2017 Fall/Winter Gear Guide - Gear Essentials

Nov 21, 2017 at 22:01
by Colin Meagher  



Clothing for riding in the dark months is one thing, but there's a lot of little things that can make riding mo' better when you gotta have your fix but the weather outside is frightful. Listed below are a few things to cover you head to toe and beyond. Things that Nikki and Colin consider essentials for the fine and pleasant misery of wintertime mountain biking.

Colin Meagher and Nikki Hollatz enjoying the views from Mt Cartier Revelstoke BC.
About the testers: Colin Meagher and Nikki Hollatz reside in Hood River, Oregon along with Nikki's two kids, a dog, and a grumpy cat named Roux. Colin is a professional photographer who spent over a decade shooting World Cup racing and events and has traveled the globe with his camera and bike. Nikki works a normal desk job and races her bike as often as she can find the time. They both have a deep appreciation for tequila and divey breakfast joints.


Justin Fernandes with all the essentials.
Justin Fernandes with all the essentials. Kistbow Trials Jacket and Madison DTE Waterproof Short, Showers Pass Waterproof socks, Giro Pivot 2.0 gloves, Giro Ambient Cap, Kitsbow LS power wool base layer.



Shower's Pass

Winter gear essentials

Crosspoint Waterproof Socks ($35 USD)

Can't or won't do waterproof shoes? Overboots like Giro's Proofs aren't an option either? Well, that limits one to a waterproof sock. Exactly what Showers Pass offers in a variety of flavors. The Crosspoint Crew sock doesn't offer the bling of a Sockguy sock but Sockguy doesn't make waterproof socks. The socks are dipped in waterproofing on a 3D form to eliminate seams and have a breathability rating of 4500 WTVR. If I did my math right (and math is NOT my strong suit) that translates to a 72k breathability rating. The socks are lined with a COOLMAX FX antimicrobial lining, too, coz no one likes stinky feet. Bottom line, this is a sock that wears and breathes like a normal sock but is waterproof. - C



Giro

Winter gear essentials

Pivot 2.0 Glove ($80 USD)

Go ahead, give mother nature the middle finger... Nikki loves windproof gloves. I love waterproof gloves. But we both love Giro's Pivot 2.0 glove. Yes, it's expensive but it's waterproof, windproof, and due to the revolutionary Outdry membrane, it's lightweight and offers more dexterity than gloves with a similar temperature rating (40F-50F--but I was comfortable using this glove in sleeting conditions just above freezing). The glove is insulated with an AGrid antimicrobial thermal fleece, a low bulk efficient insulating material. The palm uses Ax Suede Echo (Whisky Tango Foxtrot?) for grip and durability. The back of the glove uses a DWR coating to further ensure that your hand stays warm and dry. - C



Giro

Winter gear essentials
Winter gear essentials

Ambient Winter Cap ($25 USD)

Skull caps are completely underrated. You can be absolutely freezing cold and pull a skull cap from a pocket (they're that small) and within minutes be almost too warm. They allow for one to go with a much lighter mid layer, helping to eliminate the Michelin man feel that layering for winter can bring on. Nearly every apparel manufacturer has a skull cap of some kind but I prefer Giro's Ambient skull cap due to its brim. That simple brim eliminates the reservoir tip of a condom feel that some skull caps give me, allowing for a modest amount of style on what is essentially as unsexy a piece of functional wardrobe as you can find. - C



Kitsbow

Kitsbow Trials Jacket with wrist vents and a helmet compatible hood. Oh and it s waterproof and insanely breathable.

Men's Trials Jacket ($395 USD)

Softshell feel, hardshell performance. Impossible? Tell that to the designers at Kitsbow. These guys obsess over fabrics. And their Trials Jacket with wrist vents and a helmet compatible hood is the shit. Pardon my french. It's waterproof thanks to Polartec's Neoshell fabric: windproof, waterproof and insanely breathable. There are wrist vents, a roll top hood, a Napoleon pocket, adjustable cuffs and waist, and looks absolutely baller. I wore this in miserable conditions with a base layer, and a mid layer, banking on how a typical waterproof/breathable shell will help keep you warm as your sweat vapor gets trapped against the outer shell. Um... failure on my part. Neoshell has a much lower threshold for vapor transmission. I was forced to don a skull cap or freeze because it breathed so well. At the same time, it remained waterproof. Win-win. Yes, it's ungodly expensive; but damn. This thing works. - C

Kits bow s Power Wool base layer 3 snap henley style merinco wool stylish as hell and flat stitched to keep chafing and irritation at bay.

Power Wool Baselayer ($115 USD)

Kitsbow is well known for quality cycling apparel, and the Power Wool base layer is a stylish home run (although it comes at no small price). It features a 3-snap henley style collar, merino wool/polyester blend for durability and odor control, and is flat stitched to keep chaffing and irritation at bay. The blend of fibers is woven so that the wool is next to skin, and the polyester layer is on the outside of the garment where it evaporates off more readily. It's a sweet shirt that's stylish enough to head to the bar with after a ride and not look like a dweeb or knock anyone over with B.O. thanks to the odor control of the Merino fibers. - C



Pinkbike Fall Winter Gear Guide 2017 Syncline Action
Nikki Hollatz with all her key winter riding essentials. 7mesh Women's Revelation Jacket and Glidepath Shorts, Gore Power Trail Windstopper Light Gloves, TLD Speed Knee Sleeves, Endura Merino Baaba L/S Baselayer and Skullcap, and Mavic Crossmax SL Pro Thermo Shoes.



7mesh

7 Mesh Women s Revelation shell with snap on hood and micro fleece at the chin for comfort.

Women's Revelation Jacket ($450 USD)

A good jacket is a must-have. Sure, Colin and I just did reviews on a number of good choices but If you want "the" jacket, and money is no object, then this is the ultimate outwear cycling jacket. The Revelation is built to withstand the toughest conditions on the road or trail, making this your own personal absolute weather shield. This may at first glance look like a simple yet expensive shell, but 7mesh sweated all the details: it has all the bells and whistles you think you never wanted but it weighs in at a feather-weight 289 grams (10.5 oz). Check out Vernon's recent review of the men's version for all the technical details. - N



7mesh

Winter gear essentials

Women's Glidepath Short ($140 USD)

“The perfect all-round over short for mountain biking: light, durable, and comfortable.” Again, 7mesh killed it with these lightweight, super durable shorts. They are the "do it all" short: designed for all styles of riding in just about any conditions, and they feature a DWR coating, easy access front hand pockets and two side zipped pockets. No, they're not waterproof, but they repel water just fine, making them a go-to for all kinds of conditions minus torrential rain. They are so comfortable my dog even loves to sleep on them, hence the wrinkles. - N



Gore


Power Trail Windstopper® Light Gloves ($70 USD)

Gore states: “Maximum freedom of movement for more control, safety, and improved feel on the ride.” This is my lighter weight go to glove for riding in the 40 degree F and above range. It has a good fit, feel, and function. More importantly, this glove keeps my digits warm and dry thanks to the very windproof and breathable Windstopper® fabric Gore has developed. - N



Madison

Madison s DTE Waterproof short so much awesome at such a good price. Details 3 layer fabric in the high wear areas double snaps on the fly and a privacy patch to keep water out and privates well private gripper elastic and waist tab adjusters.

