7 of the Best New Mountain Bike Pants Ridden & Rated

Jun 7, 2022 at 22:38
by Mike Kazimer  

The days of wearing heavy duty, repurposed moto pants for mountain biking have become a distant memory, and there's now a wide array of options out there designed for everything from rainy laps in the bike park to long pedal-fests. Over the last few months I've been putting seven of the latest mountain bike pants to the test, subjecting them to all of the elements of a Pacific Northwest spring. That means they saw more than their fair share of mud, lots of puddles, and some sunnier weather thrown into the mix.

For reference, I have a 32-inch waist and a 33-inch inseam, and tested a size medium or 32 for all of the pants featured below.



Review Contents

NF DP4
Yeti Ridgway
Specialized Gravity Pants
DHaRCO Gravity Pants
Sombrio Vanquish
Nukeproof Blackline
Rapha Trail Fast + Light
Top Picks



NF DP4 Pants

NF make all of their apparel in Vancouver, BC, one of the reasons you see so many riders on the Shore wearing their products. The fact that they're comfortable and durable doesn't hurt either...

The DP4 is the latest version of their do-it-all riding pant, constructed from a nylon / spandex fabric blend that has a DWR coating to help ward off rain showers and puddle splashes. The biggest change from the previous version has to do with the pocket configuration. The very effective, zippered phone pocket is still on the right side, but there's now an arm-swallowing pocket on the left side with a smaller pocket inside it to hold a bike park pass or credit card. A regular-sized pocket is on located on the right hip, and there's also some bonus storage at the back of the waistband – that's a great spot to stick gloves.

NF DP4 Pants

• Closure type: Oversized elastic waist band
• Colors: black/black, black/white
• 90% nylon, 10% spandex
• Sizes: XS - XXL
• Inseam: 30", option to add 3" to inseam for M and L sizes (tested)
• Weight: 448 grams
• Made in Vancouver, BC
• MSRP: $189 USD
ridenf.com/
NF also added in a 'long' option for their medium and large sizes, which is what I tested. That adds 3” to the inseam length, bumping it up from 30” to 33”. That'll be a handy feature for lanky riders, and I'll admit it was nice to have pants that didn't feel like they'd shrunk in the wash. The waist closure remains the same, a big, stretchy elastic band that's reminiscent of the kidney belts that warehouse workers and weight lifters wear. It does the job, and the pants stayed securely in place on every ride. I did notice that my waist would get hotter and sweatier than it would with the other pants in this roundup – there's more material around the waist compared to the thinner, ratchet strap fit system found on the Yeti or Rapha pants. There's also no fly, so you'll need to pull the front of the pants down like you would with sweat pants for trailside pitstops.

The DP4's ended up being the pants I'd grab when it was a little cooler and wetter out, or for doing bike park / shuttle laps. They're comfortable and stretchy enough for extended pedaling, but they aren't the absolute airiest or lightest options out there. The flip side is that the fabric has held up extremely well – I've slid in the mud more than once, and ridden through plenty of branches and brambles and they're still looking good as new. They are one of the more expensive options on this list, but potential buyers should keep in mind that they're supporting a local business, not a mega-factory cranking out thousands of garments a day. NF also have a certified used gear section on their website for riders looking to save some money.




Pros
+ Tough, stretchy fabric holds up well to crashes & abrasion
+ Phone pocket is perfectly placed
+ Long inseam option on some sizes
Cons
- Not the lightest or most breathable option (if that's a priority)
- No fly
- Expensive, but they are handmade in Vancouver




Yeti Ridgway Pants

The Ridgway pants are new in Yeti's lineup for 2022, with a cut that Yeti says was inspired by modern joggers. In other words, they're essentially sweatpants that you can ride in without getting too sweaty. They accomplish that goal admirably, and they're in the running for the most comfortable option in this test.

The fit is more casual than some of the more race-oriented options out there, with plenty of room for kneepads, and a taper around the ankles to prevent them from getting pulled into the chain. The ankles have a zippered closure that makes them super easy to get on and off – an especially handy feature when you're trying to change out of wet and muddy clothes at the end of a ride, and the last thing you feel like doing is wrestling with a pair of uncooperative pants.

Yeti Ridgway Pants
• Closure type: cam strap webbing
• Colors: spice, black
• Sizes: SM - XXL
• Inseam: 31”
• Fabric: 55% recycled polyester / 45% polyester
• Weight: 286 grams
• Made in Vietnam
• MSRP: $170 USD
yeticycles.com
There are two hip pockets plus two zippered side pockets, all mesh-lined. I don't usually carry my keys in my pocket when I'm riding, but that mesh lining is a little more likely to snag and potentially tear than a solid-fabric lining, so it's worth a mention. Two snaps keep the pants securely closed, and the ratcheting waist straps do a great job at adjusting the fit. I wore a hip pack during most of my rides with these pants and didn't encounter any discomfort from the buckles, even though they're a little thicker than what's used on the Rapha pants.

There aren't any vents in the fabric itself, but the material is on the lighter side, and I was comfortable in temperatures up into the low 60's F (17 C). Technically those zippered side pockets could be opened up for a little extra airflow, although I didn't notice that making much of a difference. The fabric has survived plenty of muddy rides, and a few crashes, all without any rips or tears. The DWR coating isn't as effective as what's used on the NF pants; I'd say these are best suited for nicer weather, or at least times when actively raining. The saddle area is starting to show some discoloration due to the amount of grit that's been ground into it, but all the seams are holding strong, and I'd still say the overall durability is quite good.

It's worth mentioning again just how comfortable these pants are – I'd happily lounge around all day wearing these, something that can't be said for all of the other options on this list.


Pros
+ Super comfortable fit
+ Wide range of operating tempuratures thanks to lighter weight fabric.
+ Zippered ankle closure makes getting them on and off extra easy
Cons
- Expensive
- Not as water-resistant as some other options
- Mesh pockets could potentially snag on keys






Specialized Gravity Pants


Back in 2016, Specialized's Demo pants were the main reason that I finally stopped wearing shorts all year round – they were one of the first options on the market to be reasonably light and pedal-friendly. The Demo pants are still in Specialized's lineup, but they've added more options, including the lighter weight Trail Pant, and the Gravity pants shown here. The Gravity model is a more race-oriented option – it's stripped down to the bare essentials, and has a more form-fitting cut than almost all of the other options in this round-up. The snug fit won't be for everyone, but it does means that it's virtually impossible for the cuff to snag a chain, or the crotch to snag a seat.

Specialized Gravity Pants

• Closure type: plastic ratchet strap
• Colors: black, stone, butter
• Sizes: 24 - 44
• Inseam: 31”
• Fabric: Main: 89% Cordura nylon, 11% elastane, Other: 57% nylon, 43% spandex
• Weight: 383 grams
• Made in Vietnam
• MSRP: $160 USD
specialized.com
There's just enough room for kneepads, and there's extra reinforcement around the knees for additional tear resistance. A panel of stretch fabric makes it easier to get the pants on and off, which may seem like a small detail, that is unless you've spent time struggling with Specialized's Trail Pants.

There are some downsides to Gravity Pant's race-focused design. For me, the fact that there aren't any pockets at all is unfortunate. Sure, racers should leave their keys and phones in the pits, but I don't have anyone following me around to hold my stuff, and it's nice to at least have a place to stash a card or cash for post-ride snacks. Another gripe has to do with the vent holes at the back of the pants. They're perfectly positioned in the line of fire for the mud and water that sprays off the rear tire, which means that whatever you're wearing under these pants will get a nice polka dot pattern of dirt by the end of the ride.

