Check Out: Wet Weather Edition - Gear to Make Sloppy Rides More Tolerable

Oct 16, 2019 at 14:33
by Mike Kazimer  



A lot of gear comes across our desks here at Pinkbike. Check Out is a monthly round up of everything our tech editors have gotten their hands on. Sometimes it's products we're doing long-term tests on, other times it's stuff we're stoked on but don't have time to fully review. And, sometimes it's crazy shit someone sent us unsolicited and we're having a laugh.

Now that fall has officially arrived in the Northern Hemisphere, this edition of Check Out is focused on gear that can help make those cooler and wetter rides more enjoyable.




Gore C5 Gore-Tex Trail Hooded Jacket

Gore C5 jacket

Gore C5 jacket
A drop tail keeps the jacket from riding up when you're hunched over the handlebars.
Gore C5 jacket
Extended coverage, elasticized cuffs.

Features

• Water + windproof
• Colors: black, blue, grey/green
• Size: S-XXL
• $279.99
• Gore-Tex Active and PacLite Plus fabrics
• Adjustable hood and hem
• Zippered chest and side pockets
gorewear.com

bigquotesThe C5 Trail jacket is a new entry from Gore, a lightweight waterproof layer that won't take up much room in a pack if the weather improves. There aren't any pit zips, but the high level of breathability helps make that less of a concern than I expected – I was able to keep the jacket on during some low speed, high exertion climbs without ever feeling like I was trapped in a sauna.

The drop tail and extended coverage cuffs are all handy features to keep water from sneaking in, and the hood is low profile enough that it can easily fit under a helmet on those extra-soggy rides. The only issue that I've run into so far is that the main zipper will occasionally get hung up on the fabric underneath it, which can make one handed operation a challenge.

Bear in mind that Gore's sizes tend to run on the smaller side. I typically wear a medium from most manufacturers, but the size large pictured here ended up being a good fit.



Evoc Race Belt

Evoc race belt

Evoc race belt
Evoc race belt


Features

• Colors: black, blue
• Airoflex hip belt
• $45 USD
evocsports.com
• Quick access side pockets
• Key holder
• Velcro tool / nutrition pockets




bigquotesThe Evoc Race Belt obviously isn't wet-weather specific, but it's a handy option to have for those quick laps when it's raining cats and dogs. I added it into this compilation due to how low-profile it is and how well it'll fit under a rain jacket. There's only room for the bare essentials – a multi-tool, flat fixing supplies, and maybe an energy bar, so it's not the way to go if you'll be shedding layers, or want to carry a trailside feast.

I do wish the side pocket was a little more phone friendly, but the wraparound waist belt and padding make this a very comfortable way to travel light.



Dakine Thrillium Pants

Dakine Thrillium pants

Dakine Thrillium pants
The zippered side pocket has a cord for holding a bike park pass or lift ticket.
Dakine Thrillium pants
Stretch panels in the knees help make room for pads.


Features

• 4-way stretch Schoeller fabric
• Built-in webbing belt with quick-release buckle
• Articulating stretch panels around knees
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL, XXL
• $160 USD
dakine.com




bigquotesModern downhill pants have progressed a great deal from the overly heavy, moto-inspired apparel that used to be the norm. That progression means that many of the options on the market work well for non-lift served riding as well, and Dakine's Thrillium pants are a prime example. They're tough enough for DH riding, but light enough to wear on big days of pedaling in cooler weather. For me, the biggest advantage of riding in pants versus shorts is the ease of cleanup after a muddy ride, since there's no need to deal with dirty knee pads or to scrub the grit off of your shins and calves.

The size medium Thrillium pants fit perfectly (I'm 5'11", with a 33" inseam), except for one thing - the adjustable waist belt was too tight, even when it was in the loosest setting. I solved that by cutting it off (there's still a button closure underneath), which isn't exactly what you want to be doing with a brand new pair of $160 pants, but it did the trick. That little hiccup aside, the rest of the Thrillium's design details are well thought out. There are zippered pockets where there should be, enough room for wearing kneepads, and the Schoeller fabric has proven to be extremely durable and abrasion resistant.



Shimano MW7 Waterproof SPD Shoes

Shimano MW7 shoes

Shimano MW7 shoes
A single Boa dial is used to adjust the fit.
Shimano MW7 shoes
The MW7's have a new Michelin rubber outsole.


