First Look: Santa Cruz 5010 and Tallboy 2

Jun 6, 2013 at 17:53
by Mike Kazimer  
FIRST LOOK:

Santa Cruz 5010 and Tallboy 2

BY: Mike Kazimer
For the unveiling of the latest changes and additions to their lineup, Santa Cruz Bicycles chose the sleepy hamlet of Ballater, Scotland, located near the Cairngorm Mountains in the northeast corner of the country. With numerous riding options on a variety of terrain available within pedalling distance from town, Ballater was an ideal location to launch the new line. Miraculously, the typical Scottish weather held off, and dry conditions prevailed for the duration of the event, allowing us to test ride the new bikes without donning waterproof apparel.



Santa Cruz 5010


Santa Cruz 5010 Details

• 125mm travel
• 27.5" wheels
• Colors: carbon - gloss orange, matte carbon; aluminum - gloss orange or gloss white
• Frame weights (claimed): Carbon: 5.06 lbs w/rear shock, aluminum: 6.74lbs
• Price: $2699 carbon frame w/rear shock, $1950 aluminum frame w/rear shock



• ISCG-05 tabs
• 142x12mm thru-axle
• Two water bottle cage mounts
• Molded chainstay protector
• Stealth dropper post cable routing
• 73mm threaded bottom bracket


Frame Design
Santa Cruz's initial entry into the world of 27.5” wheels was the Bronson, a 150mm trail-smashing bruiser of a bike. Taking what they learned during the development of that bike, Santa Cruz created the 5010, which is designed to take the best features of the Bronson and put them into a shorter travel, lighter package. When compared to the Bronson, the 5010 has a shorter chainstay length, a lower bottom bracket height, and a steeper head angle. On paper, this should make for a quicker handling, more playful bike than its longer travel brother. The 5010 is available in either a carbon fiber or an aluminum version with a wide variety of build kit options.


  The 5010 has a very clean looking frame design, with small details like the attachment of the derailleur hanger via a large external bolt adding to this aesthetic. A tapered headtube and stealth routing for a dropper post, along with the ISCG 05 tabs make for a well-equipped frame. We were also glad to see a threaded bottom bracket on both the 5010 and the Tallboy 2, as press-fit bottom brackets seem to have a tendency to need more maintenance than we'd like to prevent them from creaking.

The front portion of the Solo s rear shock mount is carbon fiber that is integrated into the top tube rather than being glue on later in the construction process. This takes longer but adds strength to the mount.
  Santa Cruz has gone to great lengths to make sure the 5010's carbon fiber frame meets their exacting standards. The front portion of the shock mount is constructed completely of carbon fiber that is integrated into the top tube during the initial layup rather than adding it on later, a step that creates additional strength and less chance of misalignment. The rear seat stays have indentations to create room for wider tires, even in muddy conditions, and a molded chainstay protector has been added on to keep chainslap noise to a minimum as well as protecting the carbon fiber. There is also a small protective plate further up on the stay to prevent any potential damage from a dropped chain. The stiffness of the 5010 is due in part to the thickness of the upright, the portion on the non-drive side of the bike between the seat stay and the chain stay. Stiffening this portion up allows for better pedaling performance, minimizing flex even when standing up and torquing hard on the pedals.

Ride Impressions:
bigquotesThe trails we rode on the 5010 were a mix of fast, twisting singletrack and steeper, fall line trails, exactly what a trail bike with 125mm of travel should be able to handle. Climbing was handled with aplomb, no doubt aided by the light frame and carbon ENVE rims attached to it. The VPP suspension design provides a firm platform for pedalling with minimal pedal bob, even with the CTD shock set fully open.

On the descents, the 5010 projects an aura of stability, and felt surefooted even in the unfamiliar terrain we rode it through. Quick direction changes were intuitive, and the 5010's handling felt very natural without any surprises. There were no issues hopping over trail obstacles, and getting the front wheel up took only a slight rearward weight shift. The takeaway? The 5010 seems like a jack-of-all trades, a bike that can handle a little bit of everything without sacrificing much in any department. Of course, our ride time was relatively brief, nowhere long enough to comment on the durability of the components, but our first impression is a positive one.







