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Field Test: 2023 Scott Genius ST - Cape Not Included

Dec 7, 2022 at 19:09
by Mike Kazimer  

PINKBIKE FIELD TEST

Scott Genius ST



Words by Mike Kazimer; photography by Satchel Cronk


The new Scott Genius ST was the lightest, longest, and most expensive bike we had on hand for the Whistler Field Test. It's also the only bike that hides a shock in the downtube, the only one with a remote for the shock, and the only one with thru-headset cable routing. In other words, there's a lot to unpack when it comes to this 'Super Trail' bike (Remember, that's Scott's term, not mine. Even though I kind of like it...)

Let's start with the basics. The Genius ST has 150mm of rear travel that's paired with a 160mm fork, and rolls on 29” wheels. The ST 900 Tuned version we tested is the highest end option in the ST lineup at $11,000 USD, but if you wanted to spend even more the Genius 900 Ultimate comes in at one penny under $12,000.

Genius ST 900 Tuned Details

• Travel: 150mm / 160mm fork
• Carbon frame (aluminum options available)
• 63.9° head angle
• 77.2 seat angle
• 440mm chainstays
• Reach: 485mm (L)
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL
• Weight: 30.1 lb / 13.7 kg
• Price: $11,000 USD
• More info: scott-sports.com
The ST version of the Genius places a higher priority on downhill performance compared to the 'regular' Genius, and come with the adjustable headset cups set in the slackest position, along with a piggyback air shock. The function of the Twinloc remote is also different between the two versions – on the ST it's actually supposed to be called TracLoc, and the three modes are Lockout, Ramp Control, and Descend. Ramp Control is essentially like being able to add volume spacers on the fly – it makes it harder to bottom out the shock, a setting that could be useful for jump trails or rougher terrain with bigger hits.

Scott are in the middle of a long-term love affair with integration, as the Genius ST demonstrates. Hiding the shock the down tube is the most obvious example, and it certainly give the bike a distinctive, futuristic look. It's accessed via an easy-to-operate hatch on the downtube, and the air valve has been positioned at the top of the Fox Float X for better access. A built-in sag indicator on the swingarm helps simplify setup, since there's not really an easy way to view the o-ring on the shock like you would with a more conventional design.

photo

The integration continues at the front of the bike, where there's a one piece bar and stem combo from Syncros, with the brake line and dropper post housing running through the headset. There are split spacers to make it a little easier to adjust the handlebar height, but bar roll and stem length aren't adjustable.

The Genius ST's geometry numbers wouldn't be out of place on a modern enduro bike, and there's no reason that this bike couldn't be used for the occasional race. The head angle sits at 63.9-degrees, the seat tube angle is 77.2-degrees, and the chainstay length measures 440mm on all sizes. The reach on our size large test bike measures 485mm.

What does $11,000 USD get you for components? Well, there's a 160mm Fox 36 Factory Grip 2 fork, SRAM X01 AXS wireless drivetrain, Shimano XTR 4-piston brakes, and a set of Syncros Revelstoke carbon wheels. With Maxxis DHRII DoubleDown tires installed our test bike weighed in at 30.1 lb / 13.7 kg.



photo
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Climbing

When a bike has a remote lockout, it's not unreasonable to think that it's there for a reason, and if the Scott had felt extra-soft in the fully open 'Descend' mode I wouldn't have been surprised at all. Except that's not the case – the Genius climbs quite well in the open position, and really the only time that I reached for the remote lever was because I wanted to try it out, not because of any sort of bobbing or wallowing from the bike's back end. The fact that you can't actually see the shock has the additional benefit of making it easier to imagine that it's extra-efficient – as they say, 'out of sight, out of mind.'

The overall handling while climbing feels closer to what you'd expect from a modern enduro bike rather than a snappy trail bike. It feels a little more relaxed and less nimble than the Yeti SB140, for example, especially when faced with tight, slow speed turns. It's not going to be the climber's ultimate trail bike, and it does require a little more effort to get through the really tricky climbs when speeds slow to a crawl, but its light weight and good pedaling manners do make it extremely manageable.