Features

• Boa closure system
• Gore-Tex Insulated Comfort liner
• Weight: 541 gram / shoe, size 45
• Michelin outsole
• $275 USD
bike.shimano.com




bigquotesShimano's MW7 shoes recently received an update, and the latest version of this wet-weather standout now has a Boa lace closure system and a Michelin outsole for extra grip on slime covered roots and greasy rocks. The waterproof construction and light insulation makes them perfect for winters in the Pacific Northwest, where the temperature hovers between 32-45° F (0-7° C) and rain is almost guaranteed.

Along with the Gore-Tex lining, the neoprene cuff helps keep water from getting in – step into a puddle and the neoprene will get saturated, but it's less likely that your feet will be swimming in an inch of scummy water at the end of a ride. They're not cheap, but they should last multiple seasons, making them a worthy investment for anyone who spends more than a few rides a year out in the rain.





Giro Havoc H20 Waterproof Shorts

Giro Havoc H2O shorts

Dakine Thrillium pants
A velcro strap on each side can be used to cinch down the leg opening.
Giro Havoc H20
Waterproof zippers cover the leg vents.


Features
• 14” inseam
• 15,000mm waterproof / 6,000g/m2 breathability
• Color: black, blue (previous color option shown)
• Sizes: 30, 32, 33, 34, 36, 38, 40
• $160 USD
giro.com




bigquotesThe term “waterproof shorts” may seem like an oxymoron, and on really wet days pants are obviously going to be the better choice, but they do make sense for those rides when you're going to be splashing through puddles and don't want to deal with a soggy chamois. The Havoc H20 shorts don't feel all that different than a regular pair of shorts, with a long enough inseam to cover knee pads, and an adjustable waistband that can be used to make room for all those post-ride donuts. The leg openings can also be cinched down via a velcro tab in order to keep water from sneaking inside.

I found the zippered vents to be a useful feature, and the extra airflow helped make up for the fact that the waterproof fabric isn't as breathable as a typical pair of synthetic riding shorts. I did find it a little strange that the vents were placed on top of each leg, rather than in the crotch area given that these shorts are designed to be worn in the rain – that's kind of like putting a vent on the top of a raincoat's hood. However, according to Giro, during the shorts' development they found that this positioning offered the best ventilation without interfering with the seat or pedaling, and when it was really pouring most riders would have the vents closed anyways.

Overall, the shorts have held up very well, especially considering all the grime they've been exposed too. Red wouldn't have been my first color choice, but luckily the latest version comes in black or blue, which is much more appropriate for any apparel that's going to spend time being blasted by muddy water.



Squirt Cycling Products

Squirt lube


Features

• Squirt Bike Cleaner: $15 USD
• Squirt Bike Cleaner concentrate: $20
• Squirt chain lube, 120ml: $14
squirtcyclingproducts.com
• Bike Cleaner is water based and does not contain any organic solvents
• Squirt Chain Lube is a bio-degradable wax based lubricant




bigquotesNo matter if you're a toothbrush-toting neat freak, or someone who can barely remember to lube their chain, wet weather riding does require a little extra bike clean up. I typically don't use too many cleaners or degreasers - a light rinse with the hose and some lube on the chain is the extent of my post-ride protocol, but they can come in handy when you're trying to keep your bike sparkly clean and looking good as new. Squirt has two versions of their water based cleaner - a pre-mixed and a concentrated formula - that are biodegradable and non-corrosive.

Wax lubes are typically associated with dry, dusty conditions, but they can work in wet weather - you'll just need to be more diligent about how often it's applied. In addition, Squirt offers a low-temp formula if you're planning on venturing out in below-freezing conditions.





135 Comments

  • 157 17
 I love scrolling through these articles just looking at the prices to remind myself how much I hate the bike industry
  • 50 16
 You’re free to take up skateboarding! Razz
  • 25 9
 or running
  • 12 1
 or google...they mostly post MSRP's here.. I just found the shoes for 100$ less online.
  • 20 5
 shorts for $160 though..

