Bike, Surfer, Powder, & Snowboarder Magazines Shut Down

Oct 4, 2020 at 21:04
by Mike Kazimer  

It's the end of an era. According to multiple sources, Bike, Powder, Snowboarder, and Surfer magazines are being shut down by their parent company, American Media Inc.

Even though I make my living via the internet, I'll forever have a soft spot for print media – there's something about holding a magazine in your hands and actually turning the pages that makes it seem more real, more significant and less ephemeral than online content.

I purchased my first issue of Bike in 1995 from a Stop & Shop grocery store, and I was instantly enamored by the irreverent attitude, the stunning imagery, and the articles that weren't just about racing. It opened my eyes to a whole new world, and it's safe to say that it altered the path of my life. It's where I first saw photos of Gunnison, Colorado - the accompanying article described a riding scene and pace of life that further cemented my decision to leave the East Coast and begin my westward migration.

Bike was also one of the first publications to showcase the birth of the freeride movement on Vancouver's North Shore, and Sterling Lorence's unforgettable images of those early days were the inspiration for multiple roadtrips to the promised land, a place of fog, wet roots, ladder bridges, and rock rolls scattered throughout the dense forest.

The list of world-class photographers whose images were published in Bike is vast, as is the list of talented writers whose names were on the masthead over the years. It's sad to see such a storied publication cease to exist so suddenly – best of luck to all the employees who have been furloughed, and to all of the remaining print publications still making quality analog content in a digital world.


237 Comments

  • 130 6
 Page like this one with "free" content will kill all magazines. I'm not sure whether this is good or bad but it's the reality.
  • 63 0
 Paradigms shift, along with tech solutions and consumers tastes. History is riddled with such examples, printed mags are only one of them. Consumer is king. If consumers, as a collective, see the end of these mags as a net loss then they should start putting the money where their mouth is and start paying subscriptions
  • 136 1
 @Arierep: the last magazine I bought had about 40% of actual content, the rest were ads.

I'm not a fan of paying for ads.
  • 13 1
 @f00bar: first of all, let me say that mine was a neutral statement, I'm not defending paying for subscriptions/mags nor just letting them go.

Second, what you say makes a lot of sense. Could this be a chicken or egg type question? Maybe as density raised when people stopped buying prints? I don't know
  • 37 0
 It's not so much that online will kill the print titles, it's more that the print titles don't change to offer something that you don't get online. The titles that continue to just do race reports and reviews that we get on places like here and YouTube will fail. The ones that have moved towards long-form articles and story telling pieces are actually growing! A move from weekly to monthly or quarterly with quality paper and minimal advertising seems to be the future for print magazines.
  • 24 7
 @f00bar: You are not paying for the ads. You are paying less for the content thanks to the ads..
  • 7 0
 The only paper mountainbike magazine I'm currently subscribed to is Cranked. They have a website (cranked.cc) but the content is in the paper mag. They started right when Dirt Magazine quit being in print and I think they're still going really strong. James McKnight (main main behind Misspent Summers, ex Dirt Mag contributor) distributes the Analog magazine as created by Jon Gregory (another ex-Dirt magazine illustrator). Even though the distribution is through e-mail, you're supposed to do the printing, cutting and stapling yourself so it still ends up as a paper mag. Does that count? On the other end of the spectrum, you had Eskapee which is/was an online magazine with quality articles but they couldn't make ends meet even with people (including me) contributing as part of their "eskapee collective".

I think paper and online both have their place. Online is probably best for "quick news". Race results (the quick immediate ones, Misspent Summers EWS or WCDH yearbooks definitely have their place), product reviews (including "spy shots") etc. You can put them in your paper mag but it is old news once it reaces the reader, not even talking about the value it has a year or longer from then (unless it really has some historical value). So it is no longer worth trying as a paper mag. On the other hand the more "durable" content may (IMHO) be better suited to paper. All Eskapee articles deserved to be on paper (as they did with their Anthology books) and there are some good articles on Pinkbike which I'd be willing to pay for and have them in a Misspent Summers kinda book. In depth interviews with industry veterans, athletes etc, travel reports, research about training, injury and recovery.

So yeah I think paper mags definitely can survive but they have to focus on the stuff you'd be willing to read again after a few years. Online can't beat that simply because online reading still isn't as comfortable as reading from actual paper (and considering the amount of screen time most of us are getting, not even a good idea). And paper can't beat online in terms of immediacy. It is a waste to even try.

That said, I feel news on the dirtmountainbike.com website is much slower than it was back when they were still doing print.
  • 4 1
 @i-am-lp: unless of course the increase in ad revenue lines the pockets of the publisher and the magazine costs just as much as before - when it had fewer ads... thing is, I look at the product as a whole - and I wouldn't take most magazines even if they handed them out for free
  • 3 2
 @f00bar: As opposed to using Pinkbike??????
  • 1 1
 @bbeak: Maybe he's only reads the Pinkbike pages that don't have ads on them. Which are...
  • 3 1
 @Arierep: Consumer is no longer king, advertisers are. The moment advertisers are not getting what they pay for, which is all of our eyeballs and subsequent behaviour changes, the publication both online and irl will cease to exist.
  • 3 0
 @vinay: depends on the browser you use
  • 2 0
 @rrolly: advertisers go after consumer clicks/reads/whatever. They have no interest to keep investing in a media left behind by the public/consumers. Consumer activity leads where the and money goes, therefore, consumer is indeed king
  • 10 0
 @vinay: still have my mtb action subscription.

I actually like alot of the ads they are nostalgic to me.
  • 2 1
 @Arierep: That model is seen less and less. Advertisers are increasingly going where the clicks of the consumers can be more greatly controlled. It means they get more ROI.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: ”news on the dirtmountainbike.com website is much slower than it was back when they were still doing print.”

You can say that again, the whole site has been furloughed since 2018 it appears..... a sad loss when factory media pulled the plug. I used to subscribe to the print mag from here in Japan and still would be if it were up and running.....
  • 2 0
 @f00bar: I pay $85 for home internet. And $80 for my cell phone/data. Point is they will get you somehow..
RIP Bike and Powder
  • 6 2
 @f00bar: While you may not be paying actual money for ads with internet content, nothing is free on the internet. The volume of mechanisms to track user data and behaviors in internet advertising is downright Orwellian and each of us give it up willingly with every site we visit, button we push and article we read.
  • 1 0
 We all work for the internet these days.
  • 4 0
 @f00bar: having worked at a magazine years ago, (I was in the editorial side) my understanding was that subscriptions and newsstand purchases just covered the cost of distribution, and ads covered the cost of running the magazine and any profit. Subscribers are the product being sold to the advertisers, content is to attract subscribers...
  • 1 0
 @DaMilkyBarKid: this is weird , am I the only person that reads print magazines online? Our local library allows online borrowing and returns of a plethora of print magazines including Bike and Powder. I used to have a paid subscription to access online these print magazines. Are actual sales of hard copy magazines the main source of revenue?
  • 2 0
 Hahah this content isnt freee its paid for by marketing reviews LOL
  • 1 0
 @ponts: That's correct. Except, I would say that, especially nowadays, the content itself is primarily a vehicle to promote advertisers. The term we use is "service journalism."
  • 3 0
 ENDURO magazine from Germany has a really cool app that makes it seem more like reading a magazine than just articles, and they have some nice digital features that a print magazine couldn't (like a button for overlaying pictures of bikes with the geometry). Probably also cheaper to publish since no printing costs.

