Check Out: A Tiny Electric Pump, Sunglasses, Ergonomic Grips, & More

Mar 9, 2023 at 16:11
by Mike Kazimer  



A lot of gear comes across our desks here at Pinkbike. Check Out is an occasional round up of everything our tech editors have gotten their hands on. Sometimes it's products we're doing long-term tests on, other times it's stuff we're stoked on but don't have time to fully review. And, sometimes it's crazy shit someone sent us unsolicited and we're having a laugh.





Cycplus Cube Electric Pump


photo
photo


Features

• Rechargeable electric tire inflator
• Aluminum body w/ silicone case
• Dimensions: 65 x 46.6 x 28mm
• Weight: 97 grams
• Price: $89 USD
cycplus.com




bigquotesThe Cycplus Cube is a tiny, battery operated tire inflator. It measures just 65 x 47mm, or about the size of two packs of Tic Tacs. It's small enough to slip into a jersey pocket, a hip pack, or even into a bike's downtube storage compartment.

For its size, the Cycplus cube sure makes a racket. I measured it at 96 decibels, which the internet says is equivalent to being 50' away from a jackhammer. Put it this way: if you do take this out to use on the trail, be prepared for some strange glances, and for any nearby wildlife to run far, far away.

It's loud, but it does work – I was able to inflate a fully deflated 29 x 2.4" tire to 20 psi in 90 seconds. Cycplus bill the Cube as a replacement for a CO2 inflator, and it could serve that purpose, but keep in mind that it's not nearly as fast. With a CO2 it's a matter of seconds before all the air is discharged, while with the Cycplus you need to deal with two minutes of noise while it does its thing. It also doesn't put out air with the same force that you'd get from a standard air compressor, which means it's not going to be something you can use in a pinch to seat a stubborn tubeless tire.

The battery life is enough to inflate at least two mountain bike tires – there's approximately 200 seconds of usable time before it needs to be recharged. The recharge time is quick at about 20 minutes, and is accomplished via a USB cord.

Personally, I see the Cycplus as being more novel than absolutely necessary. The concept is clever, but I'll be sticking with a mini-pump for the time being, mainly so I don't scare all the squirrels away.




SQ-Lab 70X Lock-On Grips

photo

photo
photo


Features

• Single-sided lock-on grip
• Shaped for improved comfort and grip
• Length: 135mm
• Sizes: S (31mm diameter), M (33mm diameter)
• Price: $34.95 USD
sq-lab.com




bigquotesSQ Labs' 70X is an ergonomic grip that packs in a bunch of well-thought-out design features without looking overly goofy. The lock-on grips are right- and left-specific, with raised portions and different patterns and rubber compounds for extra comfort and traction. There are two thicknesses, S and M, along with black and yellow clamp options. 




Julbo Edge Sunglasses

photo

photo
photo


Features

• Extra large lens, anti-fog coating
• Adjustable nose piece
• Interchangeable magnetic lens
• Reavtiv photochromic lens
• Includes spare clear lens, hard case, and soft bag
• Price: $259.95 USD
julbo.com




bigquotesJulbo's new Edge sunglasses provide a generous amount of coverage for keeping the sun and bugs out of your eyes, and use a photochromic lens that changes tint depending on the conditions. Select models also come with a clear lens for those days when the sun is fully hiding. Switching out the lenses only takes a matter of seconds thanks to a magnetic attachment located at the center of the lens.

The glasses have an adjustable nose piece that can be manipulated to accommodate schnozzles of all sizes, and there's a rubber portion on each arm to keep them from slipping out of place when things get sweaty.




Topeak Mountain 2Stage Digital Pump

photo

photo
photo


Features

• Digital gauge w/ replaceable battery
• Stage 1: high volume, works best up to 30 psi
• Stage 2: high pressure, up to 300 psi
• $114.95 USD
• Works with Presta and Schrader valves
• Weight: 210 grams / Length: 10.2"
topeak.com




bigquotesTopeak's Mountain 2Stage digital pump is, as the name implies, a 2-in-1 pump that's able to inflate tires and forks and shocks. A dial at the base of the pump is used to switch from the high volume setting (for tires) to the high pressure setting (for shocks), and the digital readout makes it easy to monitor the pressure.