thats throwing money away
  • 5 0
 @tobiusmaximum: recently bought a new skateboard...best $150 I spent in a long time! After it only cost me $15 to upgrade/dial-in my suspension (bushings).
  • 21 10
 @mtnrush666: exactly, skating is cheap af. Does my head in when people complain about prices. Get a better job or buy cheaper shit, it’s not rocket science.
  • 13 0
 @tobiusmaximum: not when you go through decks as quick as my son does. I could build a cabin with all the broken decks at my place.
  • 2 1
 @OnkleJoachim: sounds like a greet idea! Do it!
  • 6 2
 You, too, can stay dry for the low low price of only $700 (except for your head and hands...those aren't important - get an extra pair of shorts for $160).
  • 3 2
 Speaking of a mtb/skateboarding comparison. Having participated in competitions in both sports, something that has crossed my mind is the very long list of things that must be thought of, prepared, and carried to an enduro race location, in comparison with a street skateboarding competition, for which basically you only need to carry your skateboard. What a difference! Maybe an extra deck and mounting tools at most, if you're really commited...
  • 5 6
 Oh no please, don't hate, just build you self experience:

rainproof expensive jacket? no thanks, the first slide on a rock or on a bush will tear it apart, if the fabric will survive it anyhow the washing machine will kill the waterproof treatment after two or three times.

expensive pants? no thanks i want to fart freely in my 8€ pants, pants are more or less the same of jackets in the end so if a fall will not destroy them the washing machine will.

rainproof expensive shoes? no thanks, water will get inside from the top, it's better to have shoes that can dry out as quick as possible instead and a pair of warm wool socks to keep the feet at the right temperature

Bike specific cleaning products? no thanks, some water and a clean cotton tissue is all i need, plus a drop of dish soap to remove greasy stuff.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the response. Just to be clear, I like good quality gear and do spend for the right products.

A bunch of my riding gear comes from decathlon: 10e beach jerseys work great, a 20e snowboarding tight fit hoodie is one of the best items of clothing I own and I love my a 10e bottle belt that fits a pump and tool inside.

That being said I love my Fox jacket that im hoping will last years and I got 50% off at an end of year sale (they just changed the colours the next year) or my shimano enduro shoes that I get for less than 100e every other year.

I'm too old to take up skateboarding, but climbing is another great cheap sport, just need a 50$ pair of shoes.
  • 5 0
 @flavio-san: Best investment I've made is waterproof socks. Those things are incredible. Dry feet at the end of a soaking wet day? Priceless.

I can handle getting all my other gear soaked. But I'm with you, I can't justify spending that kind of money on gear that's going to get trashed quick. I have the $$, but it's not going towards that.
  • 1 0
 @yeti85: wheeeeeeeeeeeeere did you found those shoes at 100? that's a steal
  • 2 0
 You heard it here first: Decathlon NH500 Fit pants.
Got mine for €20, perfect fit, not waterproof but dry extremely quick and don't get saggy

www.decathlon.co.uk/nh500-fit-mens-khaki-id_8502002.html
  • 2 0
 @blackjack88: especially for Giro quality... haha
  • 3 0
 Waterproof shorts are like jumbo shrimp.
  • 1 0
 @noapathy: I bought last year's version of the jacket for 124 euro at bikediscount.de they are sold out now though.

Exact same color green with a slate contrasting color.

You can see in the picture of the cuff the Velcro strap already has dirt on it.

Don't think any of it is washing out. Nothing washes out of that neon green color everything that hits it stays.

Still not a bad deal @ $150usd after shipping and currency conversion.
  • 1 0
 @flavio-san: actually it's Gore so lifetime warranty on the waterproofing.

That's why I bought Gore. Tired of buying jackets once a year.
  • 2 0
 @krashDH85: I just got some of the ShowersPass waterproof socks, such a good investment! I have had the same pataguchi waterproof shell for 4 seasons, they made a ripstop version and it has held up to plenty of crashes. I did clip a tree and tore a decent hole in it by my bicep, Gorilla glue tape front and back solved that problem and has been going strong ever since. Best part was I paid half price at the Whistler store. For the cheap end keep your eye out at costco, I picked up a "waterproof" shell for $19 (actually bought 4 of them haha). The brand is 32 Degrees, while it's not meant for long sloppy days it does the trick for normal rides in the wet. I use it all the time and have never treated it, for $19 you can't ask for much better.
  • 1 0
 @adventuresbycole: Yeah my riding buddy picked up the ShowerPass socks, which is what got me into looking for some. He raved about them
  • 1 0
 wow someone a bit salty.
  • 1 1
 @yeti85: LINK or it doesn't exists