I think that a lot of magazines could go that route.
  • 5 0
 People loves to say print is dead, but there are always opportunities for contrarians if you've got a new take on it. Monthly, ad-supported bike mag? dead. Quarterly, subscription-based coffee table bike magazine: freehubmag.com

It's not easy but it can be done.
  • 1 0
 @f00bar: I used to subscribe to magazines, often FOR the ads. Your typical SuperBowl has better commercials than game play (not of late!). I'm not a fan of crummy, dark-pattern, bs ads but I'll happily pay for awesome ads with my time and money - entertain me!
  • 1 0
 @i-am-lp: You have to come from a pretty savvy, or industry, perspective to get that. The common Joe can’t be expected to process it that far. It’s an inherent issue.
  • 1 0
 @mtb-sf: yea theirr app is very slick.

But would you pay for it? I guess thats the question.

At the end of the day, bike mag’s reviews all ended up on line, and if you’re trying to save trees then there was no point in buying a physical mag.
  • 1 0
 @Richt2000: I mean I would now that I am hooked on the quality of their content, but I also pay for like 5+ newspaper subscriptions and that probably puts me in the minority....

I think they probably also get better rates for ads than a print magazine would since companies can directly link out to their products from the ad in the digital magazine.
  • 1 0
 It’s a sad reality but it’s really an effect of today’s currency, which is people’s attention and the fact that everyone pretty much expects content to be free these days. In the world of digital content, there are endless algorithms and predictive analytics to keep us glued to online sources with the advent of online ads and digital marketing, keeping us sequestered to all things online.
  • 2 0
 @mtb-sf: I've been reading their website for years but I don't know, what's the point of using their app? Is it that you can read the articles offline? I haven't tried as I don't have a compatible device, but I'm curious. Their articles are good though.

Either way, I think there are still more than enough paper magazines and yearbooks thriving these days. I've been reading Dirt Magazine since late 2003 so I was bummed when it went out of print and somehow whatever got on their website just wasn't quite the same quality as what used to end up in the paper mag. It just wasn't as much fun to read. But when Dirt went out of print, we got Cranked. And Misspent Summers has been pumping out quality books as well. Saving trees and all, I wonder how much energy it takes for us to read an online article, with all the algorithms running to track and process our behavior. Someone once said a Google search takes about the same energy as making a cup of coffee? I wonder how much it takes to deliver us a webpage on a magazine like this and run all the algorithms in the background. A paper mag may not even be that bad.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: the complete "mag" they publish on the app generally has content way earlier then the website. Like the bike group tests, etc, they are available in the app mag sometimes weeks in advance
  • 1 0
 @Arierep: Ah, but is there content that may not make it onto the website? In issue #44 there would be a steel full suspension bike test including the Pipedream Full Moxie. Eventually they announced issue #45 but I never saw the steel bike review. Did it make it to the app? I don't really care much for when I get to read the articles but of course it is nice if you do get to read them eventually.
  • 1 0
 @kingbike2: Nope, we have pressreader access for free here in the UK.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: yes, indeed the steel FS content was available in the app. Don't know if this happens frequently tho. The perk for me is really the in advance content and the app really works well, it has a very distinct mag reading feel to it
  • 2 0
 @DaMilkyBarKid: Your assessment ain't wrong. But it is a little out when it comes to Bike.

Bike started out in the mid 90s with exactly what you describe as valuable, growing content - I don't recall them ever doing a race report, but the core of what they did was long form storytelling. It was a breath of fresh air compared to MTB Action and MBi - although they were pretty darn good in their own right. Bike also (IIRC) moved from ten issues a year to quarterly publication.Mags like MTB Pro, MTB World and Singletrack arguably fitted the same mold at a later date - in fact, Chipps specifically calls this out in the news story on the front of Singletrackworld right now. The bigger 'problem' is a wider variety of titles online and off, a diversity of media formats and the inherent overheads of print publication. Back in the 90s, there was enough scarcity of content to make print mags the go-to place for advertisers. Nowadays there's a lot more choice - and many brands also sponsor athletes who create their own content and have their own followings.The sport and the industry it supports has grown, for sure, but so have the number of avenues marketing departments can use to push their company's product.

It's important to remember that readership is only one bit of the publishing mix, and the cover price often barely covers the cost of print and distribution - the rest of a title's income is derived from selling ads, and that's only profitable if you can point to a dedicated, measurable, engaged readership. Print mags have all kinds of stats from auditors (in the UK it's always been the PPA or ABC, not sure elsewhere), but that's all they have. If you have a login to an MTB website or five, then it's likely that web site will have far more detailed info on its subscriber base, and an advertiser will have to pay far less to reach its desired audience and get an outcome.
  • 2 0
 @bentudder: I was talking more in a general sense, not specifically about Bike. I currently subscribe to Cranked (have every issue since launch) and a digital sub to Singletrack, both of which offer much, much more than the likes of MBR or MBUK. I will happily pay for something that offers something different to online places like PinkBike, longform articles and gorgeous photography that only works in print for example. Quality over quantity is the way forward for print.
  • 1 0
 On a positive note, just learned that Eskapee is up and running again.
eskapee.com
That is, Misspent Summers took over. I don't know whether it will be in print and/or online, but it will definitely be good!
  • 2 0
 @DaMilkyBarKid: Ah - I get you now! Completely agree.
  • 57 1
 This sucks. Their bible and video reviews have been class leading for a while.
  • 2 4
 They will remain the website I’m sure
  • 4 1
 Seriously. I eagerly awaited their reviews. I was already sad about Brandon Turman leaving Vital.
  • 2 0
 Agreed! I always looked forward to Bible of the Bikes. Very helpful reviews.
  • 7 0
 @wilbersk: from what I understand it's fully lights out. Sad to see.
  • 4 0
 @wilbersk: Nope. Per Adventure Journal: "This includes both print and digital products for Bike, Powder, and Surfer, and print for Snowboarder."
  • 56 0
 @brianpark: It's really shocking that there wasn't enough value there for someone to pick it up, and continue it on as a digital property. Obviously print is struggling, but if they don't have a viable path forward as a digital property, that speaks more to mismanagement than anything else.

Just for a reference point, I ran their domains through a tool I use for my work in marketing that estimates the value of the organic search traffic a domain gets every month (more specifically, what it'd cost you to pay for that same traffic in equivalent Google PPC keyword advertising).

That came out as:

Powder.com - $67.7K
Bikemag.com - $50.5K
Surfer.com - $88.0K
Snowboarder.com - $56.3K

Now - obviously that's just one ballpark metric - but it's a ballpark metric that's helpful in assessing the value of a web property.