I really like the idea behind this pump, and it does work as intended, I just wish that it was smaller (less expensive wouldn't hurt either). Its length makes it too big to stick in a hip pack, so this is more of a backpack-only item, or something to stick in a toolkit to bring along on a roadtrip. More than anything, the Digital 2Stage reminded me that I'm still on the hunt for a pocket-sized digital shock pump, something small enough to stick in a hip pack for those first few shakedown rides on a new bike.







Feedback Sports Chain Tool 3.0

photo

photo
photo


Features

• Designed for 1-12 speed SRAM and Shimano
• Made from machined tool steel
• Extra pin included in handle
• Fully serviceable
• Lifetime warranty
• Price: $35 USD
feedbacksports.com




bigquotesVersion 3.0 of Feedback Sports chain tool is compatible with just about every chain you're likely to encounter, from singlespeeds all the way up to 13-speed Campagnolo chains. Yes, if you weren't aware, they've already gone to 13 in the gravel world. If you do even a small amount of home bike maintenance, having a dedicated chain tool rather than relying on the pint-sized options found on many multi-tools is the way to go.

Feedback Sports' offering has a comfortable grip to hold onto, and the dimension of the handle provides plenty of leverage. If I had to nitpick, I wouldn't mind if the edges of the metal handle had a chamfer to them, rather than being squared off and a little sharp. That's a small detail, and not one that affects the overall function of the tool. The base of the handle holds a spare pin, and there's room to stash a few extra master links for extra convenience. The tool is fully serviceable, and comes with a limited lifetime warranty if something does go wrong. Overall, for $35 it's a solid option, one that should be able to handle years and years of shop usage. 




Author Info:
mikekazimer avatar

Member since Feb 1, 2009
1,708 articles

166 Comments
  • 245 2
 It is absurd that a majority of "sport" sunglasses are over $200. Get out of here
  • 70 0
 Thank £uxottica
  • 45 2
 rockbros on amazon. two season now on the trail plus they double for ski touring and hiking in winter when your goggles would make your face too hot or you're on the skintrack and not wearing a helmet.
  • 57 1
 Tifosis are great and you can get them for $40-80 depending on what/how many lenses you want. Not to mention all the cheap online brands like Goodr, Blenders, etc. If Keegan Swenson is winning 7 hour mtb marathon races in $30 glasses I'm pretty sure I don't need to spend $200 lol.
  • 27 35
flag rickybobby18 (Mar 10, 2023 at 10:12) (Below Threshold)
 bUt thE OpTics aRE SOoo sUperIOr!!

Bullshit. I have expensive shades (that I found on the trail) and I have cheap shades. It's all the same.
  • 21 1
 @bkm303: Tifosis are the bomb!!
  • 5 1
 @rickybobby18: yeah I have to go like "free novelty sunglasses I got at a wedding" levels of cheapness to notice much difference. If I can't see tint variation when I look at the glasses they're probably fine.

I do love some nice (like $40-50) polarized sunglasses for fishing though.
  • 12 32
flag mariomtblt (Mar 10, 2023 at 10:23) (Below Threshold)
 get some pit vipers, best $/in^2 (€/mm^2 for my homies over the pond)
  • 10 1
 @rickybobby18: it doesn’t matter how superior the lenses are after you’ve crashed, dropped or scuffed them to ratshit.

I’m not a fan of cheap safety glasses from a building merchants, but there are plenty of suitable shades out there for £20-40 that don’t look shit and protect your eyes
  • 12 0
 @bkm303: I have also had good experience with Tifosi
  • 9 13
flag Southeast-Shredder (Mar 10, 2023 at 10:34) (Below Threshold)
 specially made for your average Yeti and Pivot rider
  • 1 0
 @mca896: I agree they are inexpensive, and the lenses are good, but they are relatively uncomfortable. I can wear for about 30 minutes before the pressure points on my scalp start to bother me. Definitely a good value if your head is the right size or your pain threshold is high.
  • 7 0
 The minute my cheap sunglasses survive the gauntlet of me my kids and the woods for more than a two years… I’ll consider something fancy. Things don’t seem to be trending that direction
  • 7 0
 Sad that Ryders went out of business, they weren't super cheap but usually half the price. Mind you, my first pair of Ryders were super cheap and lasted ten years.
  • 5 2
 Uvex Hypershock Safety Glasses, $14 on Amazon. The bombproof adjustable hinges on the UVEX Genesis Safety Glasses are also sweet...$11 on Amazon.
  • 1 0
 @nskerb: I have to have quality in lens clarity like Oakley, Smith, etc... but use Tifosi because for less than $80 they have 3 lenses and the clarity is pretty good for cheaper glasses. My only gripe is the frame is too wide at the temple of the helmet causing a rather obstructed fit and the arm rubber is very catchy on hair.
  • 6 0
 @Mac1987: Julbo isn't owned by Luxottica
  • 8 3
 You want a direct example of BS overpricing in the MTB world. That mini pump is roughly $100cad.... I bought a similar pump for camping... $35. I am beginning to hate mtbing.
  • 6 0
 @onawalk: They are lightweight and designed to be used as glasses, reducing the discomfort of wearing the face.
  • 2 1
 Bolle, from screwfix(uk trade shop) £10 full uv protection. Thank me later
  • 9 0
 @onawalk:

This made me laugh... from the Q&A:
"Do not use for sports. Vision is distorted and will give head ache"
  • 10 2
 @rickybobby18: no way. You get Oakley Prizm or similar and they are so good.
Im not saying they arent too expensive , they are , but the clarity of lenses is brilliant.
Ive got Ryders, Endura, Smith, Tifosi, Oakley and more and the Prizms win by a mile
  • 5 1
 @PuppyTRex: That explains why I keep crashing!
  • 7 10
 @YukonMog: Heres the thing,
Not everyone is the same.

I'll say it loud enough for those in the back
NOT EVERYONE IS THE SAME!

So your experiences, might not be the same as others, and vice versa.

You get it?
  • 2 0
 @mca896: Came here to say exactly this! They work especially well for ski touring. They seem to fog less in summer and winter than the expensive ones too.
  • 3 0
 I bought my (Brand name starts with T) for $39, came with 3 lenses and is as sturdy AF, kind of a goggle/sungglasses shape too so really good eye protection, F all those expensive bs brands
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: That's funny
  • 6 0
 @bkm303: For $35 you really can't beat Goodr, decent scratch resistance, really light... and if you're @mikekazimer they have some clear lens options. Limited styles though.
  • 4 0
 @rickybobby18: No it isn't. Bad optics are awful to ride with. Fortunately some REALLY cheap glasses have great optics.
  • 2 0
 @mca896: Dude, just started wearing them, more comfortable than my 200 buck smiths. 30 bucks.
  • 3 0
 @bkm303: This! Picked up two pairs of Goodrs for my girls at REI: they love the looks and light weight, I love the very nice $30 price and that optics are good & tints effective enough that I can borrow them and quickly forget I am in cheap shades.
  • 4 1
 @likeittacky: +1. My Tifosi photochromic lenses have similar range and speed of adjustment to my $$$ Rudy Project photochromics, the problem is, Tifosi's frames are all huge and clunky. If you don't run hot, have a really big face, or just dig the Oakley "more cyborg = mo betta" look, then you're golden. If you're a lean, high-sweat-rate, rugged minimalist like me, those Tifosis are just going to sit in a drawer while leaner, meaner, less obtrusive options see all the riding action.
  • 4 0
 @powturn: I agree. I did not mention, sometimes when i'm charging down steeper runs, those huge frames slide and the top of the fame can get right in the line of sight, causing me to quickly shut it down. This is definitely where the high dollar frames do the best job and worth the coin for sure... but $160 is my limit for glasses pretty much and usually last a very long time, except for a pair of Smiths i lost within two weeks one time, because i hooked them on my waist pack after stopping for a brief moment and never located them after that.Frown
  • 1 0
 I bought some Poc knock offs on Wish.com for like $30. They came in a nice case with like 4 different interchangeable lenses. Good enough for me!
  • 2 0
 @mtbmdc: POC NOC OFF
  • 1 0
 The majority are not
  • 1 0
 I’d bet they’re made in Asia for less than 15$.
  • 1 0
 @bkm303: I just got a pair. They seemed pricey to me but at least feasible.
  • 1 0
 FYI: shooting sunglasses.
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: just ordered some thanks. So hot right now.
  • 1 0
 Milwaukee safety glasses for the win.
  • 1 0
 @bkm303: goodr’s are great!
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: this will definitely get you noticed. Haha
  • 89 1
 with that tiny compressor, no need to bring chainsaws to WC events anymore
  • 17 0
 Didn't watch the video. Read this comment, watched the video. Laughed way too hard.
  • 7 1
 And at $90, the joke doesn't stop here, it's on everyone who buys one.
  • 3 1
 @powturn: the oneup pump is like $70 ain’t it? Not far off
  • 5 2
 @Krby805: Lezyne HV Drive $20. Laugh all the way to the bank w/ the $70 you saved. You're welcome.
  • 1 0
 @Krby805: the one up high volume/ bigger pump is awesome and although I haven’t tried yet I’d be willing to bet it would even seat the bead on an mtb tire in a pinch. I have a drawer full of other pumps, some that even claim to fill or adjust your fork or shock but the one up is definitely the fastest at pumping up a low or fixed tire on the trail. It’s a quality pump and also has room for storage. On top of that their customer service has been top notch . They gave me a 40% discount on two new sets of pedals even after the warranty ran out after breaking the screw off at the end of the axle during a rebuild. One Up stuff is jam up.
On another note,
Anyone trying the SQ lab grips advertised here??
  • 52 8
 I DO NOT LIKE BATTERIES, SAM-I-AM.
I DO NOT LIKE THEM GOOD SIR OR MA’ME.