Vent holes aside, the Gravity pants do a good job of shedding moisture, and the fabric has held up very well so far. I'd put these pants in a similar category as the NF DP4 – the material has a similar feel, one that's not quite as soft and supple as the Rapha or Yeti pants, but also less likely to rip during a crash.



Pros
+ Cordura fabric holds up well
+ Slim fit for those aero gains

Cons
- No pockets
- Rear vents allow mud and water to get in




DHaRCO Gravity Pants

If you've watched any of the DH World Cup races this season there's a good chance you've seen a bunch of fast riders sporting DHaRCO's flashy Gravity Pants (yes, they have the same name as Specialized's pants. And yes, someone will inevitably comment something mildly amusing about lawsuits). They're hard to miss, especially the leopard print or the bright purple options. Thankfully there's a basic black version, and the forest green color I tested is also fairly subtle – think more park ranger and less raver.

The fit is on the slimmer side of things, especially in the crotch and hip area. The overall cut isn't as tapered the Specialized pants, but I found them to be tighter around my butt and thighs. There are three zippered pockets – one at the hip, one at the thigh, and one at the back of the waist band.

DHaRCO Gravity pants

• Fit adjustment: Elastic / velcro
• 7 different color options
• Sizes: S - XXL
• Inseam: 30.5”
• Fabric: 95% nylon / 5% spandex, Bluesign approved
• Weight: 415 grams
• Made in China
• MSRP: $152 USD
dharco.com
I didn't have an trouble fitting an iPhone 12 Mini in the front pockets, but considering how large some phones have gotten it wouldn't hurt if they were a little deeper. Two snaps keep the zipper fly closed, and they're backed up with a swatch of velcro to ensure there aren't any wardrobe malfunctions. The waistband fit is adjusted via an elasticized velcro strap on each hip. They're lacking the silicone grippers that some other pants have to keep them from sliding down, but I found that the snugger fit around the hips kept this from being an issue.

Although the pants are tapered, the fabric around the ankle was a little baggier than most of the other pants reviewed here, with the exception of the Sombrio Vanquish pants. It's not enough to get caught in a chain, but I could hear it rubbing on the crankarm every once in a while.

I'd place the Gravity pants in the all-rounder category – they can easily serve as a race pant one weekend, and then be used for general riding the next. The slightly thicker fabric and lack of vents does make them better suited for cooler temperatures if you're planning on heading out on a long pedalfest – they're not as airy as the Rapha Summer pants, but they'll also more likely to survive an encounter with the ground.



Pros
+ Tough construction without being too heavy
+ Wide range of color options, from wild to mild

Cons
- Pockets aren't very deep
- Slighty baggier than necessary around ankle




Sombrio Vanquish Pants

Sombrio's Vanquish pants are a departure from the skinny jean-esque fit that many mountain bike pants have adopted. They are tapered enough to not get stuck in your chain, but the cut around the thighs and knees is quite baggy – you could fit some seriously large pads under these pants. The fabric has a very similar feel to what NF uses on their DP4 pants, which makes sense considering both options use a 90/10 nylon / spandex blend. There are vent holes on the thighs and in the lumbar area, but they're pretty tiny – I'm sure they help a little, but not to the same extent as the vents on the Specialized Gravity pants.

Sombrio Vanquish
• Fit adjustment: velcro / elastic
• Colors: black, milky coffee
• Size: XS - XXL
• Inseam: 32"
• Weight: 393 grams
• Made in Cambodia
• MSRP: $207 USD
sombriocartel.com/
Zippered pockets are located on each hip, and the left pocket has an elastic cord for attaching a bike park pass. The pockets are mesh lined, so it's best to avoid carrying items that can snag on that material – try not to walk around with pockets full of partially opened paper clips if you can help it.

I didn't get along that well with the baggy fit (keep in mind that I'm shaped more like a bean pole than a wine barrel). I wore these on a handful of drizzly rides, and once the fabric started to get soaked the extra material was even more noticeable. Another gripe has to do with the velcro waist addjusters. They're functional, but the adjuster tab is pretty thick, and would hang up on my hip pack – a thinner material would make this less likely to occur.

The final sticking point is the price – at $206.99 they're the most expensive option on this list, and they're not even locally made, at least not if you live somewhere other than Cambodia. At that price I'd expect every detail to be perfect, and hope for features that elevated them above all the rest. That's not the case, and while they do what they're supposed to, they're lacking a defining element that would help justify the cost.




Pros
+ Roomier fit will work well for bigger riders
+ Tough material holds up well to abrasion
Cons
- Expensive
- Mesh lined pockets
- Thick velcro waist adjusters can catch on packs





Nukeproof Blackline Pants

Nukeproof's Blackline pants are the least expensive option on this list, but there's nothing about their fit or finish that immediately screams 'cheap.' They use a nylon / elastane fabric with a DWR treatment to help with light moisture, and there are three rows of perforations on each thigh to help with air flow. The cut is slim without being skin tight, and the inseam is long enough that they don't ride up with every pedal stroke.

The fabric is very stretchy – I'd say it has the most give out of any of the options reviewed here – but I didn't run into any issues with it snagging on my saddle.

Nukeproof Blackline

• Fit adjustment: velco straps
• Colors: black, blue
• Sizes: S - XXL
• Inseam: 31.5”
• Fabric: 88% polyamide, 12% elastane
• Weight: 276 grams
• Made in China
• MSRP: $83 USD
nukeproof.com
The Blacklines are on the lighter side of the scale too, in a similar camp as the Rapha and Yeti pants. That means they can withstand slightly lighter temperatures without getting too stifling. You'll want to be careful with keys in the mesh lined pockets, but that feature also means that opening the zipper on each hip does allow a little more air to flow.

The fit system is a little more basic than the ratcheting strap or cam-style buckle found on some of the higher-end options, and the fabric doesn't feel quite as high quality as what Rapha or Dharco are using, but for half the price of those more expensive options these are a very good deal.




Pros
+ Good value
+ Light weight; stretchy fabric adds comfort

Cons
- Mesh lined pockets






Rapha Trail Fast + Light Pants

As the name implies, Rapha's Fast + Light pants are an airy, lightweight option that are ideal for longer rides with lots of pedaling. I can't say that I normally pay much attention to how much my pants weigh, but for the gram counters out there these were the lightest on test, at 262 grams for a size medium. That's thanks to the thinner fabric and smaller fasteners that are used – riders looking for thicker option for cooler rides will be well served by Rapha's Trail pant.

The Fast + Light Pants have a zippered hip pocket on the right side, and a larger zippered pocket on the thigh with a sleeve that works perfectly for holding a phone. The fit around the waist is adjusted by a piece of webbing with a camming buckle on each side, and the end of the webbing tucks neatly into the waist band so that it's not flapping around.

Rapha Trail Fast + Light Pants

• Fit adjustment: webbing with cam buckle
• Colors: navy, grey, gold
• Sizes: XS - XXL
• Inseam: 31”
• Fabric: 88% nylon / 12% elastane
• Weight: 262 grams
• Made in Vietnam
• MSRP: $150 USD
rapha.cc
Two small snaps secure the waist band above the zippered fly. At the bottom of the pants and elastic cuff makes it easy to get them on and off. On the whole, the pants are very well made, with all the little details taken care of – it's clear that someone spent some time considering the design of these pants, rather than just pointing to a picture in a catalog and calling it good.

On the trail, these pants do work very well when the mercury climbs – they could come in handy on rides where extra protection from poison oak, brambles, or the sun is needed. Of course, there's a certain point on the thermometer when it's probably time to put the pants away and pull on some shorts, but these pants, along with the Yeti Ridgway pants, do stay cool longer than the heavier duty option in this test. Like the Ridgway pants, the thinner fabric doesn't ward off rain showers as well as something like the NF Pants, but it will withstand a light drizzle without immediately soaking through. They're not the first pants I'd grab for rainy winter rides, but for most other conditions they're extremely comfortable and breathable.