It's wild to me that with each property generating $50K+ per month worth of just search traffic, they can't find a way to keep the doors open on a digital property. Across their network, that should represent about $250k/mo in digital revenue or north of $3m/yr. Their actual revenue potential should be much higher, because obviously, you're representing access to a reader group that's very valuable to specific brands.

To me, it speaks of either long-term poor management decisions, an unwillingness to change and adapt.

I don't mean to be critical. Digital media can be a brutal business, there are lots of reasons that even well-run companies can fail, and my heart goes out to all the employees who just lost their jobs.

My point is that from an outside perspective, it seems like there should be plenty of revenue potential there to keep these going as digital properties unless they're burdened by so much debt so as to make that impossible.
  • 4 0
 @atourgates: Needs more votes. Great first analysis.
  • 4 0
 The Bible reviews are some of the most watched content on Mtb you tube channels however a lot of people never connected these reviews to actually buying the magazine.
  • 2 0
 Hopefully some of the people behind the bible of bike tests jump into those PB vacancies!
  • 3 1
 @atourgates: $600K/yr doesn't pay for much. Subtract out the required infrastructure for the digital and there might be $200K/yr left over. Then how to you get editorial content for surfing, MTB and snow sports out of $200K?

Good analysis though. What does a site like MTBR come up with as a revenue number? That is probably the minimum viable content amount to keep a site going since they are mainly forum based.
  • 11 2
 @salespunk: for reference, the same tool puts pinkbike.com at $710K/mo, MTBR at $60.6K/mo and Vitalmtb at $72.6K/mo.

Probably inaccurate for anything as niche as mountain biking if you're actually trying to guesstimate at the revenues of a site, but a piece of data that, say, an investor group might be interested in looking at if they were thinking of coming in and monetizing a web property that was for sale, or an advertiser might look at if they were considering making an ad-buy on a site. And comparatively probably reasonably accurate.

Agree that $600K/yr isn't going to put out something up to par with what we've come to expect from Bike, Powder and the like fora print publication. But is it enough to fund a decent online niche publication? Most certainly.

I know we're just kind of making up numbers here, but $400K/yr for infrastructure for a digital publication on a $600k/yr budget sounds nuts. The same tool I was using for those $ estimates puts BikeMag.com at 141k monthly visitors from organic search. Let's assume that's half their traffic, and double it to give some breathing room. That's still 564k monthly visitors.

Managed hosting from a good, hands-on host to handle that level of traffic is only going to run you $400 - $600/mo. Let's average it out at $500 and you're spending $6k/yr on hosting. Let's add another $19K for site operations just to be on the safe side, and you're still only at $25K for hosting/infrastructure.

That basically leaves you with $575k to split between content production and administrative costs. Enough to pay, say, 4-people a very fair salary (for the industry).

Could 4 talented employees (or more likely a mix of full-time employees and contractors) produce a quality digital product in any one of those niches with that budget? Absolutely.

I fully admit that we're mostly just making stuff up here. The only thing I'm reasonably confident of is that all these publications could successfully continue on as digital-only if there wasn't something else (like excessive debt, poor management/planning, personal issues etc.) preventing that.

EDIT: I totally forgot about YouTube. The last pinned video on their channel has over 9-million views, of their editor building up a Santa Cruz for their photo editor. You know how much you can charge a sponsor to create a video focused on your brand when your last one clocked up 9-million views? Lots. Especially in the right niche.

At an average of around $7.50 per thousand view on the platform, buying 9-million views on YouTube directly would cost a brand about $67k. And there's arguably more value in this type of "sponsored content" than just straight ads.

TL;DR: There's a ton of value left in these properties, and now I'm even more sad that they're just straight up shutting down.
  • 1 0
 @wilbersk: the website stopped updates Friday and everyone was furloughed. I am reading that the digital and print versions are both shut down. I hope that the rumors are wrong
  • 3 0
 One thing we’ll miss from print media is true unbiased or least somewhat critical reviews. I feel like digital media just cant give us an honest review of their major sponsoring partnership products. They’ll say “this bike is great, but the other bike is better!” Instead of just saying “this bike actually kinda sucks, even compared to much cheaper options.” We’ll all lose that critical comparison style of reviewing.
  • 3 0
 @atourgates: I worked in print in the UK for 15 years, leaving the trade about a decade ago. At the time I was features editor on a magazine that sold about 230,000 copies a fortnight. The mag had a dedicated subscriber base and a website that was very heavily trafficked. Nowadays it belongs to another publisher and is a shadow of it's former self. Most sister titles in the portfolio have closed. It's the last one in its segment.

In 2010 the web was most definitely in full force, so there was a lot more competition for advertising. That was hurting all of the titles the company produced - a web-only title had lower overheads (at the time - I don't know now, having been out of the game so long), and didn't need to have the same level of readership to take a little bit of advertising spend away from print. It was death by a thousand cuts - lots of marginally profitable websites, a few monstrously successful ones as well, and suddenly print titles had a whole ton of new competitors that hadn't been there five years ago.

The second thing was ownership, specifically private ownership. The magazine's publisher was debt-free and a very lean business. Then it sold its UK arm to a private equity company. Three sales (iirc) to two further PE firms and, finally, another PE-owned publishing company and we were suddenly tens of millions of pounds in debt. Every PE buyer had borrowed against our value and then sold it on. That's how they made their money. The only value they added was to find another buyer for us - one that added more debt. From being told we were debt-free and in good shape to being told we were in debt and would have to tighten editorial belts took about 18 months in total.

Now, I don't know about BIKE mag in particular, although I should point out it's one of the reasons I got into print magazine journalism, and it's been one of the consistently more brilliant magazines over the years. But I do know is changed ownership a few times over the years, and so it's overheads are likely to have been more than the magazine's immediate staff.
  • 1 0
 @atourgates: thanks for posting this stuff. This isnt something i know anything at all about, and i felt like i jusy learned something in the last few minutes reading your posts.
Thanks
  • 1 0
 "The second thing was ownership, specifically private ownership. The magazine's publisher was debt-free and a very lean business. Then it sold its UK arm to a private equity company. Three sales (iirc) to two further PE firms and, finally, another PE-owned publishing company and we were suddenly tens of millions of pounds in debt. Every PE buyer had borrowed against our value and then sold it on. That's how they made their money. The only value they added was to find another buyer for us - one that added more debt."

- If that aint the way of the world these days I don't what is. Something need to be done about it. It's impacting nearly every industry, housing most prominently, but manufacturing as well. Money being created from nothing, just speculation on future value.
  • 51 4
 Many of the mountain bikers I know feel entitled to discounts, free whatevers, hook ups, etc...This doesn't surprise me, esp with the attention actually required to flip through a magazine or read words. Even on this site, where many of the features are just linking you to some riders instagram making some announcement with one picture or clip...and that's it. Really? This is the content replacing magazines? The in depth interviews, glimpses into the athletes lives and the hard work of the writers and photographers is being distilled into scrollable content.

I'm in journalism, photographer at a small town newspaper in a mountain bike town. The value of content and employing people who are passionate about telling stories cannot be undervalued. This is so sad to me.
  • 12 0
 This ↑. @ShreddieMercury, this.

