Acre Hauser 10L Pack - Review

Jan 19, 2015 at 14:56
by Mike Kazimer  
Acre Hauser 14L review test

Acre Hauser 10L Pack

Acre Supply is the off-road oriented offshoot of San Francisco based Mission Workshop, a brand best known for their sturdy messenger bags and urban cycling accessories. The Hauser 10L is the smaller of Acre's two packs, and is designed to carry enough gear for an all-day ride without being overly bulky or cumbersome. Made entirely in the United States, the majority of the pack is constructed from ripstop nylon that's been coated with a waterproof laminate, and all of the zippers are waterproof as well, design features intended to help its keep contents dry even in the heaviest of downpours.


Acre Hauser 14L review test
A tool roll is housed in the pack's outermost compartment.
Acre Hauser 14L review test
Zippered mesh pockets of varying sizes help keep everything organized.

The large main compartment is accessed from the top, and can be closed either as a roll-top or by folding it over and using the buckles on the front of the pack, which provides a little extra protection for the front two zippered pockets. A vertically zippered pocket runs nearly the length of the pack, and houses a tool roll with enough room left over for a pump or some snacks. Another pocket is found at the top of the pack that can easily hold a wallet and smartphone, with one more vertical side pocket that can fit a smaller sized pump. A full face or half shell helmets can be carried by using the two buckles on the front of the pack, and two straps are housed in a zippered pocket at the base of the pack for securing armor or an additional layer. There are two position for the shoulder straps and the waist belt, and the waist belt can be completely removed if desired. Colors: Camo, Black, Blue, Grey. Weight: 1060 grams with Hydrapak 3L bladder. MSRP: $230 USD w/ 3L bladder, $195 (pack only). www.acre-supply.com

Acre Hauser 14L review test
A 3L bladder is housed in its own zippered compartment.
Acre Hauser 14L review test
The back panel's perforated Airprene foam is designed to help with ventilation, but things can still get steamy when temperatures climb.

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesWhen it's packed properly, wearing the Hauser is what I imagine it feels like to get hugged by a koala, offering supreme comfort and wrapping securely around the waist and shoulders to reduce any side to side shifting. It does take a little extra effort to achieve that level of comfort, and careful packing is key. Because the back panel offers minimal protection or support, if the main pocket is loaded haphazardly the pack will sit awkwardly, and solid objects like a camera or goggles will poke into your back. The Hauser also loses some of that koala-hug comfort when stuffed to its limit, since its height can make it shift forward on steep downhills if the shoulder and waist straps aren't firmly cinched down, but leaving a few inches of room at the top of the main pocket and paying attention when loading it up is all it takes prevent any issues. According to Acre, plans are in the works to offer a more supportive back panel this spring, one that will also be available as an upgrade / retrofit for existing packs.

Tool organization is often a sticking point for hydration packs, but Acre's decision to go with a tool roll handily takes care of this, and ended up being one of my favorite features of the Hauser. Several different sized zippered pockets keep everything organized and readily available, and spreading out the tool roll on the ground during trailside repairs creates the perfect place to put those little odds and ends - valve caps, master links, etc..., that tend to disappear the instant they're set down. The rest of the pack is well laid out, and the cavernous main pocket has enough room to hold food and layers, although smaller objects do have a tendency to drift towards the bottom. In inclement weather the Hauser does well at shedding rainwater, although I would recommend running it with the top portion folded over and buckled rather than in the roll top configuration in order to help keep water from sneaking in through the zippers. On the durability front the pack passes with flying colors - it's holding strong, with no rips, tears or seam separations to be seen.