WOULD YOU LIKE THEM HERE OR THERE?
I WOULD NOT LIKE THEM HERE OR THERE.
I WOULD NOT LIKE THEM ANYWHERE.
I DO NOT LIKE BATTERIES GOOD SIR OR MA’AME.
I DO NOT LIKE THEM, SAM-I-AM.

WOULD YOU LIKE THEM TO PUMP YOUR TUBES?
WOULD YOU LIKE THEM IN YOUR DOWNTUBES?

I DO NOT LIKE THEM TO PUMP MY TUBES.
I DO NOT LIKE THEM IN MY DOWNTUBES.
I DO NOT LIKE THEM TO CHANGE MY GEARS.
I DO NOT LIKE BATTERIES UNDER MY REAR.
I DO NOT LIKE THE ELECTRIC HYPE.
I DO NOT LIKE CHARGING MY BIKE.
  • 33 0
 Would you like to see at night?
Would you like an LED light?
Would you like it not so dim?
Would you like one Sam-I-Am?
  • 2 0
 You’re going to be like Gary Sinise in Mission to Mars—the one guy that shows up to the party with an internal combustion engine when everyone else has moved to EVs. And I applaud you.
  • 5 0
 @heterographic-homophone: you got me there. I put my kerosene lamps back in storage after the incident.
  • 6 1
 Yep, a buddy of mine charged his axs gears but then forgot to charge his e-bike battery. Then ran out of juice on a big ride. I'm with you
  • 4 5
 @gnarlysipes: EV's are a stop gap until Hydrogen Fuel Cells get going. In a decade EV's will be limited to small personal vehicles.
  • 1 2
 @OnTheRivet: I don’t doubt it, unless battery tech dramatically improves. I think ICEs still go away. Fuel cells power electric motors.
  • 6 1
 @OnTheRivet: I'm afraid I have bad news on this. Hydrogen won't be fueling homes or personal vehicles. It's not a problem with the fuel cells, it's entirely an issue of hydrogen distribution infrastructure. Hydrogen will be almost exclusively for industrial use. Source - I work in next Gen energy infrastructure.
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: Here in the UK the government are saying all heating boilers must be hydrogen ready from 2025 onwards and natural gas will be eradicated by 2030. They say the existing natural gas network can be used for distribution. So there's a good chance that by 2030 natural gas will be unavailable, except to run power turbines to produce hydrogen at a massive cost, both monetarily and environmentally. Hydrogen could work if we had sufficient renewable energy to produce it, but that's not likely to be in place by 2030.
  • 2 1
 @commental: the natural gas lines can carry a maximum of 17% hydrogen by volume. Otherwise they're going to have to build all new lines EVERYWHERE which simply won't happen (economics, planning, etc).
  • 2 1
 @ratedgg13: Hmm, I've just been looking into this a little more. They were talking about an "up to 20%" blend here. A recent study said that it would lead to a 43% increase to end user costs and only cut greenhouse gas emissions by 7%. I'm a gas engineer and we were being told not too long ago that the existing network could be repurposed. It now seems to be acknowledged that an entirely new network will be needed for 100% hydrogen. Not quite the game changer that it was recently being touted as.
  • 2 0
 @commental: yeah, unfortunately the reality hasn't seemed to get past the politicians mouths yet. Grand dreams, but not grounded in reality.
  • 3 0
 @commental: that’s because politicians don’t really understand anything properly and they don’t value the people who could tell them.
  • 2 0
 @kipvr: They value those who are telling them what they want to hear, otherwise not so much.
  • 1 0