just searched and the only result I yielded is that I'm shitty and Google.
  • 1 0
 or swimming
  • 1 0
 @tobiusmaximum: I was a skater long before I ever pedaled a bike
  • 1 0
 That's pretty much what I did. I think I could get season passes to both Rays and Wheelmill for the price of this kit.
  • 1 0
 @adventuresbycole: Costco is where I get my baggies from. $15-$20 for hybrid surf trunks with pockets that are stretchy.
  • 2 2
 @tobiusmaximum: skateboarding takes way more skill than mountain biking. I have always said mountain bikes are for people who do not have the advanced skills to ride a skateboard. Mountain bike Haters Gonna Hate! Sometimes people just can't handle the truth.
  • 3 2
 @pinnityafairy: are you addressing something is said to the contrary? just checking. because i pretty much think skateboarding is about the most technical skilled (at the highest level) of all the 'extreme' sports. having said which, humans are humans and the boundaries of every sport are being taken to the limit and beyond. (so maybe we are kidding ourselves?) isn't a rodeo 5 off a 60ft cliff drop, on a snowboard, "skilful'? are we about to venture into a discussion about skill plus (and/or vs) balls?
  • 2 2
 @tobiusmaximum: I've been a skater before your deck had a nose or concave
  • 2 2
 @pinnityafairy: another comment that seems unrelated to anything i've actually said. this is going well lol..
  • 1 2
 @pinnityafairy: You probably mean that you have been a poser for about 40 years? Just carrying your skateboard around, riding it to the coffee shop? Since as you said, mountain bikes are for people who lack advanced skills at skateboarding and here you are, commenting on a mtb site.
  • 2 2
 @DavidGuerra: you sound like a guy that snorts meth out of Christian Hosoi. Ass
  • 2 2
 @tobiusmaximum: sorry you don't understand my statement that skateboarding takes way more skill than mountain biking. How much blacker and white can I make it.
  • 2 2
 @DavidGuerra: www.pinkbike.com/photo/17165274
Does this look like a coffee shop you foolish Pollock? I've been shredding on a skateboard since the 80s get a clue bro. You were probably still a dirty thought in your daddy's mind while I was out cracking Ollie's and grinding your neighbors curb.
  • 3 2
 @pinnityafairy: Way to go! There is at least a bit of skill involved in that. So is it advanced skills that you lack? Or do you not ride mountain bikes? Just trying to make sense of your comments!
  • 2 3
 @pinnityafairy: pretty sure I agreed with you about that (despite having said nothing to the contrary initially, so it was a bit random), but then you went on to pat yourself on the back with some nostalgic self-promotion about shit antique skateboards. Totally unprompted. Hence my next comment. Normally, people read one comment then the next, you know.

You just seem like you want to a) have an argument and b) have your own little parade, just for you and your ‘skills.