DTE Waterproof Short (£85 BP)

I've used waterproof shorts. And I've used waterproof pants. Generally, I prefer waterproof pants from a performance standpoint. But I like waterproof shorts for a MTB feel. The best compromise between the two that's not priced at the cost of a newborn baby that I've used to date are the DTE Waterproof Shorts by Madison. Madison is dedicated to making quality riding apparel at a reasonable price point. The DTE shorts are a clear home run. They have silicon grip on the inner waistband, waist adjusters to fine-tune the fit, zippered pockets, a slightly long but not knicker length inseam, and scalloped fabric behind the knees to prevent bunching. The body of the short is made from a 2.5 layer waterproof/breathable fabric with 3 layer fabric in the butt, over the knees, and in the crotch. They aren't the lightest waterproof/breathable short available, but they offer great fit and great performance at a fantastic price. I tested these in fairly crappy weather and was warm and dry throughout the entire ride.



Troy Lee Designs

Winter gear essentials

Speed Knee Sleeve ($54 USD)

The TLD Speed Knee D3O equipped knee sleeves are my go-to winter riding knee pad. Easy to slip on and off, toasty warm and easy to pedal in – these are basically knee warmers with a little added protection. When you’re sick of straps and Velcro and knee guards that chafe when you’ve been pedaling in the rain for hours, these are just what you need. - N



Endura

Winter gear essentials
Winter gear essentials

Women's Baaba Merino L/S Baselayer and Baabaa Merino Skullcap (£50 and £1Cool

Merino wool is a great resource: the fibers are so fine that they don't make you itch, they have a natural wicking property so you stay dry next to your skin (a key to staying warm in wet, wintery conditions), and they don't stink up the way some artificial fibers do. This time of year a wool baselayer is an absolute must for keeping me warm and dry. Add in a skull cap, and I'm instantly even warmer. Remember that old mantra about how you lose 80% of your body heat out of your head? A skull cap cuts that down efficiently. It has such low bulk that it fits under your helmet yet will still cover your ears enough to keep icy winds at bay. Too warm? It's so small it stows in a pocket until you need it. - N



Mavic
Winter gear essentials
Winter gear essentials

Crossmax SL Pro Thermo Shoes ($225 USD)

If you're serious about winter riding, a winter shoe is pretty much a must-have. The Mavic Crossmax SL Pro Thermo shoe is a perfect shoe to keep your feet warm and dry on the coldest trails. I’m a die-hard winter shoe fan. Whether I am on the road or trail, once the temps dip below tee shirt weather, I make sure to switch over to Gore-Tex winter shoes. These shoes might be a wee bit pricey, but they have a super comfortable fit, decent grip on the outsole, and an easy to use boa/dial system. More importantly, they're built for withstanding the wear and tear of mother nature at her worst, and should withstand multiple seasons of abuse. Best part? I can just hose my feet off along with my bike after a muddy ride! - N




Oh yeah
Waste not want not.

bigquotesA lot of our riding involves waiting around for sunrise or sunset, and the lightest and most efficient form of happiness on the trail can be found in a flask.Nikki Hollatz



Specialized

Winter gear essentials
Winter gear essentials

Defroster Trail Mountain Bike Shoes ($200 USD)

Cold feet can just kill a ride. A true winter riding shoe can make the difference between a damn fun (if sloppy) ride and pure misery. The Defroster Trail Mountain Bike shoe from the big red S feature a seam-sealed bootie construction, Thinsulate insulation, and a neoprene collar to help keep your feet toasty and dry even in the worst conditions. My initial thoughts were that these would be bulky with that high cuff, but they're refreshingly light and ridiculously easy to pull on and take off. The boa lace system makes a custom fit easy. Overall I was impressed by the warmth and comfort of this shoe. The only negative observations I can offer are that the traction offered by these when hike a biking is not so good; the lugs near the toe are too tightly spaced to allow for penetration into mud and wet snow. Additionally, sizing runs a bit on the large side; my test pair were size 43.5 and I could almost have gone with a 43; typically I wear a 44 in Giro and Shimano. - C



Giro


Proof MTB Shoe Cover ($80 USD)

If dollars are tight, rather than investing in a winter specific shoe, invest in something like a pair of Giro's Proof MTB Shoe Covers. They're a water-and wind-resistant neoprene winter mountain bike shoe cover that's been optimized with flex zones in key areas for pedaling and hike a bike comfort. The Proof comes in 4 sizes and is designed to stretch over your clipless riding shoes while still allowing your ankle to flex and extend while pedaling. They're a great alternative for keeping your feet warm and dry in miserable conditions, although wrestling them on and off of your shoes can get a bit tiresome vs. investing in a true winter shoe. - C



Crocs

Winter gear essentials

Classic Fuzz Lined Clog ($40 USD)

Laugh if you will. But hear me out. Yes, they're clogs. Why? Simple: nothing sucks worse at the trailhead than doing that post ride pogo stick dance as you wrestle off your muddy shoes and try (usually a losing proposition) to NOT step into a mud puddle or into a patch of snow. The solution? A pair of these fleece-lined clogs from Croc. They make trailside footwear swaps a snap. And they're comfortable enough that you'll find yourself wearing them all over the place. Your 8-year-old is going to be jealous as you soon find you won't want to take these bad boys off. They come in a variety of colors and sizes and will keep your feet toasty warm after your winter riding adventures. Socks or no socks, join the cool club and invest in a pair of Crocs for year-round comfort and joy. Bonus: they work awesome at the ski hill, too. - N



Mainstays

Winter gear essentials

Rubber Bath Mat ($12 USD)

Won't be caught dead in a pair of Crocs? This is a cheap investment that'll keep your socks clean and dry (although not as warm as a pair of Crocs) when changing at the local trailhead. It's not rocket science: pull the mat out and flop it on the ground so you've got something clean and dry to stand on as you swap footwear. It's easy to clean and small enough that it easily stows away under a seat when not in use. - C



DryGuy

2017 Winter Gear Essentials

Force Dry DX ($80 USD)

You ever do a hard, wet day of riding and have so much fun that going again the next day is a done deal only to find that your shoes are still wet when you pull them on again? Or that they stink like a rotting corpse a week later when you're gearing up? You can eliminate that easily with a boot dryer. The DryGuy Force Dry DX is the ultimate boot and glove dryer. It's got time and temperature controls, ensuring dry boots and dry gloves by the time you are ready to hit the trail the next day. I have no idea how I lived for two decades in Seattle without one of these. A bonus is that drying your shoes and gloves promptly helps prevent the growth of bacteria and fungus that can stink up your gear as well as deteriorate it over time. Plus they work just fine for ski and snowboard gear, too. - C