When it comes down to it, the Hauser is a little different from the other packs on the market, but for some riders that's what will make it so appealing. There are a couple of quibbles - the back panel could be more supportive, and the ventilation could be improved, but otherwise the rugged construction and weatherproofing are top notch, and the tool roll is icing on the cake. Understandably, not everyone will be able to look past the price, which is nearly double that of similarly featured alternatives, but for those who place value on where a product is produced, that Made In USA tag could help make the Hauser's cost seem a little more justified. - Mike Kazimer



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74 Comments

  • + 72
 Manufacture overseas, get accused of selling out for cheap labor. Manufacture in America, get accused of being too expensive.
  • + 23
 I'll take long-lasting, locally-produced quality any day of the week. Costs far, far less in the long run.
  • + 3
 its "Artisan"
  • + 21
 I'm struggling to see how my Osprey with a lifetime warranty will cost more in the long run... especially since I haven't needed it yet, as both of them I own have been flawless.
  • + 2
 Also lifetime warranty on the Acre.
  • + 14
 Thanks yoda
  • + 3
 I've had my Dakine Nomad since 2006 and remain happy with it. Paid full msrp in Whistler when my previous pack's zipper broke. I don't think "made in the USA" carries as much weight as it once did....whether it's bikes, clothing, or gear.
  • + 1
 Not just made in America, made by hipsters in one of it's most expensive cities! I bought a messenger bag from a rival company. It was cool to be able to customize it and pick it up at the factory since they made it here, but by any other metric it's not a great bag. Shape is weird, not comfortable with much stuff in it. Design was obviously simplified so it could be made my someone with little experience sewing technical fabrics. In the future, I'll buy bags made in places where bags are made by people who have been making bags their whole career, thanks. Now if you want to sell a bag at a premium because the workers are paid fairly that's awesome, but I don't see why it has to be in SF.
  • + 7
 Jubilee55 - There are two main reasons to go with USA manufacturing. First, you are supporting higher pay for skilled manufacturing workers. Its ironic that everyone on this site talks about working for a bike company as a dream job, yet no one is willing to spend the kind of money on their bike equipment that would actually support the availability of those jobs. Second, in some industries (not carbon frames for example, mostly soft goods like this pack) you can do more advanced construction techniques in the US. Consistency in the product is actually better from overseas as they have more sophisticated production lines, but those factories can't do some of the more advanced construction techniques. Take wheelbuilding for example--you can build a lot more wheels at an overseas factory, but none of those builds will be the quality of having them built by Dave's Speeddrream, Chad at Rebarn, or Lacemine29. At the end of the day, handmade in the USA (or Canada) will get you a premium product in the softgoods market. Its up to you to decide how much extra you are willing to pay for that.
  • + 2
 @katmai I've worked with SF Made, a non-profit that promotes goods manufactured locally and one of the industries they say do poorly here is technical fabrics, because the equipment and the skillset to sew them properly don't exist locally. It's also a reason that many companies that make their messenger bags here have their backpacks made overseas, and why my chrome backpack is so heavy - they take brute force "more material" approach to waterproofing and durability.

Disclaimer* I haven't been in that scene for a couple years, so it is possible that is changing as these companies grow.
  • + 3
 @bicibicivelo - I am not intimately familiar with the San Francisco manufacturing industry. However, in my experience, US manufacturers do not have the ability to do large scale productions of technical products, but they do have the ability to do higher quality small batch items. Neither Asia nor North America has the ability to do large productions of the highest end stuff. An example would be the difference between an Osprey and a Cilo Gear pack. Osprey is made overseas in their own factory. They make some really nice backpacks and in a high volume. In contrast, Cilo is sewn by hand in Portland. The Cilo packs are overall a much higher end product than the Osprey, with better fabrics, lighter weight, and greater durability (they also cost $600+ for the best model). Another example is Arcteryx, which handmade everything in Vancouver for a number of years before moving overseas. Their current stuff looks like the Vancouver made products, but just isn't as durable. I've got 2 Vancouver made Arcteryx goretex products that are still going strong since 2001 and am now on the third warranty replacement an Asian made jacket that I purchased in 2006 where the welded seams have about a 3 year lifespan before delaminating. They look the same new, but the Canada made stuff was better.
  • + 1
 I'm stoked to see Mission workshop venture more into mountain biking equipment (bags / apparel). Sure the prices are high, but having seen their stuff in person (I work in the City). It's top notch. The styling is also practical / functional. I can't wait for them to do more mountain bike clothing. Again, with an emphasis on durability and function.

