DVO's Emerald Fork - The Journey From Concept to Reality

Dec 5, 2013 at 16:03
by Mike Kazimer  

Last November, we took a first look at DVO's Emerald fork (the very first prototype is pictured above). Since that time the hype and anticipation has continued to grow, fueled by trade show sightings of working prototypes and images of Cedric Gracia racing and riding on the inverted fork at events around the globe. But now the wait is finally over, and the first batch of forks are on their way to distributors world wide. However, don't expect to see a shiny new Emerald sitting idly in your local shop any time soon – with a production schedule of only 300 forks per month, and a large portion of those pre-sold, it's unlikely this first run will spend much time on the showroom floor. We spoke with DVO's Bryson Martin Jr., who was in Taiwan as the first forks were rolling off the assembly line, to find out more about the journey from concept to reality.





We first saw prototypes of the Emerald fork just about a year ago. Can you give us a brief overview of what it takes to get a prototype into full production?

Let’s start by saying suspension isn’t easy, arguably the most difficult part to design on a bicycle. You have to love it, you have to have a lot of passion for it or it can be easy to give up on. A year and a half ago we were walking around EuroBike with SolidWorks concepts on an iPad, showing people this crazy idea that could change the inverted suspension world. We knew that the spotlight was on us so we had to make a product that would stand apart from everyone else as well as establish a business model that was equally different. From there it was countless trips to the factory in Taiwan for development and testing, getting to the World Cups w/ CG for tuning and feedback, late nights at the shop running the fork over and over on the dyno, to sending out the first shipment of forks. Watching the company grow from making t-shirts and water bottles to releasing the Emerald was extremely hard, but honestly the most fun I’ve ever had.



A prototype Emerald undergoes testing in Taiwan.
Getting a high-end suspension company up and running is no small task. What was the biggest challenge DVO faced over the last year and a half?

Since the get-go the Emerald's development went extremely smoothly. From the first time I rode the fork to the final production version, there haven't been too many changes. When we felt comfortable enough with the fork's durability, performance, and strength we gave the suppliers the green light to go into production. Some of the biggest hurdles to overcome with the fork were actually its best attributes, the technology that has never been done before. For example, the CTA (carbon torsion arch) was a project our suppliers had never faced before. The CTA isn't a typical carbon component that they pump out every day, it's what we call a Blue Ocean project. To get it up and running it took countless meetings with many suppliers, a lot of revisions because the pieces weren't perfect, and we finally came up with a product that exceeds our testing requirements.


Is the plan still to produce only 300 Emeralds per month? If the demand is there will output be increased?

For right now we’re trying to keep production at 300 a month but it is possible to increase production if needed. This company is still very new, step-by-step is the motto here and we don’t want to get too ahead of ourselves. We also never want to have any overstock and follow the same path of everyone else with year-end blowouts. Price dropping at the end of the year to move excess inventory erodes your overall brand's equity and devalues your image, so flooding the market with product isn’t something we want to do right now. Our focus is on customer service, easy access to spare parts, easy access to tuning and set-up, and suspension that works ride after ride the way it was supposed to. We’re not in this for the biggest profit margin; we’re a passion driven company out to make the best suspension possible.


Now that the Emerald is available, when is the Jade scheduled to start shipping?

We’re looking for the Jade production to be in February and shipping no later than March 2014. Testing and development on the shock has been seamless, so getting it on the shelves isn’t too far out. The shock from the very first prototypes has needed very little adjusting; CG and I both fell in love with it on our first ride back in April this year.



Cedric Gracia's input was invaluable during the
Emerald's development.
Cedric Gracia has been DVO's most visible test pilot – will we see the roster of sponsored athletes expanded for next season?

CG has been an exponential part of the development process. During testing at World Cups Tom could go in or out one click on a setting, or change one shim slightly, and he would know instantly. Finding a rider that is that in tune with his bike, and can ride the way he does is a beautiful thing. For now he’s doing very well in the Enduro World Series and has lots of potential in the new “mtb craze”. He will be lead test rider and help with development with our new enduro fork, the Diamond. We are currently in talks with a couple big teams and we have quite a few riders who will represent us at the majority of the WC DH events. We first want to be in a position to be able to support all our riders with technical support and it's important not to bite off more than we can chew. We will be a major sponsor of the IXS Cups in Europe and be active in many DH events in North America.


The DVO product line is starting to fill out, especially with the prospect of an all-mountain fork sometime in the future. Can we expect an air shock as well?

We have some really cool concepts for air shocks still under the curtain both for DH and enduro bikes. Those projects are next on the list after the Jade and Diamond go into production, so look for some first prototypes around summer time with the production of the new Diamond enduro fork around April. We will incorporate a lot of the features found on the Emerald DH fork without the gizmo’s and hard to tune damping features. We feel the DVO customer is a bit more suspension savvy and we will do a great job at helping everyone become more educated on how to tune our products, which is actually the fun part of our job!




Behind the Scenes: Manufacturing the DVO Emerald

  The suspension components used in the Emerald are produced by SR Suntour, a company DVO chose to work with due to their high level of manufacturing skill and quality control.

  The Emerald's internals and adjustment knobs are lined up and ready for installation.

  Empty cardboard boxed patiently await their valuable cargo.

  Production Emeralds wait for a final inspection before being packaged and shipped out to eager riders.


DVO Emerald Details

• Travel: 203mm
• Air spring
• Carbon Torsion Arch (CTA)
• OTT Adjuster - allows the negative spring to be externally tuned, improving plushness
• Damping: twin tube open bath, adjustable high and low speed compression, dynamic rebound adjust




• High and low speed compression can be removed with zero oil loss
• Upper legs: 7000 series alloy, 42mm externally tapered
• Stanchions: 36mm hard anodized PTFE coated
• Weight without CTA: 2950 grams, CTA: 300 grams
• Price: $2200 USD



Views: 19,072    Faves: 120    Comments: 8



www.dvosuspension.com

Must Read This Week

301 Comments

  • + 59
 Awesome. Love the look of these forks, especially in black. It's brilliant to see a new company coming to the market that has such heritage in it founders and being so progressive in that they are making! Great to see a new upside down fork. One thing though, why is the UK price nearly £500 more than the US RRP? Granted, import and shipping have to be taken into account but surely that can't account for the full £500 difference!?! A certain UK importer being a bit greedy possibly? Competitively priced my arse.
  • + 15
 And people always say the dutch are greedy, america has everything for half the price! :S
  • - 18
flag ad15 (Dec 6, 2013 at 1:04) (Below Threshold)
 Shipping air freight is not cheap Import duty VAT
  • + 11
 It's relatively cheap in large quantities. No way is it £500 difference!
  • + 3
 Actually the price difference is more like £400 and duty would be about £60 and tax would be £300 on a $2200 item so yeah they are probably making hardly anything on each fork once you taking into account shipping cost from the US, shipping to customers and the running costs
  • + 5
 MonEddy, first you should add Sales tax (we call it VAT and its 20% for UK) to the USD price before you compare to UK price. Trouble is that the sales tax rate is different in different States so the US always quotes retail price without sale tax. USD2,200 + VAT is a lotta Wonga and the consequences of one big accident don't bear thinking about.
  • + 1
 Fair play on the VAT point. Shame the British government decided not to keep it at 15% after winter 2009. Hopefully when/if DVO up production the price will come down a bit and it will be more in line with the other DH forks on the market.
  • + 20
 How can you guys possibly be complaining?
Here in Brazil everything is at least twice as expensive than in the UK! Comparing prices with N. America is sad, stuff there is at least 1/3 of our price "/...
  • + 3
 Don't forget the back up silverfish will be providing.... The amount of behind the scenes work that has to happen for a company to distribute suspension is incredible...
  • + 13
 Bullshit, everything is overpriced in Europe. I work for a camera manufacturer which recently introduced a camera that costs $1000 (50 %) more in UK than in USA. And even though I'm not a sales manager, there's no way this price difference is caused only by the tax and import costs (not to mention that the camera is made in Japan, not USA).
Same with Oakley sunglasses - few months ago I ordered a custom made Radar ftom the States because in Europe it was 50 % more expensive. Interesting thing is that Plaintiff which I bought eralier was overpriced "only" by 30 %.

