either a 35 or 45mm stem length choice, however a matte black anodized finish to match the stealth bar is the sole option.

When looking down at the bends in the Da Bar, they appear to be slightly abnormal but are given a common 5° up and 8° back-sweep. There are no gradients marked on the stem or bar, so a tick from a felt marker is a subtle way to keep track of your preferred rotation.

As for the torque specs, the stem to bar should be tightened to 4.5 and 6.5Nm at the steer tube via the titanium torx bolts. Handlebar control clamps are advised to be torqued to the manufacturer's specifications.

Price and Weight

As far as pricing goes, We Are One only sells Da Package as a combo which costs $260 USD / $325 CAD.

The bar we tested was cut to 770mm and weighed 252g while the 35mm-length stem was 80g, making it slightly heavier than the claimed 332g number of the uncut combo.

Ride Impressions

While some riding peers claim that they can’t feel a difference between handlebars, I have no doubt that even an intermediate rider could distinguish Da Bar from an ultra-stiff handlebar in a back-to-back test. Da Bar is one of the softest handlebars I’ve tried to date.

There’s no denying that Da Bar is comfortable on relentless descents and chattery trails. Vertical compliance is ample. This can take the sting off g-outs and harsh hits that can overwhelm short-travel bikes. However, on a few different enduro bikes, and even an eMTB, the amount of movement stood out considerably.

Da Bar does stand out as one of the more compliant components on those style of bikes. I’m not saying there’s anything wrong with that, but I’d prefer to trade off some comfort for control on anything more than a traditional trail bike.

In terms of angles, I got on well with the 8 and 5-degree bends across the variety of bikes Da Package was tested on. For bikes with head tube angles steeper than 65 degrees, I might be looking for a stem length longer than 45mm to slow down the steering inputs. At the moment, there's only a 35 or 45mm-length stem choice when it comes to Da Package.

The only performance woe that I experienced was some rotation from the ODI Lock-On grips. In order to prevent this, I needed to tighten down the single-bolt clamp to the point where I thought it might strip (5Nm).




Pros

+ Softer flex is ultra comfortable, especially on short travel bikes.
+ Aluminum sleeve reduces stress around stem clamping surface.
+ Exposed carbon finish leaves no room to hide manufacturing errors.
+ In-house testing exceeded EFBE Category 5 Gravity-rating.


Cons

- Flex may be too soft for larger riders or those who prefer a full 800mm wide bar.
- Lock-on grips may need to be torqued higher than expected.
- Proprietary clamping surface is clever but comes at a higher price point (Da Stem required).




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OneUp Components Carbon Handlebar


When carbon bars first became mainstream items for downhill and enduro bikes about a decade ago, all they preached about was stiffness. OneUp wasn’t afraid to tout that the first selling point for their aptly-named “Carbon Handlebar” was to provide comfort brought on by the patented oval shapes.

It’s also clear that OneUp believes in the strength of their design since it passed the stringent EFBE TRI-Test. The 35mm diameter Carbon Handlebar also features a rotational gradient which is said to relate directly to the head angle. Instead of basic reference guidelines, head angles of 62 and 66 degrees are listed.


• Patented oval shape
• 20 or 35mm rise x 800mm width
• 8° backsweep 5° upsweep
• Weight: 233g (35mm rise at 765mm width)
• Colors: raw finish
• MSRP: $159.50 USD / $199.50 CAD
oneupcomponents.com


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Specifications

The Carbon Handlebar comes in two rises; 20 or 35mm and just one basic black finish, but sticker kits are available for customization. Uncut, the bar measures 800mm wide with 5 degrees of upsweep and 8 for backsweep.

Singular clamp grips must be installed with the collar on the inboard side. No, you can’t use your old bar ends from the 90’s with this bar. There’s also a maximum stem clamp width of 65mm and a minimum trim width of 740mm.

The listed torque specs are 6Nm for the stem face plate clamping force and 5Nm for handlebar controls. It’s worth noting that their stem requires the upper face plate bolts to be torqued first, then the bottom set.

Price and Weight

A standout number surrounding the OneUp Carbon Bar is the price tag. $159.50 USD makes it one of, if not, the most affordable carbon bars on the market. That’s backed by a one-year warranty against manufacturing defects.

On our scale, the 35mm rise Carbon Handlebar weighed 233g after being trimmed to 765mm. That’s a touch heavier than the claimed 225g measured at full length.

Ride Impressions

Before diving into the characteristics of this bar, let it be known that this handlebar has been through the wringer. It has served as my go-to when a test bike arrives with stock equipment that I don’t get along with. That means it has been subjected to frequently adjusted bar controls, brake bleeds, plus plenty of off-trail excursions and the usual shuttle damage.

With that said, the finish is showing its age after more than a season of abuse. The gradient markings are starting to peel in places. I found that changing the roll depended on the size of the test bike and my preferred stack height, so this feature wasn’t crucial for my setup preferences.

Like the We Are One Da Bar though, I did notice the need to clamp most grip collars tighter than expected. The grip clamp torque did fall within the given range of 4Nm though.

Overall, the OneUp Carbon Handlebar remains one of my favorites due to the angles and soft, but not overly flexy feel. There’s a certain way that this bar seems to swallow up vibrations that are otherwise passed along by alloy handlebars.




Pros

+ Flex and feedback is on the comfortable side without feeling vague.
+ Good price for a carbon handlebar.
+ EFBE TRI-Tested.

Cons

- Finish can peel over time.
- Rotational gradient should be taken lightly.
- Clamping surface is not compatible with all direct mount stems.




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Title Form 35 Carbon


Title MTB’s Form Carbon 35 bar is the company’s take on composite components and is molded into a unique box-shaped cross section near the bends. The unidirectional carbon fiber layup is contrary to the orientation of other oval-shaped handlebar patents and weighs a scant 196g.

Despite this shape Title MTB states that their Form 35 Carbon is engineered to retain stiffness in the steering plane, but remain vertically compliant - Title claims that the Form 35 bar is one the softest on the market. The Form 35 Carbon was also TRI-Tested by EFBE and given a Category 5 rating, making it more than suitable for downhill riding.

