Frostbike 2016: Day 2

Feb 28, 2016 at 21:42
by Colin Meagher  


Day Two at Frostbike was interesting, although not nearly as fun as running amok before the show was actually set up. Most of the big dogs were saving their ammunition for the Taipei tradeshow this coming week, so there weren't a whole lot of first-looks on hand, but the aisles of Frostbike still had a number of lust-worthy surprises in store.


Issi pedals are the result of Shimano going in house with their distribution back in 2014. There were some growing pains for Shimano with that move and dealers were clammoring for Shimano compatible pedal optoins. The Issi II Triple iand the Issi Trail III are the result. Both feature a 52.5 mm spindle rolling smoothly on 3 cartridge bearings as well as 4 degrees of float adjustable spring tension and a 14.6 deg release angle. And they come in a variety of bright colors as well as plain jane polished metal. MSRP of 75 and 100 respectively.
Issi pedals were the result of Shimano going in-house with their distribution back in 2014. Shimano's growing pains sent many dealers were clamoring for Shimano compatible pedal options and QBP responded with Issi pedals. The Issi II Triple and the Issi Trail III are the high-end of that spectrum. Both feature a 52.5 mm spindle rolling on three cartridge bearings, four degrees of float, adjustable spring-tension, and 14.6- degree release angles. And, they come in a variety of bright colors, as well as Plain Jane polished metal. MSRP is $75 and $100 respectively.

Nice to see the SRAM 1 x 11 trickle down to the masses with their NX groupset. This 1 x 11 cogset is compatible with Shimano cassette hub bodies meaning that ten speed users wanting to go 1 x 11 but unable to fit an XD cassette hub body onto their rear wheel but wanting to stay or to go SRAM can now do so without a hitch. Sure youre missing that high end 10T cog-NX is only 11-42 not SRAM s typical 10-42 gear spread but this allows price point SRAM 11 speed for the masses.
Nice to see SRAM's 1 x 11 trickle down to the masses with their NX group. The NX 1 x 11 cassette is compatible with Shimano cassette splines, meaning that ten-speed users wanting to go 1 x 11 who don't own an XD cassette hub body can now upgrade to SRAM 1 x 11 without a hitch. Sure, you'll be missing that ten-tooth cog (NX is only 11-42, not SRAM's 10-42 gear spread); but 11 is the smallest cog that fits Shimano-compatible spline bodies.

Fresh chain from KMC. Yes orange really is the new black. This is a fresh take on their X11 SL DLC super light chain with an MSRP of 193. Yeah you read that right 193. Why so much money It s light weight 235 grams for 116 links and incredibly durable. The double diamond shape assures smooth shifts and the hollow pin tech resists stretching. Yeah 193 is a chunk of change for a chain but KMC has a reputation for chains that last and last and last. Is that worth 193 Evidently it is or KMC wouldn t be selling it.
Fresh chain from KMC. Yes, orange really is the new black. This is a fresh take on their X11 SL DLC super light chain with an MSRP of $193. Yeah, you read that right: $193. Why so much money? It's light weight (235 grams for 116 links) and incredibly durable. The double-diamond shape assures smooth shifts, and the hollow pins resist stretching. KMC has a reputation for chains that last and last and last. Is that worth $193? Evidently it is, or KMC wouldn't be selling it.

Renthal is saving their big guns for the Taipai show next week but they were happy to show off two new 1 x 11 chain ring options one for the new Shimano XT and one for SRAM s 94 BCD Shimano on the left SRAM on the right . Standard wide-narrow chain profile to keep the chain behaving properly. hard anodyzied 7075 alloy I-beam rigidity and a mud channel to shed trail debris. All for 60. 30T-38T options.
Renthal is saving their big guns for the Taipei show next week, and while I saw some really cool things there, I was threatened with bodily harm if I photographed them (or even whispered about them for that matter). They were happy to show off two new 1 x 11 chainring options: one for the new Shimano XT and one for SRAM's 94 BCD cranks (Shimano on the left, SRAM on the right). Standard features are a narrow-wide tooth profile, hard-anodized 7075 alloy, rigid I-beam profiles, and a mud channel to shed trail debris. All for $60, with 30T through 38T options available.

Kuat bike racks had this Transfer trailer hitch bike rack on display. It s not new but it s inexpensive and works with everything from a road bike to a fat bike. It s available for 2 and 1 1 4 receiver hitches will hold 2 or 3 bikes depending on the model you purchase and will only set you back 289 USD.
Kuat bike racks had its Transfer trailer hitch bike rack on display. It's not new, but it's inexpensive and works with everything from a road bike to a fat bike. It's available for 2" and 1 1/4" receiver hitches, will hold two or three bikes, depending on the model you purchase, and will only set you back $289 USD.

Scratch Labs has slowly been gaining traction amongst the sea of energy bars and gels availble for consumers with their smart approach to the feed zone. A single pouch of drops containing 50g of goodness translates into 180 calories of fuel on the trail.It comes in raspberry and orange and retails for 2.45 USD.
Scratch Labs has slowly been gaining traction among the sea of energy bars and gels available for consumers with their smart approach to exercise nutrition. A single pouch of drops containing 50g of goodness translates into 180 calories of fuel on the trail. It comes in raspberry and orange and retails for $2.45 USD per package.

Day two of Frostbike
It sucks that people will try and steal something that in one way or another, someone's worked their ass off to acquire, but it's a fact that leaving your bike unattended outside a bar or on your trailer hitch rack is an invitation for a bad day. This New York Chain 1210 is not a new lock from Kryptonite, nor is it the biggest, meanest burliest deterrent they have (that's a guy named Stan who lives in a cage in the basement of their testing facility-NOT a guy to meet in a dark alley if you're a bicycle thief). The 12mm, six-sided hardened manganese links tend to shrug off bolt cutters, and the hardened double-deadbolt design of the locking device helps guard against twist attacks. There are a number of other deterrents designed into the New York, and it comes in a nice, 100cm length. It's not fool proof - brute force can defeat most locks - but this one would take a LOT of brute force to defeat. Enough that most thieves will just move onto an easier target of opportunity. Overall, it's peace of mind in a $95 package.

5.10 was showing off their Freerider EPS low and mid shoes. Featuring Primaloft insulation in the forefoor and neoprene wwrapping the back and featuring strealth soles these shoes are just the ticket for cold weather riding particularly here in the land of the fat bike. A single piece of leather is used to minimize seams for water to get in and the tongue is guessetted but this is not a waterproof shoe rather it is a water resistant shoe that s promises to be toasty warm. The shoe is available in US men s size 5-12 13 and 14. The weight will vary by size but a size 9 comes in at 465 grams. The low is avaible in this cool blue color Utility Ivy and black. The Mid is available in Auburn shown the midnight blue of the low and black. We ll have to get back to you on the price for these shoes as the price sheet was missing.
5 Ten was showing off their Freerider EPS Low and Mid shoes. These are designed for cold weather riding and feature "Primaloft" insulation in the forefoot, neoprene wrapping the back, and stealth rubber soles. There are a number of other features designed to help retain heat, too, making these shoes just the ticket for sub-zero riding, particularly here in the land of the fat bike. Other thoughtful features: a single piece of leather is used to minimize seams, which limits entry points for water, and the tongue is gussetted to keep mud and water splashing over the top from infiltrating via the laces. But this is not a waterproof shoe; rather it is a water resistant shoe that promises to be toasty warm. The shoe is available in US men's sizing from 5-12, 13, and 14. A size 9 comes in at 465 grams. The low-top version is available in this cool blue color (Midnight Blue), Utility Ivy, and Black. The mid-top is available in Auburn (shown), the same Midnight Blue of the low, and Black. We'll have to get back to you on the MSRP, as the price sheet was missing.