First Look: Santa Cruz Tallboy 2
Santa Cruz Tallboy 2 Details

• 100mm travel
• 29" wheels
• Colors: carbon - matte carbon/white, gloss white/black; aluminum - gloss green/black,
gloss grey/orange
• Frame weight with shock (claimed) = carbon: 4.9 lbs, size large
• Price (frame only) - carbon $2699 USD, aluminum $1950 USD



• Stealth cable routing
• 142x12mm thru-axle
• Two water bottle cage mounts
• Molded chainstay protector
• 73mm threaded bottom bracket
• Sized: S, M, L, XL, XXL (aluminum only)


The Tallboy was introduced into the Santa Cruz lineup in 2009 as a 29” wheeled trail bike with 100mm of travel. The basics remain the same, but the Tallboy 2 has seen a number of refinements to improve what was already Santa Cruz's top selling bike. One change that will be especially appealing to shorter statured riders is that the Tallboy 2 is available in a size small. The addition of this size was made possible by the lower shock line position that occurred when Santa Cruz reworked the suspension to improve the bike's pedaling characteristics and tweak the suspension's ramp up. The geometry remains the same, but this suspension reconfigurations allowed for the reduction of the rear shock's end of stroke ramp up, giving the rear suspension a more linear feel. The Tallboy 2's front derailleur positioning has been improved as well, with the addition of a direct mount front derailleur option.

  The quest for a stiffer and lighter frame is a common goal amongst bike companies, a goal the Tallboy 2 achieves - the carbon frame's stiffness has been increased, and it weighs in .2 pounds lighter that the previous version. The aluminum frame weighs 1/3 pound less than before, even with larger diameter chainstays. The Tallboy 2 has a 12x142 rear thru-axle, and a revised shock position that makes it possible to offer a size small frame. In the past, Santa Cruz had made rocker links from carbon fiber (the black link at the rear of the shock in the photo), but they realized that aluminum links could be made even lighter than carbon fiber, and took less labor to produce.

Santa Cruz's Carbon Construction Process

When constructing their carbon frames Santa Cruz uses a process that compacts the layers of carbon fiber on a mandrel before the frame is put into the final mold. This helps prevent any of the layers from slipping or becoming misaligned, which is what can happen if an un-compacted frame is forced into a mold. Carbon frame construction is a laborious process (which is part of the reason carbon frames cost much more than aluminum); the front triangle alone takes two people three hours to lay up.

VPP Suspension Technology
Both the Tallboy 2 and the 5010 rely on VPP suspension, a dual short link suspension design that relies on two counter-rotating links to provide a firm pedalling platform with a supple midstroke, and a slight ramp up at the end of the travel. It's a combination of a falling and rising rate suspension design, where the positioning of the two links allows for Santa Cruz to tune a bike's instant center, also known as the virtual pivot point (VPP). This point is what the rear axle is rotating around during its travel. Proper suspension set up is a bit more crucial with this design compared to a single pivot, so it's important to take the time to dial in the correct suspension settings before heading off to the trails. The lower link, the one exposed to the most possible contaminants, has two grease ports (a small grease gun is included with the bike) that can be used to push the old bearing grease out and new bearing grease in. This helps prevent the rust and corrosion that riding in wet, muddy conditions can cause.


