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Ask Pinkbike: Body Armor, Fork Upgrades, Cornering Tips, & Shoulder Bumps

Dec 29, 2022 at 12:12
by Mike Kazimer  
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Here at Pinkbike, we get inundated with all kinds of questions, ranging from the basic "Can I have stickers?" to more in-depth, soul-searching types of queries like if you should pop the question or what to name your first child. Ask Pinkbike is an occasional column where we'll be hand-picking and answering questions that have been keeping readers up at night, although we'll likely steer clear of those last two and keep it more tech-oriented.





Recommendation for new body armor?

Question: @Sam1567 asks: I might be in search of a new body armor, because the one I own at the moment isn't the best fit with my Leatt neck brace. It works okay, but could be better. The one I have currently is Alpinestars Bionic Plus without the shoulder pads (if I remember correctly). It is a good roost guard, but just doesn't fit with a Leatt brace. Also, the guard should fit under a jersey. Also, Leatt's availability isn't the best locally, so I might not be able to get one of them

bigquotes
I've been very impressed with the fit of Fox's Baseframe chest guard ($199.95 USD). Matt Beer got along well with the option pictured below, and I spent a bunch of time wearing the sleeveless version in the bike park this season with similar results. The low profile makes it easy to forget you have it on underneath a jersey, and it's breathable enough to wear on those hot summer bike park and shuttle laps.

Protective apparel has come a long way from the stormtrooper gear that used to be the norm in the early 2000's, and there are all sorts of worthy options on the market right now. Start by looking for a CE certified back protector, and from there you can decide what other protection you're looking for – there are versions that provide more shoulder protection, chest protection, or even full-length jerseys with elbow protection.


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Fox's Baseframe protective jersey is comfortable and unobtrusive.




Upgrade or replace RockShox 35 Fork?

Question: @Maxants33 asks: I have a RockShox 35 Gold on my hardtail - it's an ok fork! But I am trying to get more small bump compliance - my specific issue is feeling like I'm losing grip when trying to rail rough berms with lots of dents/roots/braking damage etc. I've played around with the basic MoCo damper, but have not been able to get a satisfying result.

I've been advised by friends to get a 2nd hand Pike. But I have been looking for months and every Pike for £300 or less has either a short steerer, chips in the stanchions, or is not Boost/29er.

My budget is small - I cannot afford a 2nd hand fork costing more than £300. I'm also a little reluctant to buy 2nd hand, since most of my friends have horror stories about 2nd hand forks being ragged and full of dirt, becoming money pits. My fork is due a service, so I was thinking about going for the Fast 3 way damper upgrade when I send it for service. It's £230, so in my budget , plus, since I know my fork has been well cared for, there's less gambling about buying something thats pre worn out.

However - anyone with more knowledge/experience think this is a dumb idea? Is this false economy? Leave it another year and save for a Pike?



bigquotesI don't think your £300 budget is totally unreasonable for finding a fork that's an improvement over the RockShox 35, although I'd recommend saving a little bit more to expand the number of options. A quick skim through the Pinkbike BuySell brings up several decent options for £350 or less. Looking for a used Pike is a good option, but I wouldn't limit yourself to that particular model and brand. A newer Marzocchi Z2 or a Fox 36 (or 34) Rhythm fork would also be worthwhile upgrades over the 35.

As for the damper upgrade, I'd hold onto that money for now. I would recommend looking into doing the basic lower leg service on your fork yourself, assuming you're at least a little mechanically inclined. It's fairly easy, and doesn't require that many tools. It can also help improve the small bump sensitivity that sent you down the upgrade route in the first place.

Marzocchi Bomber Z2 fork 2020
Marzocchi's Z2 fork would be a worthy upgrade from a RockShox 35.



Shoulder bump after AC separation?

Question: @Jnics7 asks: Experienced a level 3 AC separation a few months back (on 3/27/21). Kept it in a sling for a few weeks and then began recommended movement followed by regular activities. I am back to normal strength and speed in my enduro mtb/moto riding however I have a huge deformity on my shoulder. Has anyone else experienced a lasting deformity where the clavicle never really settles back down onto the scapula?

bigquotesWelcome to the club! Unfortunately, as you found out, the cost of admission is painful and annoying – I'm glad to hear you're back up to speed. As for the bump, if you ever end up at the beach with a bunch of shirtless mountain bikers there's a very good chance that a decent number of them will be sporting the distinctive shoulder deformity you mentioned. I'm no doctor, and nothing I say should be considered medical advice, but in my experience that bump shouldn't cause any issues in the future – just think of it as a souvenir from a ride that didn't go exactly as planned.