SockGuy


Wool Socks ($14 USD)

Wools socks are an easy essential. Nothing else delivers better warmth for the weight than wool. Plus it will work to keep your lil piggies warm even when they're wet. Want wool? Then check out Sockguy. They have an amazing array of wool socks that come in different weights as well as heights, allowing you to select exactly what you need for the kind of riding that you do. Plus they have some fun message socks. Don't like to be flashy? Go plain jane with some of their designs, too. - C



Giro


Thermal Knee Warmers ($60 USD)

Not everyone rides with knee guards every time they go out. But you need something over your knees when it's cold out--they're so poorly insulated on their own that you're much more prone to get an injury with bare knees at temperatures under 60 F that even a simple knee warmer is better than nothing. And when it's colder out--say below 45F, something like these Thermal knee warmers from Giro are perfect. They combine Giro's super Roubaix fabric with an articulated, 2-panel fit and silicone thigh grippers to keep your knees warm and protected from the elements.



Fox


Attack Water Glove ($45 USD)

I spent over 20 years living and riding in the Seattle area. I learned that nothing will popsicle my fingers while riding more quickly than wet hands. Fox's Attack Water Glove are the answer I never knew I was searching for. They're thin, so they offer great bar sense, yet their ability to sneer at whatever's falling from the sky makes them perfect for riding in the wet. It's a simple, lightweight pull-on design–there is no cuff adjustment–but I even rode a couple hours in sleeting conditions with nothing more than the Attack Water Gloves with a simple handwarmer stuffed in the back of each glove, and my hands stayed fine due to the water shedding capabilities of the glove. And it's touchscreen compatible. - C



Stanley

Winter gear essentials

Assortment of Classic Flasks ($25 USD)

As stated by Stanley: “Retro. Classic. Iconic. Sexy. We don’t care what you call it, all we know is that this sturdy flask has your back and never lets you down -- unless of course, it’s empty. Meet your new best friend." There's just something about a nice dram of whisky (or tequila, or schnapps--you get the idea) on a butt ass cold miserable day. Bring a flask and share it out at the top of the climb and you're instantly everyone's best friend. This array of varying flasks from Stanley are perfect for the job. Stainless Steel, easily opened, wide-mouthed for easy re-filling, and available in a variety of colors.



EVOC


Hip Pack Race 3I ($65 USD)

Winter rides can be awesome but they're typically shorter. And you're typically bundled up a bit. Adding a full blown pack to that mix gives me flashbacks to that little kid getting dressed in 10 layers of clothing for the chilly wait at the school bus all over again. Not to mention that during really cold rides the hose can freeze solid, making it impossible to get a sip. Solution? The hip pack. Yeah, #soendurobro, but so useful, too. The Evoc Hip Pack Race has a water bladder but also a water bottle holster so you can use a simple bottle instead of a bladder and hose that might popsicle in the cold. - C



Stanley

Winter gear essentials

Mountain Vacuum Coffee System ($60 USD)

Another Stanley winner: the "all-in-one and all you need" Mountain Vacuum Coffee System. This kit includes a boiling pot, a French press, a vacuum bottle, and two cups. You can have fresh brewed, steaming hot coffee for you and a friend no matter where you’re riding. Make a pot at home and toss it in the car; it'll stay piping hot until you need it. Or bring a stove to the trailhead and get your caffeine on at the start of the ride. Either way, rest assured you'll still have hot coffee at the end of the ride. Sure, you can brew up a pot at home and toss it into a thermos. But the all-in-one efficiency and portability of this Stanley System has made it indispensable for cold weather rides, road tripping, and even for use around the house. - N



Camelback

Winter gear essentials
Winter gear essentials

Stoaway 3L insulated bladder, the K.U.D.O. 8 and Camelbak's ($55 USD, $190 USD, and $18 USD respectively)

The thing that always used to send me packing up from a cold ride in the past was a frozen bite valve. Camelbak has the answer in their ski packs: the Stowaway 3L bladder is insulated and has an insulated hose, keeping the crunch of a frozen bite valve and hose at bay. But the Stoaway won't fit into my go-to pack. The K.U.D.O. 8. (I love the CE certified back protector that's integrated into the design). The solution there is a Crux insulated Tube; the bladder itself isn't insulated like it is with the Stoaway, but having the hose insulated adds a lot more time to a ride before the bite valve will freeze up. And when it's that cold, that's nature's signal for me to turn around anyway; although I typically run out of water before it can freeze in the bladder. - C



Goal Zero

Winter gear essentials

Flip 10 and Flip 20 Power Packs ($25 and $40 USD respectively)

In this day and age, people are relying more and more on handheld electronics for everything from simple or emergency communication while on the trail to mapping to data acquisition. The dependency is real. Yes, you can be a Luddite and go full analog, but the bottom line is that cold kills battery life and nobody wants their phone to die mid-ride: it might just mess up your Strava (LOL). But seriously, if you are relying on your phone or some other electronic device during your ride, it's way more likely to crap out in the cold than in the summer. Having a lightweight portable phone battery charger as a back up for long days out in the mountains isn't a need, but it's just smart.The Flip 10 weighs 2.5 oz (68 grams) and will reliably recharge an iPhone. The Flip 20 holds double the power and weighs in at 4.6 oz (130 grams). It's not a true "need" but it's a smart and useful back up for off the grid adventures. - C



Light Motion

Winter gear essentials

The Seca II 2500 and Imjin 800 bike lights($470 and $200 USD respectively)

Winter is called the dark months for a reason. Gone are the casual jaunts to the trailhead after work with a maybe a quick stop for a bite en route. This time of year it's dark when you head out to work and dark when you get off. Enter the season of night riding. You can use a simple headlamp but those rarely have enough lumens (light output) to make riding at full speed safe, and they tend to bounce around a fair bit, making it harder to see. And there are simple handlebar clip units that are loads cheaper than the price tag on the Seca and the Imjin lights (the Light Motion Urban Obsidian Stout 350 handlebar clip will only set you back $50). But if you're going to get serious about night riding you will want to step up to a system that's powerful enough that shining light from it through a magnifying glass will fry ants (yes, bigger is better when it comes to lumen output).