BRAEMAR SCOTLAND - 4 June 2013 - during the press launch for the Santa Cruz Bicycles Tallboy 2. Photo by Gary Perkin
  There were no problems getting the Tallboy 2 off the ground, and it easily took on Scotland's rock strewn landscape. (Photo: Gary Perkin)

Ride Impressions:
bigquotesThe geometry of 29ers has greatly improved since the big wheels started gaining popularity, and the Tallboy 2 is a prime example of what well-thought out geometry numbers can do. Quick and playful, the Tallboy is like an eager puppy, straining to leap ahead and see what's around the next corner. Even when diving blindly into steep, rock filled trails, trails where we would usually want a bike with more travel and meatier tires, the Tallboy didn't flinch, rolling down the steeps and powering through corners without backing down. The overall light weight certainly played a roll in this nimble feeling, but the geometry deserves credit as well, creating a quick and lively bike, one that encouraged us to get airborne whenever we could, doubling up little grassy knolls and popping over the rock water bars that punctuate the trails around Ballater. Although riding uphill is certainly not as fun as going down, no matter the bike, the Tallboy makes ascending as tolerable as possible, with the puppy-like tenacity emerging on the uphills as well, making quick work of the climbs we tackled with it. The Tallboy 2 would make an excellent long-range weapon, a bike that could be deployed to happily devour mile after mile of singletrack anywhere in the world. - Mike Kazimer






www.santacruzbicycles.com


116 Comments

  • 56 2
 Last week i had my mind set on building up a bronson to be the ultimate 650b bike... I DONT KNOW WHAT TO DO ANYMORE
  • 26 2
 go the Bronson!
  • 9 1
 Yeh, i think im going to stick with it, but for a company who said they will never make a 650b bike, theyre becoming pretty popular...
  • 64 3
 Have a Snickers Wink
  • 20 1
 I am on my third SC bike now and I don't think I will EVER change to another company.
  • 4 0
 I'm like that with Intense now. I really want a SC as they just look so clean but I would never buy complete. Just need to save for the ENVE stuff first....
  • 5 1
 The Solo looks really playful with its low BB, almost like a 4X bike, but I think the Bronson is the more practical option.
  • 6 3
 Spitfire!
  • 2 0
 I agree so much. If it helps, last I looked, you can't get a Solo until September. Although, I rode a KHS sixfifty, and have to say: I felt like it could do anything that my 6" travel 26" bike could do, but better. I need a Santa Cruz Demo day.
  • 1 1
 I ride a KHS sixfifty hardtail and it's wild. I'd love to try the 140mm version!
  • 3 0
 Love Santa Cruz bikes, I hope i'll be able to afford one in the future! Big Grin
  • 2 0
 Been riding Santa Cruz since my first gen Bullit and I still ride my VP Free and I can say every time I go out, I don't want anything but a Santa Cruz.
  • 4 0
 I will offer up an opinion and a quick review. Choosing solo vs Bronson depends entirely upon what kind of riding you PRIMARILY do. I got sick of pedaling my carbon nomad (so tasty) running flats up big mountains. I needed to emphasize fitness after a lot of years of DH, free riding, park riding etc. Now that I'm kind of too old for that stuff at 42 I wanted a fitness bike that rips. The solo does that. You have to run very low tire pressure and tune the suspension just right to avoid chatter and vibration from stiff carbon wheels but this thing corners well, climbs like a goat, jumps well (careful not keep front wheel from diving--I'm sure it's me vs the bike), is super tight and just snappy. But I would never take this thing into a park and I would never ride full blast down super steep technical rocky stuff because it behaves like a slightly burly XC rig, ultimately. It's the most amazing bike I have ever owned but I felt that way about the last two nomads I had, too. If you want really chunky stuff and don't mind getting smoked up hill by your bro's get the Bronson. Of you want a bike that does everything quote well but won't dominate a single category, get the solo. Niners will out climb you and you will crush them down hill. I believe 650 is the near and permanent future of MTB...
  • 26 1
 I just got a Tallboy 1 carbon and love it. Maybe in the distant future I'll try this new incarnation. I'm sure I'll get some negative props but I have to say from personal experience that VPP just seems to work much better than Specialized style FSR rear ends.
  • 2 5
 The suspension on the Bronson I demo'ed felt like it had 5x the friction of my Stumpy. Nowhere near as sensitive over small bump.
  • 2 0
 Must have been something wrong with the shock or a blown bearing. My TB c is much more active than my Stumpy FSR Pro Carbon 26. I keep them both very clean and well maintained.
  • 1 0
 I had Blur LT and felt like it had friction as well compare to my '12 stumpy carbon evo fsr 26. But comparing the FSR EVO to the TB LT I demo'ed over the weekend, the TB LT is uber plush and it's faster climber than the FSR Evo. Has to be the long travel on the TB LT and the big wheels.
  • 25 4
 I love both of those bikes, mountain rescue orange creates tension in my scrotum. Spot on Santa Cruz. If you could just make top tubes at least 0,5" longer... there is so many more people runing wider bars these days than 3 years ago, and thus shorter stems, and you are still running ETT "standards" from 5 years ago suiting 80-100mm stems. People by average also got better on their bikes as skills-clinics and general know-how in ridign are more available, so they move around more over the bike and ride more dynamicaly. Suspension got better, people are really more confident and really more forward and more attacking - so you really don't need to keep bikes so short so that an average weekend warrior from 2005 still feels safe riding anything staticaly or hanging his ass too far back. 1" more please with next Nomad!