I don't ride DH but if this fork is really £500 cheaper in the States, I'd rather fly to New York (return flight is about £300-400) and buy it there than support this rip off.
  • + 3
 Try Living and paying for sh$t in Australia, and yeah here the greedy F$%king government do tax a whole big slice of sales tax.
  • + 9
 euro prices are interesting....bmw m3 costs 57k euro's in germany...41k euros in usa...
  • + 5
 At the price difference it is the same price to fly to the US, take in some western trail, buy the fork, and fly home. As long as you use the fork here you shouldn't have to pay anything at the border, right?
  • + 5
 Right, I'm going to ask this to the dudes we are all talking about..i.e DVO/Bryson Martin and Bryson Martyn Jr. All due respect to you all and really admire what you have and are doing, but why, when you are trying to make the Big Boys of the suspension world wake up and take note, has the Emerald been put to market with such a high price tag? What baffles me even more is that you were all part of one, if not the most successful suspension companies of the 90's and naughties which also happened to produce the most affordable, well performing and reliable forks on the market! I understand that economies of scale, rising commodity prices and production costs likely play a part, but I don't believe that that is entirely responsible. An answer from the horses mouth so to speak would go a long way to settle the price question and would be much appreciated from many I'm sure.
  • + 24
 Hello MonEddy, I want to start by saying thank you for your admiration for what we're doing. The reason the cost of the Emerald is very high is the same reason that BMW M3's are 41K euros, Rolex watches are 10,000 USD, it's because you're getting what you pay for. The Emerald has a lot of parts inside and outside that we could have made with cheaper, less reliable materials to lower the cost. Instead we decided to use Carbon, Anodized CNC internals, forged mag drop outs, etc. They increase the price but also drastically increase performance, durability, and strength. Yeah we could have made the fork cheap, but that's not what we're out to do. We want to give the customer the same satisfaction of buying an M3 or a Rolex!
  • + 4
 @taletotell

You don't have to use it at all. Just throw away the box, user manual, warranty card, proof of purchase and everything else that would indicate that it's a new product. That's how I got my Oakley sunglasses to Europe - I told my friend in the USA to take them out of the box and send me the sunglasses only in a plain cardboard box. Got them here without paying a single cent, even though I should pay import duty and tax for everything worth more than €150.

Or if you need the papers, post them to your own address separately.
  • + 21
 Those who have the money for the fork and intention to own it, will buy it while those who do not have either will complain on the internet.
  • + 2
 Tweeks cycles are selling them for £1749.99
  • + 5
 Quote of the day~

"We’re not in this for the biggest profit margin; we’re a passion driven company out to make the best suspension possible."

That's what I like to hear from a company.
  • + 4
 Are they hiring?? Will work on minimum wage for the passion!
  • + 12
 i always bitch about canada vs usa prices, but reading the rest of the international folks chime in on here has me feeling a bit better...
  • + 2
 Whats wrong with a profit-driven company? The only way a company can survive in the long run is to be profit-driven. If these guys aren't, they won't last long.
  • + 16
 A company that does not care about making money wouldn't last long. A company that makes money but doesn't see profit as its only goal, on the other hand will last a long time.
  • + 8
 Living in America pisses me off a lot but then I come on here and realize how nice it can be on my wallet =)

Aren't the higher costs of food and other products in the UK/Europe offset by a slightly higher average income as compared to the US? I thought I read this somewhere...
  • - 4
flag thekayo (Dec 6, 2013 at 10:41) (Below Threshold)
 about 1.3lbs heavier then some of the other forks you see out there like marzocchi 380, 40 float and the rockshox boxxer wc. and yet still $2200
  • + 8
 MonEddy, Think of it this way, spend that extra £500 on a flight to Seattle WA, Pick up some Emeralds at Fanatik Bike shop in Bellingham, on the way to whistler! Then you'd have a fork and a trip to the promised land.
  • + 3
 @brysonmartinjr we understand the forks' $2,200 price in the States for the quality of the product, combined with small production runs, it's the mark up of products (not just yours) in Europe compared to North America that annoys people. So it's probably no fault of yours, just an unfortunate result of bureaucracy and taxes. Smile
  • - 5
flag deeeight (Dec 6, 2013 at 11:39) (Below Threshold)
 They price according to what local markets will support and those who won't pay that will complain but they're in the minority. For every complainer there are ten people waiting to get one.
  • + 2
 @shrokie

I like your thinking a lot. Guess I know where I'm heading next summer and what I will be picking up on the way
  • - 1
 @jumpingj

good backup from Silverfish...good luck with that then!

no love from me for their terrible backup of Race Face and Formula products over the years
  • - 1
 We must pay 28-33% of income tax here in cold and flat Finland on average salary, on top of that there is kind of VAT of 24% for almost everything >_> so pew pew USA, the car business is even more mixed up
  • + 2
 In canada, Chevrolet's made in Oshawa Ontario cost more at local dealerships (by 5-10k or more) than after they're exported across the border to the USA. Then again, nevermind corporations... our government regularly screws the pooch on purchasing. The new fleet oilers for the navy, we purchased the design blueprints for an existing design from a european shipbuilder for about ten times what they should have cost. For that matter, somehow its seen as better (ie jobs = votes) to build here for several times the price, projects that are already measured in the BILLIONS of dollars than buying european. Our "oilers" were originally supposed to be Joint Support Ships...ie roll-on/roll-off transports that could ALSO replenish ships and also carry helicopters, have a hospital, etc but the budget projections got out of control. Instead we're spending 3 billion to build TWO stripped down ships here. Meanwhile the dutch are doing ONE such ship fully loaded JSS for themselves for $400 million euros.

Economies of scale are supposed to make 1-off projects ridiculously more costly than multiples, except when it comes to government purchases apparently.
  • - 1
 Woooow only $2200, give me three!!!
  • + 11
 Thanks for all the awesome support from anyone and we are sorry if the price comes in a bit high but we really have some value added technology in the Emerald. Let me try to shed some light on the value enclosed in the Emerald; first off the major items like the carbon CTA and forged magnesium drop outs are certainly pricey at a manufacturing level but we feel the added torsional stiffness of the CTA really makes the inverted Emerald shine. The forged magnesium drop outs are approximately 200 grams lighter than forged alloy would be which helps neutralize the added weight of the CTA. Then the removable bottom loader compression damper is a unique and really useable feature but more expensive than a standard built in piston/shim system. Then we use 7000 series tapered alloy stanchions and upper tubes, forged CNC hollow clamps, 7000 series alloy stepped axle, and all the other parts that are honed and polished to reduce any static and dynamic friction. Plus we added the adjustable negative spring which allows for a unique & very useable performance feature that the riders will really appreciate. All together, the sum of the parts, add up to a higher cost but we feel they are really worth it. We feel there's gimmicks or gizmos that artificially inflate the cost without adding the value. Cheers, DVO
  • + 10
 To anyone complaining about price, you don't understand marketing or are ignoring the obvious. The suspension market had an opening for a high end, premium quality and price offering. High volume, low price, low margin doesn't have to be everyone's business model. As long as the value is there, DVO will build a loyal customer base and has the opportunity to establish a premium brand that riders lust for but most will never have. The big 3 planted themselves firmly in the mid-market, DVO is filling the premium void. It may not fit your budget, but that doesn't mean its stupid. It's a rather smart business model, imho.
  • + 1
 The highend niche is a secure spot for sure. The rich don't have to cut back in a recession.
  • + 4
 what@ no lockout??? howama gonna urn ma turnz now!!!!!
  • + 3
 @robwhynot Very well put! I'm glad you understand our approach to the suspension world. We're here to give the customer the ultimate satisfaction when purchasing our products. Our job is not only to make suspension, but to try our best to better the bicycle business. We all ride at DVO, we understand the drawbacks of poor business models and bad customer service. We're out to fix that! Thank you for your kind words!
  • + 0
 blame the eu.
they need there rediculous wages form somewhere dont they?
  • + 1
 Shipping from the US ? I thought they said there made in tiwan or somewhere like that so surely they get shipped from there not the states. And don't forget the US is like Marko you don't pay face value they slap tax on at the checkout
  • + 2
 only saw 2200.... what a joke.
  • + 1
 @RMCaird you are right, air shipping is "relatively" cheap in large quantities, I wouldn't call 12 pairs of forks a large quantity though, would you??
  • + 1
 No, but who said anything about 12 forks?
  • + 1
 That's how many were on the first shipment into the UK, that's not a large quantity….
  • + 0
 @Ad15... yep. lots of folks don't seem to grasp how few premium anythings get made. When Marzocchi first produced the bomber z1 as a mid-95 summer introduction offered to pro/elite downhillers, canada was alotted TWO of the things and the very first went to a buddy of mine who was friends with the distribution rep. Same goes years later for shimano airlines pneumatic shifter setup (again made for the DH market), there were maybe four or five brought into canada total and one went to a local who was an aging former elite racer now working as a bike shop manager who didn't mind blowing $1200 of his paychecks to get one of them for his bike he was trying to recapture his youthful glory on now that he had money to spend (and that was the wholesale price, the retail was like $2000 plus). Overall he probably put like 7 or 8 thousand into that custom Intense M1 (and this was 13 years ago, the equivalent today would be spending 11-12k given inflation in bikes) and as I recall the most glory he achieved on it was of all things, using it to ride across the country a few times to raise money for cancer research or something.