The lighter fabric has proven to be impressively tough – I've had a couple slide outs, and they've had a fair bit of mud and grit ground into them without any rips or tears. If they do happen to rip, a repair kit is supplied with the pants. As an added bonus, if the repairs are outside the scope of a rider's sewing skills, Rapha offers free repairs for the life of the product.



Pros
+ Very light + comfortable
+ Well thought out design
+ Includes repair kit + free repairs for life
Cons
- Not as water-resistant as some other options
- Might be too light for riders in cooler zones





Top Picks

Warm weather: Rapha Fast + Light. I know, I know, there's a certain temperature where pants stop making sense. However, for riders who are dealing with poison oak or other trailside nuisances, these pants are ideal. They're also close to the top of my list for all-day comfort - I'd happily grab them for a mega mission without thinking twice. The included repair kit and lifetime repair services are nice touches too.

Comfort: Yeti Ridgway. This was a tough one, since almost all of these pants ended up being a pretty good fit for my dimensions. The Ridgway's have a relaxed fit in the right places, and when I wore them I felt more like I was wearing a pair of crazy comfortable track pants rather than some sort of technical mountain bike apparel. Some of the more form-fitting options didn't lend themselves as well to lounging, while these ones feel like they were designed almost specifically for that purpose.

Durability / adverse conditions: NF DP4. THe DP4 pants ended up being the ones I grabbed the most for drizzly shuttle days, bike park laps, or any time when I cared more about having more fabric between me and the ground rather than the lightest fabric possible. Yes, they get a little toasty on warmer days, especially around the waist band, but they're a solid choice for a good portion of the year in the Pacific Northest or similar climates.

Race day: DHaRCO Gravity Pants. This was a tough one. Race pants tend to be slimmer fitting, free of too many extra features. However, in the end it was an extra feature that tipped my hand - the fact that the DHaRCO pants have a pocket would make me pick them over the Specialized Gravity pants. I do really like the fit and finish of Specialized's Gravity pants, but not having a spot to hold anything at all is a tough sell, at least for me.



Why aren't my pants on this list?
I'm convinced the number of MTB pants on the market is at an all-time high, and as I was putting together this review more and more options kept showing up. I had to draw the line somewhere, especially as the weather teeters on the brink of being too warm for pants. If you'd like to read about other options, this round-up from last year is another good resource, and includes options from Fox, POC, TLD, and others.

How about buying a pair of cheap synthetic hiking pants from a thrift store and calling it good? That's a totally valid option too. One thing to consider is that some non-bike-specific pants will be a little baggier around the cuffs, and may require some tailoring to make them fit and function as well as the ones featured here. Basic sewing skills aren't that hard to develop, though, and they can save you money that can be spent on important things like mid-ride snacks.




Title image: Sara Kempner


234 Comments

  • 144 7
 $65 pants identical to the ones used by teams like Commencal. You're welcome.

www.amazon.com/dp/B096LN8JRC/?coliid=I16ZVROHSJYKDP&colid=K8XAZLPOCFTJ&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it
  • 12 0
 Thanks. Cheap-ish shorts too. I usually go with Eddie Bauer ascent shorts but these look worth a try.
  • 19 0
 This is the Pinkbike gold I visit for! Thanks friend! I'm gonna look into the Nukeproof pants too though, they're offering a good price point. Thanks for including some 'budget' pants Kaz!
  • 6 0
 Thank you sir, look forward to trying these
  • 2 0
 @joshroppo: Give a ring to the Nukeproof dealer @ridesmoothbro and see if he's got them in stock.
  • 15 0
 Also, Costco Weatherproof Vintage pants are like $15. Keeps water away, wicks/dries pretty quickly, and stretchable enough to comfortably fit knee-pads under.
  • 5 18
flag audric (Jun 8, 2022 at 8:37) (Below Threshold)
 Commencal is using DHARCO clothing.... I don't know what you are talking about here?
  • 27 4
 @Snowrydr01: The worst part about Eddie Bauer is that you have to show them your active AARP membership card to be able to purchase. Wink
  • 16 0
 These are the Commencal ones I'm talking about.
www.commencalusa.com/commencal-pants-black-grey-c2x33968648
  • 20 0
 @mikekazimer lets get a review going!
  • 10 0
 @misteraustin: Whoa. Those really are the same pants. Same picture even. The logo just looks to be photoshopped in place.
  • 1 0
 @Snowrydr01: Same here, though it has been getting harder to find the First Ascent line on sale.
  • 16 0
 @audric: which of the ten commencal teams are you talking about?
  • 3 0
 @Snowrydr01: Oh, thanks for the tip. That will go well with my $20 UA jerseys.
  • 1 1
 @misteraustin: Thanks! These look great! It's too bad they don't have belt loops on these.
  • 9 0
 Didn't read the article. Ordered these, thx.
  • 1 0
 there goes mine, all pockets are zippered and lined with mesh, and not visible in pics but ankle cuffs are adjustable. Belt is included too.
www.decathlon.co.uk/p/men-s-walking-trousers/_/R-p-325496?mc=8587376&c=BLUE
  • 4 0
 So the Amazon's are $65 and in a million colors and the Commencals are in $110 black.
Same pant.

But...how did you know?
  • 2 0
 @thustlewhumber: funny, I use those same pants for hiking, trail running, golf, and even weddings, but I’ve never biked in them. I’ll have to try it out. The Hang Ten hybrid shorts from Costco are money for an XC baggy, a little short to cover knee pads, but have a nice gusseted crotch and super light weight.
  • 3 0
 I'm confused as to what sport these pants are geared towards... m.media-amazon.com/images/S/aplus-media-library-service-media/84299763-1d1f-456e-83fa-239aae9c781c.__CR0,0,970,600_PT0_SX970_V1___.jpg


Or scroll down the amazon page to see what I'm talking about?
  • 1 0
 I bought these last fall, and I cannot recommend them enough.
  • 3 0
 Check out Arion Cycling out of Knoxville, TN. Great pants for $55
  • 2 0
 @hamburglar13: PB too lazy to googlez
. Must provide link.

Also...for $55 they might be "shipped" from TN, but at that price we all know they're just a click and ship from Asia
  • 9 2
 @blowmyfuse: arioncycling.com Why do you have shipped in quotes and what is click and ship? All the inventory is in Knoxville with me. My brother and I started the company and designed the pants to our liking, not just some generic pant.
  • 1 0
 @misteraustin: I wanted to like these but they are impossibly tight around my calf/knee area to where I could barely put them on even without knee pads. No way I could pedal in them. At least when you try the Amazon ones you can return them easily. Commencal returns are a hassle.
  • 1 0
 Much appreciated mister Austin.
  • 4 0
 Nice find! I have been using these for 4 seasons now, $35, 3 zippered pockets, tapered legs, can fit full-size knee pads.

www.target.com/p/men-s-utility-jogger-pants-all-in-motion/-/A-80938229
  • 1 0
 Anyone have any inexpensive long sleeve jersey options to go along with these pants? Everything I have ever seen is just too ugly to wear.
  • 1 0
 There goes my hero
  • 1 0
 @tjbiker38: Sombrio long sleeve jersey's are great. I got the glow-in-the-dark camo one as well.
  • 4 0
 I have Rapha and Dharco pants. I bought a pair of these Commencal pants, the zipper ripped off before I even got to go on a ride with them! Inexpensive yet overpriced.
  • 2 5
 Still waiting for some company to figure out the skinny emo pants don’t fit very well with shin and knee pads underneath….especially if you have any kind of muscular leg development.