I’ll give you the heads up, nobody gives a shit how long you’ve been skating or how good you think you are.
  • 2 1
 @tobiusmaximum: well written, lol. Exactly, not 1 shit.
Cheers bloke.
  • 54 0
 Awesome! That’s winter sorted all for just $1145 dollars!!
  • 1 2
 hahaha I like it. Its funny though the vast majority of ppl in the northwest spend less to go golfing in Arizona which is were they end up or Mexico
  • 13 2
 Not gonna lie, my $50 Columbia rain jacket held its own for a 1.5 hr ride in Cumberland on Vancouver Island in January. I wouldn't spend 279 usd for that
  • 8 3
 No, it's not worth spending $279 for one rainy ride, but for a jacket that should last multiple season it's not completely unreasonable, especially if you live somewhere like the Pacific Northwest. The prices listed here are all full retail - a little internet sleuthing should help you find less expensive options.
  • 2 0
 @gunners1 having good technical gear is what makes living in the PNW a year round enjoyable venture outside. True waterproof durable items will last years and become cheap on a per use basis. I understand budgetary constraints, but if you have the money, you’re selling yourself short with cheaper items. Gore-Tex Items cost a lot in part because a singular manufacturer and patent, but it’s really good stuff.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Yeah I grew up on the Island but I still wouldn't use a goretex jacket for mtn biking as it gets covered in dirt mud etc and takes a beating when you slip on roots into trees etc. That amount of money for somthing thats going to get destroyed to me isn't worth i. I usually do a couple of rides a week normally. As for gore tex jackets, the Arcteryx stays at home for ski days. Using it for that it'll last longer as there would be less ware and tare on it from the ski hill
  • 5 0
 In the PNW, I've yet to find a rain jacket that didn't make me just as wet from sweating as it would prevent rain from getting in. The "breathability" of Gore-tex is not nearly sufficient for high output activities. What's the ticket? Are there any new like soft shells out there that do the job better for any situations other than outright downpours?
  • 3 0
 I've found that having a jacket with large enough pit zips just lets the steam out while still keeping you dry. I love my OR Foray jacket with zips that go all the way down both sides from the elbow to waist
  • 3 0
 I don’t live in the PNW. But after sweating it out in many different rain jackets, I’ve had a real good experience with the Black Diamond Stretch Rain Shadow. Even though it’s supper waterproof, the stretch material is so light that it doesn’t give you that humid garbage bag feel. The pit zips help, too.
  • 1 0
 I’m with you on this jefe, an so are 8/10 guys I ride with. I can sweat out a basic shirt, much less a waterproof jacket. The joy of long, slow climbs.
  • 1 0
 Pit zips all the way. No matter how breathable a fabric is, I think I sweat faster than it can escape through the waterproof membrane. Actual holes that let steam out is key, and rain doesn't really get in.
  • 1 0
 @zachwinston: Sounds like a good idea. Like a poncho that zips up for the downhills.
  • 5 0
 It's a pity you couldn't post a picture of the part of the Dakine pants that you had issues with - I never understand why it is so hard to ensure pictures are relevant to text.
  • 3 0
 Gore stuff is good quality, but the sizing is way out for most people. Also, I don't really see the point in a hood on a cycling jacket. How often are you going to really use it. They just get in the way, I always proffered to put a small Gore-tex hat under my helmet.
  • 5 0
 I like hoods mainly because they make the jacket usable in a non-cycling setting. If you’re going to spend that much in a jacket, it’s nice to be able to use it for other things.

In this case, the hood can fit under a helmet if it’s really dumping and doesn’t get in the way very much at all.
  • 1 0
 Recently bought a Patagonia Techface hoody jacket for riding which has an over the helmet hood. I've worn it about 10 times so far but only once on the bike!
  • 2 0
 Shimano MW7 shoes “waterproof”?!? Not since the very first ride, they wet out from the toes first and you end up with a lake inside by end of really wet rides. The water is warm mind you, and the shoes are otherwise very well fitting and high performance. Too bad the Goretex doesn’t actually keep the foot dry, but it is otherwise warm and comfy.
  • 11 0
 The holes at the front just !at the water in?

Living in the UK I have no idea why virtually all cycling shoes have mesh or holes in the front/ for area
  • 3 2
 Also $275, lol, I’ll just buy a couple pairs of waterproof socks and change mid ride
  • 7 0
 @Kimbers: It actually doesn't matter if there are hole or not as typically membrane lined shoes have sort of a membrane "inner sock" that provides the waterproofness. You could even argue that having holes will help with shedding whatever water comes in and helps get rid of the transpiration that passes through the membrane.

@OnTheShore if the membrane doesn't keep the water outside it should be sent back for warranty. As much as Goretex membrane are evil for the planet, you have to admit that they perform very well and over and extended period of time. If they are properly implemented mind you, so reading this is surprising and really makes me think of a quality control issue which should have been solved by warranty. If you didn't bother complaining that's another problem.
  • 3 0
 Seal the cleatholes with gorilla tape.
  • 3 0
 @Kimbers: Endura over shoes and Marino socks would be my call for British weather your feet still get wet but at least they stay relatively warm. just get some warm glove too so your hands are warm enough to take the over shoes off when you get home...
  • 1 0
 @Bungalow-bikes: Unfortunately there's no overshoes for flat pedal shoes. Nevertheless I'll try some this winter and will see how long the rubber band will last...
  • 4 0
 Are you sure it's water and not sweat? If so, every Gore-Tex product has a lifetime guarantee on waterproofness. Return it and demand a new pair.
  • 2 0
 @yoobee: That's why you need some VAUDE AM Moab Mid STX ! You're German how don't you know that ?!
  • 2 0
 @Bungalow-bikes: Merino socks are the answer to all wet weather riding - I'll never use anything else. Also going to try duct tape over the laces of my 5 ten impacts next wet ride.
  • 1 0
 Since basically no shoe company can make a proper waterproof shoe I don't know why someone doesn't just accept that the shoe will get wet and make something similar to a wetsuit boot. Let the foot get wet but keep water in, it warms up and you have a comfortable foot all ride.
  • 1 0
 @Balgaroth: Thanks! Really didn't know Vaude is making shoes. And I was searching for GTX and Goretex, not STX ;-)
  • 2 1
 @wildedge586: Well, ok... the question is - does the rubber last longer than a rubber band? It also gets punched by the rear pedal pins. And 50€ for some neoprene and rubber is a darned cheek.
  • 3 0
 @yoobee: ENDURA MT500 PLUS is your answer.
  • 2 0
 @cermo: Yep that's what i use with my clip less shoes, they are way too hard to take on and off and I feel like they will break some day soon, because of this... but the extra warmth they provide on a long ride in winter, out ways the faff.
  • 1 0
 @Kimbers: Exactly!