• Weight: 25, 35mm rise (194, 196g)
• 35mm clamp diameter
• 87mm clamp width (Compatible with DM1)
• 9° backsweep 5° upsweep
• Colors: matte black finish
• MSRP: $213.00 USD / $279.95 CAD
titlemtb.com

They’ve also included fine finishing touches like indexed cutting guidelines for trimming down the width, centering and rotation gradients, as well as a grippy stem clamping area.


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Specifications

The Form Carbon 35 bar comes in 25 or 35mm rise options with a stock width of 800mm and a matte black finish. It also houses a massive clamping surface area of 87mm that’s wide enough for Title’s direct mount DH stem.

In terms of angles, the Form Carbon 35 is a touch more relaxed with a 5-degree upsweep and 9 back.

The specified stem clamping force is listed at 6Nm but there are no specifics listed for the bar clamp controls. Thankfully, we never experienced any grip slippage or concerns for needing high clamping torques on the Form Carbon 35.

Price and Weight

The Form Carbon 35 bar is incredibly light at under 200g. When cut down to 770mm, our 35mm rise ample weighed 190g. The 25mm rise is claimed to be a hair lighter as well (2g less at full length).

Cheap, light, strong - pick two, right? That’s a common crossroads customers face and the Form Carbon 35 lives up to that pickle because it’s the most expensive of the three (taking into consideration pairing the bar with the stem from their respective brand).

Ride Impressions

For such a lightweight handlebar with a wild looking shape, there’s nothing perplexing about the ride quality. The Form Carbon 35 is neither too stiff or overly soft. It has a Goldilocks feel for aggressive riding and didn’t fatigue my hands or arms over the course of long days either.

Typically, I prefer an 8-degree backsweep bar cut to 770mm when using a 35mm length stem for bikes with head angles around 63-64 degrees. The 9-degree backsweep of the Form put my hands in a comfortable position, slightly further back towards the steering axis. That seemed to slow the steering and take some pressure off of the front wheel compared to the 8-degree options when installed on the same bike. Moving to a 40mm stem could be worth exploring if that bothers you.




Pros

+ Lightest of the three by a solid margin.
+ Wide clamping surface makes it compatible with DH stems.
+ EFBE TRI-Tested.


Cons

- 9-degree backsweep might not suit riders who prefer short 35mm-length stems
- A raw finish would be appealing to view the construction




How do they compare?

Can you notice the difference in the round, oval, and box-shaped cross sections? A blind test would be an interesting one, but if I had to take a stab at the vertical flex in each one (on a scale of 1-10, softest to stiffest) I’d give the We Are One Da Bar a 4. OneUp’s Carbon Bar would be around a 6 and Title MTB’s Form Carbon 35 would be close by at a 7. For reference to another popular bar not in the test, Deity’s Skywire Carbon 25mm rise, I’d give that a 9 as it’s one of the stiffest bars I’ve ridden.

When it comes time to choose one of these, you’ll probably think about cost first. We Are One’s proprietary Da Bar requires its own stem, driving up the total cost and may sway you if your current component is still shiny.

Secondly, I’d consider which type of bike you’ll be installing it on, how aggressively you ride, and how much you weigh. If you’re riding a short travel bike and want to maximize comfort, the softer bars could suffice. Keep in mind, the narrower you cut them, the less flex they will inherently have too.

Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
299 articles

179 Comments
  • 236 28
 Buy a 31.8mm bar. Problem solved.
  • 12 11
 This need more upvotes.
  • 34 21
 Not really, its not about just making a softer bar. These bars are engineered so that they have flex vertically while they are stiffer laterally for steering. Whether they are for you is up to you to decide, but there is a big difference between bars like these and a standard 31.8 bar.
  • 20 21
 @sino428: That’s some well made kool aid. Don’t forget the weight savings from increasing surface area and reducing wall thicccness.
  • 9 0
 Switched to a 31.8 alloy bar and stem this year. Really enjoying it. Honestly can't tell much of a difference between it and the OneUp bar I was using last season... and that's probably a good thing!
  • 8 2
 Just a datapoint, but I have a 31.8 Nukeproof Horizon V1 bar and I find it to be slightly stiffer than the OneUp. Better than alloy though. And any Carbon bar is better for cold weather (fat biking).
  • 4 6
 @GBeeston: Have you tried any of these bars? I have and can tell you that they are much different than any standard 31.8 bars. Whether you see any benefits to the differences is up to you, but they are much different.
  • 18 1
 Spank Spike Vibrocore 31.8 FTW! Available in 50mm rise too.
  • 21 1
 Be heavy and slow. problem solved.
  • 7 0
 Yep, my 31.8 Fatbars are many years in, taken some hits, and I have 0 concerns about them.
  • 9 0
 @BigHerm: I have VibroCore on my bike, 40mm rise. Great handlebar
  • 3 0
 Thank you!
  • 3 0
 Enve M9 is a good 50mm rise carbon option if anyone is looking. It only comes in 31.8mm diameter. I can't tell much difference comfort wise from my 35mm rise OneUp. I have not tried Vibrocore but am curious as it also comes in 75mm rise. The only carbon bar I've found too harsh was 35mm diameter Renthals. Might as well run alloy.
  • 1 0
 I did, and Renthal makes the Apex stem in 31.8mm.
  • 18 3
 There's a special place in hell for RaceFace, for pushing the 35mm standard so hard.
  • 4 0
 @jdejace: I LOVE my Enve M9 50mm rise bars.