I would love to check out this bag. I have always had camelbacks, and wouldn't call them durable. I would really love a bag that doesn't shift about too much on a ride. And finally, cleaning is a pain with my current bag. I might have to take a trip over to SF to check out the bag in person. Nice write up!
  • + 4
 I think some of you forget that manufacturing on any continent involves skilled humans operating machinery, and neither Asia nor N. America (or anywhere else for that matter) has a premium on either (though certain regions of the world are highly specialized for certain kinds of manufacturing). It is entirely possible to make hi-end, technically superior products any place in the world if you have the tools and talent in place. What is correct, is the trade-off between the quality of lower out put and full fledged mass production. It's not a 'quality-was-good-until-production-went-to-asia' problem as much as 'quality-was-good-until-production-was-vastly-increased-and-relocated-1000s-of-miles-away' problem. Language, proximity, and willingness to relocate abroad for long periods of time also effect the end product. Plenty of companies do overseas manufacturing very well, while others don't plan for or simply can't afford to address the challenges that come with establishing a massive assembly line in a foreign place. Quality is not simply an Asia vs The West relationship.
  • + 1
 MW is based in SF but one of their guys at Interbike told me the bags are sewed in Colorado, where labor is probably a little cheaper.
  • + 2
 ill stick to my osprey zealot, in one year of abuse almost every day to university, and to the hill, with full face helmet in the back hanging around still doesnt show any sing of wearing
  • + 2
 @katmai : My post was in response to @robwhynot. I've owned speed dream wheels, Turner (when they were US) frames, and the old (when it was US...I think) Knolly Endorphin. So I understand what you're promoting. But the fact is, and @general-lee stated this, is highly skilled trades-people exist everywhere. Cases in point, my Dakine pack and Specialized stumpy evo. I think we can both come up with scads of examples to support your and my case. Long story short though, I'm not spending $200 on a hydration pack when other great options exist.
  • + 14
 This is a cool pack and all.....But I could get THREE Deuter Race X packs for the same price....I've had one for over a year now and it has not complained once or ever start to show real wear, I ride three days a week and use it for school every day. Anyone who uses a Deuter understands. And it is hands down the most comfy and well venting pack I've ever used. This is a great pack full of features, but how can you justify the price? Unless your going for style points, then it's cool I guess. But that is just my opinion, this is a sick looking pack though, looks like something Batman would wear! Bring on the neg props, I'm cool with it.
  • - 2
 Nah... but its actually super well thought out. I understand the price is a little high, but the build quality is nice, its made in Merica, if that matters to you, and its the little things (well thought out but i had to repeat it differently).

The well thought out: the way the hydration pack area is separated from the rest of the bag, simple little loop for hydration pack so it hangs and doesn't get all squished and annoying AF at the bottom of the bag. loops at top of main arm straps for hose to go through. The way the main flap can overlay the zippers when a helmet isn't attached, speaking of... the helmet clips are so well placed and angled it is incredible, it is designed very well for a fullface.

Build quality, life time warranty and i haven't even gotten a loose stitch yet, and i ride 4-5 times a week and use it for runs, hikes and general outdoor use, and i abuse my shit as all of my backpacks are military grade and able to stand a good rough life. Oh... lifetime warranty.

Little things: multiple strap settings, for people of all sizes. its water and dust proof, so if it gets dirty, just unpack it and wash it off with a hose and it looks brand new. its available in a 14L for i think 5 bucks (at most 10) more if you need more space. Free shipping inside of US.