Why not AM-9 shoes without mesh/holes and maybe a bit higher ankle cuff. Would suit very well for wet weather riding...
  • 1 0
 Pretty stoked on buying these for Calgary winters... so far they've been too hot for anything warmer than -10C.
  • 1 0
 @Kimbers: or big spongy bits that soak up lots of water.
  • 1 0
 @Bungalow-bikes: If you can get them, get Bontragers waterproof oversock. One of the best purchases I've made. It keeps your feet dry and gives you the advantage of drying out your shoes more quickly. (I've found that "waterproof" shoes don't dry well.) Throw a pair of merino wool socks on, then your oversocks, and you are set!
  • 1 0
 @yoobee: There is! www.endurasport.com/MT500-Plus-Overshoe/p/bE1154

I haven't tried these yet. But I'm very curious about them.
  • 1 0
 @Vertti83: Any Shimano AM9 shoe prior to 2017 had no holes on the toe or flap. Still no idea why they made slits in the lace cover and tons of holes in the toe box in 2018. The AM7 is their enduro shoe and if people want breathable could have just left that shoe airy.

My old AM9's are perfect for fall/winter/spring. Sure, a creek crossing or big puddle can spray your leg and let the water down in the shoe, but your feet stay warm because the water and wind aren't running right across them. I'm gonn slap a piece of gorilla tape on the toe box of my 2018 AM9's and see how cold I can go.