How to handle chunky corners?

Question: @imnotded asks:I live up in the Sierra Nevada mountains and pretty much all the trails around here have pretty chunky rock gardens (rocks probably stick up between 4 and 6 inches). Usually they are weaving through large boulders on either side. These scenarios are everywhere up here and they give me a pretty hard time. Since I am new to riding I tend to ride a little slow anyway, but then you add in narrow trails and super chunky turns and I can't actually make the turn a lot of the time. Is speed the biggest benefit here?

bigquotesSpeed can be your friend in the situation that you're describing, but I'm not about to suggest that you start letting off the brakes and hoping that everything works out...

Instead, I'd recommend practicing your cornering in an area with fewer consequences if things go wrong. Setting out some cones in a grassy field and creating a mini-slalom course is a great way to get used to cornering at a variety of speeds. You can make the spacing as tight or far as you'd like, and adjust it to create a scenario that replicates what you're finding out on the trail. Start slow, and as you get more comfortable on the bike your speed will naturally increase.

Remember to look ahead at where you want to go, and to have your line planned out as far in advance as possible. It's very common for riders to end up looking at the trail right in front of them, which reduces the time you have to react to things like chunky rock gardens.

A pump track is another great place to practice cornering – the tighter rollers and berms, and the lack of pedaling can really improve your bike handling. Finally, seeking out a coach for a lesson or two is another highly recommended option. Having someone else examine your technique will make it easier to figure out what you can adjust to make those tricky corners a bit easier.




Author Info:
mikekazimer avatar

Member since Feb 1, 2009
1,752 articles

118 Comments
  • 65 1
 Fist bump for the shoulder bump.
  • 9 1
 Shoulder bump club member, here.

I did mine skiing years ago and still have a bit of a bump. Got back into the gym fairly shortly after and then competed in olympic weightlifting for a few years. Got strong with all kinds of shoulder/overhead mobility. Other than looking funky, the shoulder hasn't ever given me any issues.
  • 8 0
 Seriously, mine was only grade 2 and it took nearly a full year to be pain free and years later still has slightly reduced mobility.
  • 9 0
 I've had partial separations on both shoulders now. First time happened while wrestling a polar bear and he hip tossed me.... or maybe I fell while ice skating for the first time and tried to roll through a fall.. I can't remember which.

Second time was a relatively mild crash trying to avoid a friend that had crashed at the bottom of a blown out, marbley steep chute.

Both times resulted in what felt like an eternity of sleep depravation, weakness and loss of mobility.
I haven't had surgery on either of them though and would say I have 100% strength and mobility now.
  • 5 0
 Me too. My doctor said I could have surgery to get rid of the bump but it wouldn't help with any mobility issues or pain. I opted for no surgery and I'm all good now.
  • 20 0
 The obvious answer is to go to the gym and compete in weightlifting at the next Olympics. Not sure if anyone's mentioned this.
  • 3 0
 Grade 5 separation checking in here. Very bad bump! After surgery the bump was better but for sure still noticeable. It took about 14-16 months to be at the point of there being no bump whatsoever.
  • 4 0
 A club full of fine gentlemen I'd rather not be a member of. Got mine with a broken clavicle in April 2022, practicing for a race. I didn't need surgery but was warned about the bump. Doctor said surgery would have meant a smaller bump, but the only long term impact would be prettier x rays. Bump is nothing to worry about.
  • 2 0
 @jdavey26: did you have hook plate? I did and was a horrendous 5 months.
  • 3 0
 @jdavey26: Have grade 5 on both sides now so they match. Chiropractor told me you can hammer back into place, after 3 hits I was like STOP! Mine took about 2 years total to feel normal and to sleep on the side ok.
  • 2 3
 Where the F is friday fails, 2 weeks in a row now...there better be a big fail finally tomorrow for year end. This is my question for you pinkbike.
  • 7 0
 @SLBIKES: chiropractors man... they get some wild ideas.
  • 3 0
 I have a stage 3 on the right and stage 1 on the left. Stage 1 only took a month or so to heal and I was back in the bike park that same season, basically a sprain. The stage 3 was like 4-6 weeks of a sling with PT and I think within 3 or 4 months of the injury I felt like I was back to 100%. Rapid recovery compared to other injuries I've experienced. I have a massive bump on the right but I can control how much my shoulder blade hangs down and reduce the bump. Surgeon told me they'd only fix it if I was in a profession with a lot of overhead work/movement like a painter or something. The stage 3 shoulder never really caused me any problems for about 15 years, very strong and mobile. The only limitations I noticed during that period was intolerance to carrying heavy things on top of my shoulder, early muscle fatigue with overhead work(like painting), and it took a few years before I felt comfortable laying or sleeping on that side.