It is pitiful what passes as "content" recently. Maybe I am just old and suffering from "back in the day" rose-tinted glasses syndrome, but somehow, I think not.

If you listen carefully enough, you can sense the demand for depth; for long form written word, for more than temporary, instant, shallow, meaningless media 'influencer' inspired 'content' that is as transparent as the forced smiles that accompany it, coming from the mouths of those who still differentiate quality from quantity.

Yet those voices are, and shall remain, unheard unfortunately as the world turns ever more quickly on, dancing to the drum of the latest algorithm.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wanderer_above_the_Sea_of_Fog
Some of you may appreciate this link and its relationship to "content" and its provision.
  • 6 0
 I disagree with this statement. Today compared to yesterday with print how often did we receive "content"? Monthly, bi-monthly with print? We get daily updates and content in the digital realm. Even if some of it is links to IG or other social media content, in whole, what we get today far outweighs the garbage we got from Mountain Bike Action and the occasional print of quality content from Bike or Decline or Dirt.

Gonna miss Bike. And Powder defined skiing culture for years. What a loss. Hopefully digital can work for them. Pink Bike will be a lot to catch up with though. Kinda like ICE makers trying to catch Telsa in the EV game though.
  • 4 1
 @ShreddieMercury: well put. Your point makes me laugh at the irony of the word “content”. The “content” actually replacing the in-depth product reviews, background stories, interviews, etc. is completely devoid of actual content — it’s empty journalism. It’s ironic that that word dominates media (social and other) when it means the opposite of what it actually delivers.
  • 2 0
 @orientdave:

I’ve got a reprint of “wanderer above the mists” in my office Smile .
  • 1 0
 @ocnlogan: ..I am considering doing the same!
  • 28 0
 This sucks. While I'm not familiar with the other non-bike mags, Bike has been a staple of mine since discovering it 6 or 7 years ago. Aa UK rider, I bought an online subscription for the mag and waited for the yearly Bible Test eagerly. Some great writers and testers over the years and the content was always great. Sad times indeed that they can't even continue in an online only format.
  • 1 0
 I feel the exact same way. I still have a couple Bible of Bike Test copies even at my desk at work. This is sad Frown
  • 28 0
 Oh no! Not taking anything away from the quality of Pinkbike's journalism but Bike was of the highest quality. I hope the team can find a way to rise phoenix like from the ashes. Best wishes to all.
  • 9 0
 Hopefully Pink Bike can bring on some of the Bike talent.
  • 9 1
 @jimeg: Yeah someone grab Ryan Palmer please. He is great and lives close enough to the PB crew iirc.
  • 4 1
 @Svinyard: Would leave to see Pinkbike give Ryan Palmer an offer. Put him in charge of maintenance articles, builds, maybe some tech review.
  • 5 0
 @ces1965: YES! Perfect plan...he can do a little of everything of course but PB definitely lacks most any sources of "wrench tips". Ryan could immediately fill that gap. It is the way
  • 32 6
 Hire Ryan Palmer!
  • 12 0
 For sure. I was doing a build 2 years ago similar one of his that he published. I hit him up in Facebook with some questions. He's like: "Here's my number, I've got some time in the car moving out of Bend...give me a ring". Pretty cool dude.
  • 4 0
 @Svinyard: I cannot overstate how cool I think this is. For a guy who is basically an internet bike mechanic celebrity to just give out his number and pass along some of his copious and hard-earned wrenching knowledge for free? F'ing amazing stuff!

@brianpark: I say hire him for the meditative bike build videos alone. And let him throw in a Palmer's Peeves every now and then. Just keep him off the sauce while filming...
  • 24 0
 PB, please publish Grimy Handshake, thx
  • 5 0
 Loved "Grimy Handshake" Upon reading the 1st one I spit my coffee all over the place from laughing soo hard!! For whatever reason was always a fan!! Good luck Mike
  • 10 0
 @Robbrt: I'm also a big Ferrentino fan. Minnigh, too. And I really liked Vernon Felton at both Bike and Pinkbike.

I kinds saw this coming, though. The magazine kept getting thinner and thinner and their newest Bible of Bike tests production quality wasn't at the level of years past or what Pinkbike is putting out now.

I wish the whole Bike team the best of luck, though, and hope they land on their feet.
  • 6 0
 Ferrentino clicked on all levels for me back in the mid-90's. I was a college student working at a bike shop. I still remember a line he wrote about taking a deep breath, and slowly re-winding a customer's fraying derailleur cable, a drop of blood trickling down his fingertip. Bike had better photos and more evocative storytelling than the other, more ad-centric magazines did at the time. Same could be said for Surfer.

Like - what is a bike shop, without a questionably-cleaned restroom, toilet paper held up by an old Rock Shox Mag21 fork crown, stack of Bike magazines in the corner for reading enjoyment? Lava soap hand wash smell. Grease on the sink. That's Bike Magazine.
  • 21 0
 Agreed! Ferrentino's column single handedly made me realize that I needed to be an English major and spend my life working with bikes. Not sure if those were good decisions or not, and I'll never be as articulate or witty as our favorite kiwi, but man, it's sure been fun. Would love to see Grimy Handshake as illustrated by Taj!
  • 5 0
 @JeffWeed: Ferrentino and the Bike crew redefined cycling journalism and influenced a lot of the trends we take for granted today. Definitely had an outsized impact on MTB.
  • 12 0
 I've been getting Bike magazine for many years, and that I won't get to look forward to it showing up in my mailbox anymore is shitty news. Great photos and awesome writing. Best mountain bike mag ever.
  • 3 0
 My sentiment exactly.
  • 10 0
 Unfriendly reminder that Bike Mag was recently bought out by American Media or National Enquirer and Bezos blackmail fame. And now they've pumped and dumped Bike Mag and a bunch of other stellar enthusiast rags. Absolute jitbags that bunch.
  • 19 8
 Personally not a fan of their writing (I've always saw it as a little pretentious) or editorial choices, but it's a shame nonetheless.

Hope the team finds new gigs soon
  • 3 11
flag JDUBKC (Oct 5, 2020 at 7:18) (Below Threshold)
 A little? They reeked of it. Cancelled my subscription years ago. Good riddance.

Pretty sure Freehub Magazine is the only publication worth anyone's time and money.
  • 11 26
flag mildsauce91 (Oct 5, 2020 at 8:21) (Below Threshold)
 Complaning about pretentiousness on Pinkbike? Really? Bring on the downvotes, but the Pinkbike podcast is the most elitist heap of circle-jerk to ever seep through my earbuds.
  • 4 0
 @mildsauce91: I'm curious, I haven't really listened to the podcast (was gonna soon), but why do you call it pretentious?
  • 13 1
 @pumpjumpnflow: It's not. He's tripping. It's totally chill.
  • 11 0
 @pumpjumpnflow: I have listened to every Pinkbike podcast, start to finish, and don't find them to be the least bit pretentious. Levy is about the most self-deprecating personality out there and Kazimer is quiet and lets his riding do the talking. Sometimes people use words without knowing what they actually mean.

pre·ten·tious
/prəˈten(t)SHəs/

adjective
attempting to impress by affecting greater importance, talent, culture, etc., than is actually possessed.
  • 1 7
flag mildsauce91 (Oct 5, 2020 at 10:51) (Below Threshold)
 @pumpjumpnflow: I was being a little dramatic, it isn't all that bad, but sometimes it is a little cringe.