Irony is I have a pair of Salomon trail running shoes that are waterproof and they make them with a name brand GTX membrane and a cheaper brand. They cost a whopping $135. MTB shoe makers rip us off all day.
  • 1 0
 Cheap option - try 2 pairs of socks and you'll never look back, particularly if one of the sets is wool. Yes your feet get wet, but they also stay warm... Worth a try rather than spend it on some winter specific shoes for those cheapskates out there!
  • 1 0
 @Kimbers: So interesting how places manage trails differently. All of our trails close when it rains to minimize impact, so I never get to ride in the rain. And as the French would say, its been raining like a pissing cow.
  • 1 0
 @SvenNorske: We'd never ride. Pisgah is only a few inches short of being designated a rain forest.
  • 2 0
 FiveTen Freerider ELC + long waterproof socks ftw. The page cover keeps most of the water out. Of course, if your stand in a puddle, the shoes will still be wet for your next ride in a week...
  • 1 0
 I like my ELC, I'm on my 2nd pair, but they hold water like a sponge and they have been discontinued and old stock is limited to a few sizes only. The soles also wear through to holes in under 12 months. I'm hoping Adidas Five Ten bring out a new updated version with all the benefits of the soon to arrive Trailcross, with the ELC's lace cover.
  • 1 0
 @Malky79: The OLD Shimano AM9 shoes are the shoes that will keep your feet the driest.Bought 3 pairs before they stopped making them.Glad I did.
  • 7 10
 Waterproof socks is literally dumbest successful idea that outdoor industry has ever put forward. I will stop my foot from getting wet from water, I will instead boil it in my own sweat. Then I will completely ignore the fact that any membrane in the world that is exposed to mechanics like a sock or a glove will get torn and start leaking after only a few times we use them.. Same applies to waterproof jackets for cycling in temperatures above 10C. Good layer of wool that keeps you warm even when soaking wet, any day. How nice is it to bathe in own sweat. Ugh...
  • 3 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I've ridden many times in sub-five degree wet weather in wool socks, and my feet still get cold. Once I started riding with my waterproof Bontrager oversocks I never had the problem. They haven't torn in two winters, and my feet aren't in a pool of sweat after. Love those things!
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: I hear you; I have Reynaud's in my feet (and hands) and my Showers Pass waterproof socks make wet/cold riding a much more tolerable experience
  • 1 0
 @nug12182: I just posted the same further up. I actually want a pair of the black/blue stripe 2017's cause I think they may be a little lighter than my old school black/white stripe ones.
  • 1 0
 In the meantime, I haven't seen grass that green in nearly two years. And there hasn't been enough rain around here to even have the opportunity to go riding in the wet...come to think of it, I've been back to riding for 10 years and I don't think I even own any wet weather riding gear...it hasn't rained enough to warrant it!
  • 1 0
 Not nearly as dry here, I soldi don’t own any wet weather gear. None of it breathes well if you’re a naturally sweaty person. I am, so I don’t bother. Of course I’m not comfortable on the trail until the temps get to 15C or so...
  • 1 0
 Record rains in the US. Trails constantly closed. Crops way behind schedule. Mozzies are huge. On the plus, it looks like a jungle.
  • 1 0
 Hmm... "...the adjustable waist belt was too tight, even when it was in the loosest setting." Seems that the Thrillium pants might be for me if that's the case. With long legs and slim waist its really hard sometimes to find long enough riding pants that I could use without modifications.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer Why not extend the belt rather than cutting it off? Also those Giro zippers look awkward - weird placement.
  • 2 0
 @endlessblockades, there wasn't really a way to extend it - the webbing was too short.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer would love to see some flat-pedal shoe options in this list. The Five Ten ELC and Primaloft EPS (mentioned above) are discontinued) and the new Gore-Tex Trailcross don't come out until next August. I think the 45nrth Japanther is discontinued as well. I just got a pair of Vaude Moab AM STX's which I'm excited about but it took some heroics (OK, not really but it did take some searching and a lot of waiting) to get them to the states.
  • 2 0
 @dolface, I hear you. I’m hoping those GoreTex TrailCross shoes are up to snuff, but you’re right, there aren’t a ton of wet weather specific flat pedal shoes. It seems silly, because if there’s ever a time when running flat pedals makes sense it’s on those super wet and muddy days.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Yep. And as long as I'm wishing for a stuff, how about a Boa flat shoe? I got some Boa Kestrels and they're great. If Five Ten made an insert to fit in the cleat recess (use the cleat mounts to attach it) I would be all over it and they'd likely get publicity lift out of it because how cool would that be!?

They'd probably also increase their addressable market by ~25% for minimal R&D cost.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: I have five ten impact pros (the new model) and they are excellent in wet weather. I can wash em with a hose while they're on my feet and my toes are snug as a bug in a rug. a review for others on those would be sweet.
  • 2 0
 @NWuntilirest, you got it: www.pinkbike.com/news/five-ten-impact-pro-shoes-review.html. They're much better than the old ones in wet weather, but I'd love something more waterproof, maybe with a neoprene gaiter.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: that would be cool. Contrary to popular opinion I like the gaiter design. A gore-Tex impact pro with that gaiter design would be so cool.
  • 3 0
 Just a personal rule, but any garment utilising velcro is a don't-buy. I feel like it's lazy design, and it's almost always what fails first.
  • 1 0
 It doesn't seem to matter how much I spend on winter gear, it all turns into a sponge after about 2 months of riding. Now I buy the cheapest, 1-2 sizes too large, non breathable gear from amazon and replace it when it stops working. That plus a little duct taps has worked out hella well for me.
  • 1 0
 Literally bought a pair of the Thrillium Pants last year and just couldn't wrap my head around how you're going to make a pair of pants that actually fit... and then put a NON REMOVABLE belt in the waist, that's 2 waist sizes smaller than the fit of the pants. I love Dakine gear but damn...
  • 1 0
 I live in colorado in colorado springs. We don't ride trails on rainy days when they come because if we destroy them they will get closed. To use simple green (the HD green one) on your bike dilute 1 part simple green in 4 parts water. Should just barely be green. Waterproof gear doesn't breathe well in high output situations. Get normal gear then cover heavily in a DIY water repellant like nikwax. Put in dryer and you have water resistant clothing for a few dollars. Not quite waterproof more like water resistant also helps keep the cold wind from cutting through the clothes anything else just MTFU. I remember when mtb riders were a tough gnarly bunch. Not just ninnies complaining about gear. 15 yrs ago I rode in a parka in -15°f weather and was fine with my old used coat. Now everyone grow a pair and ride! - rant over you pansies lol
  • 1 0
 Find a closeout lightweight Gore Tex Shell from a local ski shop. I got an OR a few years back on Black Friday for $99. I prefer a ski shell so the hood fits over my helmet rather than under as suggested in the article.