The overall seated riding position was comfortable, which is a good thing considering that it's not easy to change. The integrated stem length is 40mm, and the bars have a 25mm rise, so the numbers are well within the realm of what you'd typically find on a bike like this. The seat tube angle felt appropriately steep too, and gives the bike a similar top tube length to all of the other bikes in this test.


photo

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Descending

Putting any opinions about the Genius' looks and levers aside, this is an excellent descender. It handled the higher speeds and bigger jumps in the bike park without missing a beat, thanks to its geometry and an overall ride feel that's stiff and responsive without being harsh. The reach is a little longer and the head angle is a little slacker than the other four bikes in this test, which help the Genius move towards the front of the pack when things get faster and steeper. The fact that it has the most rear travel of the bunch doesn't hurt either – that extra 10 millimeters goes a long way when dealing with knee-deep braking bumps and bombed out berms.

The light weight never felt like a detriment, either – there was plenty of stability on hand, and a smooth ramp up for dealing with bigger hits and hard landings. The Ramp Control mode is easy to activate for trails with more drops and jumps, although it doesn't make a night and day difference. I didn't use it all that much due to how good the bike feels in the full open position, but it's there if you need it.

I put down my second fastest time on the Genius, tied with the Santa Cruz Hightower, and one second behind the Trek. Realistically, all of those bikes are totally capable of going the same speed – there's not one specific trait that makes one inherently faster than the other. The Genius' extra length helps it in the straightaways, but it does require a slightly heavier hand to get it around really sharp turns, although it never felt like a handful.

Scott calls it Super Trail, and I think all-mountain should make a comeback, but no matter what, the Genius is a highly capable, versatile bike, and could be a good fit for tech-savvy riders looking for that elusive 'one bike for everything'.

It's worth mentioning that the Genius isn't the quietest bike due to the housing rattling around in the frame. Additional foam sheathing would help quell the noise, but it'd be nice if there was tube-in-tube housing, especially given how many other features Scott's engineers added to the Genius.

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Pros

+ Very capable descender
+ Light weight helps on the climbs
+ Futuristic looks make it stand out from the crowd


Cons

- Rattling dropper housing inside the large diameter downtube makes a racket.
- Proprietary shock, thru-headset cable routing, and integrated cockpit can make maintenance and setup more time-consuming.




photo
The 2022 Fall Field Test is presented G-Form



Author Info:
mikekazimer avatar

Member since Feb 1, 2009
1,753 articles

244 Comments
  • 365 2
 If they hid the shock in the headset, the evolution would be complete.
  • 129 1
 Don't give Cannondale any new ideas...

vintagecannondale.com/info/headshok
  • 28 11
 that would be some shocking head
  • 62 0
 Alternatively, they could also route the brake cable through the shock.
  • 74 1
 holy crap i just realized there was an entire bike article connected to this comments section
  • 7 0
 @pisgahgnar: I've been waiting for the moment to insert an internal-cable-routing-through-the-Headshok joke for a while. This is as close as I'll get.
  • 3 0
 @pisgahgnar: it's fine.. gravel it's the industry recycle now.
  • 9 0
 Surely the evolution will only be complete once the whole bike is integrated into the headset?
  • 2 0
 YES and NO. The drivetrain it's still exposed.
  • 1 0
 @wbro74: unicycle?
  • 250 2
 I like how you guys combined 3 cons into one so there wouldn't be more cons than pros.
  • 78 0
 And how "absolute nightmare" became "more time consuming"
  • 22 0
 They didn't even mention that the internal shock hinders your ability to run longer droppers or slam the one that comes on it...
  • 27 4
 "looks amazing but high maintenance PITA" only works if you are going to f*ck it
  • 13 0
 @Padded: most nightmares probably last shorter than maintenance on this bike
  • 4 1
 @Padded: and how to solve the con of rattling housing that could be solved easily with foam damping also involves the absolute nightmare that requires you to pretty much completely dismantle the bike.
  • 4 0
 @Padded: You're already spending 11k on a bike. It's going to be your mechanics nightmare (and job security)
  • 1 0
 @Padded: True that. In fact, one of the points (cockpit setup) is pretty much impossible without buying expensive parts vs just "time consuming". And one of the pros is "it looks nice" lol.
  • 15 3
 @Hayek: How-to install dropper housing foam liner on a Genius in 10 minutes:
You need:
- Foam liner
- Possibly a new cable if the old one is frayed
- An open mind for new designs

Press the button on the cover to access the huge service opening in the down tube. Disconnect cable. Grab cable and pull it down from the seat tube so that end comes out the hole. Slide foam tube over the housing up the down tube. Grab the housing, insert it through the guide hole next to the shock and up the seat tube. Install and tighten cable back in place.