Enter the Seca II 2500. It's got (you guessed it) a whopping 2500 lumen output in a widespread pattern that makes night riding at World Cup DH speed possible. The light is waterproof and comes with a variety of mounting options. It's a sure bet that with this mounted on your handlebars and set on high, oncoming car traffic will flick their high beams at you. That's step one. Step two is a light like the Imjin 800 mounted to your helmet so that you can see into corners and switchbacks vs. the semi-tunnel vision of even a widespread handlebar mounted light like the Seca II 2500. The Imjin offers 800 lumens of broadly dispersed light and a variety of mounting options including a handlebar mount. Used together, the Seca II 2500 and the Imjin 800 offer nearly 10 times the amount of light output of the Urban Obsidian Stout. Yes, the price tag on that is more than 10 times the amount of the Stout, but the performance means this: You. Will. Own. The. Night. And the system should last for years. - C



Kitsbow

Winter gear essentials
Winter gear essentials

Men's Mesh Trail Boxer ($40 USD)

I'm a chamois rider. And a bib chamois rider at that. It's what I find comfortable for rides of just about any length (particularly after that baboon's ass saddle sore incident in Belize 12 years ago). But not everyone is. I know riders who ride harder and longer than I do in boxer briefs. COTTON boxer briefs. That thought makes me shudder. For riders like that, Kitsbow makes the Mesh Trail Boxer. It's made from Polartec's Power Dry material, a fabric that mechanically wicks and dissipates moisture vs fabrics with a chemical wicking technology that will wear out; Power Dry will last the life of the garment. And it's flat stitched for a seamless feel. So... no chaffing. Wicks. Breathes. And it's downy soft next to skin. I'm still not gonna try them but I know people who will. - C



Patagonia


Nano-Air® Light Hybrid Vest ($99 USD)

Active insulation has been the El Dorado of the action sports apparel world since climbers used felt for insulation in mountain climbing gear back at the turn of the last century. And now it's finally arrived. Patagonia is by no means the only company that's making something that works this way, but their Nano-Air® Light Hybrid Vest is my go-to for start/stop cool weather aerobic activities. It uses FullRange™ insulation which is warm, stretchy and insanely breathable. This is a perfect mid-layer to add under a shell when the foul weather shit is hitting the fan. Core warmth is the key here, and this vest delivers it in spades. Better yet, it's available in both men's and women's colors and cuts. - C



Maxxis Tires

Winter gear essentials

Shorty ($65 USD)

As Mike Kazimer noted a week or so back, winter riding generally demands a tire with more aggressive traction. A full spike is great until you hit rocks; then you may as well be skating on ice in tennis shoes. But a cut spike can help a lot and not be wiggly piggly on rocks and roots. Maxxis turns that up a notch with the Shorty, a tire that mimics a cut spike for unreal traction in loose soils but has sipes cut into the short spikes. Siping is the process of adding shallow cuts across a knob. What it does is add more square edges. More square edges adds more gripping edges, i.e. more traction. There are a ton of spike options out there and loose conditions tires, but the Shorty offers what is basically a pro cut and siped spike tire to the masses. It's got unreal traction in loose soil, and acceptable grip on roots and rocks. Win, win, and win. - C



Marsh Guard


Marshguard Fender ($16 USD)

The Marsh Guard Fender (not to be mistaken for Marshy's Codpieces available at Mamma's in Morzine) is the brainchild of Jason Marsh, Greg Minnaar's mechanic, a Kiwi who resides in Morzine. It's an elegant solution for keeping grit out of your eyes when blasting downhill thru the kind of slop typically encountered on the World Cup circuit. It's a simple piece of plastic that can be zip tied into place. It's not foolproof but it eliminates 90% of the crap that would otherwise coat your fork stanchions and fly into your eyes. There are all kinds of knock-offs on the original coz you can't really patent a piece of plastic, but I prefer the original because I spent far too much time admiring Marsh's dedication to excellence on the World Cup circuit. - C



Muc Off


Bio Wet lube(50ml), C3 Wet Ceramic Lube (50ml), Nanotech Bike Wash (1 Liter), and Soft Washing Brush ($5.50, $10, $15, and $10 USD respectively)

Let me get this straight: you're going to take your pretty pony out into a hurricane, ride it hard, and then put it up wet? Cool. But you may as well toss the baby out with that bathwater. Be smart: get some lube. And occasionally clean your bike. It'll last longer and you won't have to buy new parts like a fat man going to burger king for a fix. Muc off has a dedication to making top performing products with an environmental conscience. The Wet Lube works well: it's biodegradable, made from renewable resources, and protects all the moving parts of your drivetrain. The C3 Ceramic Wet Lube is everything that the regular wet lube is except better. It lasts longer, ensuring smoother shifts with longer service intervals. Nanotech Bike Wash is a brake friendly "spray it on, let it soak in, spray it off" bike wash. Yes, you'll need to scrub and wipe a wee bit afterwards despite what the bottle says to get a squeaky clean bike, but it takes a LOT of the heavy lifting off of bike cleaning. You can use a toothbrush to clean your cogs and pulleys, but a nice, baby butt soft washing brush is a thing of beauty. It makes washing a destroyed bike not a pleasure but simply easier. And when it's just above freezing and you need to clean your bike, the combo of Bike Wash and Soft Washing Brush makes it a fairly painless task. - C



Trail Dog


Hungarian Dingo (priceless)

Nothing makes a trail riding experience indelibly imprinted in your memory banks more than sharing it with a great riding companion. There are very few riding buddies that will ever top a trail dog. Especially your trail dog. They say you can’t buy love—but you can adopt it from an animal shelter (and usually for a lot less money than buying from a breeder or a pet store). For years of good times, head to the local shelter and adopt. Good mutts for trail riding abound. Just be smart if you adopt a puppy: a 12-month-old pup is roughly the equivalent of a 7-year-old kid. You wouldn't make a 7-year-old kid run 10 miles, would you? Train up your pup with low and slow base miles. Save the hard days for when your mutt has both shown a love for trail rides and has the fitness and maturity for longer days. - C



EVOC


Bike Travel Bag XL ($545 USD)

A bike box is the MUST HAVE item for escaping winter for someplace warm and awesome when the relentless days of shit weather have finally broken your spirit. The EVOC Bike Travel Bag XL is their new transport case. It offers maximum protection for the frame, wheels and other components, and will fit a plus-sized bike or a fat bike. Sure, you can use a repurposed bike box (I have a few times) but most airlines won't compensate you for a destroyed frame unless it's been packed in something other than a cardboard box. I like winter but I've learned that escaping to the sunshine in the depth of winter is a key to keeping your sanity. Save your pennies. Pack your bike up and make that escape to the Canary Islands, Sedona, or a host of other adventure rides to refill the coffers of your trail riding soul. For residents of the US, Alaska Airlines adopted a new policy that allows you to fly with a bike bag for a $25 bag fee on regional flights! #getoutandride.- N


169 Comments

  • + 63
 I love the fact that people are under the impression that winter riding involves shorts. Very funny guys.
  • + 27
 You should travel more. Smile
  • + 9
 Or a hydration pack. Winter riding here means your drinking tube is frozen solid in minutes.
  • + 8
 @Dethphist: Camelbak Insulated tube.. Google it Wink