Now trust me, anytime i look at one of these reviews and see shorts and shirts for over 100 or 150 bucks i instantly stop reading. but this is an investment that is worth it. i wouldn't ever buy anything else from Acre as its all WAY over my price point. i mean i wear clearance TLD and Fox stuff. but this... this bag is epic.
  • - 1
 but to each their own bruh.
  • + 1
 Now I know where the smells come from inside class.
  • + 14
 Folks are riding $5000 bikes complaining about a $200 made in USA pack that'll probably last 10+ years? Maybe you should ride a $500 bike instead Razz

This pack looks great, not for everyone, but it's nice to see something different/new that doesn't have logos blaring all over the place.
  • + 7
 I have had my Acre pack for over a year now. It is the most comfortable pack I have ever used. Layout is top notch...as is quality. I was a bit worried about the ventilation when I first saw the back panel....but it has actually proven to be amazingly well ventilated. Stoked on this thing...

(@Mike - Holmes, your zipper's down and your tool roll is about to slip out!!)
  • + 1
 I've had mine for about eight months and my only issue is the ventilation on the relatively floppy back panel. I prefer a Deuter-style frame. On the other hand this back really sticks to your back so as long as its not over 80 degrees the ventilation or lack thereof is not a problem. I hid my truck keys in the bottom strap pocket and forgot about them. Spent a half hour looking in the woods for keys.
  • + 6
 So I see exorbitantly priced, made in USA, "tacti-cool" gear is making it's way to mountain biking now. Don't get me wrong, I will always try my best to support American made goods and services, and can appreciate the extra effort made by companies to deliver a product made entirely Stateside...but I cannot for the life of me understand the new trend of gear nerds paying prices 2x the competition for average or lesser "features."

I can never seem to find the validity in a product that is marketed for extreme outdoor use, but is sold in store fronts next to $300 axes down in New York City, and promoted with models posed deep in thought in remote outdoor venues. The customer base of skinny jean and flannel wearing "outdoorsmen" eat this stuff up, but I just can't see how. /Rant (bring on the neg props)
  • + 4
 Because mountain biking is a niche market, with a premium price structure, so company's like this, and whoever makes those over-priced shorts, know they can jack you with hipster shit. There are lots of companies our there, not necessarily in mtb, that make reasonably priced, domestic made goods. Topo designs for example make outdoor clothing in Colorado, their mountain pants are pretty damn good. You can still get an aluminum Intense or Turner for a very reasonable price. You can gat a Canadian mad Devinci for a reasonable price. Boutique hipster shit will cost you though.
  • + 6
 Love mine. Becomes stuffed pretty quickly between my camera, lenses, jacket and tools but its not supposed to be a multi day pack.

Holds a full face fairly well too.

m.pinkbike.com/photo/11153377
  • + 2
 same. i carry: keys, wallet, phone (big ass military otterbox case) tool kit with pump and multi tool and patch kit and tubes and more, snacks, usually a protein bar, electrolyte "shot bloicks" my knife, my gloves, my goggles, my full face, and a spare chain, gopro, gopro chest mount and the 3L camelbak.
  • + 1
 ^^^^You need all of that just to ride for a day? Water, multi-tool (with chain-tool), phone, tube, thats it.
  • + 1
 I must go on longer rides than you do.
  • - 7
flag SlodownU (Jan 22, 2015 at 17:06) (Below Threshold)
 You so need this bag, to hold every gimmic that you get sold.
  • + 4
 I carry a kitchen sink, but that's it. As long as this pack can carry one of those I'm sold.
  • + 1
 are we talking double or single sink, and are you going to be taking the garbage disposal with you?
  • + 1
 In all seriousness, for long days I carry pretty much all the same gear as you. Except I keep my gloves on my hands, helmet on my head (except climbing on hot days). I ride with a half shell most of the time. Typically don't take my GoPro, but do bring lights if it's going to be dark during any part of the ride. I do also carry an extra chain link or two. I currently have a camelback Mule, and while it has enough space for everything and the pockets are good-ish. I wouldn't say I love the pack.