Cmon, bring back some OG moto style PJ pants for the group of us still left.
  • 1 0
 @tjbiker38: I use the long sleeve CO-OP merino wool shirts from REI pretty much year round. They dont pick up a stench, are just 1 solid color with no branding, and go on sale once or twice a year
  • 3 0
 @buffer34: well you can basically get fox stuff from Alibaba without the fox logos...look around. Of course the chinese are basically stealing
  • 2 0
 @misteraustin:
The Commencal pants are fantastic. But, for anyone curious... Not waterproof, and very, very snug in the lower leg. No probs with most knee pads, but can be tough to pull off until you get the hang of it. Otherwise, highly recommend for comfort and slim fit if that's your jamboree.
  • 1 0
 @abueno: How do the waist sizes run?
  • 2 0
 @fgiraffe: waist size in inches. xs-26” / s-28-30” / m-32-34” / L 36-38” / xl 40-42”. They have elastic waist and draw strings
  • 2 0
 @misteraustin: tried the commencal pants, the zipper lasted 3 rides (fly and pockets) got refunded but you got what you pay for.
  • 1 0
 @mtmc99: do the merino wool shirts keep you cool on hot swampy gross days? I have a couple of merino shirts but I’m always scared of committing to them on super hot days. Rest of the year I wear them and they’re great. I live in the south east and it’s hot and humid and disgusting during the summer, lol.
  • 1 0
 @ridebikesyall: I sweat a ton but Ive never really had any issues with them getting too hot on summer days. Synthetics might work a tad better at wicking sweat but they always pick up a scent for me so I avoid them. Full disclosure I ride exclusively in the mornings in the PNW so I am rarely riding above 70 degrees. On the hottest days I will switch to a short sleeve shirt.
  • 1 0
 @joshroppo: the pants are great, I have 2 pairs. I have the dharco as well, but they are too slim fit for me and haven't been able to wear them yet
  • 2 0
 Thanks for the tip. How do these fit? I’m between a 32 and 34. I like a slightly loser fit.
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: include endura singletrack 2 if you can please. They’re the only pair I’ve ever owned and would be reluctant to try another brand as I love them so much. Seeing them compared to others would be great.
  • 1 0
 @boiseiowa: I'm going to get a pair. Do you find they are true to size?
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Been running them for coming up 2 years now, plenty of hugey's and still holding up great. I'm your thicker gentleman and they can be a little tight but I just think of the aero gains that have me sitting in 21st spot instead of 22nd spot in veterans.
  • 1 0
 But they don't say commical any where on them .
  • 1 0
 Has anyone got a Uk link to these or similar,they look really good but don’t ship to the uk
  • 1 0
 @iiman: If the cuffs are adjustable that's amazing. Had some good lightweight from Amazon but cuffs are too baggy for mtb, don't want it getting wrapped in the chain!
  • 1 0
 Those black and orange ones. Woo wee
  • 1 0
 They look very much like the specialized demo pants.
  • 2 0
 @hamburglar13: No insult. Just at that price, we all realize you're not stitching materials yourself. You picked your features from an overseas manufacturer and have a product.
Shipping from Knoxville means you do get your order without tarrifs, customs and beat to death Asian packaging.
Click. Ship.

Just some input from a rider. The only pocket worth even having on riding shorts and pants during a ride is the mid-thigh pocket similar to the TLD Sprint pant & Ruckus short. Every other pocket gets in the way of packs, harnesses, hips, pedaling, wiggling, squirming, etc.

The pockets on your pants serve a purpose pre and post ride, but for unobstructed riding, one if not both of those pockets would bug the crap out of most riders. I personally can't stand feeling anything, even a slim piece of paper, on my thighs as I pedal up hill for 30 minutes.

Just some input.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: Agree! Why we need big so many pockets on riding shorts is something I'll never understand!
  • 1 0
 Well, I bought a pair, and have returned them. I'm 6' 170lbs with a 31" waist. I purchased the size 32 and the fit is good...besides the calves. I don't have huge calves, but they are extremely tight, can't get my knee pads underneath.

Maybe I just got a weird pair, who knows.
  • 2 0
 @Hauck: which brand/style of pants are referring to since a couple different ones have been mentioned in this sub-paragraph?
  • 59 2
 It says something about Mountain Bike products/brands when the Rapha pants aren't the most expensive!
  • 25 2
 It's fucking ridiculous what they and others are charging for pants. The only reasonably priced pants in this lineup are the nukeproof ones.
  • 20 2
 @bashhard: I have the Nukeproof pants and they're great. No reason for me to pay more than $100 for pants.

Still not sure why mesh pockets are a con. They're great for ventilation and you probably shouldn't be riding with you keys in your pocket anyway - great way to get stabbed in a crash.
  • 6 7
 @schu2470: How many car keys actually have a key part sticking out these days though? A few I suppose, but not my last two (or current) car, and the oldest of them was from 2004. I always ride with my car key in my pocket, it's curved fob and there's a small zip pocket on my Fox Ranger shorts which is perfect (which I think is now gone from the current model, and no cargo pocket for phone now either).
  • 4 0
 @redrook: Alot still do. I have a 2019 chevy pickup and it has a regular old key start.
  • 1 0
 @schu2470: I also have the nukeproof one's (got them on sale from chain reaction for like $65 a few weeks ago) and the only things I don't love about them is that they fit a bit long and the pockets are small, other than that no complaints whatsoever
  • 2 1
 @redrook: My bike has 12 speeds. The car has 5 and an actual key. Electronics are fine for some things.
  • 4 2
 @noapathy: Not sure what gears have to do with anything, but my car has an actual key too, but it folds into the fob, and so have my two previous car's keys from different manufacturers. I have never used any of the physical keys to open the car, only to start it. I'm not talking about keyless start.
  • 3 1
 @redrook: My Toyota has an old school actual key sticking out, but the VW, Skoda, Renault, Audi, and Ford I have driven recently all had a fob into which the key folded as you say.