Works really well Smile
  • + 1
 It does where I live Smile

Edit: 2yrs ago I lived near you(London) and I would have agreed with you!
  • + 3
 @mevvem: yeah see no, not in my climate. Out fatbiking and those are frozen in the first 5 minutes, regardless of insulation. That's where you have to store your insulated water bottle in your backpack to keep it from freezing.
  • + 2
 Fast Florida! Shorts and sunscreen sunglasses all winter long bro. Go ahead haters negative poke away I'll be out riding while you hate. Fast Florida where you earn what you get.
  • + 1
 @Dethphist: We can't all be so lucky to ride in Edmonton, AB. What's your solution for H20 when winter riding?
  • + 3
 What's Winter? I want a Hungarian Dingo and a set of Shortys..
  • + 3
 @meagerdude: just like @ratedgg13 said, insulated bottle or thermos in the pack. Same as ski touring pretty much. Had the insulated tube for a hydration pack and it's shit; freezes up after the first suck.
  • + 1
 @endlessblockades: That thing that raises our insurance rates once a year when the roads turn to ice and the Floridiots and New Yawkers pinball off of each other in rather than stay home cause "we drive in 2 feet uh snowz...whachoo tawkin bout?"
  • + 3
 @juicebanger: word. I typically go that route when I'm touring as well as until this test I never had an insulated water tube. Once it's truly winter here (despite people barking about west coast privilege we received over 98" of snow here last winter) I'll give the camelbak a go and see how well it works at 15F or so (-9.5C). During testing for all this gear it snowed on us 3x but it was just below freezing vs real winter.
  • + 8
 @ratedgg13:

After you take a sip blow the water back in the reservoir, not going to be 100% in the coldest conditions but works well down to the mid teens especially with an insulated tube.
  • + 2
 @meagerdude: Bottle tossed into the backpack. Rides don't last as long in the winter anyway, and since it's not sweaty and hot i don't get the same craving for drink.
  • + 3
 texican, dethphist, ratedgg, & juicebanger; I have ridden in winter for quite a few years now, I wear shorts with either long underwear or full length tights. Looks goofy but allows far more freedom of movement than pants. I've had a CamelBak insulated hydration pack for around 10 or 11 winters now, the tube goes into the shoulder strap, I've never had an issue with the tube freezing when biking or skiing. If you do have a problem with the tube freezing simply blow back into the reservoir a bit to clear the tube. One issue I have heard of is the bite valve freezing up but haven't experienced that yet. I bought a pair of Keen winter boots last year & so far they have been the best winter footwear I've ever used, slim profile, durable & warm (coldest day -27C). The other things that aren't on this list, windproof lighter, a couple of candles, lightweight emergency blanket & a decent 1st aid kit. A person that gets hurt in cold winter weather has a very slim window of time before things get really ugly really fast.
  • + 1
 @juicebanger: @meagerdude & @ratedgg13, for me I find loading up the camelbak with piping hot water and taking sips, then blowing the water back through the tube so all the water is inside the pack while you ride helps for up to 2hr rides in temperatures 10-25*F. You just have to remember to blow the water back after each sip or yep, frozen tube.
  • + 1
 @Dethphist: Replace your hose with Norprene tubing.

I originally used it for watercooling my PC because of it's temperature extraction properties. It's generally used in cars for cooling and various fluid delivery. I also found that it was engineered to withstand Alaskan winters and keeps water from freezing, unless buried in snow or ice. The tube itself will not crack or shatter when it gets to -30f. The specifications state that it will work from -40f to 570f. Does not make water taste weird!
  • + 2
 @ratedgg13: I ride with 1/3 Gatorade, 1/3 water and 1/3 vodka in my Camelbak, problem solved!
  • + 26
 Lets see....I got my powder board, park board, high speed charge it still waiting/dreaming to ride it in AK board, and my I dont give a fuk just destroy it rock board. And one of those little boxes that makes beeping sounds in case the mountain decides to take 5 metric ton shit on top of me or my friends.
Now that is proper winter gear. Shorts? Give me a break, or a plane ticket to Hawaii.
  • + 3
 Now you're talking!
  • + 1
 Come to Hawaii. Today it's 72, wet and windy. Probably no dirt this week...
  • + 21
 What is the first thing you google from this list... Stanley flask my friends Stanley flask! Epic idea for cold morning rides
  • + 8
 I've recently been introduced to the sneaky hipflask swig by a couple of random mountain bikers on Helvellyn. I now carry my own every ride... I'd say whiskey tastes 3 times better when it's crappy out.
  • + 1
 @slimboyjim: My alternative I go for as well.... port. It is a bit 'more-ish' though!
  • + 1
 @bigtim: The funny thing is I almost never drink otherwise. It's a definite guilty pleasure...
  • + 18
 Winter riding shoes-great. WHERE'S THE FLATS OPTION?! Apparently winter riders only ride clips.... FFS why aren't there better options for flat shoes in winter
  • + 2
 There is this certain 5.10 shoe that Tippie was advertizing on IG: www.fiveten.com/us/freerider-eps-high-core-black
(apparently it is waterproof and insulated)
  • + 4
 What we want is FiveTen to do a high top with Goretex liner and a neoprene cuff or similar. They would be expensive no doubt but I would buy. My feet are the first things to get cold with poor circulation.
  • + 1
 www.endurasport.com/product/mt500-plus-overshoe Endura does an overshoe for flat pedals, there aren't a whole lot of winter flat pedal shoes though :/
  • + 1
 @Mattgc: I’d buy a pair right now!
  • + 0
 @Mattgc: www.onlywhatsnecessary.com/store/fr-01-black-edition, probably the closest thing to that. You get 2 liners, one for warmer days and one for colder but I have never seen them so I can't tell if they are warm enough.
  • + 2
 @Mattgc: check out 5.10s water sport shoes. Made for rafters and kayakers I think. It has the same rubber on the sole and is designed to deal with water by keeping it out and not being inclined to saturate the footbed.

www.fiveten.com/us/canyoneer-3-canvas-red?utm_source=Google&utm_medium=CPC&utm_campaign=Google_Shopping&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIs-Gmjp_f1wIVh2x-Ch1mHwcWEAQYBSABEgJaoPD_BwE
  • + 2
 Great point, @supermike306; neither Nikki nor I ride flats so we overlooked that point; but I think @LukasN89 has you covered.
  • + 1
 I had the same question, albeit my winter riding is on a fat bike in potentially minus 20. I went with a ln adidas hiking boot, the pathmaker. Some insulation and a stealth rubber sole. Tread pattern isn't ideal for a pedal, but they've done pretty well so far, and good for hike-a-bike too.
  • + 6
 I once saw that CROCS are 100% effective as a form of contraception . . . . I'll get some for my wife
  • + 1
 Remember Adidas bought 5.10 - www.amazon.com/adidas-outdoor-Mens-Terrex-Scope/dp/B00HSFCKLW

Waterproof Gore-tex AND Stealth rubber ftw.
  • + 2
 @LukasN89: I've had these a year. They're pretty bad.
  • + 1
 @Thustlewhumber: But it's a low shoe, mud and water would still get into them plus they aren't riding shoes.
  • + 1
 FiveTen rubber turns to the consistency of clay in winter so you might as well toss on hiking boots and run longer spikes in your pedals if you need anything warmer than a set of Impacts and waterproof socks. You're not gaining any grip in FiveTens in below freezing temps.
  • + 2
 @LukasN89: Tried the EPS. Didn't like them at all. The sole, which provides the bulk of insulation for any shoe, was much thinner than the standard Impact.