Box components DH cassette spacer. Why Ghost shifting can happen on rough tracks even with a clutch rear derialleur. And having that chain jump up into your spokes is a great way to bring a great race run or even a sublime ride to a screaching halt. As well as ruin your wheel. Yeah there are ghetto fixes to that problem but this elegent solution by Box will only set you back 44 and should last the life of your next couple bikes. Available in black and orange is the new black.
Box components' DH cassette spacer. Why? Ghost shifting can happen on rough tracks, even with a clutch rear derailleur. And having that chain jump up into your spokes is a great way to bring a great race run or even a sublime ride to a screeching halt. And, likely ruin your wheel by blowing up some spokes. Yes, there are "ghetto" fixes to that problem, but this elegant solution by Box will only set you back $44 and should last the life of your next couple bikes. Available in black and orange-is-the-new-black.

FSA also had these swanky carbon cranks on offer with their SLK 1X option on show mounted with their 30T megatooth 7075 aluminum single ring. This crankset ballparks in at 438 grams plus the ring weight rings are available in 26T-38T sizes and cranks are available in 170 and 175 lengths. No pricing was available but historically an FSA crankset like this would retial for about 700 USD.
FSA had these carbon SLK 1X cranks on show, mounted with their 30T "megatooth" 7075 aluminum single ring. This crankset ballparks in at 438 grams plus the ring weight; rings are available in 26T to 38T sizes and cranks are available in 170 and 175mm lengths. MSRP wasn't available at the booth when I stopped by, but the road version of the same crank retails for $585.

Problem solvers had this MisMatch 2.2 on display. It s designed to allow the use of a Matchmaker type of hardware to simplify the cockpit of your bike in the event that you are using a new Shimano XT shifter with either the Guide or the new Level brakes. They also make a standard MisMatch to all the use of a SRAM shifter with a Shimano brake. Perfect if you are mixing and matching your brake and drive train combos. 39.95 USD
Problem Solvers had this MisMatch 2.2 on display. It's designed to simplify the cockpit of your bike by allowing you to direct-mount Shimano shifters to SRAM brakes or vice versa. Perfect if you are mixing and matching your brake and drive trains. $39.95 USD

Until we are all riding electronic shifting we are all dependent on cables and housing for shifting. And it s amazing how crappy the shifting can be with cheap housing or cheap cables or both. Even with full length housing contaminants can get inside the system and make shifting a bit of a nightmare. 11 speed drivetrains are particularly suscepitible. Many mechanics swear by teflon coated cables and premium housing to combat this. But what few realize is that the coating will wear off at the bends and gum the system up even if with that premium housing. To solve this Jagwire has developed their premium Elite Ultra-Slick cable. Rather than a coated cable it s highly polished and then undergoes a proprietary treatment that results in smooth effortless shifting. MSRP 25.99 USD
Until we are all riding electronic shifting, we will be dependent upon cables and housing for shifting. And it's amazing how crappy the shifting can be with cheap housing or cheap cables or both. Even with full-length housing, contaminants can get inside the system and make shifting a bit of a nightmare. Eleven-speed drivetrains are particularly at risk. Many mechanics swear by Teflon coated cables, which will work for a while, but then that Teflon coating will wear off at any abrupt cable bend and quickly add to the problem. Jagwire recognized this and developed their premium, "Elite Ultra-Slick" cable in response. Rather than a coated cable, it's highly polished and then undergoes a proprietary treatment that results in an ultra smooth cable that offers minimal drag inside most lined shifter housing. MSRP $25.99 USD.

Mmmm Maxxis rubber. Plus size bikes are coming like it or not. The one thing holding them back has been availability of aftermarket tire selection. Maxxis gets into the mix with their Ikon and Rekon Plus tires. Available in 27.5 x 2.8. Weight was not available but best guess is about 1000 grams. The Rekon Plus is designed for aggressive trails the Ikon plus is more for hard pack. MSRP was unavailable.
Mmmm! New-ish Maxxis rubber. Plus size bikes are coming, but the one thing holding them back has been minimal tire selections. Maxxis gets into the mix with their Ikon and Rekon Plus tires. Available in 27.5 x 2.8. Weight was not readily available but best guess is about 1000 grams, plus or minus a bit. The Rekon Plus is designed for aggressive trails, the Ikon plus is designed more for hardpack. Both are tubeless ready right out of the gate. MSRP was unavailable.

Maxxis also has their new Forekaster 29 x 2.3 Tubeless ready tire on show. Syped side knobs alternating transition knobs and a nice mix of centerline knobs make this look to be a good aggressive 29er tire. Weight MSRP
Maxxis also had their new Forekaster 29 x 2.3 tubeless-ready tire on show (what's up with the "K" trend in all their new tire names - Ikon, Rekon, Forekaster... anyone?) Siped side knobs, alternating transition knobs, and a nice mix of centerline knobs, make this look to be a good, aggressive 29er tire.

Manitou air bleed buttons 2016
The Manitou Dorado fork gets a simple upgrade: pressure venting for consistent spring rates and damping. It doesn't take much to get the inside of fork warmed up after a run or two in a bike park. Those warmed up internals on an air fork can increase the air pressure, and thus affect the suspension and handling characteristics. So, Manitou engineered in this simple push-button venting solution. Ride a couple runs hard to get the guts good and toasty, and touch the red buttons to neutralize the excess pressure.

Ergon is making their GE1 grips specifically for Enduro racing. Right. They may be designed for racing but they ll also work just fine on the trails. The idea is that a single in-board lock on ring secures the grip to the end of the handlebar. The outside end is a softer dual density compound that relieves the pressure an outer lock on ring would exert on the hand. They weigh 120 grams and cost 35 USD.
Ergon is making their GE1 grips specifically for Enduro racing. The idea is that a single, in-board lock on ring secures the grip to the end of the handlebar. The outside end is a softer, dual-density compound that relieves pressure on the ulnar nerve of the hand; Ulnar pressure is a problem for riders who tend to hold as far out on the end of the handlebar as they can. And, while they may be designed for racing, they'll also work just fine on the trails. They weigh 120 grams and cost $35 USD.

When you think WTB you think saddles tires and rims. Oh and grips. Their new saddles are good as always the new rubber is light years past than their old stuff and the new rims are spec d on Santa Cruz... nuff said. But the new Pad Loc Grips are truly a well thought out solution to a problem many riders have experienced a twisting grip. Even with lock on grips getting throttled when pulling up or landing something heavy is not uncommon. Particularly with the shift towards one bolt lock on grips designed to releave the pressure on the ulnar nerve many riders get from dual lock on type grips. And that twisting grip can lead to heavy crashes. But WTB has a neat solution that Park and Truvativ have partnered with them on. The grip has a tapered sleeve inside see the cut away grip above left. With a handle bar that s been marked in increments and the use of a specially designed Park cutting tool adaptor the end of any bar can be cut at an angle to meet that internal sleeve. Even if that one bolt is loose the grip can t twist. Simple. This isn t a system many home mechanics will want because you ll only be using it a couple times a year at best but it s something to consider having your shop do for you. Pad Loc grips come in a variety of shapes and thicknesses MSRP is 34.95 for a set. Park tools and handlebars sold seperately.
When you think WTB you may think saddles, tires, and rims. Oh, and grips. The new Pad Loc Grips are truly a well-thought-out solution to a problem many riders have experienced the twisting grip. Even with lock-on grips, getting throttled when pulling up or landing something heavy is not uncommon. WTB partnered with Park and Truvativ on this project The Pad Loc grip has a tapered sleeve inside (see the cutaway grip above) left. With a handlebar that's been marked in increments and the use of a specially designed Park cutting tool adaptor, the end of any bar can be cut at an angle to meet that internal sleeve. This not only secures the grip (even if the locking collar is not secure, the grip can't twist), but this also allows for a softer feel on the edge of the bar, which not only relieves pressure on the Ulnar nerve, but allows a grip that's still nice and thin vs. a bulge on the end of the bar. This isn't a system many home mechanics will want, because you'll only be using it a couple times a year at best, but it's something to consider having your shop do for you. Pad Loc grips come in a variety of shapes and thicknesses. MSRP is $34.95 for a set. Park tools and handlebars sold separately.