@noapathy What do speeds have to do with keys?
  • 3 0
 @sino428: Yeah I don't mean the start, I mean the key folds into the fob. But as I say, I'm sure there are some which don't do that and the key is just fixed. Just explaining why key safety is not an issue for some.
  • 2 0
 @redrook: I haven't had a car with a key which didn't fold away since the early 00s, but I've generally had Fords since then.
  • 1 0
 @redrook: If your car key isn't actually a key and is a fob in general then the problem resolves itself. Even less of a problem to have mesh pockets, then.
  • 1 0
 @schu2470: Exactly. And I didn't mention mesh pockets, but I don't mind them at all.
  • 2 0
 @redrook: Gotcha. Only reason I mentioned them is Kaz has it listed as a con in the review. Makes no sense to me especially after he says you can open them for more ventilation.
  • 5 0
 @schu2470: I use endura singletrack pants and they are great for winter. Riding in long pants in the summer is so dh anyway.
  • 1 0
 @redrook: Yea I know what you meant. My trucks key doesn't even fold into a fob. Thats what I meant when I said a regular old key. It has the little remote to lock and unlock the doors but its separate from the key itself.
  • 1 2
 @rbeach: To spell it out...12spd implies the bike is newish. 5spd means manual transmission (which I happen to prefer, but also hints at the age of the car).
  • 4 0
 @redrook: house keys? Not everyone has to drive to the trails
  • 1 0
 @pen9-wy: Very true. Best not to put those in yo pocket.
  • 1 1
 @noapathy: Yeah I did not get that either, and most manual cars here in the UK still have a 5 speed transmission, occasionally 6.
  • 1 0
 @lkubica: They also have zippered vents on the thigh, which really work. About the same price as the Nukes. The latest version are pretty close to perfect for me (and I don't work for Endura!)
  • 1 0
 @secondbestbike: I know but they are still on the warmer side, but they look durable as hell. I used to ride in the winter in shorts, but you get less dirty in pants for sure. Probably could use thinner pants on a more rainy days in the summer, but the price of those stretchy thin pants is not that appealing and most of them would be thorn after one crash so I am not tempted to try. The same with jackets, I can't imagine how you can spend $200+ on something which will have tears after one crash. I would welcome a 3/4 jacket to use with elbow pads though.
  • 51 0
 so a 189 USD pant made in VC is expensive? How do you call a 200 USD pant made in Cambodia? disgusting? the NFs are the real bargain
  • 21 0
 I really appreciate how product overview mentions where the pants are made. I hope to be a more conscious shopper when it comes to this as I am mindful of my impact of other people/places when I purchase items. A VC made product is totally worth it to me and since it is made in VC I'd get it over anything else. I'd like more transparency from companies about how their products impact the environment and other people (workers in foreign countries).
  • 10 0
 @lovetoridebikes: Yes! Production transparency allows me to make better decisions as a consumer.
  • 4 1
 @lovetoridebikes: It would be good if pinkbike made a questionnaire asking people where they live. Pb is from BC and started as for North American market ages ago, but what is the percentage of people from North America reading it now? As point of where something was made becomes irrelevant if say more than 50% of your readers are from the rest of the world. I would not say this is impossible, if they are not fluent in english they might be less vocal in comments, but they might be spending more....
  • 2 0
 @gooral: excellent point. I have heard about how the country of origin of product doesn't necessarily mean bad for the environment or workers, but more so the company standards and relationship with the manufacturing process. Maybe in addition to a questionnaire about where you live, a survey asking PBer's about their experience with longevity of products or opinions for eco-friendly/worker-friendly products..?
  • 4 0
 Its always wild to me that NF can make these pants not just locally but in a very high cost area and still meet or beat many of the mass produced products price. The pants really are fantastic as well
  • 2 0
 You can walk in to their shop front and see people working on sewing machines in the back. NF is genuinely awesome, and far and away worth the price compared to the competition.
  • 2 0
 @jayacheess: Thanks for that. I was about to ask because depending on the companies ethics and the actual law, made in insert the country> do not mean the same things. For example the made in Italy pinarello bikes whose frames are built in far east and only painted in Italy.
  • 38 0
 the nerve of Specialized making pants with NO pockets...what?! immediate deal breaker
  • 14 0
 Because Specialized bikes have a SWAT box Smile
  • 6 0
 the trail pants will... the ones tested are for racing.
  • 2 0
 @jaydawg69: the demo pants are the bomb! wear mine all the time.
  • 1 0
 One pocket big enough for my phone and I'd order them...
  • 58 25
 Forget these pants. Outside killed BETA and is still charging for subscriptions.

Pinkbike hasn't reported on it!

www.bicycleretailer.com/industry-news/2022/05/23/outside-shifts-toward-digital-and-online-makes-staff-cuts-and-shuts-beta#.YqC5UOjMJPY

WTF
  • 6 0
 I'm going to miss print media. Bikes mags raised me.
  • 41 14
 I mean, you can be mad about the death of print and also read about pants - those are two very different topics. The end of Beta will be addressed in a podcast coming out later this week, and there will be an article on it in the near future as well.
  • 14 2
 @mikekazimer: Why is the "subscribe to beta" option still available...?

Also can't we just agree that the fox pants are the best and move on? =P
  • 21 0
 BETA still hasn't reported it. That site is still taking your $$ even as they know the product you are paying for is history.
  • 30 85
flag mikekazimer Mod (Jun 8, 2022 at 8:19) (Below Threshold)
 @hamwitch, I'm not sure. Things move slowly with bigger companies - hopefully that'll be taken care of soon. I do find it ironic how there's outrage about still being able to subscribe, since if more people did that in the first place Beta would still be around.
  • 23 0
 @mikekazimer: Blame the consumer, or the people marketing? Or just capitalism....?

It is sad to see an institution like Bike be shrunk and then skunked. It was probably inevitable as most MTB mags seem to be dead/dying, but it was especially heart wrenching to see Bike/Beta gobbled up and spat out so unceremoniously by Outside. It is especially disheartening to see their employees who have given a lot to the bike industry get kicked to the curb.

I was a subscriber to Bike when it was in print. And I still subscribe to MountainFlyer. But clearly I'm in the minority.
  • 2 0
 @hamwitch: a bit bad timing maybe with inflation at the moment. I was contemplating a subscription this year, until all my other bills skyrocketed.
  • 17 9
 @hamwitch, I blame the internet. And for the record, I was/am a huge fan of Bike - that was the first mountain bike magazine that seemed relevant to me, all the way back in ‘98. Mountain Flyer is a great publication too.
  • 19 7
 @mikekazimer: holy out of touch Batman.
  • 8 0
 @hamwitch: try Freehub mag. It is amazing and located in Bham.
  • 4 1
 @kokofosho, also a great recommendation. Brice Minnigh (formerly of Bike Mag) is over there now, and they have a super solid crew of writers / storytellers.
  • 3 0
 @tremeer023: thank you corporate greed youtu.be/SgjPl-YW6Hc
  • 4 0
 @mikekazimer: A Brit might say that the death of Beta is pants...
  • 3 0
 @kokofosho: When capitalism goes wrong. Good podcast and insight from Lyndsey Owens.
  • 1 0
 @vikb: Weird how a dufunked website has stopped reporting... Was there a beta only subscription or is it just that the outside subscription is still active since outside is still a thing?
  • 12 0
 I bought the year Beta membership when pinkbike was marketing it. Read a few articles but that's about it. I found the digital issue hard to navigate on my laptop and overall wasn't really interested in it. I probably would not have renewed next year but also was not expecting to have my membership money going towards nothing in just a matter of months.
  • 34 0
 @mikekazimer: as someone who subscribed to beta, the main point of frustration is that I haven’t been notified of this at all! And the fact that the option to subscribe is still around is infuriating from an honest/trust perspective.

Things move slowly at big companies, but the decision is clearly already public. Bicycle retailer had time to write an article about it but outside/beta/pinkbike don’t have time to write an email to paying customers? That’s inexcusable.
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: howbout “the killing of print” in this case. Since you guys did it.

Active vs passive voice, and all that.

Note: I haven’t purchased a physical magazine in a decade. So I killed it too.
  • 7 0
 Things move slowly at big companies? One day someone will create a big virtual community (dare I say.....'ecosystem' Wink ) where swift communication will made not only possible, but really easy. I think it will be called 'the internet' but I might be totally wrong on this.....
  • 6 0
 @wake-n-rake: Yeah rather than slow moving parts it seems like typical coporate scaminess. It kind of sounds like Outside is handling things backwards to minimize loss at the expense of customers.
  • 2 0
 @Rexuis-Twin: Same here.. Although I have to admit that I don't buy print media for years now. Only German "Bike" now and then.