Huge thumbs up!
  • 22 0
  mountain rescue orange creates tension in my scrotum.
  • 2 1
 Angry - is that filmed in Scotland?
  • 1 0
 You'd better believe it was! I rode it a few weeks ago, it's some heavenly rugged singletrack.
  • 1 0
 waki surely this is more about body proportions, what suits some will not suit others .some bikes feel perfect for me others dont, my large nomad feels spot on
  • 2 2
 Sure, but SC has quite a shortish ratio of seat tube length/standover to TT length. I'd love a Large Nomad with XLarge TT.
  • 2 0
 fair enough,i think my torso is quite short compared with my leg length ,so suits me fine ,it would be great if we could all get custom builds aye.
  • 1 0
 +1000
  • 1 0
 Fully agreed Waki. Can't believe they didn't update the lengths of the bikes to bring them up to date with the rest of the industry. Or at least offer XXLs in the Bronson, Solo and Nomad so people can size up if the current offerings are too small. Tall riders want more than just 29ers!
  • 1 0
 Some of the pictures are taken on a route known to us locals as 'The Green Mile', in Ballater, Deeside. Such a fun ride!
  • 1 0
 I'm intrigued - what brands out there are running longer top tubes to compensate for short stems on their 125mm or 100mm trail bikes? I can imagine maybe some smaller gravity oriented companies who model their shorter travel trail bikes after slope style and gravity bikes, but give me some examples mate.
  • 1 0
 Mondraker does the Factor XR, which takes it to the extreme.
  • 2 0
 Motard: yeti or Banshee for instance. Spesh Evo? Mondraker RX series runs 2" more than anyone else. Maybe SC became mainstream indeed... But their Blur TRc is perfect by me.
  • 8 0
 Santa Cruz has to be the most respected brand out there right now. Strong frames, solid suspension design that pedals great, well engineered with reliable bearings and grease zerks, geometry that handles great, plus no stupid PressFit30 bb.
  • 3 30
flag deeeight Plus (Jun 7, 2013 at 8:39) (Below Threshold)
 respected by who? Kids who don't know any better and are late to the world of advertising ? Terrific... the rest of us will be happily riding our better brands rather being part of the me too brigade.
  • 20 1
 Gee, Deeeight, how about respected by me, a late 30's guy who has been riding MTB since '92, full suspension since '97, been a professional bike mechanic for 15 years, has owned more than 50 MTBs from about every company out there, tried every suspension design via ownership or demo, pays zero attention to marketing hype (in fact, questioning every claim made by any manufacturer until I try it myself), and still recommends SC as their top choice, and rides one as their primary bike? Oh, and I've owned 4 SC's, so I know how well they hold up. All are still in service through friends' use. Get a clue.
  • 5 2
 Please tell me the brands real riders use. I need to know.
  • 12 1
 +1 for no stupid Pressfit BB
  • 4 21
flag deeeight Plus (Jun 7, 2013 at 11:18) (Below Threshold)
 Yeah.... I'm worried about the respect of someone who's profile says he's 30 and claims to have been a pro mechanic for 15 years... and riding mtbs for 21 years... real professional there.