I went from rediculously harsh/bad RaceFace 35mm bars and it was night and day. Admittedly those early race face next r 35 bars were super bad and not nearly as nice as these 35mm carbon bars listed here.
  • 4 0
 @ratedgg13: @jdejace: RaceFace Six6 would like to have a chat about being the stiffest damn bar on the market
  • 12 2
 @sino428: If you need your bars to be "stiffer laterally for steering", then it's probably time to service your headset bearings...
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: they came on my last bike. I used them twice and got rid of them. Worst handlebar I've ever used, bar none (pun intended).
  • 2 0
 +1 for Spank Vibrocore. It's the real deal.
  • 3 0
 @sino428: bars see a huge multiple of force from impact and braking vs. steering. Literally, you'll slip the stem on the steerer before you achieve perceptible handlebar flex in that plane while steering. While most riders can absolutely feel differences in vertical compliance, I am highly HIGHLY skeptical of any rider, even at a privateer pro level, that claims to be able to tell the difference in steering precision between a 31.8mm and a 35mm carbon bar, let alone two 35mm bars. The downside of a 31.8mm bar is between 20-50g, which is more than made up for by the smaller stem. 35mm is a pretty dumb standard, albeit placebo effect is real and if you feel faster and more confident, you will be faster and more confident even if it is all in your head.
  • 3 1
 @ohio: my comments would be specific to bars like these where they are engineered to have alot of vertical compliance (which is def noticeable). I didnt mean to suggest that bars like the OneUp (which are the ones ive tried) are much stiffer in terms of steering than other bars, just that the flex on the steering plane is kept stiff while while they flex alot vertically.
  • 23 0
 @sino428: Even the flexiest 31.8 or even 25.4 handlebars are exceedingly stiff compared to the torsional stiffness of everything else between the bar and the tyre's contact patch (stem/steerer/fork/wheel/tyre), in other words, the idea that the bar needs to be compliant in one direction (along the fork's axis, where loads on the bar are very high and the rider is strong) but stiff in the other direction (the steering plane, where loads on the bar are very low and the rider is weak) is really just a marketing concept and not a real world issue - nobody had problems with steering-plane stiffness even back in the old old days of 25.4mm. 35mm was introduced to make wider bars stiffer & lighter, then people decided they actually didn't want stiffer bars after all, so now we're seeing handlebar manufacturers trying complicated things to avoid using a smaller bar diameter that might be seen as "old tech".

Currently betting that someone will introduce a smaller bar diameter standard (I think 30mm or 33mm is pretty likely) within the next 2 years so that it's easy to make compliant and is still marketable as a "new technology".
  • 4 5
 @VorsprungSuspension: smaller than 31.8 would be good for women and kids too, smaller hands.

Would also let you run thicker grips for extra cushion.

I officially endorse skinny bars
  • 4 1
 ran 31.8 for ages and preached it, changed to oneup system and its been the best thing ever for my hands. i also broke so many alloy bars. havnt broken a single oneup
  • 6 0
 @wburnes: clamp diameter varies, grip diameter does not.
  • 1 2
 @jdejace: *skinny grip area bars
  • 1 0
 @jdejace: I assumed that they can't go much skinnier with grips because it would weaken the metal at the clamp, but I guess you could CNC or 3d print?
  • 1 0
 @VorsprungSuspension: have you ridden a set of Oneup bars? If they flexed and much along the steering plane as they do vertically it would be an issue.
  • 4 0
 @sino428: You're wrong, that's everyone's point. If they flexed as much along the steering plane as they do vertically then you still wouldn't notice because other aspects of the steering system, like torsional flex of the fork, are the controlling aspects of steering compliance, not the handlebar, not even a "flexy" one.
  • 1 2
 @robw515: I’m not wrong. I ride the bars, i would not want that much flex on the steering plane. It would be noticeable.
  • 2 0
 @BigHerm: reasonable price and weight too. The stem is really nice as well with 6mm allen bolts
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: Pretty sure it was Easton who started this and it trickled down from the dirt bike world where it didn't take off
  • 2 0
 @sino428: I get what you're saying man, and I actually think most people are in agreement with you if one clarifies that you are talking about amount (as in the number of millimeters) of absolute flex in each direction under normal usage, whereas they are talking about the amount of flex under an equivalent load. Bars are loaded far more in a roughly vertical (impact or braking) direction than in a horizontal (steering direction), so they will inherently flex less when steering because the loads are lower. You are correct that an equivalent amount of absolute flex in the steering direction as in the vertical direction could be problematic...as long as everyone is on the same page that you would only have the same flex in both directions if the bar was engineered in such a way that it has LESS stiffness in the steering direction. In other words, since the steering loads are lower, one would need to have less absolute stiffness in that direction to arrive at the same amount of deflection in all directions under normal usage. I hope that helps further clarify things, and if there are people out to further critique your point, I hope they specify if they are talking about flex under equivalent loading conditions or unequal loading conditions (which are what we encounter in the real world), rather than just belligerently telling you you are wrong.
  • 2 0
 @thekaiser: yes exactly, thanks for explaining it that way. Basically the one up bars flex up and down, you can feel it and even see it when pulling up hard on the bars. If they were flexing enough to move that much under steering load it would not be a good thing.
  • 1 0
 I am blown away by this comment. Just went to one of the bars listed in this article from a 31.8. Night and day, I cannot believe how much better it feels. It was a substantial upgrade. Maybe the 31.8 mm bar that came on my bike wasn't good enough, but the we are one bar has made me feel so much better on the bike and given a lot of relief to my wrists and shoulders.
  • 16 1
 I would add that if you're in the market for both a stem and bar, Da Package is competitively priced with other high-end bar/stem combos. I do appreciate these types of reviews given all the options nowadays
  • 14 0
 I bought the OneUp bar about a year ago since I was getting a lot of arm pump and hand numbness on my aluminum bar. I wanted to go with a 31.8 bar but wasn't having good luck finding what I wanted. My first ride on the OneUp bar was a full day of riding and I was surprised how much better my hands and arms felt after a full day on the bike. I was barely experiencing any pump at all by the end of the day and had minimal numbness. I was using the same grips and had my fork actually set up a little stiffer for the conditions I was riding that day. I don't notice the compliance, but the results of it are pretty obvious.
  • 1 0
 I have oneup bars as well. i find the vertical compliance most noticeable on hard climbs when pulling hard on the bars. I can really feel them moving up and down. Outside of that it feels pretty natural and i don't notice it much.
  • 6 1
 Can I make some other suggestions, that wont cost a dime to alleviate arm pump, etc. bring your levers up, and bring the levers as close to the bar as you can. Those two changes can make immediate changes, and result in more control, less fatigue, and can put you in amore advantageous position for better brake control. Most of my athletes have the made the change as well, and have similar results. Not everyone experiences arm pump and fatigue, but those that do, man does it suck
  • 7 0
 @onawalk: Interesting how different setups work for people. I started with a setup like your suggestion, then actually went back the other way and it feels better for me. I have my brake levers almost as far from the bar as they can be and I feel I have more control of them. I have pretty big hands, maybe that is the difference? Bottom line, take the time to experiment with different setups because it can make a huge difference in fatigue and comfort.
  • 2 0
 @onawalk: I already have my levers pretty far up, like 20* off of level, I’ve got pretty large hands and I set my lever distance to where they fall naturally under my first knuckle with my finger relaxed. The compliant bar made all the difference I needed.
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: that only works when. The brakes are hair triggers. Such a sucky feeling pulling to lever to the grip and not having what you were looking for
  • 2 0
 @jpat22: Thats fair,
We are all different, and need/prefer different things, so theres rarely a one size fits all solution.
There is some good logic to the set-up tips I use, and theyre generally well accepted.