Now, after 15 years since that injury and about to finish physical therapy school I'm not sure I agree with my old surgeons assessment. The upper trap attaches to the clavicle and if it moves up the upper trap will shorten creating a less efficient muscle. Additionally, I notice that arm carrying a little bit more internal rotation. I think I can fix that with some training but I think not having the clavicle attached predisposes me to that increased IR and forward slump. I'm just starting to have some minor issues with that shoulder, but I can't definitively assign my shoulder/neck issues to that injury because I have confounding variables of multiple much more troublesome injuries. It's all connected...

A quick search up of the anatomy of the AC joint and the shoulder in general might help you better understand your injury and why it sticks up. It always wanted to stick up, but the ligaments held it down and attached to the scapula, or maybe just the scapula hanging down abit gives the appearance of the clavicle sticking up, or both. The shoulder is really interesting because the clavicle to scapula attachment is the only bone to bone ligamentous attachment of the entire shoulder/arm complex. You blow that joint and now your arm is joined to your body by only muscle going from the scapula and humerus to your spine and rib cage. The only other bones like that are the hyoid in your neck and maybe the sesamoid in your foot.
  • 1 0
 @skiandmtbdirtbag: No, the first three surgeons I saw wanted to go that route. After doing some research I realized I needed to see a surgeon who specialized in athletes. I found one that used cadaver tendon to pretty much wrap around and tie my ac joint back in place. I also had a lot more damage done that needed repairing so I’m thankful I went the surgery route.

My surgery was on May 20th. I was cleared for light riding on July 20th. In mid August I was riding the bike park.

Also, I was doing A LOT of band work as soon as I could. Once I was cleared for light riding was when I got back to the gym but using much lower weights. I could feel myself breaking up the scar tissue.

I feel like I was a little lucky but also had one of the best surgeons for this procedure (In my opinion).

I can’t recommend enough finding a good surgeon. One who understands your situation and will see you as an athlete who will likely be taking more hits to their body.
  • 1 0
 @jdavey26: Yup, you had the best technique, I couldn't find anyone that would do it close to me so when with a f*cking butcher who put the wrong sized plate in.
  • 5 0
 I got a grade 4 on a big jump fail about 20 years ago. Big bump indeed. I live near a very good orthopaedic hospital and I saw a specialist shoulder doctor. He said there is an operation he can do to remove the bump, but not to bother until I’ve stopped doing ‘extreme’ biking. I’m 55 now, so should be getting ready for the operation in 15 years I reckon
  • 2 0
 Grade 4, rugby tackled a tree at aboot 20mph. As it wasn't broken I didn't seek any medical advice..... then.4 weeks later at the jumps I had no idea how weak my shoulder was from the injury. I landed a jump an just collapsed. Bars flipped an threw me into the floor like a hook up on a spine. This resulted in a well rung bell, flayed rib cage (multiple breaks on multiple ribs an a collapsed lung......
2018 suucked
  • 1 0
 @jdavey26: "found one that used cadaver tendon to pretty much wrap around and tie my ac joint back in place"
jeez, that is hardcore, I didn't know that is an option, even. Can you describe a bit more in detail?
I got a grade 4 fixed by tying together clavicle and coracoid process, that's drilling the bones to pass a string of UHMWPE through. Prettt neat, except the knot/titanium bit that sits on top of the clavicle, really annoying with backpacks
  • 1 0
 TIL this bump on my shoulder wasn't always there. Thank you Pinkbike. I dislocated my shoulder 10 years ago, I crashed on a road gap... and somehow managed to put it back in place within a few minutes. Gave me pain for months, but fortunately I didn't need any surgeries and after lots of work at the gym, it is perfectly fine now,
  • 1 0
 Every time a mountain biker has a shoulder separation an angel gets a wing!

...at least that's what I'm hoping; my wife keeps asking when it's going to finally grow in fully.