10-15 years ago I used to buy every single issue of Italian "Focus" magazine. Loved that magazine! Then I moved to Ch and stopped buying it, but 2 weeks ago we spent a week in Italy and hotel had in the lobby the whole collection of old issues. I've spent hours browsing them. The content was way better than most of the things you get across browsing the Internet and that feeling of real paper and turning pages was unbelievable. It really reminded me how much I miss the analog times
  • 22 0
 Pants are a no-go this time of year in new england for any trail riding. Crank up that humidity and heat, might not make it wearing pants. The NF made in vancouver for that price compared to everything else? hell of a deal honestly.
  • 7 0
 could help with the ticks and poison ivy though
  • 3 0
 Now that I have a few pairs I ride in them more often in VT/NH than I would've anticipated. They were great in the spring for pedaling and I expect to do more of the same in the fall too. Also they're great for shuttle/bike park days!
  • 3 2
 You'll survive, I wear pants all summer trail riding and bike parking around CT MA and VT. Its really not at all much hotter for more protection.
  • 6 6
 Pants are just the fad of the moment. Even in winter not a great reason to ride them vs shorts with leg warmers. If I need something covering my lower legs I'd opt for my shin guards (think very overgrown trail foliage) rather than pants. They provide better protection and you still have ventilation from your shorts.
  • 5 0
 I don't find pants to be much warmer (if at all) than shorts and knee pads.
  • 1 1
 @rickybobby18: likewise. The kneepads I wear have a much bigger impact on how hot I feel like I'm getting. Those same pads are also significantly less likely to shift in a crash compared to wearing shorts. The past two crashes I've had where I've wound up hurting my legs came while wearing shorts, where the lack of coverage and my knee pads getting "grabbed" by the ground meant more cuts and scrapes.

That's not even getting to the way that shorts are either too short and ride up over kneepads, or too long and get caught on stuff.

I just haven't found a disadvantage for riding pants/trousers, hence I now own three sets of different types and gave all my pairs of shorts away.
  • 4 4
 @rickybobby18: then most likely it is not that hot where you live or you don't ride in hot conditions. The bottom line is pants are hotter than shorts. It is a scientific fact. But fashion is not a fact, it is a choice. So rock on pants-wearers.

Come to the desert and wear pants in 95 degree weather and see if you feel shorts would be a good idea. Kinda like when people say they want waterproof shoes for mountain biking and they ride places where it is 50 degrees and wet. But for me waterproof shoes are sweatboxes except in the middle of winter. If you notice PB and mountain media focuses more so on the PNW/Canada/UK.....where pants probably seem like a good idea.
  • 2 4
 @CleanZine: That's definitely a problem with knee pads in general and why I'm not a very big fan of them except maybe at DH park riding. But the value of them is really in that first impact, not in the subsequent impact/sliding (like in skateboarding).

I just think most people wear kneepads (like pants) because they see people wearing them on media sites. For me anyway, my crashes usually are more likely to involve my elbow or upper leg....not my knee. I've bruised my ribs many times, but my knee has only seen some abrasions. That said, I have felt in hard DH cornering they have their place. But for trail riding? Not a fan.
  • 3 1
 @foggnm: this 100%. Been riding for over 20 years and I have never worn MTB pants. Leg warmers, tights or leg pads.
  • 1 0
 @CleanZine: Do you have any recs for good lightweight knee pads?
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: ditto here.

I had a pair of endura pants modified to have a zipper from ankle to knee so I can pedal w/o kneepads and put the pads on for descent without dropping trou

All that said I do live in rainy pnwet and have lots of 40-50deg and damp conditions, definitely wouldn't wear pants in 90's heat

@warmerdamj: Also have done the leggings under shorts and the issues I've had are: knit fabrics don't take a dwr coating and so wet out quickly. Also knee pads slide on the knit so if you crash you just end up tearing holes in the non-patchable knit fabric. Nylon is slipperier and also patchable so a bit less likely to tear due to abrasion and easier to repair if it does tear.

But hey different strokes for different folks.
  • 3 1
 @foggnm: “pants are just the fad of the moment” is tied for top best #1 comment ever on pb. Congratulations!
  • 1 0
 @warmerdamj: I wouldn't say I've never worn pants, but I've never worn MTB pants. Usually I like the early spring and late fall because I can wear my armour even for the climb. My shorts go down to my knee pads and if it's cold enough I wear socks that go up to my knee pads. If it's really cold I'll wear wool leggings. Only if it's well below zero (or just at zero and seriously wet) will I put on some old cross country pants on top of it all - but that's 2-3 times a year at best.
I look at those pictures, and right away I think - too hot. But I guess they now have to cater to all those people just riding park and never pedalling enough to warm up.
  • 21 0
 Your old pair of jeans > scissors > jorts > babe magnet.

Enough said.
  • 16 0
 I have the wrangler ATG joggers. Mine were on sale for $18 when I got them (So I got two pair, for less than half the cost of the cheapest pants on the list above.). Every comment thread on every pant review I've seen has at least one person chiming in with a recommendation for these pants (Probably stemming from the singletracks.com post a few months back.), and a bunch more comments echoing the first person who brings them up.

Why not actually test them and include them in the next review, other than as an "thrift-store hiking pants" aside?

Sure they probably have *some* drawbacks as compared to an MTB specific pant, but for my money they're great. Rode them all winter with no complaints. Having said that, I haven't tried an MTB specific pant, so maybe I don't know what I'm missing. That's where an actual review would be useful for those on the fence.
  • 2 0
 I bought the pants when they were on sale thanks to the singletracks article. The lack of a zippered pocket rules them out for mountain biking but they are great for hiking and climbing.
  • 4 2
 My guess is that Wrangler never cuts PB a check for advertising and including them in reviews. There are lots of great products out there that are reasonably priced that we will never see on here because they're not made by the right brands.
  • 1 0
 @haen: I've been wearing them for years, nothing has fallen out of any pockets, and there is one zippered pocket.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: did some searching and looks like there are quite a few variations of the ATGs. Thanks for the tip!
  • 12 0
 I've got the Nukeproof ones, they've been great so far and they do feel really light and stretchy on. They're still too warm for me though once it gets beyond 15 degrees C if I'm also wearing knee pads.

I've also got the Endura MT500 which have been bulletproof for three years and apart from the logo peeling off look as good as new. They are way thicker and heavier than the Nukeproofs, but they also have a 33" inseam in size small which is worth knowing if you're a racing snake like me.

@mikekazimer many thanks for including all the info about your and the pants' inseam lengths and the sizes tested, that's really useful.
  • 1 0
 Same here. I use them all year and cannot be more happy Smile .
  • 13 1
 what's with all the 31/32" inseams? The waist sizing can differ but the inseams are all the same—why is this?!?
  • 5 1
 Literally the most frustrating thing in all MTB apparel
  • 2 0
 As noted in the article, NF DP4 Pants come in a long (~34" inseam) version in M and L sizes
  • 3 1
 @boomforeal: still not that long. Lots of people need like 35-36
  • 4 1
 @stormracing: ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • 3 1
 Cheaper to produce. Percentage of tall riders is not that high. For the same reasons lots of bikes still have same chainstay length for all sizes and bars with same rise
  • 3 0
 @stormracing: for real, I'm a 36" inseam and I'm so sick of every bike apparel company refusing to make a true tall version of their gear, if they make a tall version at all (almost all don't). I just buy stretchy jeans now, it's the only option that fits.