I find a lot of people are fairly resistant at first, as it feels unnatural, or foreign to them, it takes some getting used to for sure.
I coach about 40 different riders, and work with another several coaches, all but one have made it a permanent change. If I was even close to as fast as that guy, I'd be happy, hes a freak with bike skills.
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: stoked for you to find something that works
  • 1 0
 @sam2222: not at all,
My codes feel fairly standard compared to others, it just takes some time to get used to.
Theres some good logic to the idea, but it definitely takes some adjustment, and getting used to.

Shoot me a message, and I'll give you some more detail, and reasoning if youre at all interested.
  • 1 0
 @sam2222: if you're brakes pull all the way to the bar at the reach that is comfortable for you they likely need a bleed and or new pads.

If neither of those work, I recommend some Formula Curas which are pretty inexpensive and will change your life.
  • 1 0
 @jpat22: you might feel more 'control' but you're giving up huge amounts of power.
And it's a skill you can learn to modulate that power. You'll never make your fingertips that much stronger.
  • 1 0
 Stay with 31.8 and buy Spank Vibrocore, than if you still lack comfort, swap to RevGrips.
  • 1 0
 @BarryWalstead: definitely possible but I don’t have any problems locking up ever at the moment. Right now I need to focus on braking less
  • 2 0
 @jpat22: less braking or less time spent braking?
I find we all need to brake MORE! for less time, hence why I prioritize power output.
  • 2 0
 @jpat22: just turn that idea around a bit,
If you can use less force to pull the brakes for a similar output, then it’s less fatiguing. It also provides more control over the output you do have, meaning you can vary the force required more, so that you can be at the optimal brake force, more of the time.
It’s not necessarily about intimate power, it’s about using that power (force) more effectively, and more consistently
  • 17 2
 35mm handlebars with all the comfort of a 31.8mm. Gotta love the bike industry
  • 13 1
 Really wish manufacturers would start making higher rise bars. In my extremely informed and perfect opinion, everyone is running far too low front ends for the type of steep stuff most folks ride. And as reaches are growing longer, frame stacks are getting lower allowing shorter people to ride longer bikes but totally screwing over taller folks. I was skeptical but am running 3” risers now and couldn’t be more comfortable. I think most people would do well trying out 50mm rise bars at minimum assuming they aren’t almost too smalll for their frame size
  • 2 0
 Why make riser bars when you can just make more stem options?
  • 1 0
 It definitely shortens up the bikes original reach. I have 80 mm diety bars and it's a huge difference than the 25mm stock bars. I have not felt it a hindrance on climbs yet. And it looks way cleaner than a whole bunch of stem spacers
  • 4 0
 Preach! Add to the problem of bike companies cutting steerer tubes super short for looks.
  • 1 0
 @sam2222: riser bars dont shorten reach, stem spacers do. Riser bars just increase stack. Longer steer tubes shorten reach.

35mm high risers will be the new standard soon.
  • 1 0
 I got myself some Mone Lights bars on my Honzo ESD, "moto style" with 2.5" rise and 12° backsweep, and find them pretty cool. I'm nowhere near enough of a good rider to have a good opinion but I can feel the flex when I swich back from a bike with alloy bars, but forget about it when I'm riding, so it's good to me.
  • 2 0
 @RonSauce: Depending on Roll and sweep, yes they do.
i argued with some clown at the bike shop, we measured several setups and when roll and sweep are brung into it, they damn sure do shorten the reach
  • 1 0
 The taller the bar, the more you can roll it to fine-tune reach before moving out of your sweet spot for sweep.
  • 2 0
 @HeatedRotor: and you could mount the bars backwards and increase reach even more. Why would your roll and sweep change drastically? You could pick some off the wall bar with weird numbers to prove an extreme point, but really a 15mm rise bar from "Brand-A" and a 45 mm rise bar with the same backsweep is not going to shorten your reach. A longer steer tube will 100% all the time make reach shorter.
  • 2 0
 @wburnes: right? Why is all the rise in the bar? Why not make riser stems? Seems obvious to me.
  • 1 0
 @BarryWalstead: FWIW there are a few stems with varying degrees of rise. My bike has a low cut steerer and too low stack for an xl. I wound up with the Funn equalizer - 10 mm rise and the stack height was 6mm shorter than the stock stem giving me even more adjustment. I’m able to keep my 35mm rise bars and still play with height.

From my in no way comprehensive research lowest rise -> highest: DMR defy, Anvil swage v2, Renthal apex, I9 a35, Funn equalizer, Canfield. Of those the DMR (27mm) and Funn (34mm) have the shortest stack height. The rest are pretty standard 38-40mm.
  • 14 0
 All of my problems with bar stiffness/wrist pain mostly went away when I bought bars with 12degrees of back sweep.
  • 3 0
 Yet most manufacturers only offer 8 or 9, maybe 10.