50 bikes? I'm several digits more bikes worth of riding and ownership past you. I've owned and ridden bikes from more than fifty BRANDS. I've owned several SC's also and I know how well they don't actually hold up, and especially don't hold up any real resale value more importantly. But sure...negative prop me children...its what you live for...and gives your life its sole meaning, direction and purpose. Oh woe is me for having a life outside this site.
  • 4 1
 I think you two just beaten any average journo in nr of bikes he ever tested, save owning them... with due respect of course.
  • 2 9
flag deeeight Plus (Jun 7, 2013 at 15:01) (Below Threshold)
 Have you ever looked at my past buy/sell listings...every bike I've built and listed for sale here, I've ridden. Just counting bikes I've flipped in the past five years there's 36 of them whose ads are still in the pinkbike BST archives. Every bike I've built in every dealer I've worked, I've ridden. Then there are literally the hundreds not listed here, stretching back another 15 years. More than one journalist has questioned if I'm one of their colleagues alter egos or something... there's a reason for that and its not because of my pretty face.
  • 13 0
 Girls, girls, both of your purses are pretty.
  • 3 0
 I love all the anti press fit BB comments. I wonder how they feel about press fit headsets....
  • 2 4
 @jcinv... I tried pointing that out before and got negative propped like mad.
  • 8 1
 Deeeight, it's obvious you're the one who doesn't have a life outside of this site. You comment on every single article, and to every single person's comment whom you don't agree with...just like you started here. You are constantly called out for incessant trolling, and yet you're the one saying others live to neg prop on this site. Your profile shows you've posted 12 comments just in the past 24 hours, and all of them are "actually, you're wrong" comments, as always. Most of us see through it and realize you say these things just to get responses (like mine, but I digress). I think you enjoy sitting there imagining people pounding on their keyboards with steam coming out of their ears.

Who cares what my profile says my age is, I don't bother putting my exact date of birth into these sites' forms. I'm 39 if you must know, and have been a professional mechanic since I was 24, yes. And been riding MTB since 18, yes. Started racing BMX at age 6, was a sponsored/travelling freestyler at age 13. I know my stuff.

I'm pretty sure there's a "diminishing return" on experience of owning/riding much more than 50 bikes. So you've owned 75. Or 100. Really don't think that means much after a point.

Not my fault if your SC's didn't hold up. Love to know why you think SC's don't hold value. There simply are no facts to back that up. They resell on here and Ebay for as high/higher percent of retail as anything else.
  • 1 0
 I love my TBc and it has held up very well. VPP is a solid suspension design and from my experiences much better than FSR/Horst and single pivot Kleins. They seem to be better at promoting their products so kudos to them.
  • 10 0
 So many good articles today Pinkbike!
  • 5 2
 I miss when a brand announce a new bike and this was a total new design. By now since the SC Blur all the bikes are the same design, Blur, Blur 4X, Blur LT, Blur Tr, Tallboy, Bronson, Solo, nothing new in design, sorry SC sad but true.
  • 3 0
 If, "The VPP suspension design provides a firm platform for pedalling with minimal pedal bob, even with the CTD shock set fully open," then why do we need the CTD shock? I know, I know, my single pivot, linkless Heckler benefits from it. But if it's such a good idea, then why did I change it out for a DHX 5 coil shock?

On a lighter note, no BB30; thanks, SC! If I could afford a second XC bike, a Solo would definitely be in the mix.
  • 7 0
 Both stunning bikes
  • 2 0
 agreed
  • 3 1
 Normally I don't really care what a bike looks like, but since I like the Santa Cruz's suspension platform, may as well have a nice looking bike, hey?

That Solo... very nice.