I did mine about 5 years ago and it took 6+ months to get back to some semblance of normal, but the absolute best treatment IMO is build up lots of muscle in the area. My surgeon said "ask 5 doctors how to fix it and you'll get at least 6 answers", but none of the surgical options look great for long-term success and happiness. My suggestion: lots of shoulder presses and push-ups.
  • 1 0
 @kuejku: I dislocated my shoulder and fractured the end of my humerus a year ago. I had decent physio (albeit curtailed by having to move countries), but it's still not great in terms of pain in various places. Do I just try and build up the muscle and push through the pain?
  • 2 0
 @ripridesbikes: Depraved sleep sounds serious, should probably get that checked also.
  • 1 0
 Separated shoulder 20 years ago snowboarding, took about 9 months to recover fully, still have my bump. You might notice some long term shoulder pain from certain unsupported positions - for me it still happens on long transoceanic flights where I’m forced to sit for 12+ hours without an armrest at an appropriate height, but otherwise it’s not an issue. Be sure to get packs (like if you backpack on multi day trips) that have straps that don’t sit right on the bump, that can get really uncomfortable… otherwise no lasting issues with mine.
  • 1 0
 @BenPea: It sounds like your injury was worse than mine. I did a lot of training at the gym even before the crash, so I didn't have to start building muscles from scratch... anyway, I did a lot of band work and some less painful weight training (push ups, push ups on bosu (with and without a bar) - for stability. Chest presses didn't give me much pain so I also did that. I also started doing shoulder presses as soon as I felt comfortable. To be honest, most painful were pull ups and all flexibility exercises, but I feel that those actually helped me the most. IIRC it took around 2 years before it was back to normal.
  • 1 0
 @kuejku: Thanks man. The fracture meant 6 weeks of immobilisation, which was not great for rehab and led to capsulitis. I got lucky with a specialist for the latter, but despite recovering full amplitude and a lot of pool work, the pain has dragged on. I'm just going to push through with your suggestions and see what happens. Cheers!
  • 2 0
 @SLBIKES: that is seriously bonkers...
  • 1 0
 @skiandmtbdirtbag: Yep. Hook plate is sometimes needed depending on the fracture, but man, the rotator cuff irritation with the hook plate is worse than the initial injury! And I still got to join the club with a decent little bump - though of no consequence anymore. (The rotator cuff needs tuning up occasionally though)
  • 1 0
 @BenPea: dislocated shoulder is different from an AC joint separation. Also, which end of your humerus did you fracture?

Dislocating a shoulder generally refers to the humerous dislocating from its connection to the scapula.

The severity of this injury can be pretty mild as in it pops back in and never comes out again, to it pops out all the time and is very unstable.

You are only a year out, so you got a good chance for conservative management with physio.

If I were you, I'd see a physio, shoulder specialist. He can run some tests and determine if there is any joint instability, and then tell you what to do to work on it, and what to avoid to keep from making it worse.

If that doesn't work you can look into surgeries. From what I've seen in the clinic, very difficult surgeries to bounce back from.
  • 1 0
 @DhDWills: A bit of trochiter (?) came off during the dislocation (anterior). Rotator cuff was not damaged. It's all tight. But the ligaments/tendons aren't happy.
  • 1 0
 @iiman: ahaha you have a berd spoke in your shoulder
  • 1 0
 @BenPea: Greater or lesser trochanter? Were you ever checked for avascular necrosis? This is an often missed condition when there are breaks to the bone near arteries. The artery is severed and the artery only supplies a very small part of the bone, so that part of bone withers and rots. It is easy to miss on initial radiographs and only shows up on radiographs some time later.

What is your pain level 1-10 and does it fluctuate through out the day? What makes it worse? What makes it better? What are those pain levels?

Key question: Do you have pain at night while sleeping that wakes you up or keeps you awake?

For an advanced case.....do you have a fever?