Mechanical Threads is a QBP brand that supports local bike shops. They have a variety of well messaged t-shirts available at at their many dealers. If a dealer isn t located nearby you can order their shirts online and the profits from that shirt sale will be credited to the shop nearest you. Kind of a cool program to support local shops don t you think
Mechanical Threads is a QBP T-shirt brand that supports local bike shops. They have a variety of well messaged shirts available online and at their many dealers. If a dealer isn't located nearby, you can order their shirts online, and the profits from that shirt sale will be credited to the shop nearest you. Not a money maker, but kind of a cool program to support local shops, don't you think?

LH Thomson continues their march into the dropper post category with their new 100 mm dropper the bottom post pictiured obviously the upper one is their standard 125mm dropper . Not available for show but in final pre-production stages is a 150mm dropper as well. Available in both external and stealth routing with an MSRP of 449.95 to 479.95. Weights vary by seatpost diameter but ballparks at around 590 grams plus or minus a bit depending on housing etc.
LH Thomson continues their march into the dropper post category with their new 100mm dropper (the bottom post pictured, obviously; the upper one is their standard 125mm dropper). It's available in both external and stealth routing, with an MSRP of $449.95 to $479.95. Weights vary by seatpost diameter but ballparks at around 590 grams, plus or minus a bit depending on housing, etc. Not available for show, but in final pre-production stages is a 150mm dropper as well.

Fyxsation 6 pack caddy. They also make a Growler caddy. And a wine bottle caddy. But I like this one the best. I don t think I ll be taking it on any trails in Moab but for a spin down to the water or up to a view Why not 69.95. Sure you can use a back pack but this thing just oozes class.
Fyxsation makes this 6-pack caddy. They also make a Growler caddy and a wine bottle caddy, but I like this one the best. I don't think I'll be taking it on any trails in Moab, but for a spin down to the water or up to a view? Why not? $69.95. Sure, you can use a backpack, but this thing just oozes class.

100 had their new Air Craft colors on display. Of particular note was this orange chrome version of their carbon fiber helmet. There s a red chrome version too. Both are limited edition lids and are about 2 weeks our from delivery get em whle you can.
100% had their new Air Craft colors on display. Of particular note was this orange/chrome version of their carbon fiber helmet. There's a red/chrome version, too. Both are limited edition lids and are about two weeks out from delivery. Get 'em whle you can.

Platypus hydration is well known amongs camping circles for water bottles and water filtering solutions. But now they are stepping squarely into the hydration pack game with this the Duthie 15 their premiere pack they also offer a women s pack called the Souixon 10 a Diuthie 10 and a couple smaller packs . All the bells and whistles that one d expect are here breathable mesh back panel called the Floatair 3 liter bladder helmet and pad carry compartments for tools food clothing as well as a padded eyewear pocket. The pack also has a rain fly bonus--I hate pulling out soggy gear after a wet ride . 977 grams and 149.95. 3 colors were on display green black and the red gray version pictured here yeah it looks blue that was the lighting at the venue .
Platypus Hydration is well known among camping circles for water bottles and water filtering solutions. But, now they are stepping squarely into the hydration pack game with this, the Duthie 15, their premiere pack (they also offer a women's pack called the Souixon 10, a Diuthie 10, and a couple smaller packs). All the bells and whistles that one'd expect are here: breathable mesh back panel (called the Floatair), three-liter bladder, helmet and pad carry, compartments for tools, food, clothing, as well as a padded eyewear pocket. The pack also has a rain fly (bonus - I hate pulling out soggy gear after a wet ride). Three colors were on display: green, black, and the red/gray version pictured here. The pack weighs 977 grams and costs $149.95.

It s hard to show here but the ODI Elite Pro Grip is yet another lock on grip that does away with the twin locking flanges. Like the Ergon grip and the WTB grrp this too has a padded portion to relieve ulnar nerver pressure on the ouside of the hand. It also has a slight curve to it to fit more securely in the hand and the offset grip design allows for rotating the thick padded part of the grip to where it needs to be to optimize shock absorbtion and padding. Available in red black and graphite they retail for 28.95.
It's hard to show here, but the ODI Elite Pro Grip is yet another lock-on grip that does away with the twin locking flanges in an effort to relieve nerve pressure. It also has a slight curve to it to fit more securely in the hand, and the offset grip design of the Pro Grip (there are two other grips in the line) allows for rotating the thick, padded part of the grip to optimize shock absorption and padding. Available in red, black, and graphite, they retail for $28.95.

Lezyne had these two versions of their Control Drive CO2 cartridge systems on hand. They aren t new but not a lot of people are aware that their CO2 cartridges are available with a cartridge coozy and come in the standard 16 gram as well as a 25 gram cartridge size. The Control drive allows for controlled inflation and can be operated one handed too. Black and silver 26.99
Lezyne had two versions of their Control Drive CO2 cartridge systems on hand. They aren't new, but not a lot of people are not aware that their CO2 cartridges are available with a cartridge coozy (discharging a CO2 cartridge is a downright chilling experience and some hand protection is nice), and they come in the standard, 16-gram cartridge as well as a 25-gram cartridge size. The Control drive allows for controlled inflation, and can be operated one-handed, too. Black and silver, $26.99

Birzman isn t the only game in town for torque tools for carbon and oher delicate bits Pedros had these T drivers on hand. Each color code corresonds to a different torque setting 4 Nm for yellow 5 Nm for orange and 6Nm for green and each comes with a 4mm allen a 5mm allen and a t25 torx bit. Weigth Who cares MSRP 40.
Birzman isn't the only game in town for torque tools for use on carbon and other delicate bits; Pedros had these T drivers on hand, too. Each color code corresponds to a different torque setting (4 Nm for yellow, 5 Nm for orange, and 6Nm for green) and each comes with a 4mm Allen, a 5mm Allen, and a t25 Torx bit. These are shop-quality tools. MSRP: $40.

The Xpedo GFX platform pedal weighs in at 385 grams and comes in 5 colors black blue oil slick orange and red. It s a nice looking platorm spd pedal with 6 deg of float that spins on 3 cartridge bearings. Retention duties on the generously sized 105 x 90mm platform by a spring loaded spd mechanism and 4 adjustable pins. 129 per pair.
The Xpedo GFX platform pedal weighs in at 385 grams and comes in five colors: black, blue, oil slick, orange, and red. It's a nice looking platform SPD-type pedal with six degrees of float. The GFX spins on three cartridge bearings. Retention duties on the generously sized 105 x 90mm platform are done by a spring-loaded mechanism and four adjustable pins ensure that you can say on while unclipped. $129 per pair.

MMMM Cane Creek Double Barrel Coil CS cut away. What can I say about this shock that hasn t already been said 665 without the spring. And quit drooiling on your keyboard.
MMMM! Cane Creek Double Barrel Coil CS cut-away. What can I say about this shock that hasn't already been said? $665 without the spring. And quit drooling on your keyboard.