Did you buy an sq lab bar? I like em, but wish they had higher ride options and a full 800mm width.
  • 3 0
 +1 for sqlab. ANSWER 20/20 is also a wild option.
  • 3 1
 @handsomedan: That's because we're all basically the same don't you know. Same with virtually all saddles. Except for SQ Lab. How many years of begging did it take before Specialized started making the S6 size or Santa Cruz making decent XXLs? In the last two years was it?
  • 4 0
 @handsomedan: Try ergotec - not light, but up to 70mm rise with 12deg backsweep. Cheap too Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @handsomedan: I have the SQlab bars on my hardtail and Syntace bars on my full suspension. I'm a big fan of both, but I, too, would like the option to run higher rise.
  • 1 0
 @handsomedan: You might also try Hunter Smooth Bars (75mm rise, 15 deg back sweep)... I also have some 16 deg SQ bars with 45mm rise... wish they had a higher rise but I love the back sweep. Will order some Hunter bars at some point...
  • 1 0
 @handsomedan: pretty sure protaper does a 800mm version with 12° of back sweep
  • 1 0
 Just found SQ lab 12d and loving the improved comfort!
  • 8 0
 If they want to be special why are they all basically the same width, rises and upsweep/backsweep?
Why isn't there some kind of objective rating for flex so that a 110lb versus 220lb rider can get a sense of what to expect (even when factoring for variation due to cutting)?
  • 4 0
 It would be nice to see more variation / options for back and up sweep. Human anatomy is highly variable. Lots of wrists require up to 15 degrees of backsweep to stay neutral. If your wrist isn’t neutral you are probably dealing with wrist pain.
  • 4 0
 @handsomedan: sqlab and salsa do interesting back sweep options (I currently use 12 on my enduro and 16 degree on my xc bike). Newmen does a big 8 degree up sweep bar, which I'd like to try.
  • 1 0
 Nukeproof Horizon V2s are an interesting take on more sweep but the fore/aft hand position still being in the same place
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: the 11' Salsa bar looks promising for sure especially at 800mm. SQ Lab offers more backsweep and rise options but only at 780mm. Also wow the SQ Lab carbon bars got really expensive.
  • 1 0
 @alexsin: Wow, I hadn't seen their new pricing. Thats disappointing. Luckily, I stick to alu bars anyways.
  • 5 0
 been running the Title Form 35's in 770mm width on my enduro race bike. I struggle with carpal tunnel and wrist issues from my job - I will say these do a nice job dampening and my hands/ wrists don't feel nearly as terrible after a long rough descent
  • 2 5
 If youre interested, reach out, I might have some ideas for you to try to help alleviate the issue, without buying new stuff
  • 6 0
 Ive had all three. Gave the others away, kept the OneUp. Now I have 3. You’ll notice it most when you switch away. First few metres without the OneUp feel like my fork has broken. So much more vibration transmission.
  • 5 1
 There is a grammar error in the pro/ cons section of the We are one Da Package.

"Proprietary clamping surface is clever but >requires? comes at a higher price point (Da Stem required)."
  • 3 0
 As an "old" and bigger guy (~240lbs), I appreciate added comfort in the cockpit, esp if I'm riding for the entire day, whether on trails or at the bike park. Having been on the OneUp for a while on my trail bike, I personally notice a difference in the flex/feel when I switch up to my hardtail that has an alloy bar. Looking ahead, I'm game on trying out the WeAreOne Da Package, esp if it adds more comfort and reduces hand/arm fatigue. I do appreciate the different rises available (I'd go w/ the 35, cuz that's what I have w/ the OneUp currently) from DaPackage, as that was not an option till about 3ys(?) ago.
  • 3 0
 On paper WAO has all the stuff I hate: proprietary, sleeves and expensive - yet its totally on my radar now and would love to try it out. Having nerve damage gets expensive but better to spend than needlessly suffer.

Fwiw here's my generalized experience in 31.8 (least compliant to most): plain ol' aluminum - vibrocore - carbon... with Ti feeling somewhat relatable to carbon regarding compliance but less absorbing of vibration. Obviously, each mfgr bar is different beyond materials so not a hard n fast rule.
  • 4 2
 The weight / supposed vibration-dampening of carbon bars has never outweighed my fear of getting a core sampled by my bars due to a manufacturing defect / overtightened clamp / random fluke. I have a bent set of aluminum bars as wall decor reminding me of that fear.
  • 5 1
 I've broken aluminum bars in half, bent a couple sets too.
  • 3 1
 Dude in the first 5 sec was on an alloy Renthal.

youtu.be/Px7B0FPsvY0

Everything breaks. Well, maybe not steel.
  • 2 8
flag wburnes (Jun 9, 2023 at 10:30) (Below Threshold)
 @jdejace: everything breaks, but carbon breaks most often
  • 4 2
 @wburnes: are you sure? Or is this the same old wives tale as carbon wheels?
  • 1 12
flag wburnes (Jun 9, 2023 at 11:22) (Below Threshold)
 @jdejace: Carbon wheels break more often than alloy ones too. Carbon just generally doesnt belong on mountainbikes. No real performance benefit despite the high cost, environmental impact, and reduced durability.
  • 6 1
 @wburnes: I do not break carbon wheels more often than alloy wheels. I'm not the only one. You do you.
  • 1 4
 @jdejace: which rims specifically? I've never seen a broken DT Swiss FR rim
  • 6 1
 @wburnes: I’ve broken far more aluminum frames than I’ve broken carbon frames.
  • 3 1
 @wburnes: typical DT M/XM and E/EX series wheels that come on most bikes. Walked home many times due to dents big enough to lose all the sealant. No walking home in two years on We Are One wheels. I have not tried the 600g FR. What carbon rims have left you stranded?
  • 3 3
 @jdejace: None, I've never broken a rim or tire. I own 3 alloy wheelsets and one carbon wheelset. The alloy wheelset on my DH bike gets the most use and abuse, Spank 350 Vibrocore, mullet, Berd Spokes, Onyx Vesper Hubs, 76projects valves, I run Cushcore on every wheelset.

Main problem with carbon is its tendency to spontaneous and catastrophic failure. Metal will bend or begin to crack, carbon will just shatter, usually with zero warning, when it's ready to die
  • 2 0
 No, carbon cannot be bent back into shape. From a practical standpoint though many riders aren't riding hard enough to hurt carbon wheels, but hard enough to suffer alloy related mechanicals. Carbon is a good practical choice for that demographic. Some people will kill anything, we all know this. They are left with compromises to choose.