The Impacts are really a good flat for winter riding if you buy them large enough to wear heavy socks underneath.

One issue with the Impact is the tongue shoe interface - water funnels right into that area then down on top of your forefoot. I gooped mine up with silicone glue in that area to help prevent the "drip". I also use gators with the shoe as they are cut pretty low and can let a lot of slush in at the ankle.

So, doctored up Impacts, along with a plastic flat pedal, works better than any other winter set up I've tried. But, I do agree with Mattgc that a Gortex hight top Five Ten would be nice.

The Spec Defrosters are great for running clippies and I've got a really old pair. I use them more for cool Fall riding than cold winter riding.


All that said, by January I bail on riding and pull out the skis.
  • + 2
 @LukasN89: Yes, but seriously they need to add a lace cover!
  • + 3
 @MikerJ: I actually laughed out loud when I looked at the Spec boots...you look like an elf from Santa Clause with them Big Grin
  • + 2
 @themountain: No doubt. But, don't fool yourself, a grown man riding a bike in the woods with a dorky looking helmet and flashy clothes, looks like a dork to pretty much anyone else, with or without the goofy shoes. Might as well have warm feet.

However, their old model, from a few years back, looked much less conspicuous.
  • + 1
 The OWN Fr 01 as also a good alternative.
  • + 16
 How am I supposed to afford my $10000 superbike if I spend it all on $400 Jackets?
  • + 4
 Ya, when Kitsbow is the cheapest jacket on the list, you know you're not in your proper place on the interwebz.
  • - 1
 But for real doe, if you are looking for a wind proof shell (not water proof) see: Marmot DriClime Windshirt. Wicks moisture very well. Favorite riding shirt.
  • + 3
 I did do a review expressly covering winter apparel that was up last week; there are a number of cheaper options available in there, @Bromaphobe. I just really liked the kitsbow piece. It worked awesome. here's a link to the earlier reviews, tho: www.pinkbike.com/news/7-mens-winter-clothing-kits-to-keep-you-warm-into-2018.html
  • + 13
 Who else stared at the Nikki/ Anvil/ Flask photo in envy?That's a fine looking anvil.
  • + 2
 Who else tried to figure out why there is a commercial food grade funnel in the garage and yet wondered if it was food grade at all?
  • + 1
 Yes. Exactly. Total anvil envy. Forget the other stuff I want the anvil.
  • + 8
 Why do everyone want to ride with their dogs? My wife and I have been close, a few times, to have accidents with dogs. Here, in our local trails, it's forbidden for safety reasons. but few people respect the rules and you now have poo all over the place...
  • - 24
flag bar2bar (Nov 27, 2017 at 5:45) (Below Threshold)
 OMG OMG, you almost got into accidents mountain biking with dogs, you should stick to riding on concrete paths where it's realllly safe. jesus.
  • + 7
 @bar2bar: Hahaha, do you think riding on the road is safer? If I fall and it's my fault, ok. But if I fall, because someone else brings his dog in the trails, noway! I hate poo everywhere ... if you can not pick up your dog's poop, you should not own one!
  • - 17
flag bar2bar (Nov 27, 2017 at 6:17) (Below Threshold)
 @fred0: If you fall because someone else brings his dog in the trails?? are you kidding me lol..., No, I don't think roads are safer, that's why I said you should ride on concrete paths...or paved city bike paths, sounds like that's where you belong.
  • + 3
 @bar2bar: No it's not a joke ... When a dog comes out of nowhere and cuts you the way, it's very unpleasant ... It happened to me a few times. But the poop problem is more important in my local trails.
  • - 8
flag bar2bar (Nov 27, 2017 at 6:39) (Below Threshold)
 @fred0: now they're coming out of nowhere and cutting you,....in 25 years of mtn bike riding, I've never seen that before. If you ever come across a bear on a trail, you'll wish you had a dog at your side...had it happen 3 times, the last time was last week. Happy trails Fred.
  • + 3
 Some people suck. It's worth putting other people at bone-breaking risk so they can take selfies with their trail dog for the Insta.
  • + 19
 I don't ride with my dogs anymore because they don't understand limits. On the easiest rides they blast themselves full charge through the most angry, rooty, rocky, gravely, paved or soaking wet gritty crap you can imagine, desperate to stay in touch with their owner.

I know too many dog owner's whose pooches shoulders, paws or hips are wrecked from all the "epic" trail rides they've been on. I stopped running my long legged, super smooth and ever so agile dog at 4. Within a year of stopping, he gained a ton of energy back, his health improved and all the sudden visits to the vet for a tweaked this or sprained that were over and done. Dogs give everything for their owner and don't know how not to ruin their bodies.

My opinion won't change yours so please don't argue it. Just stating why I stopped and encouraging other dog owners to pay a little more attention to how much their pooches lay their bodies on the line, rather than looking at the stuff the dog is doing as "rad" or "cool". Thank you.
  • + 8
 I hope this stuff was tested in the Yukon in the middle of January in a blizzard . Otherwise people will be squawking about West Coast Privilege again .
  • + 2
 Because REEEEEEEE honestly if you are wearing shorts, it isn't winter.
  • + 7
 4 different shoes, 2 different flasks, a trail dog - but no eyewear? I think I would prefer glasses in the wet than a massively overpriced and expensive bike bag for Winter riding...
  • + 14
 You are correct. We should have included eyewear. These projects are a massive undertaking and details easily get missed. We are using the Smith Attack glasses with the ChromaPop Contrast Rose lenses for most of our winter riding.
  • + 1
 Shred optics goggles with the dual lens option. 2 season on them and I can do even short fireroad climbs with them on in high humidity without serious fogging issues. they are a game changer
  • + 8
 The Hungarian Dingo's expression for this article says it all!
  • + 4
 at long last, thank you Kitsbow. After years of sweating through the sleeves of so many shirts, you have provided wrist vents. How many times have I forgone long sleeve jackets to save me from my sweaty wrist embarrassment. Want to go for a ride? Well, it's a little cool, so I had better not, lest my riding group mock ol' sweaty wrists for the rest of eternity.
  • + 3
 Sounds like a great idea to me. Nice airflow up the sleeves. I overheat within minutes in a waterproof generally so a bit of air flow like this would be great.
  • + 6
 Those tld knee pads def do not go high enough on upper leg like so many others do.
  • + 1
 those things are ankle weights in no time. The TLD Raid is a better choice for cold weather.
  • + 3
 I'd rather be a little colder and damper and buy a full bike with the money I saved on those upper layers...