Anyway back to point, I'm sure of those initial 12 DVO forks for the UK, every single one of them is spoken for by dealers/customers who pre-ordered the things.
  • + 1
 a shop near me has two pairs and advertised on here. muddybumbikes.....
  • + 1
 don't forget US prices are always shown without tax! In CA you will have to ad 10% to the dollar prices too...
Its actually typical US thing. They make you believe something is cheap but than you always end up paying more vs. Europe where you usually pay what you see
  • + 21
 It is a true delight to see it happening DVO! I wish you all the best of luck so that your company establishes on the market, and I am looking forward to see more products from you. I am very thankful that you are providing a true alternative, a distinctive option in the times of optimisation killing creativity. It takes balls to do so and I respect you for that. Cheers!
  • + 4
 good answer bro...personally i wish i had the cash to drop on these tonight and i would! i love USD's, anyone who has ridden a truely well tuned pair of Avalanche DHF's will agree with me
  • + 5
 I rode the DHF-8 for about 5 years, no rebuilds. I lived by Josh Bender's motto " Life's too short not to go big, gotta go big". It was heavy, and lacked torsional stiffness, but it saved me so many times, it was worth the expense. The thing was soo plush, I never knew how rough the trails really were until I rode other forks on them. I recently rented a DH bike at mountain creek, and my wrists were sore after one run. The fork felt like it was rigid. Found out later it was a 2013 boxxer.
So when I see a fork that is inverted, has small bump sensitivity, is close in weight to the other offerings, and is claimed to be pretty strong, my interest is perked. Hopefully it stands up to the hype, maybe it can give Avalanche a run for it's money, without all that extra weight.
  • + 2
 What we need now is Josh Bender to test out forks on the Jah drop. I wonder if with today's technology he would have been able to land it?
  • + 2
 Thanks Waki! Really appreciate the kind words!
  • + 12
 major respect for DVO for their passion and desire to create the best suspension in the industry.
still, I cant see anyone who would buy a 3+ kg fork for 2200$, especially if it doesn't have any apparent advantage over the competition...
  • + 0
 Yep your right
  • + 8
 Quote from www.pinkbike.com/news/Bryson-Martin-Talks-About-DVO-Suspension.html

''Later, Cedric and I talked and he agreed that a stronger fork (and shock) with DH level performance is more critical than just a light weight product. I think you will be happy with what we are working on.''

I think it`s more than true Wink
  • + 3
 I remember this article. On this quote they were referring to the enduro fork that's under development. Sorry dude but I think it's not relevant here. On the Emerald they insisted go for the inverted design, and had to do it heavier to have a reasonable stiffness compared to the competition. They didn't make it superior, just as-stiff-as any other fork out there, but heavier. In the end the question is whether going for an inverted design actually gives such a big performance boost, and if this added performance is worth the weight penalty.
  • + 3
 Yeah, the weight is shocking. At 7.2 lbs it's quite a bit heavier than everyone else's old gen forks, let alone the new ones. Weight isn't everything blah blah blah, and I agree as my bikes are not built like that at all, but an extra 1-1.3 lbs or whatever at the handlebars is a lot.
  • + 1
 And you're paying with gold for each extra libra! Wink
just kidding, let's wait for the first review...
  • + 1
 If you look at he weight compared to the Dorado this isn't that far off. the dorado pro is about 2973 grams and the expert is 3096 grams if it wasn't for the 300gram CTA it would be almost the exact same as the pro. the question is does the CTA give enough extra stiffness to make up for the weight gain.
  • + 1
 Hey it's lighter than my shiver, also inverted and I can adjust compression and rebound I'll be buying one ASAP! Still undecided if I'll cut the carbon arch or have some guards made to give it the full on moto look haha!
  • + 15
 With DH bikes now weighing in at 35lbs, who gives a crap if your fork is 300g heavier, as long as performance and reliability are there (let's give them a chance to prove this).

I could run single ply tires to save weight, but they don't perform as well, so I don't
I could run an air shock, but I don't because they don't perform as well in my experience
I could run lighter brakes, but they don't stop as well, or are as reliable as 4 piston saints
I could go on, but most people are far too concerned about a meaningless number than performance and durability. Bikes got light enough 5 years ago to stop compromising on performance, but not many people got the memo.
This aint no Monster T on a Stinky Delux coming in at 48lbs. It'll be on carbon V10's coming in at 35lbs. About the same as my 6 year old dirtjump hardtail.
As for price, there seems to be plenty of carbon V10's, Sessions and Demo's around despite costing a lot more than the competition. It's all about performance, and if it's there it will find its way onto a lot of front ends.
My V10 will be happy to rock a green one Smile
  • + 8
 Make a big sh*t in toilet before training. There will be the same 300 g minus of Your total rider weight on track. (Y)
  • + 1
 I don't understand, the weight is advertised at 2950grams=6.5.lbs. How are you guys coming up with 7.2lbs?
  • + 4
 Damn why are people complaining about weight.. I'm still riding an 8 year old Iron Horse 7point5 that weighs in way over 40 lbs
  • + 1
 ya my Knolly v-tach weighs in at about 42 lbs. but i have to admit i would love to ride the Knolly Podium which runs at about 38 lbs.
  • + 0
 @naturechild. 2950g without CTA. 3250 with.
  • + 2
 oh. i didn't know that. thanks.
  • + 7
 Hey guys, just some info regarding the weight; we have almost 400 grams of oil in the Emerald which increases the weight but we feel that added benefit of more oil outweighs the down side of the additional weight. Oil is the heart of the system and 400 cc's of high quality damping fluid keeps everything running smooth inside and greatly reduces the wear and tear on the bushings and other internal/external parts. Also, the CTA weighing in around 300 grams is additional but the added performance is what we feel very beneficial to the overall feel of the Emerald. We did try to offset the CTA weight by using tapered stanchions and forged magnesium drop outs. I hope this helps explain that a little more weight greatly increases performance and longevity of the product, we want everyone to enjoy years of use form out products without the hassles of constant rebuilds and replaced parts. Cheers, DVO
  • + 6
 That's is alot of oil, and I'm sure it goes a long way in preserving the performance of the fork. Fox forks feel plush when they have fresh oil in them, but I've seen them take a dramatic turn for the worse in the course of one day of DH runs in muddy conditions. It is mostly due to the ridiculously small amount of oil in Fox forks. If you are a fox sponsored pro you get it rebuilt every race, but the average rider needs something they can consistently rely upon. This fork looks strong as an ox and as reliable as a guide dog for the blind. And probably as plush as a kitten's furry belly. A fork truly built for the apocalypse when spare parts and warranty service might be hard to come by.
  • + 4
 Bike weight really does not matter much. I am less than 70kg with gear. Compared to the 80 to 100kg crowd my body is a gem. Much nimbler, lot less wear and tear on my joints. Couldn`t care less if my bike is 17kg or 22kg. Partsweight is about perceptive marketing. Light=Better MSRP and less productlife. Translated to lighter RS 2013 fork this means horrible small bump compliance and Fox` quick wearing design. Both trade in function for weightsavings.
  • + 9
 Drastically reducing oil volume to save weight is like quitting your job to save money on transportation. It may work for a week but there's not much of a future in it. You need air in your tires and oil in your forks. No compromise.
  • + 9
 The thing about weight weenies is that instead of getting in the gym or eating a bit more protein to gain muscle and strength, they'll sacrifice performance and speed by chopping bikes and components down to nothing... Remember when the idiots were drilling holes in their freaking hoops?!? Here's a fact for you fellas bitching about weight: I'm a woman whose race weight is around 140, height around 5'8". I'm not tiny, but I'm not an amazon. My size L carbon Fury weighs 39.5 lbs with carbon bars, wheels, cranks, saddle, etc. and a 40. I rock a heavy setup because it saves my ass when I bail over the bars or ditch the bike in a rock garden and still have a race to finish. Parts need to work for me to be able to do that. If you're whining and complaining about a DOWNHILL fork that's "too heavy", you need to A) spend a lot less time bitching and moaning and more time on the bike and B) get in the gym a bit more and get your spaghetti arms bike-ready. Smile
  • + 2
 ambatt: We like your style!
  • + 1
 @ ambatt: in 2013, you can have a sub-33lbs bike without sacrificing performance or nothing. (Carbon bars are dangerous because they don't warn you before breaking...). The weight of the bike, and where is the weight, has an impact on your endurance specially when there is a lot of roots or rocks on the track. An extra 400g on the fork isn't a problem, but if you ad 400g on the fork, 100 on the bar, 200 on the schock... you will quicly have a heavy bike that won't perform the same. If you only race 3 minutes long downhills or less, you can get over your bike's weight, but for long and hard races, weight is your enemy.