Side gripe: a lot of these companies are also making their mtb pants for people who apparently don't ride MTB: the fox and specialized pants (besides being too short) don't fit over my thighs and butt. I have what I would describe as an athletic in build, slim but musclular, you know ... like a cyclist has, and I cannot get these painted on, fallout boy, super skinny pants on past my thighs.
  • 1 0
 @sharpGT: unfortunately tall for some of these companies is like 33” which is nuts! So short.
I’m with you on being sick of it and not being able to wear any of them. And yeah the fit is quite comical at this point. I remember the old troylee and and royal racing style of pants! Those fit well. Weren’t practically leggings.
I’m slender and pretty athletic build and I’m just in the same boat as you. They are oddly tight in strange places. One pair practically constrains my calves they are so tight

I’ve started being a huge fan of Lululemons ABC Warpstreme pants in 37”s. Unfortunately they aren’t the fit for bike park or pads in general but regular trail riding they are dialed
  • 9 0
 The NF pants are only slightly more expensive than most of the made in china pants. They're incredibly durable and they will also repair them for you. Those pants are worth the slightly higher cost.
  • 8 0
 Because you mentioned it getting too warm for pants it's too bad you didn't include the 7mesh glidepath pants... I run hot, and wear them up to 10 degrees C.
  • 7 0
 I have to say the 7mesh Glidepath pants are the best I've ever owned. They're 200 bucks CAD but I've worn them for every ride all winter without an ounce of wear showing on them.
  • 8 0
 I like the 7Mesh pants FWIW...I think they look better than most of these too.
  • 3 0
 I agree. Love mine, very impressed.
  • 3 0
 Yep, I got a pair of Glidepath pants this spring and have been very happy with them.
  • 3 0
 @charmingbob: Same here...been wearing them even on warmer days...pretty much always grabbing them instead of shorts.
  • 3 0
 Also from Target www.target.com/p/men-s-lightweight-run-pants-all-in-motion/-/A-77603131?preselect=77286980#lnk=sametab The zippered ankle allows for pads to be put on/off without taking the pants off. Super lightweight, not great for actual rain, but work great if trails are wet and temps are cool.
  • 6 0
 I ride with DHaRCO gravity pants all the time. I love how protected I feel in them. They fit really well. I would highly recommend.
  • 7 1
 belt loops will last longer than any "new" tech to hold up the pants, but maybe that is the plan when you $200 pants fail at staying up you have to buy another pair.
  • 3 0
 For those in Europe & UK, the Decathlon Rockrider MTB bottoms are a fabulous purchase at 40 GBP, great value. -"Developed using stretch material to allow full freedom of movement when riding hard and descending fast on technical trails, they boast cleverly placed waterproof material in all the right places." -
  • 2 0
 I own a pair of Fox flexair (~€100), Decathlon MTB specific pants (~€50) and Decathlon MH500 hiking pants (€30).

The Fox are actually nicer than the others, solid construction, survived loads of crashes yet look as new, surprisingly breathable, ankle is too tight though.

The Decathlon MTB specific pants are nice, quite tough looking, feel good, but they have waterproof fabric on the shins and butt which make them very hot, so winter only.

The Decathlon hiking pants are actually probably the ones I wear the most, really breathable, "feel like im wearing nothing at all", probably wont survive as long as the others but they look great so far despite a lot of briars and branches scratching them. Ankle fit is very loose/baggy as they are not MTB specific but this has not been an issue.
  • 1 0
 @Mugen: Or should I call you Ned. lol @ " "feel like im wearing nothing at all""
  • 1 0
 Definitely a good price point but after one winter of wearing them I have a small hole in the so called 'waterproof' panel on the bum. Buy cheap buy twice I reckon with them and I'll be buying a different pair for when winter comes round again.
  • 5 0
 Just ordered another pair of Wrangler ATG joggers from Target on clearance for $22 USD. They were recommended on another MTB site and they are great
  • 4 0
 I learned yesterday that I need special handlebars for my ebike so I assume I will need ePant that have better compliance as well. Please bike industry I will pay 2x your current prices for ePants.
  • 1 1
 I know a company that is in fact going to make Ebike-specific clothing. The biggest difference is that they have more cargo pockets on them going on longer rides. Kinda makes sense.
  • 3 1
 Just here to throw in the regular comment from a tall guy…. Still screwed horribly by inseam length on all riding pants pretty much. None out there for those 35” plus guys not wanting capris!

It’s a bit outside riding pants but the by far most comfortable and best fitting are these

shop.lululemon.com/p/men-pants/ABC-Slim-Warpstreme-37/_/prod9400064?color=36763&sz=34

Super comfortable material for moving around in and come in 37”s

Be cool if companies would be willing to do custom add ons for length. I know tons would pay extra for it. Heard of NF doing it. Maybe they can add more to the talls
  • 6 0
 No coveralls; ridiculous.
  • 4 0
 @mikekazimer which ones are the best for wearing in 70F+ and high humidity solely to avoid ticks and mosquito bites?
  • 6 0
 The Rapha pants are the way to go, followed by the Yeti or Nukeproof.
  • 1 0
 Trees are the best pants I've tried. Light, 4 way stretch, snug in the right places. All made in Quebec. Their riding jackets are pretty boss too.
treesmountainapparel.com/en/collections/short-homme/products/pantalon-loamy-tma-192mc-noir
  • 1 0
 I got excited when NF announced they'd be doing tall sizing, but then saw that "tall" is a 33" inseam. Having two inseam options will definitely help cover a wider range of riders, but it would be awesome to see a company offer a full range of sizes, especially when they're this expensive.

Anyone offer a 32" waist, 36" inseam? I know... I'm lanky.

If anyone else is desperate for some riding pants in an odd size, DirtyRides MTB apparel does custom sizing. The downside is that the quality is garbage and they're uncomfortable to wear with a hip pack or any pack with a hip belt.
  • 1 0
 Weird - was just about to refer you to DirtyRiders but… if ya got a lemon, not a good ref. The pair I ordered -32 waist x 36 inseam- is mint. Fits well, welll made ($140 US, shipped) so Im not seeing the crap materials… maybe we got diff’t models?). Year round, crashes, dirt - its been solid. Anyway - maybe check Kuhls Rock Renegade - has tall sizes. Doesnt fit big pads under but will take g-form style / thinner trail style pads and has a few zip & deep pockets. Liked em so well I got 2 pairs
  • 1 0
 For someone looking for a warm fat bike pant I use the Fat Jacks. Just wait for a Club Ride sale and they're like 60-70$. Awesome pants. They don't cost a fortune and have durable, functional pockets and zippers. Also have the Gold Rush and Wrangler ATG pants as others have mentioned here. All good.
  • 3 0
 Very excited that the new Rockshox coil shaft appears to not have not yet snapped on the Stumpy from side-loading, unless this is an older photo of @mikekazimer?
  • 1 0
 great to see NF finally release pants for tall people. kind of annoying that they claimed their old pants actually fit tall people and would even argue with customers over social media that their inseam was taller than the industry standard and fit people 6’2.
  • 1 0
 Being on the shorter side, I’m particularly fussy about the length and general fit of riding pants. Subsequently, when I find some that I like and that tick all of the boxes, I’ll buy them.
The @DHaRCO Gravity Pants have been my favourites since they were launch, great fit, so very comfortable, durable and good value too. I’ve now got four pairs, in different colours (including the awesome leopard print) and would definitely recommend.
  • 3 0
 Patagonia point peak trail pant blows all these options away been using them for years...
  • 1 0
 I tried this year the fashion of pants (tld Skyline) instead of tights and personally I find the pants really not comfortable for the days of pedaling, as soon as you sweat it sticks and I don't like this feeling
  • 2 0
 NF pants are the king daddy shit...get them and never worry about pants again. If you really mess them up, send them back to NF and get a discount on a new pair.
  • 2 0
 Special riding pants for the first ten or fifteen years of riding. After that just ride in whatever. Stretchy skinny jeans seem to work pretty good.
  • 2 0
 Wish they would specify these are pants for men in the title. Scrolled through the whole thing to see there were no women's options.
  • 4 0
 BELT LOOPS FOR CRYING OUT LOUD!
  • 2 0
 Are you complaining that they have them or you want them? I personally love them, otherwise trousers slide down from my non-existing hips when I put my phone in the pocket....
  • 3 0
 What a deal. You get to pay six times what these pants are worth and support child labor as well.
  • 2 0
 NF pants are now an essential part of the Sea To Sky rider kit. A long with driving a Tacoma and having a massive mortgage..
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: Well written review, I like the final paragraph as well. Kudos for mentioning fit not just in subjective terms but providing your measures as well as the pants'
  • 2 0
 Kudos to Pinkbike for adding the country of origin! At least for me, it's a contributing factor to the buying decision process.
  • 3 0
 Rapha - for when you want to play golf right before/after biking.
  • 1 0
 Has someone experience with LooseRiders Pants?