 @OnTheRivet: With an EV you don't have to go to a gas station. And ours is charged by our solar panels. I absolutely love not having to go to gas stations and no oil changes. Who knows what the future will bring but I'm definitely a fan of EVs over fuel cells as they exist now.
  • 1 0
 @acali: Isn’t a fuel cell essentially just a power source like a battery? So you don’t need an internal combustion engine to spin a crankshaft to deliver power to the transmission and then to the wheels. Couldn’t a fuel cell power an electric motor by means of an onboard electric generator (aka turbine)? Admittedly, I know very little about the subject but now I know where to waste the next several hours…
  • 1 0
 Or at least the next 15 seconds. It’s akin to a battery in that it produces electricity. en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuel_cell
  • 1 0
 @gnarlysipes: yes, a hydrogen fuel cell can generate electricity. However as noted above the problem is actually getting hydrogen to where you want it. Hydrogen "gas stations" are immensely problematic.
  • 1 0
 @gnarlysipes: a fuel cell is a little bit like a battery, which essentially turns hydrogen into electricity. The trouble is it’s very slow, so you still need a battery to supply large currents to the electric motor. Still it’s a much smaller battery than EV. EVs are just a total human fail. We’ve gone from digging up one damaging resource to digging up a limited one. At least hydrogen is everywhere and can be produced easily using excess (off peak) renewables.
  • 29 5
 I like that pump as a replacement for CO2. Sure it’s a compromise with regards to battery life, but not having to waste CO2 cartridges every time you get a flat would be cool. If I wasn’t on the OneUp pump train in the SWAT box, I’d think about that pump.
  • 13 0
 Idk, I'd have a hard time leaving the CO2 at home. In the (unlikely) event a tire becomes unseated that pump wouldn't help much. But if the tire is even sorta holding air I'll always reach for a pump first. Interesting product though.

Then again I've carried CO2 for years and never actually used it on the trail in close to a decade. Plugs + mini pump has always been enough.
  • 14 1
 you know about hand pumps right? The hand pumps!!!
  • 16 3
 @bkm303: A short length of hose with a schrader nozzle on one end and a presta on the other, one with a valve. Find a parked car/tractor/wheelbarrow and make good sneaky use of some free air.
  • 5 0
 You can inflate 1 regular MTB tire, at best. Look at their website. I’m guessing the carbon footprint for this greatly outweighs that of my recyclable CO2 cartridges.
  • 4 0
 you should check out the Fumpa, I've seen one inflate multiple 2.4x29 tires it's pretty impressive. fumpapumps.com
  • 20 0
 @davidccoleman: I’m nervous to Google that. Thanks for the link.
  • 2 0
 @bkm303: Definitely seems more like a hand pump alternative than a CO2 alternative, and from that perspective, it's not a very good one given the battery life limitation.
  • 10 1
 E pumps aren't pumps! How can you even call it mountain biking if you pump up your tire with a battery...pffft!
  • 2 0
 90 seconds to inflate a tire? I can do that by hand AND do the 96dB thing too if needed. Lazy people already have so many CO2 inflators to choose from, good luck competing in that market.
  • 2 0
 You don't have a local recycling option for those? They are easily recycled... I just save them up for my next dump run and drop them in with the metal recycling.