Vittoria had their Morsa 29 x 2.3 tire on hand. This is not a new tire but looks to be something for of interest for riders with a thirst for gravity driven trail riding. It features a proprietary 4C layering process that offers hard rubber under soft lugs while reraining a light weight pinch flat resistant sidewall. Tubeless ready too. The more interesting thing is the addition of Graphene in the rubber this molecule is an allotrope of carbon it s the wikipedia age look it up and when injected into the rubber it allows the molecules to line up when rolling and to shift sideways when at rest. This allows the tire at a molecular level to offer less rolling resistance when rolling and more rolling resistence under braking forces. Yes mad science run amok but in a good way. Scence aside the Morsa looks to be a good aggressive tire with ramped center knobs for fast rolling and nicely siped side lugs for good cornering. It is available in a 27.5 and 29 x 2.3 configurations. Weights are not be found anywhere despite scouring the interwebs. MSRP looks to be 72.
Vittoria had their Morsa 29 x 2.3 tire on hand. This is not a new tire, but looks to be something of interest for riders with a thirst for gravity-driven trail riding. It features a proprietary 4C layering process that molds hard rubber under soft lugs (nothing like running a soft durometer rubber tire and ripping off all your side knobs after a single day of riding) while retaining a light weight, pinch-flat resistant sidewall. The Morsa is tubeless ready, too. The more interesting thing is the addition of Graphene in the rubber; this molecule is an allotrope of carbon (it's the Wikipedia age: look it up) and when injected into the rubber it allows the molecules to "line up" when rolling and to shift "sideways" when at rest. This allows the tire at a molecular level to offer less rolling resistance when rolling and more grip under braking forces. Science aside, the Morsa looks to be a good, aggressive tire with ramped center knobs for fast rolling, and nicely siped side lugs for good cornering. It is available in a 27.5 and 29 x 2.3 configurations. MSRP looks to be $72.

DMR Vault pedals. I can t say I persoanlly like this colorway specifically designed to match a Salsa fat bike that was unfortunately not on display but I can t help but admire the look and feel of this 169.99 purple fade pedal. The 105 x 115 mm platform offers a generous secure grippy support underfoot. It features 11 pins and a 17mm concave footbed. It s constructed of 6061 aluminum that sits on a chro mo steel axle with high load DU bushing and a cartridge bearing to keep them spinning. 410 grams. DMR has less expensive and less eye searing versions of this pedal available at 147.
DMR Vault pedals. I can't say that I like this purple fade colorway (specifically designed to match a Salsa fat bike that was, unfortunately, not on display), but I can't help but admire the look and feel of this $169.99 pedal. The 105 x 115 mm platform offers a generous, secure, grippy support underfoot. It features 11 pins per side and a 17mm concave foot-bed. It's constructed of 6061 aluminum that sits on a chromoly steel axle with a high-load DU bushing paired with a cartridge bearing to keep them spinning. 410 grams. (DMR has less expensive (and less eye searing) versions of this pedal available at $147.)

Nothing new at MRP but their SXG guide is too damn sexy not to show it off. 30-34T and 34-38T compatible. 4mm hex key opening on both top and bottom Alloy and carbon versions. Boost compatible. 7-2 speed compatible. ISCG 05 mounting. A nylon upper and lower with TPU material strategicallu placed to keep chain chatter to a minimum plus a replaceable SX skid... Mmmm-mmm Whats not to love 169.95 for the alloy version shown here 224.95 for the carbon backing plate version. 149 grams for the alloy 34-38T version 109 grams for the 30-34T carbon version.
Last but not least; while there was nothing new at MRP, their SXG guide is too damn sexy not to show it off: 30-34T and 34-38T compatible, 4mm hex key opening on both top and bottom, aluminum and carbon versions, Boost compatible, 1 or 2 chainring speed compatible, and fits ISCG 05 mounts. The nylon upper and lower guide has a TPU lining inside to keep chain chatter to a minimum, plus, the bash is replaceable... Mmmm-mmm! $169.95 for the alloy version shown here, $224.95 for the carbon backing plate version. 149 grams for the alloy 34-38T, 109 grams for the 30-34T carbon version.


And that's a wrap! Stay tuned for Taipei updates on PB next week for more tech.




170 Comments

  • 170 5
 Anyone else thinking the wtb grips are a solution to a non-existent problem?? Seems like an even more effective way of removing a core sample of your liver than standard lock-ons, not to mention the extra work involved in ensuring you can't use any other grip unless you cut another 100mm off your bar.. I just switched to ODI Elite grips like above, they are the tits.
  • 71 1
 Completely agree. I would never cut my bars at such a wonky angle for the purpose of holding a single proprietary grip in place at a single fixed angle. Oh, and good luck ever trying to resell your triangle-cut bars, too.
  • 67 1
 I will NEVER cut a stupid angle on the end of my bars to accomodate a WTB-specific grip.
  • 33 4
 A good use of this idea was to cut the steering column and use a specific steam to guarantee perfect alignment with the front wheel
  • 9 3
 You won't but if WTB convinces bike producers to spec their grip on their bike, an already cut down bar will also be speced on the bike. That only means if you buy that bike, you'll kind of be forced to use their grips as long as you keep the original handlebar. I may be wrong on this one
  • 62 2
 I've never had a lock on grip that rotated... never!
  • 17 0
 i agree. Saw those ERGON grips and thought they looked awesome then scrolled down a pic to the WTB grips... what a joke. who ever they paid to think of that idea is headed in the wrong direction. and then you see special tools needed to cut them at that angle.... no thanks. WTB should end production on that bad idea before they waste anymore money. Also, if WTB wants to pay people for bad ideas I'm sure I could come up with some silly things. How about a triangular seat tube so there is no way you can put your seat post in backwards....
  • 22 20
 @Bureb thats exactly what WTB accomplished. Honestly I thought this whole idea was crazy. But I got some of the grips and cut up my Boobars and I love them. I did expirence grip twisting from Renthal, Odi, and Specialize grips. Thats gone now. And they are wicked comfy on discents. Havnt had locked on fingers in a really long time now.
  • 16 12
 Yeah, alright down vote the guy who has actually tried the grips. Man your heads are five feet deep in your asses. Scared of too much stuff.
  • 4 2
 You're an ideas man.
  • 7 1
 Since when did lock-on grips not work 100%? Oh, so they always have worked. OK, pass.
  • 3 9
flag chillrider199 (Feb 29, 2016 at 9:55) (Below Threshold)
 I always had problems with them eventually. Go big and bottom out and the weight just turns them down. It sucks and its sketchy. And yes, I tighten the bolts.
  • 16 2
 If you don't put a little grease on the lock-on screws you cant get them tight enough imo, a little grease on each end and you can torque them down enough that your bar would probably twist in the stem before the grip will. Also the plus side of that is you can remove them easier without stripping the allen head. Never go in dry.
  • 10 0
 As my grips wear I like to rotate them slightly to put rubber where it's needed, dosn't add much life but enough to warrent doing it. Not an option with this grip.
  • 6 1
 how many shops are going to end up with a dusty propitiatory park tools setup they wont ever use?
  • 6 0
 "This not only secures the grip (even if the locking collar is not secure, the grip can't twist)" What? So if the locking collar is not secured I'd be less worried about them twisting and more worried about the grip sliding off the bar.
  • 8 2
 It sounds like cutting the bars allows for full BOOST applications creating the ultimate boost/bar cut standard.
  • 1 1
 Um... What?
  • 3 1
 you guys will not buy these, but believe me, there are people out there that will buy them, I have a couple of riding buddies that are candidates for this type of nonsense purchase.
  • 4 1
 if twisting grips are really an issue there are simpler ways to accomplish the same thing that grip is doing.