sorry but my boxxer with open bath crconception cartridge, or my domain SC with Crconception open bath cartridge are both at 2850g and they have a lot of oil, too, they are also very plush and the domain is stiff enough (my boxxer isn't stiff enough for me). So yeah, I think 3200g for a 2014 fork is a lot.
Oh, I forgot... 2400g fork (with enough oil, it's a true open bath cartridge) a little less stiff than a fox40 scontent-a-cdg.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc3/1377615_530672077018041_499478771_n.jpg
  • - 1
 @faul: Not sure what races or trails you're riding and/or racing, but the only race that was even close to being 3 minutes this year was Sea Otter, which doesn't really qualify as 'downhill'. The US Gravity Nationals course at Angel Fire was a 6-plus minute course, 7 on a broken bike with no pedal power and a smashed frame; my favorite local trail that I ride 5-6 times a week is an 18-minute (race speed) ride with a 200+ foot rock garden from hell. Maybe a heavier weight would affect YOUR endurance (which is sad), but it doesn't seem to trouble mine when I'm in race condition, and quite frankly, I don't seem to have any trouble keeping up with (or leaving behind) the folks who have much lighter bikes... The discussion here is about a DOWNHILL fork made for DOWNHILL riding, hence my comment about the DOWNHILL specifics of a fork's weight not really being an issue. Now please, tell me again about those three-minute courses? Wink Oh, and also? My bike may be a bit burlier than some, but it sure seemed to perform just fine on the WC last year... Under multiple riders, with even a bit of a heavier build.

Also: I'm not really going to lend any sort of legitimacy to yor argument about carbon bars; anyone can claim anything about any particular component because of their personal perspective, but giving me unsolicited advice on my chosen parts that are working just fine for me is a bit arrogant and hype-ish, no?
  • + 2
 The Boxxer is a bit flexy, agree. Agree with ambatt. Bodyweight and fitness is a bigger issue. Light bikes with big wheels dont work and last well. I junked my carbon racer for an 9kg vintage columbus track racer I found hanging in an old shop. The 25 year old Campy parts are way better than what is on the market today. Fit and ride are better, no clunking, vibrations, absolutely quiet when riding. Modern saddle excluded.
  • + 1
 You said your bike "saves your ass". But you know, carbon won't crack or bend before breaking. So maybe it will never break, mabe it will. And you won't be able to know if it's still "safe" until it will break. Good luck with it.

And, as the flag next to my nickname suggests, I'm from France. Here, there is a lot of race between 2 and 4 minutes, some are more than 5, and I don't know any true downhill race here over 6 minutes. (it's called "enduro" here, but pretty everything is called "enduro")

Have you tried once a bike 1kg lighter than yours but as effective? (If it's a light saussage with two wheels that's doesn't count). Or just try once a pair of wheels 500g lighter/heavier, than yours. You'll see how weight can perform.
  • + 2
 Faul: and again, you're wrong. Carbon fiber DOES bend and crack before it breaks, it simply depends on the weave, the type of carbon/carbon fiber an the temperatures used, as well as coatings, etc. Case in point: my last Fury frame, which cracked and broke in multiple places, yet was still rideable. Some fibers will fray, others will snap. I have tried a lighter bike; again, I find that my bike works for me AND other pros because of many different qualities, including weight, stability, stiffness, etc. I'm still failing to understand your attitude and condescension... I would suggest that you widen your perspective before making inaccurate, ignorant statements and suggestions such as the ones you have made this far.

What you also seem unable to grasp is that not only am I perfectly happy with my current rig, but that it's winning me races. My original comment was a reality check in reference to the whiners complaining about the weight of a downhill fork.
  • + 1
 Do you think you might get this fork Amanda?Would look sick on your Fury!!!
  • + 1
 Definitely considering it, @merlinmarlee! I'd go with the black, most likely... I've always been a huge fan of the oil-bath inverted forks, and with this guy available, I'm definitely considering it. Either this or a full DLC coating on my 40, but either one is a big commitment! Smile
  • + 3
 I have an 18kg (~40lbs) DH bike and ride it up and downhill. Thing is I have a Shiver so the bike is front heavy and I used to love manually into stuff. So 3.2kg sounds light to me coming from a 4kg (8.8lbs)fork! Oh and by the way, I weigh ~60kg (132lbs) with my riding clothes, shoes, knee pads and helmet!
  • + 13
 I'll wait till a v2 of both the emrald and jade come out, seeing as they'll most likely be more reliable and less expensive. patience is a virtue.
  • + 7
 How many of you can name a company...ANY COMPANY in the bike industry that immediately posts answers to the drones questioning them about their product???? DVO is setting the standard not only for immediate response to internet questions but they will soon back that up with customer service and tuning for their product. With FOX being recently made public and the service taken mainly in-house you are going to see a huge shift to DVO. Thanks guys for your industry changing responses.
  • + 4
 You're welcome! We care about how the feel and what they have to say, good or bad, we listen and adopt. Cheers, DVO
  • + 6
 It's expensive. We can all see that. If it's performance is above everything else, why shouldn't the price be as well? They brought something bigger and better to the table, and with a lot of competition sitting around them at that table. Even though this is a top dollar item, after all things considered around being a brand new company, and developing a product with the focus of being the best on the market, I find it remarkable that the price is actually as LOW as it is. I would love to see anyone saying the price is a absurd do the same for less. In cycling in general, people get really worked up when there is something they cannot attain because the sport is still so young that we are simply not used to it. In reality, this naive line of thought is contradictory.
If you want cheaper products, there are plenty of options. If you want the best performance, you are going to have to pay. If you want that same performance available at a lower price, go out and make it! More competition in the market is the only way to lower prices. For there to be more competition, you need more demand, so therefore the sport must grow. As the sport grows, so will the gap between the least and most expensive products on the market, as the need for higher performance will continue to grow. So guess what... The top tier products will always be out of reach for the majority! Just be thankful products like this even Exist! It makes the products us mortals Can afford much much better.
I commend DVO for following through on a vision and seriously wish them all the best. Looking forward to seeing what else is to come.
  • + 1
 Well said!
  • + 1
 Thanks for awesome words and support! We really appreciate it! Cheers, DVO
  • + 1
 Let's not forget a single Enve hoop is $1K.
I'd say there's at least as much tech in the torsion arch to say it alone is of similar retail value.
  • + 1
 You're spot on there kramster!
  • + 0
 Actually, I find it quite cheap. I was expecting the price to be double of what it is. Luckily it wasn´t, so I´ve bought one. Summer can´t come quick enough!
  • + 3
 $2200 for a fork?...man, that's a lot of cash for a fork...that's above the BOS prices... don't get how a motocross product can be 5 times the material yet about the same price (or less)..and on top of that, waaaay more capable. Understanding the whole economics of it and all... just don't get the market sometimes.
  • + 2
 Its not just the quantity of material but the quality of the material and how it is finished. We have a lot of experience from the moto world and the Emerald would be like purchasing a works fork which would cost substantially more than what comes standard on a motocross bike. Cheers, DVO
  • + 1
 I mean no disrespect here but I currently run 2012 boxxers WCs (they came with the bike) and I don't see why your forks cost so much more than say the 2014 Boxxer which (at CRC) are currently £900. I love the look of your forks, the technical write ups are amazing, my favorite color is green and id love a set but I just don't see how I could be helped through buying these over the above or even sticking to what I currently have??
  • + 3
 Not to mention that we are talking a complete difference in materials used to make the parts. The uppers are made from billet material instead of cast material which makes them a stronger more uniform material. This also takes longer to manufacture and thus more cost. Also to take into consideration is the anodized finish which is much better than the cheap paint used on cast aluminum and magnesium parts. Do you know how to get paint to stick to aluminum or magnesium parts? You clear anodize it first. So why not anodize the whole part? Anodizing a casting will get you a poor coating due to the silicon not allowing the coating to penetrate the material. Poor starting materials equal a poor finish. Anodizing will outlast the paint, but costs more. Just do a little bit or research on what materials and coatings are going into the products before making unrealistic price comparisons. One last fact, a small company like DVO and White Brothers has far better customer service than the big box brands. Do you want a cheaper product or a product with a far better warranty and first class customer service? just my 2 cents.
  • + 1
 We agree! Cheers, DVO
  • + 2
 Plenty of oil which I like. Easy to tune the bottom out circuit and damping ( go to DVO web site watch the vid.) Which no other fork has. Years of prototype testing. Any one else doing that before they put a product to market? Open bath damping is the most robust durable form of damping. Trying to save weight by using less oil is a bad idea.
Oh the fork looks crazy sexy sick!
300 unites per year? I would not call that mass production. You wont see these forks going for a song on some bike sale.
Does this fork cost about the same as the retail price for a Fox 40? Maybe a bit more than the inverted Durado pro?
I think people that actualy have the money will sell out those 300 forks pretty fast!
Cant wait to see some Emeralds Shredding up the North Shore Smile
  • + 1
 Thanks Sshredder!
  • + 5
 how many articles of DVO suspensions in pinkbike? they have a lot of friends here!!!!
  • + 2
 They treat us well here on PB and we appreciate it!
  • + 2
 The fork was never intended for a weekend warrior mountain biker. It was always designed for the high end of DH racing. The price is not that far off if you compare it with something similar. For instance the X-Fusion Revel HLR is a good comparison because of the low quantities intended to be produced and a newer design on the inverted fork to increase the torsional rigidity. This single crown fork retails for $1800 USD and when compared to the travel increase and benefits of the Emerald that is a good price. You cannot compare the cost of a brand new fork that has not been on the market for years to one that has because the market is flooded. The price you can purchase a Fox 40 or a Boxxer at is much lower than the MSRP because of the company manufacturing and selling making much larger production runs. I have ridden a Marzocchi Shiver DC and SC as well as a White Brothers DH2 and Groove 200 and the benefits of the inverted design are amazing. A lot less maintenance on the seals and much more small bump compliance. Yes they might not be as torsionally stiff as a non-inverted fork, but did you actually ride it or just check by holding the wheel and turning the bars.
  • + 0
 Interesting @sk8rpro1, a friend of mine used to ride moto a ton, and he always said those forks would flex like mad when you do the parking lot test like you suggested(hold the wheel in the legs and twist the bars). I just assumed that the stiffer,torsional, fork was the goal...maybe not so much?
  • + 1
 I just did not notice the flex as much when actually riding the bike. The problem with flex, at least with my old Shiver SC's was the bushings were worn out causing it to be excessive. My fork was a 2002 and I did a full rebuild with slider bushings in 2012 and the fork did not flex hardly at all. In fact I had to use a dead blow hammer after sizing the bushings to install the stanchions. After the break in period it was good as new. To expect the original bushings on a fork to last that long without servicing is very unrealistic. You just have to maintain the fork regardless of design. Do the parking lot test on a worn out fox that has the coating worn off the stanchions and you will see flex in a non-inverted fork, but replace the bushings and stanchions and the flex is gone. This flex may be less notieable than an inverted fork, but it still exists.
  • + 3
 Thanks guys! Its amazing people are still riding Shivers that were made 12 years ago, its a testament to using quality parts and a lot of oil will deliver years of riding. Its a lesson we learned years ago that its better to have a slightly heavier suspension system, it will last longer and absorb the bumps better than a lightweight product with a small amount of oil. Cheers, DVO
  • + 2
 My black DVO is on order. What make this the first viable upside down fork is the stiff 4-way axleclamping and, to a lesser degree, the 3d arch. Should be stiffer than the rim. Hope its a plush fullltravel plow-fork with tunable rebound.
  • + 3
 I rode around on one in a parking lot at interbike...yeah its easily the most plush fork i've ever ridden in my life. Under low speed it just feels amazing. I wish I was able to utilize the HSC bc apparently it's also amazing. If I rode in a bike park every single day, it would be my fork
  • + 1
 Thanks, sounds promising.
  • + 2
 I wonder if it is stiffer than a Shiver without the arch...
  • + 5
 Just a quick one to the Guy for Brazil, to say about stuff being cheaper in England, it needs to be, Our weather is shit and You have a lot better looking Women on Your beaches than We do!!! : )
  • + 2
 Thanks Wakaba for ordering our product! We know you'll love it and we are here to fully support ya if you need it! Cheers, DVO
  • + 3
 @ DVO What you guys show here is priceless! ! Is the direct contact with the prospects and clients. Thi is service. Is not pay for a fork because is maybe lighter or any other point like happens whith other bands. Is the investment on services and support for your product, by the way is an engineering masterpiece. My respect and best wishes.
  • + 3
 Thanks erubio! Its great to hear from everyone.
  • + 2
 Awful lot of complaints about price, but nobody asking what you actually get for that $2200, and putting it in perspective. Fox and Rock Shox top level forks are both $1700, BOS is $2100 and the Marzocchi 380 is $1850, the bargain of the bunch seems to be the Dorado at $1500. Definitely not a cheap fork, but not too far out there either. Time will tell if the extra cash is worth it, but if they're anything like the Marzocchi forks from back in the day (which are still the benchmark for reliability), I think the upfront cost is very well justified. A more expensive, but more robust and more reliable fork serves the weekend warrior far better than the current top level forks that you have to spend almost as much time tinkering with as riding.