www.loose-riders.com/index.asp?bid=27&cid=179&pid=8298&strt=1
  • 1 0
 No, but the jersey that I got from them is great
  • 4 5
 Why is the country of manufacturer a key bullet point? Outside of patriotism, I fail to see the logic. Products are made oversees because that is often where the best facilities are that produce the best quality at a price the market will bear. Sure, a small brand can manufacture domestically but that isnt scalable without compromising capital. I hear quality being preached but where does your iphone or your Tom Ford or your Garmin get built? Not domestically. This old school rhetoric from the 80s is resurfacing in a really odd way. Supply chain issues and temporary macro dynamics shouldn't be the reason you on shore and compromise your corporate strategy. So outside of patriotism, is is relevant?
  • 4 0
 It seems to work for Guerilla Gravity. Obviously other examples such as Ford and even Toyota make some vehicles here. The lack of a capital investment is the only reason more things are not domestically manufactured. Obviously anyone can learn to make products and it is not like bikes are rocket ships. A lot of the reason manufacturing oversees is better is because US corporations have helped make it possible to make more money at the expense of jobs domestically. Are you insinuating it is better overall to ship items across the globe unnecessarily when it would be more sustainable to manufacture closer to where these primary markets are? I wouldn't say employing people in other countries first is our primary goal. Not to say everyone is not deserving of having a good life economically but that is the purview of governments in those countries. But ya Capitalism good because cheaper labor?
  • 8 0
 Lol. "the best facilities are that produce the best quality at a price the market will bear" = the cheapest labor and the most lax regulations. If NF can do it in Canada for comparable pricing to China and South Asia, why is that? The people making the Yeti and Rapha pants aren't getting paid what NF workers are. If I'm dropping $150-$200 on pants I'd like fair pay, lower emissions from shipping, etc. to be a part of that.
  • 2 1
 @jsobrie: Rapha is owned by Walmart apparently, so do not expect them to pay a decent wage to their employees, wherever they are
  • 1 1
 pretty sure nf announced that they’re not going to be produced in canada going forward. @jsobrie:
  • 1 0
 @moroj82: All NF's technical garments are produced in Vancouver with the bulk of those produced in our own factory. As we continue to grow we will continue to source the most suitable vendors to our standards and ethics from around the world.
  • 1 1
 @jsobrie: I hear you on the ethics, but would say that many brands that offshore are holding manufacturers responsible for the wellbeing of their staff and require fair labor practices with regular inspections. Its not like the 80s. Nike and others felt the kickback and responded. The reality is many brands now spend significant efforts ensuring their entire supply chain is sustainable and ethical. Not all of them mind you. But thankfully the larger brands wont risk the reputation hit for taking advantage of unfair labor practices. Examples would be Starbucks and the coffee trade, HP and its toner recycling programs in Haiti, both of which provide education programs and childcare for underprivileged workers and their children. Something that just would be completely out of reach otherwise. I get your point, but things have moved on. Thank god.
  • 2 0
 Hey look the Yeti pants are priced in line with most of the other options. What will people complain about now?
  • 3 0
 Pants. Just in time for summer.
  • 2 0
 Exactly what I thought.
  • 1 0
 Bought a pair of the Nukeproofs last fall and they're such a good value. So comfortable I wanted to their them all day and as pj's too.
  • 1 0
 I've got the five ten trail x pants and they are awesome fit,comfortable and good pocket sizes. The poppers around the ankle are perfect! Highly recommend
  • 2 0
 The link to the Rapha website should be rapha.cc, not rapha.com
  • 3 0
 long option ftw!
  • 2 0
 Dharco pants have been my only solution to a 25" waist x 33" inseam
  • 1 0
 More food would work too!
  • 2 0
 Belt loops. look in to it
  • 2 0
 I nearly forgot it's not summer everywhere...
  • 2 0
 Arion Cycling MR2 TrailPant only $55
Arioncycling.com
  • 1 0
 And yet these £100+ trousers always end up ripping super easily. Love patching my Troy lees and royals!
  • 2 0
 I have the purple tie dye dharco pants they pretty swag
  • 1 0
 "DON'T YOU HATE PANTS?" ~Homer J. Simpson

www.youtube.com/watch?v=U14QaBE8N7c
  • 1 0
 Honest question - do companies have to pay a fee to have their products reviewed in these tests?
  • 1 0
 Nope, it doesn't cost anything to have a product reviewed on Pinkbike. That goes for everything from grips to complete bicycles.
  • 2 0
 Thank you for the „made in“ information!
  • 2 0
 [Removed]
  • 2 1
 [Obliterated]
  • 1 0
 @bigtim: I removed it. Pinkbike doesn't have a good way to manage comments like other sites do.
  • 1 0
 Anyone tried the Sport Hill pants? They're local to me and priced well.
  • 5 4
 Wrangler cargo hiking pants at Walmart. $28
  • 14 0
 Cargo shorts? Damn dude, save some women for the rest of us, will ya?
  • 2 0
 Yuk. No thank you to riding in cotton shorts. Enjoy your chafed taint.
  • 2 0
 @rbeach: They're not cotton. Or shorts.

And @fullendurbro they're also available without cargo pockets. I have a pair and they make great MTB pants.

Some of these pants have some cool MTB-specific features they don't, obviously. But I have a pair and once you hem the ankles in a bit they're pretty much perfect MTB pants for nearly TEN TIMES less than some of the pants on this list.
  • 1 0
 @charliewentoutside: fullendurbro said they were shorts first, but sure, only correct me Wink

Care to link to them?
  • 2 0
 @rbeach: These aren't the exact ones I have (mine have a zipper pocket on the left leg) but they look like they're otherwise the same: www.target.com/p/wrangler-men-s-atg-performance-5-pocket-pants/-/A-80926115

Anything "Wrangler ATG" will work (that's their no-cotton outdoor/performance pant), there are a variety of styles of them and different retailers also seem to have slightly different ones. I just went to Target and grabbed mine off a rack a while back.
  • 2 0
 @charliewentoutside: Agreed. I have a few pair of similar ones and I think I paid $25 for them. They have been great...
  • 1 0
 Specialized bringing new meaning to the term "Mud butt"
  • 1 0
 I have a pair of Leatt pants, they are amazing.
  • 1 0
 Did the seams not all blow out after a few rides? That's been my experience with Leatt. Asked them about a warranty and they told me to get lost.
  • 2 0
 @eteyber: bummer! I would say the only thing I had was the rubber bit on the back started to come undone a little, but I put a couple stitches back in and it's been fine since. Going on my 3rd season with them. They were cheaper (at the time) than alternatives, and actually fit me.
  • 1 0
 bought fox ranger pants for $50. just have to look in the discount bin
  • 1 0
 Another whole raft of MTB pants that won't fit tall riders, lovely
  • 1 0
 Clubride for the win!!!! Bellingham tested!!!
  • 1 0
 Two things:
People wear special pants or pants at all to ride?
Goodwill.
  • 1 0
 dakine thrillium
  • 1 0
 The old ones in the Schöller fabric - awesome
  • 1 2
 oh man......more ammo for the mountain bikers are punters thesis I am writing! Put some pants on and go ride your bike! CM!
  • 1 1
 Hey bike industry. I'm not going to buy $200 pants.





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