PS for Europeans, you can get Buff type headbands in decathlon for 2€ I have like 10 at home they are so practical
  • + 7
 Do Crocs make good flat petal shoes?
  • + 2
 Gore windstopper is pretty crappy, IMO. I have a jacket and gloves. The jacket is moderately effective at stopping wind, but certainly isn't weather resistant otherwise. I wear it under a waterproof shell on cold days just as a (very expensive) layer of insulation. The gloves suck and leave my fingers pretty numb after my 30 minute commute on winter mornings.

Most of this gear is overkill for my winter dirt riding. I'll save my epic rides for warmer weather. I'll be okay for an hour or two in the mid-atlantic with my cheap gear that doesn't keep me totally dry or ideally warm.
  • + 5
 I disagree on the shorts thing - (waterproof) shorts + warm footwear = sub zero *c days for me...
  • + 4
 None of this stuff will work in proper winter conditions. Let’s see something that’s actually used in real winter riding.
  • + 3
 @juleous I dig on the 3 blind mice trails but was under the impression that winter mtb riding in Penticton meant fat biking? Seems like most of the trails get snowed in? If that's the case, some of the items reviewed here will work to supplement winter riding but otherwise you'll either want to wax up the skis, fire up the sled, or look into XC ski clothing(seriously--it's a high aerobic pursuit with clothing and insulation meant to work in conditions cooler than what we encounter here in Hood River.
  • + 0
 Any autumn jacket with some insulation, and cotton sweat pants, scarf and buff under the helmet. That is what I use all winter round for 10 km communting in Oslo. I have to open the jacket and sweater halfway because of the heat produced. You don't need more, unless you are in Montreal and its -30° Celsius. Then maybe wear two t-shirts and long johns.
  • + 3
 I would like to see anyone try some winter riding in good (c)old Sweden with shorts and single baselayer. The coffee is not gonna save you from your doom Smile
  • + 3
 Swedish West Coast winter is fantastic. Oh +5C, I guess I’ll just take a long sleeve Jersey and go out riding. Oh a bit windy, chilly. Where does this humidity Adyd du dy hadydy, come bededededydydydy from. brrrrr, It will get better as I warm up... just keep riding bbb b b bbb dydyy...

15 minutes later come the first symptoms of hypothermia.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I once went out drinking with my workmates. As we rolled up to our destination I felt really foggy, so I decided to jump out of the taxi and walk it off the last few hundred meters. After that it all went black. When I woke up several kilometers in the wrong direction, the time had passed 04.00. This was late October and I was in my t-shirt. I was sore from the fall I took to get where I was laying, but the worst was the cold. Lucky for me, I managed to catch a taxi off duty and persuade the driver to take me home. That's why I'm always dressed appropriate nowadays. Never want to feel cold again Smile
  • + 5
 The giro gloves and the dog made my day
  • + 2
 Love the dog too, but what the heck is a Hungarian Dingo? I googled it and came up with nothing. Looks like a cross between a brindle pit and any number of other breeds, which is fine with me.
  • + 5
 Nikki and I got tired of people constantly asking what breed Luna is. So we started saying she was a Hungarian Dingo. They always nod and say, "Oh. I've never heard of that but her ears look like a Dingo..." LOL. She's a Mexican rescue mutt: she's pit, chihuahua, heeler, and Got only knows what else.
  • + 1
 Everytime I see these articles I get excited, but they are always filled with a bunch of fall clothes. Please make an article with actual winter clothing. I have been searching for solid gloves for fat biking and would appreciate some suggestions. You're Canadians, someone has to have experience with actual cold weather.
  • + 1
 for REALLY freezing days i use the old Fox Antifreeze gloves
www.amazon.com/Fox-Head-Mens-Antifreeze-Glove/dp/B003HC8I0M