The average rider doesn't service their own suspension, how many times do you have to pay a shop to rebuild your fork to burn up that $500-700 savings from the initial purchase. Sure the same guy who sends his Boxxer in will send his DVO in, but the service interval should be quite longer.

They should also be commended for selling their best fork to the public, rather than some watered down version. How many WC DH races were won this year on a fork you can actually buy?
  • + 1
 Thanks maxyedor!
  • + 4
 Cant wait till next season to see all the groms in the whistler village on spotless matching green v10cs, enve wheels, and DVO forks.
  • + 1
 Us too! That would be sweet!
  • + 1
 For all you complaing about price terry tibs is selling some zoom forks for £50 see how you get on with them, yes uk is dearer than USA we have tax this pays for you nhs for when you come off. I joined pink bike to moan #getagrip #keepriding ps you guys have done a great job few people will have there cocks out when they see these rolling down !
  • + 2
 Now that's dam funny!
  • + 1
 Hey dvo, just curious: do you have an Ozzy distributer sorted who isn't going to rip us off? Are these serviceable without special tools? Can seals, bushings etc be obtained in oz if they are going to be available? MTB has a piss poor representation in this country and everyone still buys from CRC in Ireland or Jenson in usa
  • + 1
 Hey ctd07, Our distributor there is NSDynamics and they can back you up on any support you might need. We have seals and any kind of spare parts available and they know how to work on suspension. Any other detailed questions or concerns please hit us up at voice@dvosuspension.com and we will make sure you are fully supported. Cheers, DVO
  • + 1
 $2200 is out of the realm of the weekend warrior. Is this going to perform noticeably better than a used Boxxer World Cup off craigslist with Push DIY kit? As the costs of buying performance skyrocket, I'm thinking it may be time for some of us to hone in on our building and engineering skills and build our own race steeds. What's to say a 5 year old Stinky with a hack upgraded suspension, new drivetrain, and some lighter parts will not perform up to par for the sport/expert rider? Come on Pinkbike, lets have a build off. A world cup decked out all pro bike, spare no expense, versus a backyard smart build and the average rider. I bet the times are not too different.
  • + 1
 That would be a great idea!
  • + 1
 If i had the cash it would be nice. But i dont, so I buy almost all used stuff. BUT i cant speak to the preformance differnce to top of the line new stuff cause ive never ridden fancy expensive shit. Ignorance is bliss i guess
  • + 2
 Hopefully you can have the opportunity to test one soon!
  • + 1
 Id rather have a fist full of cash than a handfull of hope. Right now my totem needs an air fill every ride due to a slow leak. Im interested in more then testing. Smile
  • + 1
 Wow, didn't expect a response from DVO themselves. You know what would be really great? Offering internals and upgrades for existing products too. A good lot of us riders know how to hack everything from forks, to brakes, to make things work better without a lot of cash. Fuglio, just go into your LBS or online, you can readily find new totem internals on the cheap and rebuild your problems away. I bought a totem coil and did the air internal swap myself through an LBS and still saved hundreds on the cost of a RS Totem Air.
  • + 1
 I'll be switching to a coil once i get the parts. When your poor and hard on parts you have to learn how to fix shit on your own. So itll be interesting to see how many times i put it back to gether before it starts working right. Im excited to learn. Then i can start trying differnt oil weights and get it tuned perfect
  • + 2
 I believe I still have the blue coil lying around in my basement. I can ship it to you if you like.
  • + 5
 $2200? No thanks. I'll just keep my Marzocchi!
  • + 1
 A lot of crying over the price and yet we all know if its good product, even the weekend Warior will buy it. just like when Sram showed the XX1 series everybody cried about the pricetag, and yet its selling good among the weekend wariors and not only the pros
  • + 1
 Looking forward to comparing these new DVO'S with my current Avalanche DHF-8. My Avalanche forks have been problem free for 8 years and still feel butter smooth after years of abuse! They may be heavier but I say "ha it makes you a stronger rider from it".
Foes,Shivers,Dorados,Risse,Avalanche have all been where your taking you product now! Am sure your fork will work wonders for people just like the predecessor brands have done in the past.
  • + 1
 Can't go wrong with Avalanche Suspension, they know how to make it!
  • + 1
 Happy to see this finally come to market. It's been a highly anticipated product that I'm sure will perform well. My opinions re: weight/cost/aesthetics aside, it's nice to see a company prioritize function first. Best of luck, DVO!!!
  • + 1
 Thanks man!
  • + 5
 Send me a bill, I want one
  • + 1
 Awesome and Thanks!
  • + 1
 DVO reps were at big bear this past weekend. i dindt get to demo it on my bike, but i did ride around the top with it. Very plush from top to bottom with slight stiffening at the top. This was a pretty linear feeling fork. the guy explained to me that there is an independent adjustment for the first half and the second half compression. I will be wanting to consider this to be my next purchase
  • + 1
 @byorita. I was one of the guys talking to you at Big Bear. We will be up there this weekend if you would like to spend a little more time on the fork. The Emerald has an adjustment called "OTT" which stands for Off The To, It is a dynamic negative spring. This adjustment only affects the first part of the travel and is on the spring side of the fork. This allows the fork to compensate for a large range of rider weights and abilities but also allows you to control how soft or firm you want the first part of the travel without negatively affecting other parts of the travel.