I think catastrophic failure risk in carbon wheels is overstated. Every recent failure I've heard of has been a loud noise and a crack in the rim that continued to hold air. Yoann Barelli rode a cracked I9/WAO for months and he's doing worse things to bikes than me. Don't go Enduro racing on XC wheels to tempt fate but I think this idea that riders are falling on their face regularly due to carbon wheel failure is fantasy.
  • 3 1
 @wburnes: thats weird, im yet to break a carbon frame but have broken alot of alloys...............
  • 1 4
 @jdejace: Alloy related mechanicals? Never heard of such a thing. Someone who isn't riding hard enough to break carbon wheels definitely won't break alloy wheels.

WAO would tell you that riding on a visibly damaged carbon rim is very unsafe so I don't think Barelli doing something stupid is a valid point. If Barelli was on an FR560, FR 541, he wouldn't have broken a rim in the first place.
  • 1 1
 @HeatedRotor: Not really. Depends on how you ride, who made it, luck. It is weird that you've had fewer failures with a less durable material though
  • 2 2
 @wburnes: My alloys havnt broken because of crashes, just general riding, Lots and lots of cracked welds and downtubes you can see the bends in because of the load.

Ive been on Canyons carbon spectral and torque, zero issues.

w/o crashes, carbon is more durable. I've had a few crashes on the canyons and theyve been all good aswell.

My son went through 3 alloy frames this year between feb and end of april. Headtube seperated on like a 5 foot drop, modern alloy bikes are just not up to fluff.
  • 2 2
 @HeatedRotor: I find that difficult to believe tbh. Which alloy frames specifically have been cracking? There are plenty that never have these issues, like Nicolai
  • 3 0
 @wburnes: nicolai etc are exception to this as they are very good at what they do.
Commencal, TR, Trek & rocky - 90% of the bikes mentioned we've had to get refunds for as they kept failing.

My friend Snapped a headtube on an SX not long ago in a small feature and now in a legal battle with commencal as he was put in hospital for several weeks.
  • 1 0
 @HeatedRotor: Yeah I've heard about Commencal having some problems with the Supreme by the shock mount. Currently ride a Suprem and a Bird AM9. Sucks about your friend. Is he going to recover 100%?

I want to try a custom steel or Ti bike for my next build, probably similar to what Aston MTB has, but with an ebike motor/gearbox combo unit instead of a Pinion or dérailleur.
  • 2 1
 @wburnes: was in a coma for 5 days, but is on track to make a full recovery, we had cracks on our headtube on our SX, had a chainstay snap, also had weld cracking at shock mount on the meta TR.
  • 1 0
 @wburnes: I don't think that's true. If it was, it wouldnt be used in all the critical applications it is currently.
  • 1 0
 @wburnes: I gotta know how the Spank Vibrocore w/ Berd spokes run?? Contemplating that exact same build for my DH wheelset.

I have vibrocores with steel spokes on one bike, and berd spokes on carbon rims on another bike.

Would love to hear your thoughts on how those spokes feel with the Vibrocore rims!
  • 3 0
 I’ve been running Da Package on 2 bikes and it’s great. Super bomber, nice vertical compliance, did. Feels plenty stiff to me riding blacks and double blacks, steeps, jumps, loose chunk, the works.
  • 4 1
 would like to see someone toss together a deflection rig to generate some meaningful(ish) data for comparison. wouldn't even have to be that elaborate (ie, stem in vice, hang a weight on bar end, measure deflection).
  • 3 0
 Somebody please do this. It's ridiculous to rely on the anecdotal evidence of the guy at the shop for this information. Some teenage at the shop telling me how this stiff carbon bar changed his riding. Yeah stiff for you when you're 115lbs soaking wet.
  • 1 0
 @jdejace: yes! just like that. objective data is good. and i do like the compliant oneups (as a not heavy rider).
  • 1 0
 An old steerer tube/ DH fork crowns could add another interesting layer to this, see how much (if any perceivable) difference stems make too or if its pretty much all bars

PS I meant to upvote you but accidentally clicked downvote
  • 2 0
 I started looking for a more comfy bar 3 years ago, starting off with a fasst flexx bar/in which the flex was almost too much, then i went to a one up bar in which i found no percieved flex, i recently swapped back to the fasst flexx bar bit this time using the hardest elastomers, im digging these bars with the hard elastomers at my current weight 220lbs/ recently went to sedona to ride bikes at the festival, i was honestly surprised at how much i was missing the fasst flexx bars/ for those interested fasst flexx now offers a more affordable aluminum version, they also offer a bar with more traditiona bar geometry as well as a bar with more sweep/ not trying do hate on the one up bar, i think its a great bar, i just think the fasst flexx is where it’s at for combatting hand/wrist fatigue/ note: i will still experience fatigue with the FF bar but it will come muuuuch later than with other bars
  • 1 0
 I think it's a cool product, wish they'd make a higher rise option than 25mm.
  • 1 0
 @jdejace: just get a taller stem
  • 1 0
 @wburnes: I have +10mm on a 40mm stem. Other than kooky stuff like the Raised Reverse Stem there isn't much rise in typical 40-50mm MTB stems. You can't get nearly as much rise out of a stem as you can a set of bars. I run 50mm rise bars. I would want even taller if my bike didn't have a relatively tall stack height.
  • 1 0
 @wburnes: single crown. I've looked at the Yoshi but prefer not to use 35mm bars. It is a decent option with the OneUp. Like I said, not much out there.
  • 1 0
 @jdejace: would a 31.8 to 35 adapter work?
  • 1 0
 @wburnes: yeah that would work. I'm not too excited about using an aftermarket handlebar shim (dropper shim I don't care) but it would likely be fine. So a $200 stem + $325 dollar bars + $10 shim, hurts a little but it's viable. Might be a tight fit too Fasst lists the center section at 63mm and Yoshi's clamp width is 63mm.
  • 2 0
 The We Are One stem was made in collaboration with 77designz aka Kavenz. It’s the lightest stem out there for 35mm bars and I saved like 60 grams. Be careful on installation as it’s easy to scrape up your bars trying to force them into the one piece clamp. Ask my OneUp bars how I know.
  • 1 0
 It used to be. They parted ways a year or two ago. This current one is WAO. I own the original combo from when WAO started making the bars for 77, and I think the 77 stem looks better. This new one is a copy of the 77, but much more plain looking.
  • 2 0
 I know this is a silly concern to have but for components like bars and cranks, I don't know if I would want them to be carbon. Alloy has the same material properties everywhere and it is easy to see when it has started to fail, while carbon bars may have flaws in their layup even though it is extremely unlikely that can't be detected until the bars snap. Even if only 1 in 10,000 bars are faulty, that is a 1 in 10,000 chance of potentially having a component that could cause a lethal crash.
  • 1 0
 Oh cranks is for sure always a hell no, there's never a reason for carbon cranks. I've watched one just shear right off from a rock strike that I'm dead sure would have lived if it was aluminum
  • 9 8
 "Compared to alloy bars, which tend to all feel similar, carbon tends to damp the feedback much differently than the ring of aluminum."