"The hardtail episode" is basically an hour of listening to why hardtails suck.

In another episode a dude (Kaz, I think, but not certain) goes on and on about how bike shops are "toxic" to work at, based on some negative experience he had as a teenager, and continues to try to defend this stance without any real evidence other than his anecdote.

There are a few other instances, but overall it's alright to listen to. I went into it with high expectations and was a bit disappointed. They act as if anything other than the latest enduro wonder bike is "fine if you're on a budget" or for non-enthusiasts.

And that anything other than lift-access big mountain riding is for peons. You're from BC, we get it.

Could just be me, but again, I started listening with a big smile. Ended with a neutralish frown.

Levy is cool. Kazimer letting his "riding do the talking" doesn't really help a podcast be more listen-able. Not sure how that would apply.
  • 1 0
 @jnroyal: Agreed!
  • 17 1
 @mildsauce91, I loved working at bike shops - I spent more than a decade as a wench, and that wasn't me that said they're toxic. I'm also not sure where you got the idea that we think lift-access big mountain riding is the only way to go - the vast majority of the riding Levy and I do is pedal powered.

Either way, you don't need to listen if you're not enjoying it, but we're trying to make them entertaining and interesting for most people.
  • 1 0
 @jnroyal: agree, listened to some of them and they had nothing of what made me dislike Bikemag's tone.
  • 2 1
 @mikekazimer: I mostly enjoy the podcasts but the hardtail episode was just plain embarrassing. Sounding like by a bunch of whingeing entitled kids about how they shake you up. There are whole parts of the world that are not BC. Some parts are even flat yet somehow people ride bikes that are not 150mm travel offroad and survive. Crazy huh?
  • 4 0
 @mikekazimer: I say keep up the good work. Your podcast has become an unexpected weekly source of comfort during this year of the 'rona. The banter is rock solid. It's like listening to some old buddies just shooting the shit when social distancing means I struggle to do that myself.
  • 1 1
 @mikekazimer: I wasn't sure if it was you or not, just knew it wasn't Levy.

Buy yea, keep it up! I'm glad the podcast exists, even if it isn't my favorite. I'll still listen here and there just because it's about mountain biking and I really enjoy this website.
  • 1 0
 @dave119: Yea that one was particularly bad. There were others that, to me, had moments of extreme cringe as well but the overall episodes were okay. Anyway, It's not like I'm some renowned reviewer, I'm just a dork at a keyboard. Pay me no mind
  • 8 0
 Really sad news, big fan of Bike, the bible and the articles, I always felt Bike commented on the experience of riding and not what you should be riding, even with the Bible of Bike tests it was never preachy and not about what you should ride but commentated on where the industry was in terms of development and trends. I hope they continue online.
  • 8 0
 So disappointed. Ive been subscribed to DirtRag, Bike and Freehub for nearly a decade, and this year two of them are gone. Im a millennial, but print media has never gotten old for me, and im really bumming about this. This year, ive gone from getting like 20 magazines a year in my mailbox down to 4.
  • 9 0
 Guess I need to subscribe to Freehub now.
  • 5 0
 @roma258: Freehub is awesome!
  • 1 0
 @roma258: Freehub is one of the best out there!!! (Not that there are many left)
  • 2 0
 I have a bone to pick here. Bike folds, and they get an article. DirtRag folds and PB says nothing. Where's the love?! Bike was a great magazine, but when it comes to irreverence, DirtRag was the best. Plus it was around for longer than Bike.
  • 1 0
 @viccuus: im with you on that. This time with Bike, im bummed. But DirtRag was something else. When was getting back into MTB it was DR that helped make an integral part of me. When DR shut down it was just a gut punch, really felt like losing something special to me
  • 9 0
 That really blows. I dont care about the format, but Bike's online content was top notch. I hope they will resurrect in some other online manner.
  • 7 0
 I literally just bought a bike after reading and watching their most recent Bible tests...devastating to hear that’s the last one. Just as with this site having reviewers who’ve been around long enough for you to learn their personal preferences and biases is incredibly helpful when bike shopping. RIP Bike Mag, you will be missed. Hopefully all the content creators can land elsewhere soon.
  • 2 2
 Pretty sure they won’t end the website
  • 1 0
 @wilbersk: I hope you’re right but based on Travis Engel’s Instagram and others it’s not looking good
  • 9 0
 My impression is that Bike created a friendlier environment for women early on. They have been a good influence on the culture.
  • 7 0
 This is truly sad, but personally I am most bummed about Powder since that one will leave the biggest void as there aren't any other decent ski magazines out there. I ditched my Bike subscription years ago and started reading Mountain Flyer and Freehub instead. I think both are much higher quality with fewer ads and much more well written content. Highly recommended for anyone who was a Bike subscriber.
  • 2 0
 The Ski Journal is pretty solid. Feel more like they complimented each other as there are no gear reviews in TSJ, but the storytelling and visuals are good.
  • 8 0
 Such a shame. Their Bible of Bike Tests are epic and I've long been a fan from the other side of the pond. I wish everyone involved all the best for the future.
  • 6 0
 I still have a copy of the very first issue of Bike Magazine that I bought at a gas station way back in the early 90's. I remember buying it because they didn't have Mountain Bike Action, and immediately upon reading it I was struck by how much better it was than MBA in every way. It was the very best of the mountain bike magazines (although I also enjoyed Decline during its brief lifetime) and I will miss reading it a lot. There is something to be said for the material, tactile experience of reading a paper magazine - and the photos just look better in print. I have been on Pinkbike in one form or another since pretty much the beginning as well, and although I love this site it will never replace print media for me. Personally I believe there is still room in the world for both....it's too bad that the marketplace economics of the industry disagree.
  • 8 0
 that's bad news. ive always loved any mt biking print magazine. always loved the bible bike test issues. shame
  • 6 0
 Bike was the only magazine I ever subscribed.
I guess some people will never know the pleasure of reading a paper magazine,I can't even begin to understand it.
Where can I read opinions from Mike Ferrentino? He is the best.
  • 2 0
 He shares seeds of wisdom on Instagram under ekimonitnerref, not much about bikes but he has a heck of a green thumb
  • 7 0
 Gutted for all. Bck in the 90's, Surfer magazine was our main inspiration for getting out there and scoring some waves. Those were the days Frown
  • 6 0
 Same. So many pages of SURFER cut out and taped on my walls.
  • 3 0
 @tbmaddux: I used to hang the Reef Brazil on my wall too... good stuff
  • 5 0
 This is too bad. I loved Powder years ago especially for the photography in the magazine. Bike is one of my go to for bike info for the Bible tests. Ryan is good speaker and I trust his opinion and will find a place to write. I like Travis too but he has become weird.
  • 1 0
 LOL. Yeah Travis is a funny cat. He tripped out when he grew his hair crazy long. He's always sort of ten years behind. I think it's a Michigan thing. LOL.
  • 5 0
 Ahh...the death of everything before. I remember this regret way back before the turn of the century and thinking that this must define me...twenty years later I realise that it didn't and it doesn't. Things, like people, die. Other things, like other people, replace them. Fortunately, bicycles seem to have managed to survive more than a few generations...and that should be our key take home message.
  • 5 0
 I understand that this may have been inevitable but it doesn’t make it any easier. BIKE was one of the reasons I got into mountain biking as a kid and stayed with it into adulthood. Sad day. Could 2020 get worse?
  • 4 0
 Bummed about Bike, but I believe they can continue with an online presence only and thrive. Maybe print one or two issues a year that focus on photo and long articles. Could it continue as a publication that is owned by those who work there?
Regarding Powder, it hasn't been of any use for over 10 years. They really just print whatever ad copy that is sent their way. Blister Gear has long since taken their place, with the exception of the photo annual.
  • 2 1
 they have a semisuccesfull youtube page, unfortunaltey the guys making the content there have nothing personalitywise when compared to Seth or Brian or Jordan, or any other succesfull bike youtuber out there.
  • 4 0
 We're at a loss here. Not only a loss of a print magazine, we can stomach that. It's the change of times.