If you have unrelenting night pain...go to the ER now
  • 1 0
 @DhDWills: Greater. I had an orthopedic surgeon keeping an eye on it (regular x-rays) for 4 months after the crash. The bone is fine. It all went back into place when it was popped back in. The pain comes when lifting, etc. If 10 is the hell of the hour or so I spent pre-reduction, then it can reach around 6 if I really try. It's all in the soft tissue. No pain at night.
  • 40 1
 ..."if you ever end up at the beach with a bunch of shirtless mountain bikers".... While on the subject: If you found yourself on the beach with a bunch of pants less mountain bikers, I wonder what would be seen? Leathery taints? Saddle sore scars? For a while I had a scar on my inner thigh alarmingly close to genitals from a hard case where I scraped my thigh against the seatpost qr lever, and somehow managed to avoid testicular trauma. An acquaintance blew off the pedals at high speed and made violent and prolonged contact between butt crack and rear tire. He was nicknamed Frodo for the rest of the trip, cause he destroyed his ring.
  • 4 2
 Please just don’t. I can’t think about that.
  • 26 0
 Frodo hahahahahahaah
  • 15 1
 @imnotded I live in the Southern California mountains myself, Front and traction is at a minimum so good suspension, a soft compound front tire, and the correct tire pressure are critical in the dry loose and rocky trails that we live in as traction is at a minimum. I would recommend a fork with at least 140 mm (up to 160) of travel, keeping it serviced with its recommended service intervals, hanging it upside down to keep the seals lubricated, using silicone lube under the seals once a month between intervals. The increase in traction after a fork service is mind blowing. for tire psi I use one psi for every 8.5 pounds of body weight in the front, and 7.5psi per pound in the rear (for me that’s 20/23psi @ 170lbs). lastly assuming you don’t want heavy Enduro casings, the only Maxis tire that comes in a sticky rubber with an EXO casing is the DHR ii in 2.4. this would be my tire recommendation for the front or find another brand who makes a sticky rubber tire in a lightweight casing. I have found the soft rubber to make a enormous difference in the loose dry terrain of Socal.
  • 2 1
 This is good advice for @maxants33 also.
A tire is a lot cheaper than a fork, and even cheaper than that is optimizing tire pressure.
  • 9 0
 @imnotded and @mikekazimer - advice for coaching by a professional or expert buddy w/ analytical eye is spot on for cutting to the chase on major issues holding you back. I've been riding the slick dust-on-crust, DG sand, bulletproof "cheesgrater" clay, & deep flume dust that passes for "soil" on the chunkiest trails the Sierra Nevada have to offer for 35+ yrs, & what I see most often in unskilled & uncertain riders is missed entry-braking points followed by poor body position, leading to lack of scanning the trail ahead b/c out-of-position riders are struggling to survive each rock in front of their tire. Properly tuned suspension & supple tires that "stick" to rocks when you hit them help to a degree (new Specialized T9 tires are exceptional at this & last significantly longer than Max Grip or even Max Terra on sharp rocks & abrasive soils) but even the best equipment money can buy will not help keep you on-line in chunky corners if your current technique has you consistently missing them.
  • 4 0
 @powturn:
This sounds really interesting. I actually undertook loads of coaching when I first started mountain biking a few years ago. My ethos was to have a crap bike and invest in the coaching. But for sure, I can bet bad habits have crept in since then, and perhaps I'm laying some of the blame on my tech! And/or I am also doing way more advanced trails than I used to, so perhaps I need to get some coaching for this new territory...

Do you have any go to videos on this? There's so many vids out there, but some are better focused than others. I'll try get some friends to observe me also. And consider going back to coaching.
  • 3 0
 @Maxants33: Ben Cathro's "How To" PB series from last season was absolute gold. There were episodes targeted at braking, cornering, vision, and body position for absorbing trail features that will help you hone the constellation of skills necessary for cornering in the rough.
  • 1 0
 DHF comes in max grip and exo
  • 16 1
 RS 35 needs to go away
  • 28 0
 Same with all the lower level sram products. There is no reason for SX drivetrain or Level brakes to exist.
  • 3 1
 @ratedgg13: IDK man, i had some Level T's and they were actually really good. I switched back to my Zees, but I couldnt fault them. Way better than Guides.
  • 7 0
 Would you rather they keep specing the 30mm stanction Judy or Recon on these bikes instead? They'll do it.
  • 5 1
 @j-t-g: or just make them work well. The bomber z2 is proof that a cheap fork can be good.
  • 2 0
 @danielfloyd: rs35 is more of a budget option than the z2. The z2 is comparable to reveleation/yari
  • 3 1
 eh, it's a fair criticism as the retail on the two in USD is like, 40 bucks or so. The Revelation/Yari are most like a basic grip damper fox fork (both are quite good for the money).