Then do a search for Gore Tex wind pants - best place would be actually Golf sites and the like.

I don't worry too much about my feet as long as I am wearing wool socks and riding with neoprene winter covers.

3mm neoprene surf gloves seem to be the best option for the hands IMO.
  • 1 0
 No mention to the Dirtlej set of suits? Bought the Core Edition past winter and has been the best thing I've bought for Irish weather. Bring hell or high water, you will find me riding no questions asked under any rain or snow and on top of that, the fabric is strong as hell, crashed several times already, no damage at all. And is still waterproof after more than 1k km on it. I use it to commute to my office too.
  • 4 0
 Merino wool socks FTW. Your feet will be wet but warm.
  • 1 0
 I've been using the MW7's ( updated BOA version ) for 10 months, fabulous piece of kit but they do allow water ingress through the cleat bed after a couple of hours in the wet.
  • 1 0
 XM9s keep you warm and dry as long as you don't get water over the top. Best way to ensure that is winter tights with the leg zipper at the back left open and the bottom of the tights splayed over the top of the boots like gaiters. Works a treat.
  • 1 0
 Me scrolling through this article: oh this product looks interesting! *sees price* f*ck that.... oh this product looks interesting! *sees price* f*ck that.... oh this product looks interesting! *sees price* f*ck that....
  • 4 1
 Save some money, water proof sock with normal shoe - end
  • 8 2
 Save even more money by wearing normal socks and MTFU?
  • 2 0
 The price of this gear is one thing, but one crash and no doubt it will all be ripped to shreds.
  • 1 0
 Or ride tight trails with prickly brush.
  • 2 0
 Best winter upgrade is flat pedals. Cleats transfer cold up into your feet. Break out your woolies and reset your goals.
  • 1 0
 Except there isn't a good flatpedal shoe for the winter or slop.
  • 1 0
 5 10 EPS
  • 1 0
 @mlangestromhttps://www.zappos.com/p/five-ten-freerider-eps-black-black-black/product/8731569/color/24150
  • 1 0
 You're gonna get wet sooner later or sweat like a snake in a wagon rott. Keep warm wear big pants and invest in some Marino wool....
  • 1 0
 1l dakine hot laps hip bag, can hide it under a jersey or jacket. Super low profile and you can fit all the stuff you need, phone inc.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, where is my waterproof flat pedal shoe? My feet are ALWAYS cold no matter what sock combo I use. If anyone knows of any, please let me know.
  • 1 0
 I posted earlier - get some Bontrager oversocks. Wear them over Merino wool and you'll be good to go.
  • 1 0
 Madison waterproof trousers and a pair of sealskins, job done for just over 100 quid.
  • 2 0
 Biodegradable Bike Cleaner.... sooo Simple Green for 15x the price?
  • 1 0
 Simple green trashed the finish on my bike. You need to make sure you use the purple one (not the heavy duty stuff).
  • 2 0
 Couple of dog poo bags under your socks.nice dry feet
  • 3 0
 You can find some of those trail side. . . .
  • 2 0
 Where is the water-proof winter flatpedal shoe? :'(
  • 1 0
 You too can be the most pretentiously-dressed dork around with your yellow reflective vest.
  • 1 0
 A fender, shell, and a bunch of wool is all I need to make off-season riding just as fun as summer.
  • 1 0
 To me a pair of waterproof shorts is like a convertible submarine. Doesn’t make much sense.
Get some waterproof pants!
  • 1 0
 They only stay waterproof the cleaner they are and all waterproof pants wear at the crotch fast.
  • 1 0
 What's wrong with a sloppy ride...?
  • 1 0
 That's what I asked her... She said her boyfriend doesn't like it.

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