We're at an immense loss of writing skills: Just read the Grimy Handshake, the articles of Nicole Formosa and even Ryan's reflections.

And that's me saying, whose main language is German. We don't have anything like it here, where biking is all about bikes and parts and tests and shit. But not about human life's ups and downs and how biking simply makes it better.
  • 3 0
 A shame to see more mags biting the dust. Bike was great and was the one for North Shore free riding content back in the 90’s (a sponsor of the Kranked series)
Pretty hard finding a newsagent that stocks MTB bike mags these days
  • 4 0
 That’s sad news. It’s something I checked out a fair bit and it did do MTB coverage different to Dirt, pinkbike, vital. I hope the guys working there get other work in the industry
  • 3 0
 Sad day. Been receiving the mag for over 15 years. Loved going through every page during my morning “meetings” in the bathroom. Going to miss the many excellent writers and hope they resurface so I can enjoy them again. Thanks for the many hours of enjoyment (and numb legs).
  • 3 0
 SURFER magazine gone forever is a huge loss and truly the end of an era. I'll miss it dearly. So many memories!! I'm lucky to have surfed, biked and snowboarded since a teen, but SURFER had been around for decades when I first got a copy and was once a conerstone to the global surf scene. I'll just cherish The Surfer's Journal even more
  • 5 0
 Damn! Powder magazine was my bible growing up in the 80's! It was just perfection back then...
  • 5 0
 People would rather mindlessly scroll instagram for pictures and videos than buy a physical paper magazine.
  • 2 0
 This sucks. I've been a subscriber for around 10 years now to Bike, Freehub and Dirt Rag. I still have every issue of all those. Hopefully Freehub survives. I love the convenience of the internet, but nothing beats flipping through the physical pages of those magazines out on my deck with a nice cup of coffee to get me pumped for riding.
  • 2 0
 My father and older brother worked their whole lives at a newsprint mill producing paper for major US publications. When the internet was created, yes there was a time prior to the www, they lost their jobs. This is bigger then the front line workers at a publication losing their livelihood. It goes down the chain to the source. These shutdowns probably effect thousands of people.
  • 3 0
 Absolutely gutted. Loved Bible of Bike. Everything they did had a distinct level of art to it. I'll miss the beauty they always brought to what they did and the sport we love.
  • 2 0
 Is it the print portion that is being shut down or online content as well? As of this morning bikemag.com is still up, so I assume it is just the print portion.

Either way it is a sad day for me. I still remember when the first issue came out. It was revolutionary at the time in content and format. The imagery was stunning and it was the first time a bicycle magazine had focused so much on visuals and the core riders instead of the general population. Later on they lost their way and started taking themselves too seriously, but the Bible was another revolutionary idea that started at the magazine and is not copied across the industry.
  • 2 0
 The press release I saw said Surfer and Bike websites would stay live but updates would cease. So, the page will probably just continue to look the same until they decide to fully shut it down.
  • 2 0
 Bike Mag always had gorgeous pictures too.

I hope Bible Bike Tests continues on youtube/online as well as I do appreciate what they have to say and how they review.

PB needs to hire a couple of those guys for sure, it can't hurt.
  • 2 0
 Mike Ferrentino is like the Hemmingway of cycling literature. Always read Grimy Handshake first. And then, #2 went straight to Butcher Paper - Kristin has an amazing way of making you see yourself in her stories. Thanks to both of you and the rest of the crew - I REALLY hope incredible things are ahead for the entire staff - you deserve it!
  • 3 0
 What a bummer! With the German Freeride Magazine, bike is my favorite print magazine. I spent way too much money on buying issues across the pond...
  • 1 0
 This is crazy.

I was literally about to send an email to Bike Mag to try and have some stuff published and thought I'd look on Pinkbike first... Then you see this... :-(

Quality paper print mags should be saved people!!! So bummed to hear about this.
  • 2 0
 The only way to save them is to buy them, and no one does evidently.
  • 1 0
 I'm really sad. In Italy mtb magazines resist but they are rather ridiculous. For me BIKE has been my real bible and it will be a huge lack that I will compensate by browsing through the old magazines that I have kept in these 20 years ..
  • 2 1
 all those mags have always been outstanding when it comes to photos and stories. it was definitely driven by people who love what they are doing and not always went on the known paths. Sad. I never will be one of the guys sitting with his phone ar tablet on the toilet. Paper is the real deal..
  • 6 2
 Bummer! Get Ryan Palmer on boat! He has such a good and humble way to talk bikes.
  • 1 0
 Not to mention he is one hell of a wrench!
  • 1 0
 Daaaaaaaaaammmmnnn!! Been a subscriber to BIKE for over 10 years. It's so good to get it in the mail. I was looking at the Photo Annual literally this morning even. SO SAD. Good luck to all the contributors, but it's clear they are qualified to many rad things. They kept the stoke alive, tangibly.
  • 1 0
 I have (had?) been a subscriber for over 10 years. I subscribed to Dirt and Dirt Rag until the end as well. It's a shame that the magazine business model seems to be unsustainable.

With Bike I have thoroughly enjoyed Butcher Paper and Grimy Handshake over the years. Butcher Paper especially, has always been a joy to read and 'Buzz' was always full of beautiful photos with spending some time with.

I was hopeful that the quarterly approach that Bike had taken was going to allow them to prosper. I certainly think there is a place for more long form writing and printed photos but I think it's going to take a different business model to deliver this on paper.
  • 1 0
 I guess even the dentists aren't buying them and putting them in the waiting rooms anymore....

Kids don't do static fixed schedule media like us old folks. My teenagers don't watch tv ( they stream), listen to the radio ( stream), read newspapers ( what are those), or buy magazines ( silly mom or dad got them the odd subscription but they never asked). I bet the younger readers here are pretty much the same.