The reason you see SX/Level/35s specced on stuff is because of how SRAM does bulk discounts for brands and their manufacturing strategy. I would be willing to bet that at scale, the Gold 35 is quite a bit cheaper for SRAM to produce than a Marz Z2 is for Fox. SRAM can do huge bulk discounts for brands, including solid access for high end parts, when they agree to spec a few thousand lower end bikes with 35s, SX drivetrains, and Level brakes. Having chatted with a product manager or two, sometimes SRAM won't even play ball on getting you the stuff you want unless you're willing to pick up a bunch of stuff that shimano simply outcompetes them in the segment.
  • 2 0
 @thegoodflow: I got really disappointed with the Z2. I bought a brand new one from after market last year and it had a horrible play in the bushings.... same issue as the RS 35 BTW.
Even if it's a "cheaper" Fox chassis, the bushings are cast and NOT replacable on a Z2, so Fox advises to change the lower legs... for some Fox 34 ones!
Better buy a Fox 34 or 36 Rythm rather than this Marzoshit (the Z1 is correct although).
Look at all the discussions in the forum relating this bushing issues...
  • 2 0
 @danstonQ: strange, because I have a Z2 that came stock on my hardtail and its been phenomenal.
  • 2 0
 Lighter weight oil in the simple RS fork damper can really help with fork sensitivity on high frequency inputs like braking bumps. RS uses (and recommends) a 5wt oil for their cheap dampers, but if you want faster response and are already at the lowest compression damping setting, they also sell a 2.5wt oil that really opens up the damper on the fork. It's a really easy thing to change out, and much less money than a new fork.
  • 1 0
 IDK man, I didn't choose 35, 35 Gold choose me Big Grin But I feel like it works better than the top of the line fox 36 I used to have on 12-year-old bike. I will ride it until I save up for an upgrade or until I destroy it. I would def not buy it for full MSRP in my local bike shop, but when it comes with the bike ( which I am pretty sure 99% of the cases) it is very capable fork
  • 7 0
 I had a 5th degree separation of the left AC. Went to my surgeon, who works exclusively on athletes. He told me that the fix would be "Purely cosmetic." And unless I make my living throwing with my left arm, it is best to just PT your way to success. Mine always reminds me to go back to the gym if I fall off the back, with a slight sharp pain that goes away with a few sessions of very light weight training.
  • 2 0
 Wish I had your surgeon, grade 5 here, surgery was a mistake
  • 1 0
 @skiandmtbdirtbag: go find someone in your area to prolo your shoulder. It will r re-stabilize your shoulder if you want to look at this website Drreeves.com. A good one to explain the regenerative process of Prolotherapy, and how prolo can help thicken and strengthen the ligaments and tendons around your shoulder
  • 1 0
 @keithbellpa: I am good now, it was the time that the metal was in my shoulder that was horrendous, I would have go the same endpoint without surgery and would have skipped a lot of pain.
  • 1 0
 @skiandmtbdirtbag: also grade 5 here, i got surgery with a tiplate. 12 years later i can not say that it was a mistake. Sure it is not like it was before and swimming is a pain but everything else is ok. Not sure it would have healed as good without surgery.
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: Mine failed within a week of the plate coming out (all three ligaments retore). 6 months of building muscle it's now my good shoulder. Can throw a baseball all day. Wish I had down that from the start.
  • 7 1
 @Maxants33 If the 35 can accept the Fast damper, I'd say do it, then upgrade to a better chassis down the road. The feel of the fork is very heavily influenced by the damper. That damper is likely something you'll take from fork to fork in the future. A lowers service will at best return the fork to feeling new, which still sucks.
If you want to get a different fork with tonnes of value built in, its Z1 all the way. Z2 is not as good because the damper is contained in the upper by a clip, which can blow out of place, and you cannot upgrade to a contained damper like the grip or grip2. Currently I'm on a Z1 coil with a grip2 damper, which feels like a big shiny pair of tits!
  • 3 0
 Keep your 35 and go there : www.novyparts.com/optimisation-novyparts-suspensions-vtt/rock-shox-fourches/splug-novyparts-bloc-compression-optimisation-fourche.html
Needs to be translated in english sorry but Novypart has a solid reputation in France. You can contact him directly to have the best advice .
  • 3 0
 Thanks for the advice - Unfortunately the fast damper for the 35 is 35 specific, so would be an investment for that fork only...
@mikekazimer did point out the nice simple idea of servicing the seals - but sadly, in my tiny London flat, I'm doubtful my girlfriend would be too happy about me dissembling forks! I'd probably take it to the local bike shop for that, so more £/$ going into the fork.

I did find a new DVO diamond D2 - for close to the price of the fast damper + labour costs! So I think I will give it a shot. Seems like a safe bet as buying new, I won't expect any hidden costs. Plus - I love the idea of a fork thats part coil. Heard good things about the small bumps with this fork.