Interesting swingarms. I'm not saying they look bad, just interesting. In fact they add to the coolness of these frames.
  • 5 0
 Pretty much the same as a Carbine. but better colors !
  • 1 0
 It is the same VPP suspension design. Jeff at Intense is good friends with the dudes at SC and pays them a patent license fee to use VPP.
  • 5 0
 The Solo is a sharp looking bike...actually the one that could sell me the 650b idea works. lol
  • 2 0
 I have loved every bike I ever owned... eg . intense, spec, rocky, gt, cannondale, something wrong with people who look at a manufacturer and decide the bike is good/bad before even riding it...."stick it to the man" eh?.... Well, one day you will be " the man" ..... And just like people.... Looks don't ever tell the whole story....
  • 5 0
 I'd rather have a Bronson. Just kidding. Like I have money for either!
  • 5 0
 Awesome bikes; just have to be a doctor or lawyer to be able to get one
  • 3 0
 Santa Cruz bikes are so dialed! Love how even the Tallboy 2 has a really clean internal routing for stealth dropper posts. No more tire rub!
  • 2 1
 Solo is the 650b trC. Fixed the shortcomings of the trC with steeper seatpost, and they supposedly fixed the rear travel so that the solo uses all 125 whereas many say the trC does not. Color options, graphics kinda weak imho.
  • 2 0
 I'm totally digging the new SC decals and colour options. They match the super clean frames theyre producing. Im itching to get a new SC duallie. Nomad C, Bronson C or Solo C? The mountain rescue orange is really speaking to me.

That will have to wait though. Im just waiting for my new Jackal frame to be delivered which will have to do me for now.
  • 2 1
 and to all the people whining about the costs of enve wheels, there are other manufacturers with similar offerings at a fraction of the price. if you were to google "cheap chinese carbon rims" for example, you just might find something out there... it might require a little DIY, but in the amount of time spent whining here, you could have built yourself a new set of wheels.
  • 1 0
 www.light-bicycle.com
  • 5 5
 Creaking isn't caused because of a press-fit bottom bracket, its caused by improper assembly. You can get creaking in ANY type of bottom bracket if you install the thing wrong. Lubrication and proper torque is your friend when pressing parts together... just as you should grease inside the headtube when pressing in the headset, same goes for pressing in bottom bracket cups, or when pressing cranks onto the spindle. For years people complained that square-taper cranks creaked...and that was for years idiots in the bike world the world over kept repeating the same old wives tale that greasing the tapers would lead to over installations and split arms.... except it didn't... not unless you installed your cranks with an air gun meant to install wheel nuts on cars cranked up to 150 foot-pounds of torque or something.
  • 5 0
 I betya the big, experienced bike mag knows how to assemble a bike. Press fit is just a bandaid for carbon frames from when they couldn't do it right yet. Threaded bb allows for far easier home service, and placement of the bearings further out on the spindle.
  • 2 0
 Really nice bike, but I think the Bronson is a more versitile bike! 125mm of traveling is not enought... but they sure look good on paper!
  • 1 0
 Interesting to see the e*thirteen XCX guide on the Solo with XX1..........Is it just there for looks, overkill, or does the miraculous chainring not hold onto the chain as well as advertised?
  • 4 0
 yes yes yes!!!!
  • 3 0
 That Solo is Schwingtastic!...I'm gonna have to pull a bank job...
  • 2 0
 What a fantastic looking trail. And Peaty doing it proud.