My age is making me a bit like my teenagers, the grim doughnut is old news and I have nearly forgotten about it completely already. Same goes for my media uptake lately, it all comes to me via the evil ether.

In 30 years will we look back and ponder the news in 2050 "Specialized announced today that they are getting out of the non-assisted bike business, they could no longer get enough adds on the bike to make up for the weak demand and poor sales. Specialized was the last of the mainstream bike companies still be producing classic mechanical bikes.
  • 1 0
 Your post makes me sad...there might be something to your last paragraph. Only a few retro tinkerers will bother with bicycles, kind of like the few hobbyists who still ride steel framed hand made Italian road bikes.
  • 1 0
 Weird coincidence. I watch the movie ”The Moment” for the first time yesterday, Sunday October 4th.
Only to realize later in the evening, that one of the pioneer, Dave Swetland, passed on October 4th 2008.
Now I read that Bike magazine is gone today?? which was the main Media stream from that era and the boost of the freedom we have on bikes.
Magazines have inspired me as much as what you @mikekazimer, it is for sure the the end of an era. Getting the “cover of a magazine“ is still an expression that will stay with a strong meaning. Sad times. I wish the digital didn’t take over as much as it did.
  • 1 0
 Surfer, bike, and powder were all pretty good. I liked them because they didn't seem to be trying to directly shove products down my throat with non stop reviews and interviews like the other magazines had. And less competition coverage and more travel emphasis was cool.
  • 1 0
 Dammit. Pretty sure I have read every issue of that mag, starting with Grimy Handshake, every time. Anyone else remember the beer foam shootout? Quintessential BIKE. Those '90's features were so fun. I will miss the articles, the photos, the reminders not to take ourselves too seriously (or seriously at all) and that mountain bikes are for fun and exploration.

Dammit.
  • 3 0
 Sorry to hear this and for the employees - the Bible of Bike tests steered my first modern mtb purchase - my 134. Thoroughly enjoyed their banter on each video.
  • 1 0
 Bike mag has really gone downhill in the past few years. I remember buying the Bible of Bike tests editions a couple years back. I think that less than 10 percent of the magazine, based on page count, was actually devoted to it. The rest were random stories, where the authors would spend two pages describing a random burger or pages on pages of adds. Personally, I like paper magazines, and would willingly pay more for better content. A good example would be BMW Car mag, where I've paid over $12 per issue. Another example would be Outdoox4, although they've been plagued with late deliveries; such as getting the March issue out in September.
  • 2 0
 In a world that consumes content at an insane pace, it is hard to compete when most of articles and news are months old....I do love the trips and excellent photography, but it just is not enough in this world. RIP print..
  • 2 0
 First as a writer and later as a photographer, creating stories and shooting images that made the pages of Bike has been the honour of my journalistic career. It will be missed.
  • 1 0
 Free, advertisement financed outlets, such as Pinkbike, are the reason for this paradigm shift. As I'm not a huge fan of print magazines anyways, I'm embracing the trend. Although it's obviously sad to see them dying out since there's so many people who'd rather still buy print. Generally it's sad to see BIKE MAG shutting down, I really liked their Bible of Bike Tests, especially since it was often times done in a more sober, grown up style than on here.
  • 1 0
 I used to love picking up a bike or car magazine every couple months and flipping through it. I stopped a few years back when it started to feel like more pages were advertisements than content. If I'm paying for the magazine I don't want the majority of what I bought to be ads.
  • 1 0
 Dang! I hate to see this too. I think I've been a subscriber since the beginning. I hate to see mags drop out. RIP Bike and Decline. I never did find out where any of the Decline people went to. Does anybody know? You would think that this being a fairly small industry and working at a mag being a very specific talent, that another mag or site would pick them up.

Bike got thinner and thinner every issue, so it doesn't surprise me. I would love to see an MTB mag on the same level as Racer X Illustrated for moto.

There is just something about reserving content for you print subscribers, and having a good quality paper mag in your hand while taking care of business on the sh*tter.

Losing another magazine doesn't help any of us, whether you subscribed or not. I always figured that for less than $20 per year (that's one cheap meal), I could get the print version.

I'm sure the staff at Bike are on here, I'd love to see where they end up if the whole thing goes down, but hopefully they keep their jobs via the website, and we get another "Pinkbike"!
  • 1 0
 I will never forget the black and white cover shots of the Shore done by Sterling . I still love admiring photography and reading . I guess I could hang monitor s on my walls but I prefer fine art prints. It's a shame we have almost completely gone digital.
  • 2 0
 Bummer, there's nothing like print but the demand simply isn't there. They have had to have seen this coming for years. Let's hope they stick around with everything transitioned to digital.
  • 2 0
 RIP BIKE magazine. I will never forget the amazing artistic photos in every BIKE mag that made you wonder, where, who and how. I will cherish my Bike mag poster even more now.
  • 1 0
 From reading about Joey Buran become a Pipe Master, to seeing pics of Richie Schley in Kamloops for the first time, thank you to both Surfer and Bike.
You have shaped my life, as well as so many other surfers'/riders'. You will be missed and we will tell our grandchildren about you in reverent tones.
  • 1 0
 I still surprised those surveyed for so long in printed;

There certain models for newspapers that publish some of the content for free, and some with limited access;

for pink bike it could be like:

- all announcements/press releases - free
- Sport coverage / Field test - subscription based