Thanks for the advice - it has heavily shaped my decision making!
  • 6 0
 The 35 just isn’t a worthwhile platform to upgrade. QC issues and bushing design are going to limit how it performs. Save your money and upgrade the whole fork, not just the damper.
  • 2 0
 I serviced a friends 35 in hopes of improving the performance and was still underwhelmed by it. I’m currently on the DVO bandwagon after having been a Fox fanboy for years.
  • 2 0
 @Maxants33: Heck yeah, been riding a DVO Diamond for a few years (plus put one on my wifes bike) and you get a ton (or tonne I should say) of performance for the price. Can't go wrong with that!
  • 1 0
 +! for switch to DVO because the RS 35 is just OK and not really upgradable and needed to stay in a low budget. I bought a Beryl on sale for $400, and that fork is now called the Diamond 2 I think. The DVO had the best small bump sensitivity vs. RS 35 or my Fox 34 or 36. I'm about to sell it on my old 27.5 bike and hope to get back on a DVO fork some day on the new 29er.
  • 1 0
 @MountainBored: how do you all know that DVO is better? Like are you able to compare side by side or this is just what internet tells you? Real question cuz I have 35 and need to know where is the best bang for the buck ( used market is not an option due to everyone is lying about real conditions of the items)
  • 2 1
 @valrock: LOL, I guess I know from the 2 DVOs that I have on my bikes and a couple buddies who have DVOs. I've ridden almost everything else except for the new Lyric and although some people will have a preference for a certain brand, DVO is right up there in terms of performance with Fox/RS/Ohlins/Manitou, Etc. Add to the fact that they are usually substantially less expensive and I think it's a no brainer. Just watch Remy Mettalier's videos to see what they are capable of Smile
  • 1 3
 @OCSunDevil: IDK man, based on your buy and sell profile I highly doubt you rode anything else new enough and long enough for such claims
  • 2 0
 @valrock: LOL OK bro.
  • 6 0
 I have no idea how tuneable the 35 is, but I would look at maybe an oil weight change in the damper if possible to try first (lighter oil).

Beyond that, I took a shim out of my Manitou Magnum Comp valve stack and it made a world of difference for small bumps. It doesn't firm right up when locked out anymore, but it is a small price to pay. Because it was actually free. Might be something to look at and play around with.
  • 3 0
 Ive had a shoulder rebuild and a dislocated clavicle. My model days are ruined. I have slight mobility issues behind my back but the physio says strong is better than flexible in this case. I have a lump and 4” scar! Cross training for health rather than a specific sport is the best. Probably that will get me banned from pink bike.
  • 3 0
 Big bump here, I've done the same ACJ four times over (RTA, snowboarding and twice biking)

- if it functions ok after some waiting/rehab then just accept the weird contour and get on with it
- lots of people will have stories of good results post surgery but many don't and if it works ok why take the risk
- any chirop/other saying they can re-align/push back into shape is talking more shit than usual