With every other fork on the market you have to mess with air or compression settings to change the suppleness and tracking ability of the fork. Making those adjustments affect the entire travel of the fork and can lead to excessive diving, or wallowing in the travel. Those problems aren't seen on the Emerald because OTT affects the negative spring and not the air spring or compression.
  • + 1
 Ill buy one ( white preferably ) after buying my future Foes Hydro (white of course )
Money is not a issue for me now !!!!
Cant wait for it next year !!!!

Go DvO go !!!!!! I hope yall hit some fame and glory

Ps are they better than my Dorado Pro ????
  • + 1
 Think about how much people spend on a set of Carbon wheels. The DVO is almost half of the bike, last longer than a season or two, and is still less than a set of those fancy carbon wheels. I'd put my money into a functioning part of the bike, not something with cool graphics that doesn't make me feel anymore confident.
  • + 1
 You're right, carbon wheels are sweet but really expensive, with suspension, there are so many parts (hundreds) that go into making a quality product and if you skimp on just one item, things can go side ways real quickly and that statement comes from first hand experience! Cheers, DVO
  • + 1
 Hi DVOSuspension guys! Super excited to see the Emerald release after all my drooling and pawing over this fork for the past year. I need to get my order in! A super plush, inverted fork I can actually work on?!? I can't wait!
  • + 1
 Awesome and thanks aaoliver! We look forward to having you as a customer! Cheers, DVO
  • + 4
 Guys i personally think that it's a nice fork but really overpriced! Just like Fox!
  • + 0
 I agree... but if you think about it - this is the new kid on the block, they have made a lot of promises, they have a limited production run, and unlike fox they openly admit that this fork is not for everyone and don't expect everyone to go out and buy it. give it a few years (and a hopefully the odd pay rise for myself) and I'll be keeping a keen eye on the various options that they will no doubt be offering.
  • + 2
 Fox is about $500 cheaper. You can do a lot with that money on a frame up
  • + 0
 Boxxer world cups MSRP for around 1700-1800, the new Marz dh fork is around 1800, the Fox 40 goes for around 1700-1800... how is fox over priced? The difference is that they dont have a cheap option like RS does... if Fox is overpriced then they are all overpriced. (not saying that they arent, but all are in the same boat)
  • + 3
 Thanks for all your comments! We feel there are quite a few value added performance features on the Emerald that are not found on the other big guys... Like the adjustable negative spring or OTT feature. There's no need to take the fork apart to adjust the negative spring, just turn the knob and tune your sag and initial feel, now you can run a higher air pressure without suffering small bump harshness. The no-oil-loss removable compression assembly is also unique, no everyone can easily access the tuning capability of what World Cup racers get but a whole lot easier. Overall, we feel theres a lot more value and performance than what's presently offered. Cheers, DVO
  • + 0
 How can you judge if it's overpriced if you (I assume) haven't tried it? Fox is way overpriced though, nowadays BOS is at the same price level and anyone who has tried one knows they blow Fox stuff out of the water.
  • + 1
 A tech question. Since many solutions applied in mtb are taken directly from motorcycles, why isn't the inverted fork so popular? Is it more expensive in design and production or something else?
  • + 0
 I think there are a few factors as to why it's not as popular. These are just two I can think of right now. 1 - The stanchions are very vulnerable down there, rock gardens and frequent crashes will damage inverted forks faster if you have the cover off and if you leave them on you're adding a decent amount of weight that could be saved by using a non inverted fork. This is different from a dirt bike because the weight of some stanchion guards won't be noticeable because of the overall weight of a dirt bike being far greater than that of a mtb, also more likely that you will be riding the majority of time on dirt instead of through and over rocks on a mtb. 2 - Non inverted mtb forks don't flex as much as an inverted fork with no wheel arch on it. Dorados are known to flex more than other forks with the wheel arch giving support. It seems that DVO has tried to fix this with the unusual looking stanchion guards with integrated wheel arch, but I'm sure a regular non inverted fork with the wheel arch integrated into the lowers would still be stiffer.
  • + 2
 I think the links will keep you up to date. But a big reason is torsional stiffness.
USD forks have great fort-aft but torsional (twisting force, ie cornering) is much harder to control and to do this takes and increase in material which inevitably adds weight. Fox couldn't achieve the torsional stiffness they wanted without getting over the weight they were happy with.

I think the big move into USD will be when manufactures make the leap into making forks out of carbon which will allow them to beef up without adding too much weight penalty, this however has clear draw backs.

Im very keen to see how these forks perform.
  • + 15
 Hello pioterski, very good question. Inverted forks have been very popular in MX because of their performance. The reason why they aren't so popular in mtb is because it's hard to get the weight down, with it also being torsionally strong enough. On an MX bike, you have a motor so weight isn't so crucial as the human powered bikes, they can afford to make it "burly" enough to be torsionally stiff and perform well. Where we were able to pull it off was with the CTA. The carbon guard allowed us to stay competitive in weight, and still be torsionally stiff. It's also 4mm thick carbon that protects the stanchions, so rock gardens or whatever else you decide to mash, you're good!

On the performance side of things, they are much more active because of the unsprung weight at the wheel. When the fork is initially compressed, the less weight there is at the wheel, the faster it can compress and therefore be more supple.

It lasts longer. Since the fork is upside down, so are the seals. Every time the fork compresses, the seals are pushing dirt away. On a conventional fork, the stanchions are constantly shoving dirt into the seals and therefore contamination occurs.

It's strong. If you watched our latest video on testing the Emerald, take notice the curve of the fork when it is flexed to the max. It is a smooth arc from the clamps all the way to the axle. Typically on conventional forks, you'll notice they have a "kink" where the casting and stanchions meet. That is a stress riser. The Emerald flexes as a whole, not in two pieces.

The list goes on but hope this helps!

Cheers, DVO!
  • + 1
 @brysonmartinjr

Curious on your opinion on fork outers been produced in carbon in the future (I mean in general as a generally development no DVO specifically) is there a issue using carbon outer with an aluminum casing inside for wear and function? I'd think this would reduce weight while allowing the forks to still function as normal internally? IS this something that you can see happening in the future or even moving to titanium over the aluminum?
  • + 2
 I don't really see a problem with stiffness as you'd wash out on the front before torsional stiffness comes into play. This might be different when riding lots of groomed and steep berms but that's not the kind of terrain you'd buy a Dorado for anyway. When riding rocky or deeply rooted tracks a little bit of compliancy is a good thing actually.
  • + 3
 Isn't the unsprung weight benefit of the inverted fork gone when the 300 gram CTA is added?
  • + 2
 It would reduce it but lowers are much heavier than 300grams. so you will probably still experience a good improvement in the unsprung weight.
  • + 3
 @brysonmartinjr

The big difference between MX and MTB non-USD fork is the lack of arch on lowers of the non-usd MX fork. So a MX USD fork is naturally torsionally stiffer than a MX non-USD fork. Moreover, the weight of the MX need much more frontal stiffness than a bike when you brake. MX racers look at the weight of their bikes, too.

I don't trust the "unsprung weight" argument.
1) because if you compare USD and non USD, the unsprug weight is nearly the same (magnesium lowers are about the same weight as aluminium stanchions)
2) because a wheel weight about twice the whole fork, so the unsprung weight have to be saved on the tires before on the fork.

So the main advantages of a usd fork are the biggest clamping aera and the lengh of the bushing you can have, due to the extra lengh of the upper legs. More bushing lengh means more plushness and more stiffness. (plushness of a usd fork don't come from the seal, if you compare two open bath cartridge forks)(and this is why you don't have the "kink" on the emerald).