Is that a train at 3.53?
  • 4 0
 Im so Enve-ous of these.
  • 3 0
 • Two water bottle cage mounts ... very nice.
  • 4 0
 dear santa. .
  • 3 1
 Can I replace my 26" wheels for 27.5" on my Blur and call it a Solo? Would they fit....No, really?
  • 4 0
 I converted my Blur LT to 650b 4 months ago and love it.. They will fit if you have the right fork. It's a better bike with 650b, basically a bike between the Solo and Bronson. My opinion though.
  • 2 0
 i believe a few people have done it with some very minor mods to the shock.
  • 1 0
 Please tell me how you did that. How did the geometry change with the new wheel size? Does it handle well?
  • 1 0
 yeah - is the bb not too high now?
  • 1 0
 doesn't work on a trc, back tyre rubs the frame when it bottoms, so you end up having to run a higher pressure in the shock which just ruins the ride. haven't tried replacing/modding the shock though to be fair.
  • 3 0
 bikeaddict - RE: Blur TRc for 650b conversion - you can put a bottom-out spacer into the shock to stop tire/frame contact.
MTBR 650b forum has lots of TRc's...
  • 2 0
 same goes with hecklers... change the shock (same eye to eye, less stroke) or slip in a spacer to limit travel and you can run the tires fine.
  • 1 0
 You need a 4mm bottom out spacer to prevent seat tube rub.
  • 2 0
 Both UHMAZEING, but can afford neither Frown
  • 2 0
 SCB continues to bring us ground breaking bike technology!
  • 2 0
 So many bikes, so little time....
  • 2 2
 Just an FYI to people writing reviews, the point is to list some positivies and some negatives of the product. Reviews of only the positive attributes are worthless praise.
  • 6 0
 I don't think Pinkbike is pretending this is anything more than a press release intro to the bikes. No harm really. SC gets worldwide free advertising, the editor gets to go to Scotland and ride and we get distracted from work. win win win. I would never buy a bike based on someone else's review anyway.
  • 2 2
 how many negatives are there going to be on $10K bikes... other than the price?
  • 1 0
 @PeteyInNH: Ever ridden an SB66??? There are plenty of negatives about that overly expensive "wonder bike"... High price doesn't always equal perfect and a Norco Range Killer B will blow the doors off bike 3X it's cost cause rear suspensions design isn't a factor of pricing.
  • 2 4
 "Carbon frame construction is a laborious process (which is part of the reason carbon frames cost much more than aluminum); the front triangle alone takes two people three hours to lay up."
NOT TRUE - it's manufactured in china, where the wages are about 40 cents an hour. the costs of making a carbon frame are on par or cheaper than alloy frames. the setup costs of creating the molds is a little more expensive, but we're going to see a day (soon) where carbon bikes are on par or cheaper than alloy. in fact, if you produce enough frames, your cost per unit continually decreases.
  • 2 2
 Says someone who's never worked with composites.
  • 1 0
 Import taxes is what gets you with the costs as well. All of SC's carbon frames have a duty of 13% when it enters the USA. Then if us Canadians want it we have to pay an additional 13% for HST so in the end were paying 26% more which really sucks!
  • 3 0
 i've worked with composites and seen landed costs into USA for frames from a small manufacturer in both AL and carbon. Carbon was $50 more, for a limited production run.
anyway, you're going to pay import duty for both Carbon and Aluminum, so there should be no difference there.
  • 1 0
 Is going to be a tough decision between the Solo and the new GT Sensor Carbon 650
  • 1 0
 I really enjoyed the read! Mikey- we miss you in gunni, but it is pretty rad to see your stuff on pinkbike. Scotland, wow!
  • 1 0
 their bike designs all look the same. from the Tr to the Nomad. gets boring.
  • 1 2
 I bet even my Hardrock from the 90's would ride great with ENVE wheels... Glad they overlook the fact that they're riding bikes costing ~$10K.
  • 2 1
 so are these U.S made or Taiwan made?
  • 3 0
 China I do believe.
  • 2 1
 That Solo vid is the best thing ever made.
  • 1 1
 Naah it's contrived garbage. The TR vid of Bryceland is something else though.
  • 1 0
 Pretty soon every bike SC makes is gonna look exactly the same...
  • 1 0
 These bikes look amazing!
  • 1 0
 You gotta work it hard to be a SOLO MAN !!!
  • 1 0
 now this bike are made in china.. not fan anymore by santa cruz bikes...
  • 1 0
 Soporific
  • 1 0
 a dream life...
  • 1 0
 Squirt!!
  • 1 0
 nice
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