1.) glue... people put it on motorcycle grips.. I don't because i don't like the hassle when removing them but even hairspray can help.

2.) a simpler way that wouldnt require a new tool to be manufactured would be to have a bolt/nut on the end that is passed through the outside grip collar then through a hole in the ends of the handlebar that could be drilled with.... well a drill.... hope that makes sense without drawing a picture.

3.) serrations in the locking collar that dig into the handlebar when tightened....

Anyways, point is that this idea is overkill and ridiculous

either way, its a joke and not necessary.
  • 3 6
 Um its not a joke. See I put these grips on and I now love them. Why? Because they dont rotate. And they are comfy as a lazy boy couch. And theyre lasting pretty damn long. I got fed up with lock on grips. Now I have these and they are great. And I wont be getting fed up with them.
  • 4 0
 just curious, what made you fed up with lock on grips?
  • 2 2
 Well I always had problems with them twisting after huge hits. Which thats never safe. Every now and then Id slide out and the end lock ring would rip off. (That one Im curious as to how it always ends up happening.) My hands ride far outward toward the grips. So the edge of my palms would sit on the rings. Blisters would accur on some crazy rough descents. But padloc stopped all of that. Like im such a happy customer with these things.
  • 1 0
 cutting the bars is what some people is afraid of, including myself, I actually fiddle with bar set up a few times a year so that's why I wouldn't be the customer for this, I believe that personal continuous improvement in MTB riding is the mix of the development of oneself riding skills and the flexibility of the bike to evolve according to it.
There is no "ultimate-perfect-absolute" bike set up, bikes should to be able to evolve at a similar pace as your skills, IMO.
@chillrider199 , have you faced the problem of wanting to rotate the bar? is it a problem?
  • 1 0
 No I havnt. I understand that adjustments are limited if you do this. Even if your hands arent lined up with the pad perfectly, theyre still comfy. When I build my bikes I spend hours getting it to the perfect angles and such. So I never move my bars.
  • 2 0
 that's a problem man "spending hours to get "perfect" angles"
  • 1 0
 No i mean everything in general. I spend like 10 minutes on my bars at most. Bars are easy.
  • 1 1
 Someone just needs to invent a grim with an allen on the end that operates an internal fixing that works like a Hope Head Doctor.Problem Solved and my bars can stay intact
  • 65 1
 Don't want your grips to slip? Mutilating your bars is the only solution. Other than, you know, putting two lockrings on your grips.
  • 6 2
 Whilst I agree that bar mutilation is a bit extreme single lock ring grips have evolved for a reason. Double lock rings are uncomfortable! "Hey lets place an immovable, narrow, metal band right under the ulner nerve".
  • 2 0
 dude you should consider a wider handlebar or hope.
  • 53 1
 The industry has lost its mind with the price of everything. In a weak market this stuff continues to climb in price with no real increase in actual value....whiskey tango foxtrot!
  • 37 1
 Just remember the article last week about Fatbikes, the average buyer has an income well over $100k. Average Joe is no longer the target market and the cycling industry is going full yuppie. Of course when the yuppies get bored with them they're all going to shit themselves when they turn back to their old market to find a sea of Direct sales brands where their sales used to be.
  • 10 0
 +1 Fix-the-Spade
  • 6 3
 Full retail is mainly for boutique collectors, tourists, novices and suckers. You see this a lot in the ski and snowboard industry as well, where someone is always willing to pay for the latest and greatest on an impulse at local shops, while those who know wait for the clearance sales or look for online overstock of previous years items. Helps if you know what you're getting into though, often you get what you pay for... Sucks when you see someone pay full price and they come back with a delaminated ski/board or a bike that creaks, at least if you buy it at a local shop they will work with you for an exchange or warranty issue.
  • 2 0
 Fix-the-Spade, that is the 100% truth.
  • 1 0
 Make that + 1,000!
  • 1 2
 thought it was whiskey tango bullshit...
  • 2 1
 I get tired of reminding people but sometimes I just have to..... Average Joe has NEVER been the target market. And as always - there are entry level and mid range bikes and parts available. The best part is those bikes are better than ever. Top offerings have increased a little in price yes, but you do not need these things and nobody is forcing you to buy. It's just a lot of whining about something that is a simple reality. It is what it is. Go ride.
  • 34 1
 Funny how KMC's chain is evidently worth $193, or they "wouldn't be selling it"
  • 14 3
 Evidently, they'd like to get $193 for it. I have a somewhat beat up Bridgestone MB6. I'd like to get $10,000 for it. Evidently, it's worth that since that's what I want, right? I don't think that word means what you think it means...
  • 25 0
 Funny, the chain for my KTM which is 10 times the material and 2000 times as strong costs about 40$ less.
Think I might rather cut my carbon bars for those innovative WTB grips then and get me a pair of those neat 5.10 Bowling shoes.
Or should I just invest in the Pinarello Dogma XM 9.9?! Decisions, decisions..

WTF 2016?
  • 15 0
 Dentists like brightly coloured chains
  • 4 0
 i feel like i just bought the 10 speed DLC black coated version of that chain with red accents for like $75. not quite sure i understand why this particular one is almost 3 times as much, but hey... whatev...
  • 5 6
 In an open marketplace, if you ask for a certain price and people are willing to pay that price, then it's "worth" it. KMC's not stupid, if they're asking that much, then evidently, some people are willing to pay that amount.
  • 10 0
 $193 for a chain?!!!!!
[cough] [sneeze] [head explodes]
  • 2 0
 @meagerdude depends on volume, though: If they don't sell enough of them because of too high price, they end up going to outlet clearance, & depending on production costs, that could mean they lose money on them. For instance, I have 2 "all black" Wipperman chains that were half what this chain costs at initial retail(to be fair, 10 speed, not 11Smile I ended up getting them for less than the normal, non-black chain retails for(I paid about $19,) because they were being clearanced on Steep & Cheap.
  • 1 0
 There's no one but lbs's that actually charge that much for them. Theres loads on ebay and CRC carries them
  • 2 0
 Why do Canadians hate dentists so much so in here?
  • 1 2
 It will be worth it the moment someone buys it. Simple as. Whether or not it's worth it to me or you is a different matter.
  • 2 0
 I just bought one yesterday on CRC... I have a new xx1 too but found it for 102$ cad shipping included so decided to go with it as I am building my dream bike and wanted everything black! Even at this price it took me a couple of weeks to take a decision... oh well, I'll try it once and then I'll have my xx1! But 193$ is a real joke!!! Even at 102$ but well, all black got me! lol
  • 1 0
 @Timo82 ...did it make it thru customs or did you get dinged? I'm ordering in a couple weeks
  • 1 0
 Talked myself out of a chain... Attn wiggle/crc: free chain for me for free advertising pls--- suddenly out of stock does me no good
  • 2 0
 @wolf-amongst-lambs don't know yet, I'll let you know! But like I read on pinkbike the other day, you have to choose the ''untracked'' free option (there's a tracked free option too) otherwise you WILL pay some extras for sure!
  • 1 0
 @wolf-amongst-lambs Well... 14 days delivery to Quebec with 25$ of applicable taxes on a 100$ chain! Thats 25%! Really thought a chain would pass through customs without any fees! Frown I won't buy on CRC anymore!
  • 29 4
 There are also "non-ghetto" solutions to ghost shifting into your spokes. They are called limit screws and come free with every single mech you have ever bought. Which makes that Box components spacer look kinda like utterly pointless and expensive extra weight...
  • 18 7
 When a chain's slapping around on a rowdy descent it doesn't always care about limit screws.
  • 12 0
 If your 'getting rowdy' on a decent your not likely to have your chain in your lowest gear. Your more likely to be in the high speed gears.
  • 6 3
 Whether my chain "cares" about my limit screws matters not. They are there. They physically block your mech from being able to reach the spokes. If they are set correctly, your mech CAN NOT get to the spokes without something being seriously wrong or broken. These spacers are designed to make your bike look pretty and nothing else. Pointless, worthless, tat.
  • 4 3
 You absolutely can get your mech into the spokes hitting nasty stuff at speed. The chain will bounce around, get on the inside of the cassette, then when you step on the pedals the torque bends/snaps your hangar and mech meets spoke. The limit screws don't factor into it.