I probably only use 1 or 2 a year because I carry a OneUp pump as well as 2xCO2's. And it's usually for someone else I'm with or meet on the trail. I use inserts so I almost never have to re-seat a bead on the trail.
  • 2 0
 @valrock: Yep, no CO2 and no batteries. Always dependable. Works rain or shine.
  • 1 0
 My Nashbar mini pump I had years ago weighing about 100g is just fine. I've used it so many times for the last 15 years that it's basically the best tool I have in my backpack.. I don't need to spend over $100USD for something that makes people do a double take on the trails. I'm the tire ninja on the trails!
  • 3 0
 @islandforlife: My question is: Who is still getting flats? I had a series of pinch flats in my sidewall next to the rim a few years back but then I got a proper tire gauge and realized my pressure was way too low. Since then, I’ve had one situation where I needed air—I had a hole in the tread and neglected to check my sealant.
  • 1 0
 That's what they want you to think, man. But both from a trash perspective and a carbon footprint perspective, I'd bet this will be far worse than recyclable steel cartridges. Plus, who's to say it's pitiful battery hasn't been diminished by the time you actually need to use it.
  • 2 0
 @gnarlysipes: Ha true... since I started using inserts and proper tires, haven't had many flats... did have one puncture through the tread last year that needed some bacon and air. But otherwise I seem to use my CO2's and pump far more helping out others on the trail than myself. Always seems to be bike parks as well... people just don't see to come prepared with proper equipment or tools.
  • 2 2
 @gnarlysipes: you not riding hard enough bruh
  • 1 0
 @valrock: Probably true but my dented rims would beg to differ. I definitely try to land soft on jumps but on techy, rock garden stuff I like to just plow through.
  • 2 0
 @islandforlife: The last couple of cartridges I’ve used were helping others. That’s also true of my spare tubes. In fact, I don’t recall a time in the last 9 years where I used a tube for myself but I’ve gone through four or five. I did have to ride awkwardly forward weighted a couple of times down the last couple of miles more than once, though.
  • 25 0
 It's not the size of the pump that matters, it's how you use it.
  • 22 1
 And once she tries battery powered, it can be hard to go back.
  • 5 0
 @heterographic-homophone: Yeah but as Mike pointed out, the noise can draw unwanted attention
  • 14 0
 The tiny compressor is so genius! Now instead of having to make sure you bring a small pump on rides to save from a walk out, you now get to make sure you bring the compressor and make sure it's charged before you ride! Yay progress!
  • 8 1
 Exactly. And batteries lose charge just sitting around so you can’t simply throw it in your pack and forget about it, because it will probably be dead by the time you need it. I’m old school…topeak race rocket MT hand pump attached to the bike frame. Always works and always there when I need it.
  • 1 0
 @boopiejones: yep, and for the roadie a lezyne road drive fits inside my seat post so I never have to worry about not having it
  • 15 0
 "It's about the size of two packs of Tic Tacs" Americans will use anything but the metric system
  • 3 1
 @Shitass: in fairness a foot is only 12 inches so they don't have to count much more than that, it's also the amount of toes most of em have
  • 1 0
 @p0rtal00: the could use the metric system like i said. Cm or mm or inches. Theyll use fractions of inches too
  • 14 5
 'It also doesn't put out air with the same force that you'd get from a standard air compressor, which means it's not going to be something you can use in a pinch to seat a stubborn tubeless tire.'

Really? Who would have thought....
  • 3 0
 Ha ha
  • 14 3
 @theteaser, I mean, based on the racket it makes it wouldn't be unreasonable to think it'd push air out a little more forcefully than it does.
  • 11 4
 @mikekazimer: Yall are confusing pressure and flowrate.
  • 3 0
 @bikerbarrett: Some of us are just confused.
  • 9 0
 Remember far side cartoons?
"As Cody distractedly inflates his 29+ tire with his Cycplus on his recent Colorado bike packing trip, he has no idea that the chainsaw quality noise probably saved his life from bear attack".
  • 9 1
 I think $115 is entirely reasonable for an electric pump/gauge that functions as both a shock and normal tire (presta/a header) pump & high pressure gauge.

I have 5 different gages/pumps to accomplish the same function as that one Topeak.
  • 2 0
 Edit: the title to this article really confused me, I thought the topeak was also an electric pump but in reality it’s a hand pump that just happens to have a digital gauge on it. Eh.
  • 2 1
 @loudv8noises: yeah, that’s a $40 pump
  • 22 0
 But do you have a 96 decibel pack of Tic Tac though?
  • 1 0
 These 2-stage pumps are great. Giant has one (Giant Control combo pump) and I used to have a RockShox one that I'm pretty sure was the same pump with different decals. Both were/are around $50 IIRC (analog gauge). When it got stolen out of my car I replaced it with a cheapo amazon one for $30 and I have no complaints after about 2 years. They're all around 10" though which is a downside.