A) no, alloy bars do not all feel the same. Renthal makes bars that feel much nicer/different than other options, more damped in particular.

B) yet you all continue the myth that (almost) all carbon wheels are way pingier than any alloy rim
  • 3 5
 I think we can all agree that alu bars, can feel very similar, mostly cause their made by the same manufacturer just with a different label on them.
So our collective experience with them, is essentially all on the same bar. and those bars tend to be of a entry level variety.

Carbon wheels do feel pingier (in my experience) this might be due to higher spoke tension than what alu wheels are typically.

My WAO's arent comfortable, its not a way I would describe them. But, solid, stiff (not overly) precise, these are things I would use to describe them. My I9' alloy enduros, very non-descript in every way

Different materials can feel different, when manufactured in differnt ways, maybe you didnt know that....
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: What waos you got? Still trying to decide if I want to try Revolutions, couldn't decide if hearing they were stiffer than Unions was a good or bad thing yet
  • 1 0
 @TeaPunk: Unions, on Hadley hubs, J bend, DT Swiss spokes, 32 hole
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: Welp I pulled the trigger, about to find out how the Convergence Triads are
  • 2 0
 @TeaPunk: Hope you love em,
I've grown to love my Unions, and miss them everytime I ride something different.
Recently rode a buddies bike with DT Swiss wheels, made me pine for the precise feel of my Unions.

Thinking of swapping out the I9's on my small bike
  • 4 0
 I run both OneUp and these bars. The WR1 bars give me noticeably more comfort on long rides.
  • 3 0
 Good review. I do think it's worth noting that WR1 is made in NA, which for some people is worth money. I'm biased, I own them.
  • 5 0
 "Work less, ride more"


How am i supposed to afford your expensive shit?
  • 3 2
 Call me a sceptic but folk need to get a ‘grip’
All this vibration damping is primarily taken care of by tyres, grips & forks.
Either soften your tyre, get squishier grips or mess with your forks before buying into this nonsense.
The primary purpouse of handlebars is steering and positioning.
Use your components wisely, they’re not cheap.
  • 3 0
 Okay I will call you a skeptic. I believe people when they tell me their steel frame feels more comfortable and transmits less harshness to their body than an aluminum frame. If it works for frames why not the bars? Its easy to find people here talking about how stiff and harsh one bar feels and how another gave them relief, I don't think they're all drinking kool-aid, I believe em. Different materials have different energy absorbing/transmitting properties, it's not so wild to consider. And everything adjustable on your bike is a compromise, you can only go so soft on tires and suspension before you're giving up other characteristics that you desire, tires and suspension can only do so much. You might not want to sacrifice how they perform just to deal with vibration. And that's why we have material engineering
  • 1 0
 @TeaPunk: yeah fair point, I too believe folks if they think they feel benefits from upgrades etc.
I often wonder why there’s not really any high end steel bars? Heavy yes but folks like coil springs & steel frames plus steel bars would be good for custom bending.
It just seems an expensive way to dampen vibration.
I speak as a 50 something old fart who works with hand & cordless tools so non tingling post-ride hands is something i’ve striven for over the decades and unsurprisingly front tyre pressure is number one factor.
Softer casings, lower pressures, bigger volume are what will make way more difference than bar material.
Grips are another area for improvement. I’ve often fancied experimenting modifying my bars to fit custom made air/foam grip inserts. I feel a sunday shed project coming on….
  • 2 0
 @Kebabroll: Heh I'm about to personally find out for myself the truth. I just had an incident of my hand going numb and sharp on the outside grip point for days after I ride and I realized that I can't ride anymore until I figure out whats going on (still using an aluminum bar). So nothing like a painful motivation to spur you to drop money on something in hopes of relief, I'll be testing the WAO bar soon
  • 1 0
 @TeaPunk: good luck with the solution, I find a good bit of backsweep helps, I was running stooge bars with 17 degrees backsweep for years and they were good, moved on to alutech 70mm rise with 12 degrees as I wanted a bit more height up front.
All this takes me back to my original point that bars are for getting your hands in the right place. No fancy expensive materials will work very well if yer paws are not well positioned. Thats what i reckon anyway.
Sooo many options, hope something works out
  • 1 0
 I had some 35mm easton Havoc carbon bars and this vertical compliance drove me nuts, because its not just vibrations where you notice, but also when you are handling the bike. Every time id pull up to lift the front end it felt horrible, my hands would move like an inch on a hard pull. Running the oldschool alu fatbars in 31.8 now and they feel MUCH better. The only place id be genuinely interested in this type of thing would be on a rigid XC bike or a flatbar gravel bike.
  • 1 0
 Just for information purposes I've got the we are one setup. You can get a different color stem if you go to the guy they did the collaboration with on the bar stem combo, I just didn't want basic black on his website he's got all kinds of colors. 77designz is the place
  • 3 2
 Interesting review. I keep considering carbon, but a past experience with a handlebar that broke on a highspeed gravity trail and resulted in broken bones and surgery still keeps me from trying them.
  • 4 0
 Laterally stiff yet vertically compliant! Say it with me!
  • 3 1
 Snapped my OneUp bars with a minor amount of leverage in a crash. Was very disconcerting. Now I'm on WR1's - would agree that they are even more comfortable.
  • 5 1
 Paying over $200 for a bar is insane Eek
  • 4 2
 I like reading about heavier riders chasing fork setup issues with wallowing and it turns out they run a flexy OneUp bar.
  • 5 4
 I bet the tester would never be able to tell which bar is which in a blind test. Unless you actually measure deflection under load this is just a silly exercise.
  • 3 1
 As the owner of a one-up bar, I can feel the flex just pushing down on them in the parking lot. It's not that subtle.
  • 2 1
 @sdurant12: Agreed, you notice it immediately. maybe the difference between these three might not be noticeable since they are similar, but compared to regular bars you'd be able to pick out the Oneup instantly.
  • 1 0
 @sdurant12: compared to what? This test does not rate it as the "flexiest" (whatever that means). One person rating bars on a 1-10 scale is meaningless, and a blind test, if oyu could devise it, would just go so far ... you need to MEASURE WITH AN INSTRUMENT, otherwise is just fluff good for web site chats.
  • 1 0
 @dododuzzi: I see. When you said "unless you measure deflection under load..." I thought you were saying that the flex wouldn't even be measurable and that carbon bars flexing was total BS. Now I understand that you're saying they should actually measure flex, and that unless they do comparing the bars is useless.