Don't believe me? Go look at all the WC pro's bikes. If it wasn't an issue, they wouldn't be running protectors and saving the weight instead. And yet they do. (Oh, and before someone starts moaning about sponsorship, it's only SRAM that integrates it into their cassettes, but even the Shimano riders run custom built protectors).
  • 3 1
 No. A well set up mech cannot get to your spokes. A well set up mech CAN NOT let your chain get between the cassette and the spokes at the bottom, and if its happening at the top then your freehub is toast. Seriously, if you are having mech in spoke problems, then something isnt set up right on your bike. Remember a couple of years back when all the pros were running full ranges of gears? How many times did you see a mech write off a pros wheel on a wc dh track? That'll be none...

Yes they are all losing their extra gears, having finally caught up with the rest of the planet and realising that 7 is plenty and any more just leads to the need to double shift. The spacers are there to look pretty. a bit of pipe cut to the right length with nice flat ends would do the job just as well and be lighter. You cant get a properly set up mech to ghost shift from the cog right next to the spokes, so how you imagine it is ever gonna make it across the 1.5 inches of room (even with no "guard") on a 7 speed setup is beyond me. Its a stupid product for people who don't think before they buy. Sadly, thats most people...
  • 21 0
 Question about those air venting systems on the forks (like the Dorado shown here. I get the physics of how the air pressure in an air fork can increase as things heat up. But if you bleed the excess pressure out while it's heated up, what happens when the fork cools back down? Isn't the fork then under pressurized back at the cooler temperature? How exactly does this work?
  • 3 0
 very good question indeed and I hope some tech guru can shed some light on that
  • 4 3
 Im a guru !! I Guess the air in the pressure chamber is not affected, it suppose to be only the air trapped during assembly !!
  • 23 1
 You are not venting the air spring, just internal pressure that bulds up inside the sliders that contributes to a higher spring rate after hard use. Riders used to use a sharpened zip tie to pry the lip of the seals and dust wipers away from the stanchion tubes to release air, but that can damage the seals. It happens with coil forks as well.
  • 13 6
 If you had relieved the air spring while the fork was "hot", after it cooled down it would create low pressure. If you open the relief valve when low pressure is in the system, air will enter the system and the air spring will go back to normal pressure.
  • 91 4
 Just think of it like a queef... Your girl is not deflating, she's just letting out a little excess pressure from air getting shoved in under heavy use.
  • 2 1
 @sino428 while your air springs pressure may change slightly from use, it will be pretty unnoticeable. But everytime you cycle your fork you are creating a vacume behind the seal, on hard hits you can pull air into the lowers (in the case of the durado, uppers) and begin to build up pressure in the "neutral" space of the fork. Sliding a zip tie past the seal every few rides is how we usually do it. The "neutral" space has much more volume than the air spring in the fork, so a couple psi can be very noticeable. Your fork will begin to seem much harsher. As for negative pressure after riding from cooling, that's going to be pretty minimal, and the fork will equalize quickly on its next use. Seals to a pretty good job of keeping dirt out but due to the direction of the lip on the seal, air gets in easier than out. In some cases you can build up enough pressure to pop the seal out if the tolerances aren't super tight. Have had it happen to me on one occasion before I started to regularly bleed my fork(s)
  • 5 0
 @AaGro well said !!
  • 1 1
 I should specify more better, you'll also only get negative pressure after use if the cooling is enough to negate any pressure build up from riding. Only if you bleed it at the very bottom of the last run of the day or driving down in elevation drastically will you begin to even possibly have any real negative pressure, or vacum.
  • 2 1
 @AaGro
that is something I can work with - even as not technican ;-)
THANKS!
  • 4 0
 There were on moto cross forks years ago. I ran Monster ts for dh racing back in 2000 and I would remove the rebound knobs and damper cartridge c rings so I could let the air out at the top of each run. It was a ghetto way of doing it but it made a measureable difference in the forks ability to track the terrain. That was an open bath fork. The manitou is a cartridge fork and were known for blowing the lower seals off and dumping oil on the rotor. My sense is that the buttons help in the ways they mention but of course they neglect to mention seals blowing off. Seems they haven't taken a page from one of the first inverted forks, the stratos super 8, and made a seal capture sulystem that threads into the bottom of the lower leg.

The arm chair engineers on the net are abundant but the ignorance of the actual engineers is ass-tounding at times. Like the time back in 2007 before ide bars took off I was at interbike and was a big fan of manitou and the dorado....they axed it right around that time and I was like "WHY!". I tried to tell those clowns at answer that they needed to produce a 32" bar and they said nobody wanted anything that wide and I replied "make it and t let the consumer decide for themselves and cut it down as needed." I don't wonder why companies like this teeter on the edge of disaster. The list of f*ck ups for Answer is long.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for all the answers everyone. I think where I got tripped up is where the article said "Those warmed up internals on an air fork" which led me to believe this was as issue with air sprung pressure. But as @RichardCunningham pointed out it can be an issue with coil forks too which makes sense based on the explanation.
  • 1 0
 So you are telling me that I can produce air riding my bike??!!! Call green peace and tell them that their work is done!!!
  • 1 0
 Is it just me that went "dang, that's a good idea, what's all the shit talk about the grips" in all fairness I'd go Ergon but my race face strafe seem to do a good job.
  • 1 0
 Heck, this isn't even new in MTB, either: Shiver DCs have a little set screw in the top cap you can remove to bleed air. I would actually compress the lower slightly when I put them back in, in order to generate a slight vacuum: It seemed to both make my fork slightly more supple immediately afterward, as well as keep me from having to bleed them as often.
  • 1 0
 @a-r-c The Dorado is not a cartridge fork, it is open bath. Also, they are not "known" for blowing seals. I've been running my Dorado for 4 or 5 years now, and another 3 people in my area have run Dorados for the same amount of time or longer.

Also, to add a little info on the pressure relief valves, pressure builds up between the outer legs and the stanchions in three main ways: air does get pulled in past the seals, the fork heats up and as you change elevation. As the fork goes into its travel the pressure between the outer and the stanchion goes up.

I have been running the pressure relief valves (and the IRT for the Dorado) for months now. Every so often I pull the front wheel, compress the damper leg about half way while pressing down the bleed valve. At full extension that leg then sits under a little vacuum. With the fork back together I compress the fork and press the air spring side valve to get a tiny bit of vacuum on that side. This way, the fork has to go through a little bit of travel before the pressure inside the outer legs switches over to positive pressure. I find it makes it more supple.