$115 is a little high IMO but not crazy, Topeak makes really nice stuff. I'm sure the gauge is quality but I doubt a 300 psi gauge is super trustworthy down at tire pressures. But at least you can get a reading, unlike on my cheapo analog gauge.
  • 8 0
 I would just tape that electric pump to my bars near a thumb. "BRAAAP BRAAAAP" !!!
  • 1 0
 Hell yes!
  • 1 0
 Just imagine the application for e-Bikes. Battery extension and warning klaxon in one. Even more annoying!
  • 5 0
 SQLab 70x grips are fantastic... I've battled hand pain my entire life, and these are the best grips I've found, way better than anything round or Ergons various offerings, for me. I just wish they came in a larger size.
  • 1 0
 Best grips for my hand pain and I’ve tried maybe thirty. I’d like a longer length but am fine with the diameter even with my xl hands.
  • 1 0
 Do these ones stay in place? I bought an older model with inboard clamps but the outside edge rotated almost freely making them useless.
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: I had those, too, just with some hairspray to hold them in place. These are way better in that regard.
  • 1 0
 @Glenngineer: Great thanks. I used hairspray on my old set but apparently the hairspray I used isn't clydesdale approved.
  • 8 1
 Imagine paying $90 and still not pumping up your tires faster than a pump
  • 16 0
 Ok, now what?
  • 14 0
 @RonSauce: now imagine your ears are ringing from the noisy pump that just died after only getting your tire to 5 psi because you forgot to charge it last night. And as you angrily chuck the tictac pump into the forest, your $260 glasses fall off your face into the gravel and get all scratched up.
  • 3 0
 You're definitely bringing a bigger pump that me, either that or you've really got olympic jerk speed.
  • 8 0
 @boopiejones: this is one hell of a guided meditation.
  • 7 0
 What is this!? A compressor for ants?!?
  • 3 0
 I have the Feedback Sports portable bike repair stand and their wheel and rotor truing stand that mounts on top. Both are superb. If I ever need another chain tool, I wouldn't hesitate buying more of their stuff.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, a good chain tool is essential. But I wouldn't necessarily say the portable ones aren't good for home use. I've been using that Park Little Brute for two decades or so and it's been going strong without issues. The pin is replaceable should I ever need that. It isn't hard to operate unlike some too-tiny chain tools. Maybe bigger is even more comfortable but if you want to buy only one, just get the durable and comfortable one you can take along. If you get the big one, you'll still need another small tool. And you can't skimp on that one either. Having your big chain tool fail in your workshop is bad (but then you still have your portable tool as spare to finish the job). Having your portable chain tool fail during a trailside repair is horror (as the big one is at home).
  • 2 0
 Shock pump that fits in hip pack - Lezyne Digital Shock Drive. Fits pretty well in most hip packs, works well on shocks. Expensive though. ride.lezyne.com/collections/digital-inflation-shock-pumps/products/digital-shock-drive
  • 1 0
 I think what's nice about this one is that you get a tire pump and shock pump in one, with a digital gauge. Even though it isn't mentioned, my experience is that most mini-pumps come with a clamp so that you can bolt it under the bottle cage bolts and possibly use the ones under the down tube (the ones everyone complains about). So unless you insist on taking stuff off the bike and onto the body (or your bike doesn't have bottle mounts) you can bolt it to the bike and not worry about whether it fits the pack or not.
  • 1 0
 I’ve got that pump. Lovely pump and you should buy it. Just remember to by a 10x pack of the tiny batteries as they don’t last long.
  • 4 0
 Wow that chain took actually looks amazing! Never thought I'd ever say those words.
  • 3 0
 The two way pump seems like a great option to throw in your truck and leave it there days where you forgot to check everything.
  • 1 0
 Or get a dedicated floor and a dedicated shock pump and throw those in your truck. Then you have a better tool for each job and you still have a tenner left over.
  • 1 0
 If it's just a "have it in the truck" pump just get this bad boy a.co/d/6LRsQmR