I've had to hike-a-bike when suffering a mechanical, so now I just try to play it safe and over prep a bit. I would rather sit and fix an issue for 20 min than have to hike 6 or 7 miles again.

"Double Sink - 1HP InSink Erator"
  • + 3
 It's all about the quality of the materials used in the construction. It uses a laminated rip stop material that was developed by a company that makes sailcloth fabric. It's said to be 10X more waterproof than other bag fabrics since the lamination process is bonding instead of a spray on coating. Also the laminating make the fabric much stronger since the fibers are all glued together. If you were to go to the fabric store to buy the same fabric you'd pay 3X the price compared to other bag fabrics (i.e. Cordura). I bought the 14L for this very reason. Quality materials and workmanship make the Acre bags worth every penny.
  • + 2
 The tool pouch is a nice idea for when you're having arrest stop or have a mechanical that requires a full break. Most of the time for me it's :hey grab my multi tool for me from the front pouch so i can adjust XYZ component", I don't want my buddy to have to rummage through a full bag to find something, that's why quick access outside pockets are so common on packs. And what is with that strip of velcro at the top?
  • + 1
 Y'know, you just gave me an Idea: I'd totally pay for a pack that had a purpose built multi-tool pocket on the shoulder or hip straps, especially if it came with a multi-tool that the pocket was designed for, so that it didn't move around or poke through the straps.
  • + 2
 not sure I'd want a multi tool on my shoulder or hip, being the two places I tend to land first when crashing off balance Smile
But something more within reach on the lower sides of packs would be great.
  • + 1
 Properly designed pocket could mitigate that risk, or maybe careful placement somewhere that is less likely to take an impact, like the very top of the shoulder, with a downward facing flap. Or maybe on the very edge of the pack, but still reachable without taking the pack off, like right behind the tie point for the hip belt.
  • + 1
 @robwhynot - That strip of velcro is so you can roll the top of the pack shut, instead of using the two buckles. It gives it a little more room that way.
  • + 2
 I have no problem paying big bucks for good stuff. But shame on me if I buy some fancy stuff that is not perfect. Fix the back, offer custom colorway/fabric options (like the domestic messenger bag co.s) and also bigger options (for example it's well below freezing and I want to carry extra gear). Otherwise, this falls into kitsbow territory. I would pay if it's perfect. But it's not and I don't want it.
  • + 2
 The comments on the back panel were significant for me. I want to be able to carry items without them jabbing into my spine. I've had a chrome messenger bag for years that I have used for around town, carry on, bike commuting etc.and its basic, big and bombproof, but if an item shifts or I'm carrying odd shaped items it can be uncomfortable. With the shifting that inevitably occurs in mountain biking as well as wanting to unpack and repack quick in the rain, muck, snow etc. sometimes... I'd rather have something that sits well with reasonably even weight and pressure distribution. Loving my evoc but know that there are many good bags out there that will last equally long (and likely cost less for more features).
  • + 1
 Back protector is a must IMO. Also love how my Shimano pack has raised corners on the back protector to keep it off your back and better ventilated. I'll happily spend more money for local if it's a much better pack, but this doesn't appear to be.
  • + 1
 I have the Hauser 14L pack and it is a godsend if you ride in wet weather. The past month where i am had a few weekends of torrential downpour. The Hauser let none of that inside. The adjustable straps are ingenious, and the material is resistant to abrasion. I love the tool organizer that is included. It's pricey, but it's a unique take on the trail pack that is made in the USA with excellent quality.