But the lack of torsionnal stiffness is the enemy of USD forks. So you have to find ways to stiffen it. DVO found a way with a carbon arch. The X fusion revel or cannondale lefty have another way to stiffen the fork. So I think USD for are going to be more popular in the future.
  • + 1
 That is definitely a really cool concept and something I would love to see! Carbon is a really cool material, you can "tune" the carbon to flex in the direction you want, determine stiffness in certain areas etc. I think it's something that can be done, it will take a lot of development time though.
  • + 6
 They tried arches in moto, but they couldn't get the same performance as an inverted design. The torsional flex issue is a marketing ploy. The dorado is known as the best tracking fork on the market in spite of the supposed flaw. It's just been marketing that kept the inverted design off of the market, as conventional forks are cheaper to manufacture. They can get away with sloppier tolerances making production cheaper.
  • + 2
 @Hammerbro: great question and yes the added weight of the CTA does increase the weight but we tried to offset it by using forged magnesium drop outs which are 200 grams lighter than ones made from alloy. The majority of the oil sits above the stanchion tube all contained n the upper tube so the unsprung weight is kept to a minimum. Cheers, DVO
  • + 2
 @Willie1: You have a good point about why inverted forks have not been more popular- marketing and image. It has little to do with the performance, and more to do with the fact that Fox, Marz and RS have been running the show. Ask anyone who's actually ridden an inverted fork like a Dorado and they'll tell you all about how it eats up bumps, is suuuuper plush, durability, tuneable, etc, etc, long before they mention anything about the flex (if they even noticed it).
  • + 1
 The other cool aspect of where the overall technology of bikes today is that everything is getting stiffer and having some compliance built back into the bike will deliver a better overall ride. With carbon frames, rims, oversized bars, etc the structure of the bike is very stiff and the suspension must absorb and "lightly flex" to the contours of the terrain. A stiff suspension structure will only deflect and bounce you right off the trail.
  • + 2
 Also would like to mention that USD forks are stiffer as the 'flex' point of the stanchion/slider join is lower down resulting in less flex amplification at the dropout, as well as the wider, more rigid part of the fork being at the top again results in less flex and flex amplitude. Torsional rigidity and weight are the only real downside, but the torsional flex could be countered by using a stiffer, wider rim and tight pg spokes as wheels flex a hell of a lot too.
  • + 3
 Over priced like most bikes/parts. peeps stop looking for technology to help your riding and just go and ride!
  • + 2
 Actually quality suspension is one of the few parts that can help ya ride better, safer, and faster.
  • + 1
 The fork looks so good on my bike! Due to winter, I have yet to let it rip unfortunately.

But! I can report that ODI's excellent fork-bumpers for the Fox40 also fits (just) on the Emerald. Yay!
  • + 3
 1.5 years seems very quick to me ! I'll wait for the next version of them with all the gremlins worked out !
  • - 1
 Remember that these guys already have years of experience in mtb suspension behind them, I wouldn't expect there to be any more issues with them than with a new fork form any of the established brands (especially at that price).
  • + 0
 dingus, think about how many issues the 2010 boxxer had and the float 40 is having.
  • + 0
 Yeah, my point was that I don't think they'll be more prone to issues than their rivals because they're a new company.
  • + 0
 they come from marz which is reliable (2008 wasn't but ignore that) and the Emerald isn't exactly lightweight so it should be reliable if you go by the logic that 2010 boxxer world cups and float 40s aren't reliable simply because they tried to lighten up
  • + 0
 finnrambo, I'm not following your logic here. I fail to see the correlation between the weight of a fork and the reliability of its internals.
  • + 1
 it seems heavier things are usually stronger (well not marz 200Cool but it seems to be designed for reliability at the cost of some weight when the other "race" forks don't seem to be designed with reliability in mind at all, that's my logic but I don't see why the dvo would have any issues, marz experience and cnc internals can't go wrong
  • + 1
 also it's open bath which has proven to be very reliable, and ignore the sunglasses emoticon, I meant to put two thousand eight
  • + 1
 Hello Nobble: In one sense you're right, just because a part is heavier doesn't mean it stronger or more durable. But in regards to the Emerald the added weight of the oil (400cc's/400 grams), CTA, and the fact that the structure is inverted will increase its reliability. The most important component to improving damping performance and increasing reliability is how much oil is used in the system. Oil works in three ways; one as a damping fluid, two as a lubricant, and three as a cooling element absorbing heat. In a long travel fork, theres a lot of loads that need to be controlled through sliding surfaces and bushings. Theres also a lot of fluid that is rapidly moved from one side of the damper to the other as the fork compresses and rebounds. More oil is better! Cheers, DVO
  • + 1
 I agree that increased oil volumes will increase service intervals and overall reliability, but my point to finnrambo was that there's no reason why the emerald will be any less likely to see teething problems with its first year in production than any other fork. I know you guys have done all the right testing but there's always some hiccups bringing something into production. Fox have had it with their float 40, and Rockshox had it in 2010 when they overhauled the boxxer. That said, I'm stoked to see your stuff finally on the market.
  • + 1
 Thx Nobble, appreciate the good words! We have done our homework and completed extensive testing and testing and testing and...So we hope to have everything in line with the new products without any gremlins! Hope to have ya as a customer soon! Cheers, DVO
  • + 0
 Identity program seams archaic or under invested in, from logos, application techniques to the final packaging. Not to mentioned a little "special" look and feel of the product design. Hopefully they work amazing which of course is the most important thing. imo
  • + 3
 Brilliant fork (it seems because there aren't any serious reviews) but that price, hmmm..
  • + 1
 Thanks Pauiko, we will have a PB test coming soon!
  • + 2
 product looks awesome,, cant wait to see some rich kid riding a set when i overtake him...lol i will stick with my fox 40's thanks..
  • + 1
 DVO isn't about catering to only the rich kids, we feel our customers are more suspension savvy and prefer the best. Cheers, DVO
  • + 2
 A quick search and... 2014 Fox 40 = £1300. 2014 Boxxer WC = £900. DVO = £2000. I love these forks and not a Rock Shox fan but ill stick with my Boxxers Smile
  • + 1
 I would love to see a mid-travel single crown inverted offering from them in the future. Maybe even adjustable travel, like 130-150mm.
  • + 3
 We might be working on such a product! Stay tuned!
  • + 2
 someone is having a laugh with the profit margins.. unfortunately like most products in the bike industry, bar a few
  • + 1
 Very true!
  • + 3
 41 seconds, that scrub is dirty!
  • + 2
 Mikey Sylvestri moto scrubbing it!
  • + 1
 beyond curious to see how much torsional stiffness that carbon support adds cause to be honest its very hard to visually accept that it produces much stiffness.
  • + 1
 Hey Summit, the CTA does add quite a bit torsional stiffness to the inverted design but its important that the fork isn't too stiff. After various iterations of the CTA we choose the version that delivered the best feeling between torsional stiffness and compliance. Visually speaking, its like incorporating an arch on the inverted design linking to drop outs together. Hope this helps, cheers DVO
  • + 1
 Hey DVO, what happened to the 1 1/8th steer tube? All the pics look like 1.5 - 1 1/8th tapered steerers. Is there still a full 1 1/8th option when ordering the Emerald?
  • + 0
 Built with pride in Merica bought with covert racism from Asia. If you want something with pride go fracking earn it. Pride is for things you achieve by yourself not where you buy it from
  • + 1
 Damn those things are more than Marzocchi 888 heavy with the carbon arch included, might as well cop another kilo and fit an Avalanche fork lol
  • + 1
 The new 888 uses a closed oil system which helps reduce weight but at a cost of reliability.
  • + 1
 As a light rider myself I find a lighter fork much better, at 3.25kg inc. the arch I would find these on the tad-cumbersome side for me. But if you've genuinely managed to create a reliable fit and forget fork suitable for most riders and that will last years, then the MTB industry sorely needs you! The service intervals on current Rs and Fox forks are pathetic.
  • + 1
 If you people don't like the price don't bitch just buy elcheepo and bitch about what a POS you have. Good stuff is not cheep.
  • + 1
 Dame hope to see this fork at my country so many people talking about it but no one haven try it or dare to own one...the black colour looks so awesome
  • + 2
 Malaysia
Time Trading
No.30, Jalan Raja Udang 14, Taman Pantai Sepang Putra,
43950 Sg. Pelek, Sepang, Selangor, Malaysia
timetrading66@yahoo.c
  • - 1
 I am seriously impressed with the attention to detail, technology, and the effort that went into creating this fork! I am also amazed by the comments about the price.. Seriously?? The quality of this fork, and the new technology it offers are far above and beyond the standard technology offered in any other retail DH fork. A Ferrari is expensive because it can offer what a standard car can't…a higher performance level. Quit whining! Let these guys enjoy the release of their new product without being little basement dwelling critics.. Good work DVO! It took a lot of guts, and I applaud you for it.
  • + 2
 Thanks buddy, appreciate the support!
  • + 3
 This is just SICK! I love it!
  • + 1
 Thanks buddy!
  • + 1
 In the picture of the forks lined up for the final inspection there is a green pair missing a pinch bolt. I would be very pissed receiving them with that missing HAHA
  • + 1
 That's funny and you have a keen eye! All the forks are checked prior to being boxed up, we compress them, run through the adjustments, double check all the bolts and air them up to 70 psi. Cheers, DVO
  • + 3
 the all black is actually beautiful
  • + 1
 Thanks pokadot!
  • + 1
 I like this fork! Testing processes of the DVO Emerald fork are awesome: www.mtb-downhill.net/video-dvo-suspension-emerald-testing
  • + 1
 I don't think Cedric is a good fork tester... He spends like 80% of the time either jumping or manualling!!
CG is the bestest!!!!
  • + 1
 This is why the aerodynamics of the CTA helps flying.
  • + 2
 Thats a great comment and very true!
  • + 1
 I will get a pair of these,,but will leave it for a year, so they clear up the niggles. The best developed products, usually come a year after release.
  • + 1
 Looks to be a great fork developed, but give it time and Suntour will be making this on their brand at lower cost. Win win for everyone.
  • + 3
 I would be really pissed if SR knocks our design off! In all honestly, we have agreed for that not to happen!
  • + 1
 i will try the emerald if the price ever comes down to around the same as the competition
  • + 1
 Hello, DVO!
Could you tell what weight difference of unsprung weight between Emerald and other non-inverted forks?
  • + 1
 @byblik Good question! We decided to go with Forged Magnesium Drop-outs which dropped 200grams vs. the ones made of alloy.
  • + 1
 Never looks at unsprung weight of a fork. This is a legend.
And with 300g CTA, around 300g for each tubes, and the drops out, there is no unsprung weight saved. Boxxer lowers are less than 700g.