I'd argue that both are necessary. You need both ride experience and measurements, ideally with measurements coming after ride experience. If you found one bar to be most comfortable and then found that it was 'mid pack' in flex, then you could probably attribute that to the placebo effect. If you found one bar to be most comfortable and then find it's the most flexible, then you could argue that flex actually makes a difference (but, again, maybe it was placebo and you got lucky). Just knowing the relative flex on its own (without subjective reviews) isn't useful cause maybe even the softest bar is too stiff for it to matter.
  • 2 0
 Are there any 50mm ride bars that have similar compliance to the OneUp bar?
  • 2 0
 Has anybody tried one of these and the spank vibrocore bars? Curious about how different they feel
  • 4 0
 I have the Oneup bars now and have ridden vibrocore in the past. They are two completely different ways of trying to solve the same problem. Bars like the Oneup are using flex in certain areas to make them less harsh, while the spank bars are still pretty stiff overall but use a foam inside to reduce vibration.

Honestly I like both and both achieve the goal to an extent but they feel pretty different. I think i might pick each one over the other depending on the bike/type of riding i am doing.
  • 2 0
 @sino428: Thanks, this is exactly what I was looking for. I was thinking of trying vibrocore on my DH bike (which is setup quite stiff, both frame/fork flex and suspension settings) and a softer Oneup for my Trail/Enduro bike (which has noticeably more flex in the frame and single crown fork).

I've just been toughing it out and getting my hands hardened up the first few bikepark days every year, but as someone who takes ~6 months off of biking to ski every winter I am getting sick of "breaking in" my hands every bike season
  • 2 0
 @IsaacWislon82: just keep in mind the improvements will marginal. Neither option is going to eliminate arm pump and and suddenly make a DH feel like a gravel path. That’s just he nature of the beast. But they do seem to help.
  • 1 0
 This is perfect timing as these are 3 of the 4 bars I have been considering buying to replace my stock RF bars, the only one missing is the Trail One bars
  • 2 4
 One Up stuff has always been great value and pretty good quality. However, a stem that requires removing grips/controls becuase you can remove a faceplate is a no go. I am sure some folks who count grams or XC types would disagree, but I tinker and swap bikes too much.
  • 2 0
 I think you mean ‘We Are One’. OneUp can be used with any 35mm stem. I run a 40mm Race Face Affect R 35.
  • 1 1
 @cwatt: good catch. Oops. Both companies high on my list though. Just not a fan of stems without removable face plates
  • 1 0
 @bman33: It’s a very good point nonetheless. I didn’t consider it when I purchased my OneUp bars (I didn’t like the multiple pieces of the We Are One system), but I’ve flown a few times with my bike which require the bars to be removed from the stem and I can’t imagine needing to remove the controls in the process.
  • 5 0
 @cwatt: just remove at the stem instead. I prefer it that way, don't have to worry about setting bar angle.
  • 1 0
 @jdejace: I have the OneUp EDC headset which requires the special tool for removal. Moreover, I don’t have a second stem (or 3D printed spacer) to reinstall in its place.
  • 1 0
 @cwatt: obviously do whatever you prefer but the OneUp multitool has a tool for the top cap and extra stem spacers will cost you ~$5.
  • 1 0
 Hey the One Up stem and bar combo only weights about 860 grams less then my stem and handlebar setup.
  • 1 0
 OneUp: "There’s also a maximum stem clamp width of 65mm and a minimum trim width of 740mm." ?
  • 1 0
 I got my Nukeproof Horizon carbon bars on sale for $61 and they're excellent
  • 1 0
 it's an open mold, like burgtec, sixpack and other brand using it. no development, no r&d cost at all.
you can go to the specific vendor and buy of the shelf
imagine 60bu ks and they still making profit out of it
  • 1 0
 @s7ngletrail79: catalog parts can be fit for purpose - maybe even excellent, why not?
  • 1 0
 Who's csrbon bar ever broke, name brand and time of usage. Jackson Goldstone, you're first....
  • 2 2
 Look, I love WR1 as much as the next guy and I even own their wheels, but their stem is just plain ugly.
  • 1 3
 Probably because they don’t make the stem. It’s made by a German company 77designz
  • 1 0
 @Keegansamonster It used to be. They parted ways a year or two ago. This new one is WAO.
I own the original 'package' from when WAO started making the bars for 77, and I think the 77 stem looks better. This new one is a copy of the 77, and much more plain looking.
  • 1 0
 I love my oneUp bars, but I wish they made them without less up sweep.
  • 1 0
 But which one is da best?
  • 1 0
 My favorite bar serves cold beer!
  • 1 0
 Made me picture either a pullable tap handle bolted to the front of someones stem, or a handle bar tab where the beer pours out of one or both ends





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