What I wish it had (and Pinkbike touched upon this already) was compression straps. If you actually use the tool organizer, it will most-likely be the heaviest mass in your pack. When riding trail, this weight shifts easily during moves on the bike. It can unsettle your balance easily during high-speed sections. Compression straps would be nice to cinch the load tightly to prevent this. I sent a note to Acre with this feedback and hope they may consider this for a revision.
  • + 4
 Neat looking pack but not sure its worth the cost considering some of the competitive packs out there.
  • + 4
 ^^ this! It's seems like a fine pack, but there's just too many great ones out there these days. One slip up (the back panel) and it's all over.
  • + 1
 read my above review... basically, it is worth it, but i understand why you might not believe so.
  • + 1
 If it has a life time warranty. like all my MEC packs. Then i would get this pack. And it would hopefuly be the last pack i ever have to purchase. Or can continue to use my packs that come with life time warranties. It is a well thought out pack.
  • + 1
 i started reading the responses before the article , and after reading that article i was expecting the pack t be in the $400 to $500 range judging by the reply's i think it,s a fair price , good rain gear is worth it,s weight in gold when it comes to winter riding in BC
  • + 3
 My takeaway from this is that I'm going to go buy a tool roll and put it in my current backpack.
  • + 2
 @bicibicivelo: That's not a bad idea - the tool roll is available seperately: missionworkshop.com/products/accessories/tool-roll.php.
  • + 1
 Thanks! The zippered pouches make much more sense for mtb than the typical tool loops/pockets that seem to assume we ride around with a bunch of box wrenches.
  • + 1
 Its amazing how little people know about bikes or US manufacturing, yet espouse their "knowledge" on the subject. Nothing but hyperbole and asinine comments about something you know nothing about.
  • + 1
 People always jump to the cheap labour costs for over seas manufacturing, how about the lack of environmental standards? One trip to a smoggy manufacturing hub in South East Asia would be enlightening.
  • + 1
 Still searching for the 'it' pack. I run a wingnut (hyper 3) as I'm sold on low cg weight/ez side pockets, but it flops to the side a bit(steep chunky), straps aren't great, poor back ventilation, and it gets smelly.
  • + 4
 I love my pack, quality is top of the line!
  • + 1
 I had black diamond sidewinder with with a wide zip opening i tried to add stuff there, unzipped it and all was falling out off it- wide opening in the middle - not my cup of tea, especially for this price!
  • + 1
 Valve caps? The perfect place for those is not on your tool roll but in the bin... lose em before you're spotted using them Mike!
  • + 1
 Reckon he means the valve cap on your shock. Lose that and you can get into some trouble.
  • + 1
 they could of at least come out with a few color schemes, its a nice pack but i would also like it to match the rest of my gear/bike. keep it in america ftw.
  • + 1
 This pack is so ugly that it should be available in cow hide and supplied in a set with a reindeer jumper and a pair of thick framed glasses.
  • + 2
 I'm sure its great for carrying clippers to make sure your Hipster Youth haircut stays sharp and clean. One word. DAKINE.
  • + 1
 What he said. My apex has been everywhere with me. Everyday use for the past 5 years. No complaints at all. Crashed, sweated, snagged, slid, cartwheeled whatever. It is still smiling and so am I.
  • + 1
 I have a MIssionWorkshop backpack that I commute with everyday. It is hands down the best backpack that I have ever owned.
  • + 1
 How the hell does 3 liters last an "all day ride". I go through about a liter an hour on warmer days.
  • + 2
 ...but can you get koala bear to carry your helmet for you @mikekazimer ?
  • + 1
 @tworldsmine, I wish. I might need to go down to Australia to see if I can find one, although that might seriously decrease my uphill speed. Lots of nap breaks.
  • + 1
 The nylon and plastic materials were made in China. The pack was designed, cut, assembled, sewn together in the USA.
  • + 1
 Flat to the back and waterproof, that would make a good bag for when you out snowboarding / skiing too
  • + 1
 Getting hugged by a koala would *&^&ing hurt! they have claws for climbing trees
  • + 1
 wish i had one on this mornings ride as it was very wet and mucky
  • + 1
 I was out the second I saw the price. Not for a pack.
  • + 1
 Hey yo!! I gotz to get me one ov doze!!!
  • + 1
 Stop hating and go ride!
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