Your front wheel (with discs, tires, tubes...) is about 3000g, and you have tires from 800g to 1500g, This is where is the unsprung weight you have to look at.
  • + 1
 We also went with forged mag drop outs and tapered stanchion tubes to counter the added weight of the CTA. When comparing an inverted fork to a right side up structure, we also must consider that a magnesium casting must also have the bushings, oil & dust seals, c-clips, plus you are also moving any internal parts that are attached to the bottom of the casting via the footnuts. With right side up designs you also have to consider the friction and binding as the fork compresses under stress. Both these areas are contributing factors to the reasons why USD designs feel better than RSD models. Cheers, DVO
  • + 2
 those guys shred hard, those forks loook badass!
  • + 2
 Thanks Buddy!
  • + 1
 Brilliant & beautiful. Wish I could find a woman I could say that about. Smile
  • + 1
 That's seriously funny, could make for a good ad. Cheers, DVO
  • + 1
 think i will stick to dorados they perform great even with flex and alot cheaper
  • + 3
 At least you're riding inverted and the Dorado is a great fork! Cheers, DVO
  • + 2
 How does that carbon protector add any significant torsional strength?
  • + 1
 It is a really cool thing that we are getting other suspension options for mtb
  • + 1
 Thanks bikeshreddermtb!
  • + 1
 Is Tapered going to be the only version? or is there going to be a 1.5" and a 1.1/8" ?
  • + 1
 For you straight 1 1/8 head tube dh bike? Those days are gone.
  • + 2
 Tapered for now and we may consider 1 1/8th when we get caught up with our back orders. Thanks, DVO
  • + 1
 Thanks DVO Smile and no Fuglio, Those days will always live as long as the headset and frame companies still keep making them. Also because tapered is kinda still new to the dual crown fork industry.
  • + 2
 Looks nice, but my bike is cheaper than the fork alone.
  • + 1
 What is with the vomit-green colour obsession? Kick ass fork though.
  • + 2
 Vomit green is more like that stuff that flew out of Linda Blairs mouth in the exorcist. We do offer it in black and some more colors in the works. Cheers, DVO
  • + 1
 send me one. if i dont eat for 6 month i can pay it
  • + 1
 what about the price compared to bos forks????
  • + 1
 I think we are on par with the BOS products, depends on the country of course.
  • + 1
 Would love to pick up a pair of these in red!
  • + 1
 How does the CTA add significant stiffness?
  • + 1
 The same way lowers do, with an arch.
  • + 2
 Hey jmm337: the CTA is a simple idea yet very complex in its construction. Basically, it serves as an arch on an inverted structure linking the drop outs together improving torsional stiffness. The top of the CTA/fender looking part creates a torsion box effect supporting the arch from flexing which all add up to about in increase of 25% over a non-CTA inverted fork. Hope this helps explain things! Cheers, DVO
  • + 1
 Thanks DVOSuspension that makes sense. It is quite some effort to go through for increased torsional stiffness. How does an inverted motocross fork achieve it's stiffness without a CTA/fender? Is it by using a larger axle?
  • - 2
 @DVO

I always wondered why inverted forks won't have an oval shape, in order to reduce the breaking flex, since their stanchions are near the axle, thus suffering a much bigger stress and flex.
  • + 3
 That is a great idea! German A have some inverted forks for 2014 with that in mind.
www.bikerumor.com/2013/09/11/eb13-germana-invents-teardrop-shaped-stanchions-for-inverted-crown-suspension-forks
  • + 2
 1. Seals 2. Bushing fit
  • + 3
 Thanks for posting that link SintraFreeride , very clever idea they come up with for only having the upper part of the lowers oval so make it easy on bushings/seals
  • - 1
 Nice to see something like that! But maybe seals and bushing could be made oval, so the lowers could also keep the shape!
  • + 2
 If you're talking about fore / aft flex then the highest stresses are up near the head tube.
  • + 2
 That's a perceptive idea and one we thought of years ago. The hard part is the manufacturing oval stanchions and bushings to correct tolerances, circular is much easier and more precise. It is possible but one that may prove costly. Cheers, DVO
  • + 1
 Such a cool company which is vocal in the pinkbike community
  • + 1
 @carlosamigo thanks bud! we try our best!
  • + 1
 That's what I'm talking about. Exactly my point.
  • + 1
 Price: $2200 USD too much money.
  • + 1
 maybe depends how they perform whether its justified.

Compared to the competitors they are way over priced but hopefully that price is justified in the performance of these forks. I'm scared to know what the AUD price is its always very costly down here parts can run up to 30% more so hopefully they don't edge the 3000 mark for us.
  • + 1
 I'm gonna go raid that factory! Who's with me?
  • + 2
 We are in!
  • + 1
 We should probably raid it when DVOSuspension are out!
  • + 1
 Just give us a test already. Enough of the bull....
  • + 2
 Tests can be BS too! But, this fork works and Mike will be testing the emerald soon!
  • + 1
 glad to see their going with "green technology"
  • + 1
 Dorados or DVO ??????????? If ya got the money, spend it!!!
  • + 1
 CG at Crankworx on the Emerald.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/9988646
  • + 0
 2200 dollars, psshhh, i would rather have fox 40 or boxxers for the price, lol, i'll ride em' if you give em' to me.
  • + 1
 Oh my God that black on gold Oh my God Oh my God that Black on Gold
  • - 1
 Hello, this is Fox. We have what you are looking for in a non-inverted, proven, less expensive package... just saying.
  • + 1
 hello fox this is the consumers, your float 40 is having reliability issues and is still overpriced
  • + 1
 @finnrambo: well said!
  • + 2
 im so poor.
  • + 1
 Stoked they come in black!!!
  • + 1
 Well I'm green with envy!
  • + 3
 Thanks buddy!
  • + 1
 aweee i was hoping that the DVO stuff would be made in the usa!
  • + 2
 We tried but it just wasn't viable. We have been manufacturing all over the world and the global landscape has greatly changed over the past 15 years. America has some of the highest tax rates as well as other business related costs which make it very difficult to be made in the USA.
  • - 2
 Mmmmh much steeze, wow forks, so downhill, lot of travel, so gnar, performance yeah.
  • + 0
 let's confine ourselves to pinkbike memes only, please
  • + 1
 Thx guys!
  • - 3
 $2200?? knock knock... who's there? taiwan... shut the front door!!
  • + 5
 DVO chose Suntour because of the high level of manufacturing skill and quality control. Where is your fork made bro?
  • + 2
 the US
  • + 5
 When considering manufacturing quality, Its not so much where it is made but who is behind the parts to make sure they are manufactured correctly. When it comes to topic of labor, thats a subject that can be heavily debated from every view point. In regards to SR Suntour as our assembly partner, we have been working with them for many years and very familiar with how they operate and how they think as a company and on both a personal and business level.
  • + 5
 Only the US itself is deluded enough to think its manufacturing skill is higher than anyone else's.
  • + 3
 Only hexhamstu is deluded enough to think one jackass on pinkbike speaks for an entire nation.
  • + 3
 Hexhamstu. It's not so much quality, but rather supporting your local economy.
  • - 3
 So green, much shiny, wow.
  • - 1
 pinkbike memes are bad enough. take it back to reddit please and thank u.
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.142885
Mobile Version of Website