Fox has had bleed valves on the 40 for a couple years now. As others mentioned these aren't the first ones in mtb, but they were probably the most visible on a very popular fork.
  • 1 0
 @intensemack10. Just a bit of background so you don't think I just pull this stuff out of my ass. I was racing on the orginal dordao design back in 2003 then 2004 and 2005. All these forks were the same in layout as the current dorado which is a cartridge system which is housed in the stantion tube. The main difference in design between a open bath and a closed damper is that with a closed system there is seperate lubricating oil for the bushings, that being said, the Dorado is a cartridge system with about 30-40 cc of lubrication oil...I liked using 0w syn motor oil in mine....between the stantion and the upper leg. It adheres to the bushings and doesn't run away so quickly that there is a bunch of heat build up. I also used this in my fox 40s for 6 years...some of the smoothest forks around and never needed to burp these forks due to lower heat inside the forks. To be honest I don't know what Manitou recommends for a lubrication oil in these newer Dorados. I would imagine its fork oil, which has lower adhesion to the bushings then 0w syn oil.

While I agree that elevation can affect the forks air pressure it is subtle unless you ride at 25'000 feet above sea level. If you set your spring pressure at the base of the ski area to what you ride for sag, you will notice very little difference in the 1500feet of gain you will likely ride down. The main culprit is as you pointed out is heat due to friction. This can be attributed to two things...incorrect or incomplete lubrication of the bushings or gasification of the said lubricating oils as they attempt to cool the heated internals. Depending on the situation it could be one or both of these things.

Further....I have seen more dorados with blown seals and ruin front brakes then any other design. Granted this is partly due to gravity....but to be honest they are the most supple piles of maintenance crap I have ever used.

Happy trails.
  • 1 0
 Humble pie. You're right Intense mack10. Its open bath. I prefer closed damper systems Like the 40s and the earlier dorados. I digress. Nothing more to say here...lol.
  • 1 0
 @a-r-c based on your own definition, the Dorado is not a cartridge fork. The damper oil on the damper leg also provides the lubrication for the bushings. Have you ever taken one apart? You obviously have no idea what you're talking about.

The air leg then uses a splash bath oil for the bushing lubrication. Manitou's recommended oils are Motorex Semi Bath for the air side and Motorex Racing Fork oil 5wt for the damper. Then Prep M grease for the air piston lubrication and for the seals.

Apparently your knowledge is based on the older generation model, which is very different than the current one. The details I am referring to are for the current model.
  • 17 1
 $25 for a shifter cable. That is practically as expensive as audiophile speaker cable. Better last a long time.
  • 4 3
 Shimano already has cables that expensive.
  • 3 2
 Probably makes as much difference too
  • 1 0
 Genius
  • 12 0
 A leather 6 bottle beer caddy??
If i want to be a hipster I'll ride a single speed, grow a beard and be a tosser thanks very much.
  • 8 1
 One-third of the way there...
  • 2 0
 Says the hipster?
  • 13 0
 Icebike and frostbike have gotten my tired brain all confused
  • 12 0
 Brain freeze
  • 8 0
 If you don't have lots of money the bike industry is a COLD place.
  • 3 2
 @properp I see some enduro-specific heatgrips coming in for your cold hands right now... starting at only 120$ for one... or 240$ if you have two cold hands.
  • 11 0
 PINKBIKE!!! Why no nahbs coverage?!?!?!
  • 4 0
 Their is some rediculess politics with nahbs.
  • 3 1
 It's coming. My good friend is down there showing off his goodies and said a pinkbike journalist group came by and took pictures.
  • 10 2
 $193 for a *painted* KMC chain when XTR can be had for $40?
Crack smoking is alive and well at Frostbike.
  • 3 2
 It's definitely not painted. I have the green one on my MTB and the color is still on there after multiple rides. Paint would have worn off after a single ride.
  • 2 1
 Yeah it's not paint , I have the black one for my XO1DH set up, rode it an entire season, still looks and shifts like the day I got it .
  • 4 0
 So call it a "finish" - you're paying x4 the going rate of XX / XTR for a KMC chain in pretty colors?
They may be made in the KMC factory, but Shimano's proprietary designs shift better & have consistently tested better for longevity in the field & lab.
I can get 200+ hours of hard riding out of an XTR chain. Unless that $200 KMC lasts 1000+ hours, you're throwing money out the window.
  • 1 0
 If you buy it at retail: but I often see stuff like this at clearance prices a year later, because the price is so high. I've got 2 black 10 speed chains from Wipperman for exactly that reason, they were like $100 at first retail, I paid like $19.
  • 1 1
 Yup , I only got it cuz it's fully black and pretty bad ass
  • 2 0
 Anyone elses chain connector snapped on their kmc chain?
  • 1 1
 my XX1 chain is only like $40 tops
  • 6 1
 " Mechanical Threads is a QBP T-shirt brand that supports local bike shops. They have a variety of well messaged shirts available online and at their many dealers. If a dealer isn't located nearby, you can order their shirts online, and the profits from that shirt sale will be credited to the shop nearest you. Not a money maker, but kind of a cool program to support local shops, don't you think?"

This is the coolest thing I have read this year. I wanna buy one just so I can walk into my local shop wearing it and confuse the crap out of them.
  • 3 0
 Are Manitou ever going to actually release the top caps for the Dorado?
Every now and then over the last couple of years they turn up at some bike show or other, but never appear for sale, no indication of pricing or availability, is this a joke? Will they ever make it so i can buy some or do they simply have nothing else to bring to a show, WTF!
  • 3 0
 The us of "K" in words by maxxis is the new standard in spelling that they have developed. They are going to shove this standard down our throats and we are all going to complain to our mothers about it... but in 2 years, we'll all be using it... just wait and see.
  • 3 0
 Makxis ... expect to see the name change soon.
  • 1 0
 Soon they will be called Markxist, a revolutionary company promising to bring new industry standards to all classes of mountain bikers Wink
  • 2 0
 Not sure why the lock was a spot light. I had one of those 15 years ago and in my opinion the Bell one is nicer... and cheaper. LOL!

The Lezyne CO2 solution once again... isn't new. And they're crappy.

Really not sure why DMR thinks that pedal is worth $170.

T-Drivers have been around for what seems like centuries now and that solution has nothing new to offer.