(and I am a surgeon)
  • 2 0
 If you want comparability with the leatt neck brace, get a leatt chest protector, the 3.0 is solid. But heavy. The have straps that hold it all together and pieces to take off where you insert parts of the neck brace. It's a nice system. That being said, for lighter days when I still want chest protection, the fox base frame is perfect.
  • 1 0
 Unfortunately, I also already have an AC seperation on both sides. Left grade 3 without surgery, right grade 4+ with hook plate... I feel the function is better with surgery than without. But the left side is only 5 months old... Do any of you have an idea which protector jacket could protect best in the future?
  • 1 0
 The Troy Lee UPL 7855 body armour works great for me. Heaps of protection and you can remove a couple of pads to fit a neck brace if needed. On the shoulder lumps, I have one from MTB and one from playing Australian football. So they match now.
  • 5 1
 The 35 gold is an excellent fork for the money. I would service and tune first.
  • 1 0
 the problem is that most people here don't ride bikes, they just complain about them Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Does anyone make a light Fullface-Helmet you could wear while riding XC? I‘ve been thinking a lot about how I‘ve been lucky not to crash on my face and how I propably won‘t always be that fortunate…and I‘d like to keep my teeth Wink
Like the look of the Kali Invader (2.0) for example, but that one sadly doesn’t have MIPS, which is a deal breaker for me
  • 1 0
 What I‘m looking for in short: light, breathable fullface with rotational impact protection
  • 4 0
 The specialized gambit may be what you're looking for. It has a lot of ventilation around your head, but still gives you the extra full face protection. And it has mips. It feels a lot like the ambush but with a chin guard. I'm currently on my second one, after breaking the first in a high speed crash that also broke my clavicle. Not only did I have no concussion symptoms, I didn't even have any soreness or headaches. Half off price for crash replacement was an easy decision. I haveva somewhat oval head so specialized helmets fit me best. If your head is more round the Troy Lee stage is also nice but will likely fit better.
  • 2 0
 @lejake: ixs trigger ff is light and has mips.
  • 2 0
 @mtb-thetown: Thank you! Just looked at the pb-review and it seems you could be very much right Smile
  • 1 0
 @FaahkEet: Thanks, I‘ll look into that one too Smile
  • 2 0
 IXS Trigger full face for sure, weighs something like 600 grams and is very comfy and flows well. Dont let people tell you its overkill, you only get 1 set of teeth.
  • 1 0
 The Fox Proframe meets your requirements. My old one deprived a dentist of their new Yeti...
  • 1 0
 @korev: I had the old one without the fit adjustment dial and it moved around on my head a lot, and is much warmer than the gambit. It basically only stayed in place wraring goggles. Felt much more like a DH helmet. I haven't tried the new one, which looks nice, but the old one is not as nice as a lot of the newer options for a light full face.
  • 2 0
 @mtb-thetown: Fair enough, mine fitted well - I guess our heads must be different. I replaced mine with aSweet Protection which is horribly heavy and hot (I had little choice as I was racing the next day and had crashed the ProFrame)
  • 1 0
 @korev: if it fit perfectly, I'd imagine having pads instead of the dial adjuster would be great. Definitely feels more protective like a real dh or moto helmet. My friend has the same problem with his old one I did, but the new version with the dial should fit more people. You lose the dh helmet feel though so its a tradeoff. Specialized helmets just seem to fit me best so that's what I use.
  • 1 0
 I've got the endura mt5000 - its sooo light, and sooo breathable that its unreal. It uses minimal padding and foam, instead using all these little bits that look like cut up drinking straws. The straws are open ended so that's probably why why it's so breathable.
  • 1 0
 I can highly recommend that Fox vest as 'body armour for riders that hate body armour'! I've tried an hated multiple types an brands an this is the first spine protection I've felt comfortable enough to ride in. I REALLY don't know it's there. It's so comfortable I even use it for DJ now
  • 2 0
 Although... there is no DAMN WAY I'd pay full price for it. Got mine in a under half rrp cost an even that seems way to expensive for a vest with a bit of D30...........
  • 2 0
 Anyone here ride with hip and thigh protection? Kali makes padded shorts, just wondering if anyone has any feedback on that idea.
  • 2 0
 Good for shuttling/park. Terrible for climbing.
  • 2 0
 I always ride with padded shorts but not kali brand. Saved my ass many times.
  • 2 0
 yes I've used Raceface and Fly Racing shorts with hip/thigh pads. The Fly ones also have a tailbone pad which is nice. I always wear them on lift park days.
  • 1 0
 @crsimmons: interesting, I really like Fly products in general. I'll check those out, thanks!
  • 1 0
 Check out the Endura MT500 undershorts. I put a lot of miles on them and they're still in great shape. There's no extra bulk but the d30 is there when it counts
  • 1 0
 I use Leatt 3DF 4.0 impact shorts under MTB shorts. The difference between the 4 and 5 versions is addition upper hip protection and tailbone pad. I use them all the time (enduro racing training, bike park, etc.). They are not too hot in the summer but do get slippery on hot days but vent well. For racing, I put in plastic grommets in the waist band so a pair of bibs with snap loops can keep them up. It helps keep the bulk down around my waist on long days. I am not podium finishing so I don’t care if I look like moto dude - I am recovering from a big clay slam in November and my Leatt body armor saved my ass from big time trauma.
  • 1 0
 I have tld shockdoctor which are amazing and I pedal in Then all the time, they can get hot on anything above 25 Celsius buy aside from that they're sweet. Comfy as to
  • 4 0
 ask pinkbike, why am i single?
  • 3 5
 Get an ebike and you will become more attractive
  • 5 0
 But only to other ebikers......
  • 6 0
 Because 14y-o is an awkward age Wink
  • 3 0
 Because I use a Rockshox 35 Gold and thought upgrading it would make me more attractive
  • 3 0
 Quite logical answers
  • 1 0
 Love the pump track advice for cornering. Rewards good body position I've found.
  • 1 0
 That shoulder bump is never going away unless you get surgery. I had a grade 3 like 12 years ago and it still has a bump.
  • 1 0
 As long as you don't run wtb vigilante you will corner just fine..
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