they are bulky but also super insulated, waterproof and windproof.
  • + 2
 I don’t know how it happened and I’m ok with not questioning, but I officially fell in love with Nikki Hollatz, the beautiful woman pouring beautiful whiskey into a flask.
  • + 1
 I've spent the last two winters in the PNW, and TO ME, it makes a lot more sense to spend 400$ on a jacket than on a carbon bar or carbon cranks ; it makes my rides a lot more comfy. Having said that, that's a big lot of money, and I bought mine on sale at 50% ...
  • + 5
 I see the bath mat is a 27.5. I'll wait for the 29 version.
  • + 1
 Subscribed
  • + 4
 Good spot. LIke they say, pick a bath mat size and be a dick about it.
  • + 1
 Four. Hundred. Dollars. That's just a "little" bit much for a MTB jacket I think. But I would be willing to forgive that if it had basic arm pit zips for venting. For something like cycling - especially mountain biking - I haven't found a winter rain jacket without armpit zips that breathed well enough. I guess maybe the kitsbow jacket works perfectly fine without them, but it better for that price. Anyone have it to confirm?
  • + 1
 Did you read my review? That thing breathes amazingly well. The forearm vents channel air in, and the ability for air to vent back out via the material is way better than anything else I've used.
  • + 1
 Insulated tube is not really necessary. Just blow the water back into the bladder after you sip. Therefore nothing in the tube to freeze. Old ski touring trick. Or if you forget once then stuff the tube down the back of your jacket. Body heat keeps er frost free.
  • + 1
 Any recommendations for a winter insole? I spend too much money on my trail dog, so I'm looking at shoe covers. It seems something besides the super thin, ventilated insoles would be helpful in addition to that.
  • + 0
 I look for my shorts and t-shirt. I now get my sunglasses. Put some sunscreen on. Now I go out and ride in Florida where it is so horrible to ride here all year long. Please stay in the winter snow and freeze and be a Grumpy Bastard and tell me how horrible it is to ride in Florida. There is absolutely no good riding in Florida and you get sunburned here please stay in the winter snow where you are. Absolutely nothing for you haters here.
  • + 4
 I like these guys. Can they write more please?
  • + 1
 Yes its un cool pardon the pun. To get out of truck with your fancy plastic bike wearing pants. No you can wear water proof every thing else. But you must get mud and cold water on your bare legs.
  • + 2
 Those Mavic boots are a version of the Lake winter boot. If they are anything similar in comfort and insulation, they're a winter footwear go to FTW!
  • + 1
 I live in Edmonton, that’s the largest city in northern Canada. Regularly ride in temperatures below -20c, trust me you could pile on all this gear and your not gonna be warm.
  • + 1
 I'll say it again: The Club Ride pants are soooo much better than shorts! I'll never ride in shorts when it's below 50ish degrees. Knee warmers are silly when you can wear warm and comfortable pants.
  • + 2
 Can we get an article like this but with "Summer Gear". Particularly gear for 35C and >90% humidity?
  • + 1
 If anybody is interested in a wallet-friendly version of this list go ahead and hit me up lol. It started off pretty reasonable, at least...
  • + 1
 My low (no) budget riding wear. Helmet and goggles, gloves, jersey+hodie+waterproof jacket, slim fit jeans from Bershka and good old Vans shoes.
  • + 2
 I have had excellent results riding with a flask under all weather conditions. 10/10.
  • + 2
 One of the better winter gear lists that I've scanned. Thanks for the Xmass list ideas!
  • + 3
 Flask.....is a keep for sure.
  • + 2
 Waterproof socks pfffft, I just dip my five tens in stand milk and I’m good to go
  • + 1
 Any cheap alternatives to the nano bike wash that I can buy or make and still use in a spray bottle?
Is it any better then soapy water?
  • + 3
 simple green
  • + 1
 @rrolly: is it brake pad friendly?
  • + 3
 @robjames: +1 for the Simple Green. Never had any brake pad issues whatsoever.
  • + 1
 @armcoal: thanks guys.
  • + 2
 buy a dirtbike, spend the winter at your local indoor-skatepark! my plan for the upcoming winter.
  • + 1
 Anyone tried the giro shoe covers with flat pedal shoes? Or any other shoe cover that work well for flats?
  • + 2
 Flat pedals will likely eat shoe covers; the pins are pretty sharp and I suspect that trying to step off the pedal in a hurry might not work out so well. Try the 5.10 shoes mentioned above.
  • + 1
 @meagerdude: thank you very much for your reply. I kinda thought that might be the case.....but $50 shoe covers vs a $150 pair of shoes is worth asking, right?
  • + 1
 @Torbo24: definitely!
  • + 2
 Trail dog is the best part of this article!
  • + 1
 I like the picture of nikki riding in full winter gear in a place that look like semi desert... :/
  • + 1
 The desert isn't always warm, man.
  • + 1
 what @pinhead907 said, @ybsurf: Hood River is on the Eastern edge of the Cascades mountains. So it gets dry here in the summer pretty fast, especially a few miles E of town. That's where that image taken: the Syncline, the one zone we can ride almost all winter long. It faces south so that even when we do get snow down in town, unless it's unusually heavy or cold or both; it will typically melt out in a few days.
  • + 1
 @meagerdude: yeah probably cold I'm just used to wet winter here in bc so for me winter is more about waterproof than insulation Wink
  • + 1
 @ybsurf: we do get wet, too; all the testing I did for the clothing guide posted last week was done in rain, sleet, or snow, less a couple kits when it was just cold and dry, but the trails were still soggy. It's just during the summers that we have predominantly dry weather.
  • + 1
 I stand corrected, @integralz; he's a Kiwi, not a Brit. Between him and Josh Bryceland it was always almost impossible to understand either of them coz their accents were so thick.
  • + 2
 1) big mountain pow skis
2) touring skis
3) avalanche beacon
  • + 2
 Wheres the sensible mountain biker list?
  • + 1
 Dude, I just buy everything on closeout/sale/deal whatever. So it's kinda hard to make a sensible mountain bikers list, since it's basically a hodgepodge of what you find for cheap in your size.
  • + 1
 you know what the holes in crocs are for? transpiration of human dignity, i reckon.
  • + 2
 Yeah, winter clothing for Florida
  • + 1
 Endura Goretex shoe covers for clip in shoes are amazing feet are warmest part of my body and keep dry.
  • + 1
 450 bucks for a coat that's gunna get blitzed to shreds when you're tumbling down some wet slab in Squamton. Yeh nah.
  • + 1
 Why is that Giro glove showing the finger?
  • + 4
 read the first line underneath it...
  • + 1
 $395 for shorts? Nah bro.
  • + 1
 Of all this winter gear I have only Subaru key. :/
  • + 1
 I thought wearing wool as a base layer wasn’t good loads up with sweat?
  • + 3
 Wool is awesome. It’s very breathable and stays warm and soft even if it gets wet.
  • + 4
 Are you confusing it with cotton maybe? A good merino wool base layer IS GREAT. It's warm, wicks away moisture and it is warm even if it gets slightly wet (unlike the polypropylene stuff).
  • + 1
 Wool as a whole gets wet although it still keeps you warm. Merino wool, on the other hand, has wicking properties (as in it pulls sweat from the body and transports it to the outer edge of the garment).

Check this shot: www.pinkbike.com/photo/14244604

What you see there is sweat wicking off the merino wool base layer. Merino wool is also pretty soft on the skin--regular wool is pretty coarse--24 microns or so in diameter. Human hair is 15-100 microns in diameter. Merino is 15-23 microns in diameter so it's very fine and soft.
  • + 1
 I’m sold on the Giro glove as long as it gets to me like that. Haha
  • + 1
 Swobo wool knickers are my favorite winter cycling garment.
  • + 1
 Gore... Goooooore... that’s a woody word!
  • - 1
 Only cotton touches this body. Wink I don't care if the moisture is trapped in collapsed fiber networks, I can always bring a spare t-shirt.
  • + 1
 Trail dog was the only thing worth it.
  • + 1
 Is PB a northern hemisphere only site?
  • + 1
 Nope, PB has reporters down S but the majority of the staff resides N of the equator.
  • + 1
 @meagerdude: Apologies, I was being a sook this morning, aircon broke awoke in a sweat.....

lol
  • + 2
 Crocs. Just wrong
  • + 1
 Why all the plastics, right? I'm from The Netherlands, we have wooden clogs. Or well, we may actually have more tourists with wooden clogs than actual locals wearing these. But they'd do a better job regardless and at least you won't piss off mother nature when you loose it in a really really deep puddle. Those Giro gloves were rude enough.
  • + 0
 Maybe wool for inner gloves, but the rest cotton. Wool, even merino is just too darn itchy.
  • + 1
 You may have a wool sensitivity, @joni0001984; merino wool is substantially finer than a human hair and is generally soft next to skin. If that's the case, you may wish to try Patagonia's Capilene layers for a base layer. It has an anti stink treatment called polygiene that seems to work well.
  • + 1
 What are those shoes in the top pic?
  • + 1
 Shimano MW7
  • + 1
 Anyone have suggestions for flat pedal friendly shoe covers?
  • + 1
 Bin bags knowing the anger on here that something might be expensive...
  • + 2
 @Jeeef: That's pretty awesome.
  • + 2
 @Jeeef: Those do look good - shame the XL is not big enough for anyone with big feet though...
  • + 1
 What the crocs Big Grin
  • + 1
 Mamma's is the best!
  • - 1
 You had me up until the Crocs.
  • - 2
 Gay-enduro! Ohhh yeah.
  • + 1
 Upvoted, only because I saw downvotes and wanted to wade against all the butthurt flooding.
  • - 2
 Bojler eladó.
  • + 1
 lmaolol

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