with like limit of 1 article from paid content per month fo free;
  • 1 0
 The same thing happened to the Transworld Media publications last year by AMI. Perhaps they were profitable, just not profitable enough for such a large parent company. If I remember correctly, the people of Transworld Motocross even claim to have offered to purchase it but were declined and since formed swapmotolive.com where I think they talked about it on their podcast or perhaps it was another moto podcast.
  • 1 0
 I've been wondering how long it might be before we see 20 page "bound" smart books/magazines. Wherein each page is a double-sided flexible display. You could have infinite pages just by turning over the book top over bottom. Hence kind of like a color Kindle, but still preserving some of the user experience of turning pages. Then your "smart magazine" or "smart book" could be all of your books wrapped up into one device. This does, however, mean you can no longer have a physical library, and for many that is a sad prospect, for others that is liberating. Does beg the question, how much longer will book printing survive before it too is not economical and instead goes strictly electronic.
Hopefully, many of the Bike Mag folks get picked up by Pinkbike, MTBR, or GMBN.
  • 1 0
 I had a similar experience that Mike did. I bought a copy of BIKE that had Downieville on the cover. That led me and my wife to race the downhill in '96. The pictures were worth the subscription. I always flipped toe the BUZZ section and tried to guess the photographer for each image. Hopefully, the folks there will find new gigs or start a rad online magazine.
  • 1 0
 A very sad day. I've been a subscriber for over twenty years. Loved Bike Mag. Still have most of my issues in the basement. Some of the highlights I remember: Beer Foam shootout, The "Funk" issue, The long running Sh!tbike stories, I remember actually LOL'ing when reading the "Ask Chopper" responses to reader questions, Grimmy Handshake and Butcher Paper were great. I remember way back when, the "Local Knowledge" section, was sometimes one of the only ways to get info about mtn bike events in your area (that's right kids, I'm that old !). The "Buzz" photo section was on point and last but not least, the "Photo Annuals" were always amazing. I loved Bike Mag because for the most part, it was never about the bike, it was about the people who ride them and the places they ride. Feels like a little bit of the soul of Mtn Biking has died today.
  • 1 0
 the real shame is that the parent company didnt give Bike Mag a chance to do one final issue, the chance to say thanks and farewell.
  • 1 0
 I used to love Bike back in the day (90's). The last few years the magazine got thinner and thinner, with basically minimal content and the rest ads. They were offering something like 2 years for $7 and I felt like that was overpriced so I gave up on them; well, they gave up on me first. I'm willing to pay for content, but Bike failed to provide that anymore. The writing and content used to be top notch, I hope those writers/photographers are able to continue their passion in some capacity.
  • 1 0
 I was ‘forced’ to switch to a digital Bike Subscription years ago as my young kids would rip the paper mags from time to time! $2.99/year subscription that’s coming up for renewal end of November. Other online Mags seem to be $19.99/year.
  • 2 0
 Could they continue on as an online only publication? They have 250K youtube subscribers so clearly they have a significant following.
  • 1 0
 I wish - I enjoy their YouTube videos. But, they have a pretty big staff, and even though 250k is significant, I think it's way too few to support the staff that they had.
  • 1 0
 @pinhead907: It's twice as many as vitalmtb for example. and 60% as many as pink bike. They're one of the largest mtb channels out there.
  • 1 0
 in the record year when the bike industry sold virtually everything, a bike magazin goes down? Instead of sending shitty PRs, dear marketing directors, pay for some advertising, now that you have the budget
  • 1 0
 I subscribed to Bike for years. I stopped because by the time the magazine arrived I had seen all the content online, they were giving it away for free.
  • 2 0
 Used to buy bike magazines on a monthly basis (mbuk, decline, dirt) until they started costing me usd10/mag
  • 1 0
 Dang. I actually cracked open what is now the last issue I will get, earlier this morning. Switchback, Dirt Rag, now Bike. RIP.
  • 4 1
 Engel's man bun killed this mag.
  • 1 0
 I'm not sure if your thesis is entirely bulletproof, but indeed, man buns have never *helped* anything.
  • 3 1
 Engel was a ripper! You’re allowed to have a man bun when you’re that good.
  • 1 0
 I've never surfed a day in my life but I'll miss the Reef ads in Surfer magazine more than I'll miss any of the magazines as a whole.
  • 1 0
 You guys getting nostalgic for print should all subscribe to Mountain Flyer. It's a well done rag with excellent photos that I'd love to see survive.
  • 1 0
 Seems like American Media, Inc. has made some questionable decisions ????

en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Media,_Inc.
  • 1 1
 Only went there for the Bible videos (although those have become less useful the past couple of years) but the rest of their content you could find on any other mtb site including PB.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer Props for the Stop & Shop NE nod. Riding past the Stop & Shop, with the radio on.
-Boston Native in the Bay Area
  • 1 0
 Bike magazine has been directly responsible for me spending most of my disposable income on bikes and global travel since the mid 90s.
  • 2 1
 Was powder magazine in a desperate attempt to find a new target audience with that cover?
  • 2 2
 This is what global warming does. No more need for warm clothing and the snow sports brands haven't yet caught up to offer an alternative.
  • 2 2
 Sad to hear, but am I the only one who didn't like the Bible reviews? "This bike is great. This bike is great, too. And so is this one."
  • 9 0
 Most bikes are great these days. They do pick their favourites.
  • 1 0
 It was a good run, but as far as I could tell, Bike mag peaked with the "beer foam shootout".
  • 1 1
 I was a big fan of Mountain Bike Action And Bike Magazine few years ago. It was a real pleasure to received these mags at home. RIP BIke mag.
  • 1 3
 Mountain Bike Action is still around.
  • 2 0
 It’s now or never for pinkbike magazine!!
  • 2 0
 Best of luck to all Bike employees! Hang in there.
  • 1 0
 Will that's a shit sandwich - been a Bike subscriber since forever. Goddamn the interweb.
  • 1 0
 Sad, but reality of the times. Websites are the new magazines. Everyone gets their content from the internet now.
  • 1 0
 Bummer - always look forward to a new copy arriving in the mail. I guess it will just be Freehub now
  • 1 0
 They should have free trail maps app, get everyone signed up then charge for it. Popular thing I hear.
  • 1 0
 Long term subscriber to both BikeMag and Powder.
Sad: what are we going to read now on The Throne?
  • 1 0
 WoW! Surfer is shutting down. That magazine was easily 55-60 years old. THE surfing magazine S-A-D
  • 1 0
 Sucks! Snowboarder's annual Good Wood tests influenced more than a couple snowboard purchases through the years!
  • 1 1
 Egon got it right 36 years ago. "Print is dead."
This sucks. The mag is dead, long live the mag!!!
  • 2 0
 ????so bummed
  • 1 0
 What about there YouTube channel?
  • 1 1
 Still have my collection going back to 1998. The most creative mountain bike riding. It got me started.
  • 1 1
 Nice little white up, Bike seemed so cool and unique back then. Every issue felt like a discovery.
  • 2 0
 #savereddick
  • 1 0
 Couldn't agree more
  • 2 1
 Damn. And I just started subscribing this summer.
  • 1 0
 Seriously... you had to post this on a Monday?! This sucks...
  • 1 0
 Does anyone know if Bike will live on as online only?
  • 4 1
 Editor-in-chief Nicole Formosa gets a lot of crap from cowardly internet trolls, but I personally thought that she did an excellent job. And I love everyone on her staff. I am going to miss those annual Bible of Bikes issues, of which I still have dating back to 2013. RIP, Bike Magazine. Sad day indeed.
  • 3 0
 @yoondaman: Agree, love the bike bible.
  • 1 0
 Are my bike mags going up in value?
  • 1 1
 Bike Mag has hit my mailbox for 20 years. Sad to see the print version go but paradigms change.
  • 1 0
 i still miss Bicycle Motocross Action .. Frown
  • 1 0
 Best photography in the biz.
  • 1 2
 Alas. I cancelled my Bike subscription last year. And coincidentally just threw out a decades worth of old magazines this week. Life goes on.
  • 1 0
 What am I going to read in the bathroom now?
  • 1 1
 hahahahahahahhahahah bike mag can go they were to political #getwokegobroke
  • 2 0
 Sad face
  • 1 0
 Hey Pinkbike people, hire them from Bike! ????
  • 1 0
 FreeHub Magazine for life!
  • 1 0
 Will miss Sarah Connor doing bike reviews.
  • 1 2
 Just recently canceled my prescription due to the fact BIKE supports BLM . Biggest racist and most destructive organization in America
  • 1 0
 I for one welcome or our new online overlords!
  • 1 0
 I'm gonna miss Uncle Knobby!
  • 1 0
 Sad day... Frown
  • 1 0
 Fuckin hell man.
  • 1 0
 Miss my paper mags. Frown
  • 1 4
 Rip Ryan Palmer Frown
  • 8 0
 He’s not dying ffs.

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