Bought it after my rockshox pump got stolen. Works great.
  • 1 0
 I'd buy a mini pump that could somehow recharge my light/phone/garmin to get me home. I'll settle for the mini pump I've already got, or a similar one to replace it when it breaks or gets lost. It pumps up a tyre and fits in a pocket. Batteries not required.
  • 1 0
 Some older Wiley X XL-1 sun glasses, balistic rated, perfect for them flying stones when cars speed by, changable lens, smoke, yellow, clear, a removable head band, usefull in preventing glasses from rattling off on bouncy descents, removable gasket seal around the eye rims, keep the pollen out the hay fever eyes aswell as the dust, smoke from heather burning, hard case included with clip attachment, no adjustable nose piece but a friendlier cost considering
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer get the Lezyne Digital Shock Drive pump. It's a little longer than a can of beer and fits easily into fannypacks for those first few shakedown rides. I've had mine for almost ten years, long enough to where I had to replace the o-rings in the head/hose, which Lezyne supplied for free.
  • 2 0
 What's the old adage, "just because you can, doesn't mean you should? I haven't seen anything that applies to adage more than the little Cycplus Cube Electric Pump.
  • 4 0
 Brilliant!! I was looking for more things to charge before my rides.
  • 1 1
 The cube pump looks so cool. I'm the guy on the trail who is always helping his buddies get their shit back together. I don't carry much but what I do carry are essential. It all fits in my SWAT box. I think I'll be adding the cube to my arsenal.
  • 2 1
 I appreciate the offer… but my car is only a mile away. I’ll walk it out.
  • 3 0
 that tiny compressor is the answer for me for my Jamaica season as I can not bring CO2 canisters on the airplanes.
  • 2 0
 I thought that this article was about a device that had all the things in the title lol
  • 4 5
 Why not have a bottle cage mount for the Topeak Mountain 2Stage ? Doesn't look too much bigger than a Oneup 100cc . Also ... next time you write an article complaining about size, please add anything for perspective so readers can judge.
  • 8 2
 It's 10.2" long, so almost the length of the long edge of a typical sheet of paper.

Photo for scale (I have big hands): www.pinkbike.com/photo/24338581
  • 9 1
 @mikekazimer: how many bananas long is it
  • 6 0
 @bkm303: 1 baguette
  • 16 0
 @mikekazimer: if you are going to use Imperial please don't decimalise it.

It's 704/69ths of an inch long.
  • 7 1
 @Jvisscher: I'm american dude, how many slim jims in a baguette?
  • 2 2
 @L0rdTom: excellent

or 1 & 2/3 420/69ths of an inch. Nice.

all measurements should be in 420/69ths, the new imperial standard
my bike's wheelbase is 8 420/69ths inches long
  • 2 0
 10.2” is pretty long to strap to a frame. I have a Topeak race rocket MT which is approximately 7.75” long. Another 2.5 inches would be cumbersome.
  • 2 0
 My experience with the Topeak dual action pump is that if it gets muddy, the seals fail and it stops working. Best to keep it clean in a pack.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: my 100cc OneUp pump fits in the SWAT hole of my Enduro in the included wrap, with a axs battery that makes it a touch longer. Probably not the best way to treat a $xxx pump long term, but on for that first ride or two trying a new setup.
  • 1 0
 I foresee electric pumps being installed in wheels in the future, with the benefit deflating the tire to a certain pressure too.
  • 1 0
 We need more plastic crap that finds its way to the landfill (in best cases) or into nature to turn into micro plastic that eventually we ingest!
  • 1 0
 A $90 pump, what a waste of money and material. Stupid idea, influencing the environment. Excess of form over content, just to sell and earn, sad.
  • 1 1
 All this compony over charging there product.. get the f out man . stupidly ridiculous. that's even a word.lol
  • 1 0
 Yes, I think they were enjoyed!
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: hahahahahahahahahahahaha!
  • 1 0
 1 time use per full charge o a 700*25 c tire
Ya....No
  • 1 1
 That pump really seems worth the $90
  • 1 0
 Pump / legit bear horn
  • 1 0
 i'm bored
  • 1 1
 the inflator is intriguing...
  • 1 3
 Sweet!!! We got mini battery powered air compressors now, but bikes still use old-ass, stupid presta valves…







Copyright © 2000 - 2024. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.043666
Mobile Version of Website