Not sure how I'd feel chopping the end of my bars off for a grip that may or may not be on the market when I need new grips. Interesting solution though.
  • 7 1
 Enduro specific grips
  • 2 0
 the enduro meme again
  • 2 0
 i'd like to hear what anyone has to say about the vittoria morsas. their tubeless cyclocross tires are easy to set up and super grippy plus grey sidewalls are rad on the right bike.
  • 1 0
 Been using their Saguaros up until a a few days ago, now trying their new Mezcal Graphene; it's an XC/dry conditions type tire, but it is good. Rolls fast, great grip on the corners, sets up tubeless easy. We buy them here for approx US$50.
  • 1 0
 Recently, a bunch of buddy's have been riding Gomas. the sidewalls seem to be great when dealing with desert, tire killing rocks.
  • 5 0
 Wow - the Platy hydration pack is 77g? Sign me up! Wink
  • 3 0
 Well played, sngltrkmnd. Make that 977 grams. I'll edit that to read correctly.
  • 2 0
 Sweet coverage as usual @meagerdude
  • 1 0
 I've read customer reviews on that chain, everyone says it's not worth the money. And the 100% helmet looks sick, but i can tell it's going to be $150 more just because it's a "limited edition".... i wouldn't wear it due to how prone i am do crashing
  • 1 0
 Been looking for a while for a replacement pedal, using DX's and M785 trail, problems with both really, the DX's weight is an issue, also mud retention.. and the M785 although better still gets clogged, and clipping in gets difficult as there seems to be no definite feel to align the cleat and the pedal... was wondering whether this Issi trail might be an answer ? There definitely seems to be a lack of Shimano spd compatible pedals out there, especially in the DH/AM sections, looking for a light platform spd compatible pedal with decent mud clearing, simple clip-in, durable and servicable.....
  • 1 0
 Unless you absolutely want Shimano products for whatever reason, why not try crankbrothers? Gotta be the simplest desing on the market, wide variety of models from (almost)massless titanium/unicorn alloy, tour the france record breaking eggbeaters to nuclear apocalypse enduring Mallets Race. I even think you could set them in concrete they'd still clip.
  • 5 4
 Kriptonite ny locks... If your bike get stolen, they will replace it. Unless you live in ny, where it does not apply. Wtf.
SRAM cassette Frown
Fsa cranks looks ace.
Wtb no comment.
  • 1 0
 Kryptonite will refund your bike only if you send them a proof that you are already insured against bike theft, and provide the said broken lock.
  • 1 0
 there is a power cutter thing that can cut through literally any chain in like 5 seconds, some are battery and others can be plugged into the bases of lightposts
  • 1 0
 I'm skeptical of how much different the Graphene impregnated Vittoria tires make. Graphene is astronomically expensive, so the amount they are adding has to be incredibly small at their price point.
  • 1 0
 Why is everyone bitching about the ulner nerve. I ride lock ons and have never had a problem with comfort. You're on an mtb for christs sake. It's rocky and rooty and rough. Nothing "comfy" about it
  • 1 0
 Although in their defence I ride an 8 and 8 which reduces the feedback to my hands and arms
  • 3 0
 Still waiting for 5:10 to make a good looking shoe.
  • 1 0
 the only people who claim they have bought these and are giving a positive post are people who have a invested interest in the product in my honest opinion
  • 4 2
 Those Maxxis tires look awfully nice...
  • 4 3
 c'mon, those DMR pedals look SWEET! but wtb's new grips just...don't look worth it.
  • 3 2
 I think those Maxxis people are playing too much Mortal Kombat. Now they think they can put "K's" in everything
  • 2 4
 I like the bowling shoes from Five10... well, I thought of the bowling shoe concept about 15 years ago so, I'm going to need a good % of the sales from units sold...15-ish years ago, I drove about and hour-90 so I could hit one of my favorite trails. Got the place where I usually parked, unloaded my bike, my backpack, gloves, helmet... shoes, shoes, ok, the shoes are under the rear seat? ..... no, in the trunk? no... under the front seats? SON OF NUT CRACKER!!! I left my bike shoes back at the house. M Fin', now what... all I had was the shoes on my feet which were a pair of semi business style dress shoes..They weren't a pair of Bally but, nice, nonetheless.. Well, I wasn't about to drive all the way home without riding so, I just said F-it and when for a ride anyway. Turns out, those shoes were great match up for the pedals I had at the time.. I never slipped off and had a great ride. Since then, I have never been very picky about shoes.. I do prefer SPD style shoes but, when I'm using platform pedals. I could care less what shoes I wear along as they aren't laced shoes. that's the one thing I hate about shoes in general --- laces. laces get get janky too quick, thorns and prickers get stuck in them too easy, they come un-tied too quick and if the touch the bathroom floor, forget (old Seinfeld reference). I'd rather do no laces at all, just some sorta slip on or a Velcro strap design. Lately, I have been keen on Shoes-For-Crews shoes, the sole design of those shoes has insane traction .. I can walk on ice with em and not slip,, scale really steep rock edges without a problem and of course, stay glue'd to any pedal. This is the model I have been using lately: www.shoesforcrews.com/sfc3/index.cfm?changeWebsite=US_en&route=c_store.viewDetailsOfProduct&partnumber=6044

fantastic shoe, they last a good long time, pretty cheap price and silly good traction. ehh, they look a little Mr Rogers but, I don't care.. I'll out ride half ya anyway so, who cares.
  • 1 0
 I'm going to need a brown leather wool lined jacket to go with those shoes, and a fedora with a feather in it for work.
  • 2 0
 I wish 5:10 would make a shoe for extremely hot weather too.
  • 2 0
 Hollow pins reduce chain "stretch"? I'm calling BS without some proof.
  • 1 0
 6 pack holder looks good but does it hold cans and fit on my fatter tube 29r? Hmm
  • 4 6
 If you (like me) don't want to (or can't) shell out $95 for the Kryptonite lock, Harbor Freight has a slightly smaller equivalent for like $20. Does the job for me. Chain link locks forever!
  • 6 1
 I can guarantee that the harbor freight chain will be a doddle to cut in comparison to the kryptonite.
  • 6 0
 Can you ACTUALLY guarantee it ....
  • 2 0
 Yes.
  • 1 0
 And my big problem with big ass chains is not toughness, it's weight. Gotta carry that anchor around with you.
  • 1 0
 The thing is that I don't leave my bike expensive bikes unattended for long periods of time (normally just going in for a burger after a ride while the bike is locked in the bed of my truck), and when I do leave one alone for a while, that massive chain link lock is securing a beat up 1997 Kona Hardtail. The whole concept of a lock is to deter, as nothing can't be broken with the right tools or enough time. My only point was that the look of the massive chain link lock is normally enough to deter, not that the $20 lock is better than the Kryptonite.
  • 2 2
 Those Maxxis tires look great! It is about time for something that will handle the mud better.
  • 1 0
 Or just get the 2.7" wide Minions instead.
  • 1 0
 Is that $40 for all three Pedro's torque wrenches?
  • 2 1
 40/piece
  • 1 0
 i've never looked into it, but that seems like an ok deal if its all three.
  • 3 2
 At first glance I thought that KMC chain was rusty
  • 3 2
 Look at the price...that's not rust, it's coated in gold!
  • 2 1
 Same old crap. Different barrel.
  • 2 0
 Ergon or ODI ?
  • 2 2
 Finally! A winter platform pedal shoe. It is mind boggling that one hasn't existed until now. Seriously, WTF bike industry?
  • 1 0
 Lol yeah, going out on your bike and getting rat arsed is so classy!
  • 1 0
 Lets see some graphene frames!!!!
  • 3 2
 NX hate storm inbound...
  • 4 0
 It's heavy; next hater please!
  • 2 1
 Besides attaching a brick to your back wheels it's a good system.
  • 2 0
 Its inexpensive and I dont care that much if i break it. Next.
  • 4 5
 I can't be the only one who wishes Thomson would make their dropper's stanchion black.
  • 2 2
 Pizza caddy anyone ? Beers without pizza is mtb with mud.
  • 3 5
 aaand... Maxxis delivers what looks like the most reasonable tread pattern for a PLUS tyre...
  • 1 1
 Pllllllease just make something relevant in a 26x2.7 Maxxis! C'mon Maxxis! You Can Do It! You Know you can!
  • 1 0
 Its a HR2 with intermediate knobs.
  • 1 3
 I would so invest in that 6-pack caddy!
  • 3 1
 Would probably a pretty popular item here in Vancouver....to the hipster crowd.
  • 1 4
 Nice looking 5-10s !
  • 4 4
 wish they weren't a cold weather shoe. I like how they look!
  • 3 4
 I want a pair of the brown ones for just every day sneakers! Look nicer than most shoes on the market.
  • 2 2
 I use the grey shoes in the back for every day use. They are light grippy and styleish. I just wish they would put harder rubber on the heals. The stealth rubber wears out to quickly on the heals.
  • 3 2
 Not included in the price of these 5-10's are the Forrest Gump leg braces...extra moola just to get the look right.





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