While not everything is super convenient on these new bikes, dropper cable and shock remote cable replacement/work actually is quite easy. It's really nice not having to remove the bottom bracket for anything except to actually replace the bottom bracket.
Either way it was strange to see this problem in the review since all cable housing is supposed to come with foam liners from factory as far as I know, and has been doing so since a couple of years.
  • 101 3
 It's got unforgivable routing. It rattles. Where's the goddamned shock? It's so expensive. I FOR ONE would never buy it. But my god, I find it to be a truly beautiful bastard.
  • 11 1
 Hidden shock is nice for keeping it out of the mud and snow, those epic dust days and so on. The cables though… hard pass.
  • 27 0
 don't forget the integrated stem/bars. Zero adjustability in one of the areas where you actually want some adjustability. Hard pass from me.
  • 1 0
 @thebradjohns: quick sell it and you get enough spares...
  • 1 1
 @smartyiak: OMG! this is a detonation...
  • 3 2
 I thought I loved the look of it too, until I saw it in person. It is an ugly bike up close. I feel like all these shots are of an air brushed model. In reality it has acne scars.
  • 2 0
 @yourrealdad: Matte black always looks awful and so does that accent colour. It couldn't be much worse. I don't know what they were thinking.
  • 113 20
 I am reading the comments thinking “wow based on bikes coming out with headset cable route no one will ever buy a bike again”.

Then I realize, all these commenters weren’t ever going to buy a bike anyways b/c: too expensive, pressfit bb, no bottle cage mount, seattube too tall, not 27.5, mullet, “bad” geo, boost spacing, super boost, not super boost, 35 mm bars, short dropper, chainstay same length on all sizes, internal rear brake routing, too heavy, e-bikes, 28.99, flip chips, sram, shimano, fox, tire spec, no in frame storage, clevis trunnion shock, carbon wheels, rattling noise, etc.

Basically if doesn’t come stock with: bottle cage mount inside internal storage, internal-external routing options, carbon-alloy frame, full shramo drivetrain, rock fox suspension, 100% non-custom adjustable geo, carboninum tubeless wheels, cushcore tubed dd exo tires, 29lbs, super non-boost spacing, threaded pf bb, fully serviceable by just looking at it wrong, 27.5 and 29 wheels, made in eco-friendly super happy love factory with all local grown ingredients, and less than $2,499.
  • 41 0
 Exactly! Why can't manufactures figure this out???
  • 12 7
 Just the proprietary garbage and headset routing is enough to get almost no one to buy it.
  • 11 0
 All mountain bikes will be subject to some compromise no matter who the buyer is. However, making systems more complicated belies actual improvement. Real genius is found in simplicity. I am no luddite, but the add-ons here do not seem to really improve the bike. The TwinLoc/TracLoc (Tone Loc might be okay, but I digress) alone would make me skip this bike and even the testers barely employed it. Throw in the rat's nest of cables, proprietary stem/bar and no thanks. This is too bad as it is real good looking bike and tbh if you cut all that stuff out, giving it normal shock, headset/stem/bar it would probably be a run away success.
  • 10 0
 @nickfranko:It will be sold out in a month, if not already.
  • 3 0
 @nickfranko: The proportion of PB/Vital users that maintain their own bikes is undoubtedly high, but that doesn't represent the majority of MTB riders. I'd bet most of the people who buy these will be letting the dealer do the work, and there are still more than enough of those customers.
  • 1 1
 @m47h13u: you forgot ugly. Vanity is a Pinkers no1 trait it seems.
  • 1 0
 Perfect comment, Love it, so true.
  • 2 0
 Comments are dependant on which way the wind is blowing that particular day.
  • 1 0
 The best comment I've ever read on PB
  • 65 6
 So for $11k I can get something that looks like an e-bike (aka ugly), is loud and a pain to work on and has proprietary parts, where do I sign up?
  • 65 0
 But look at the benefits - It’s a full second faster than a $4000 bike that doesn’t have all those issues.
  • 4 0
 @CincoBoy: Indeed! And those timed runs mean nothing anyway ...
  • 14 0
 You almost forgot that there's basically zero adjustment of your hbar, stem stack and a comically bad, bordering on offensive, left hand series of levers. Hot garbage.
  • 2 0
 @93EXCivic yep agree, it’s not Redalp-level ugly but it still hit a few branches on the way down…
  • 7 5
 Everything about this bike bothers me so damn much that I MIGHT feel forced to heckle anyone I see actually riding one. And frankly anyone buying 11K bicycle regardless of personal wealth deserves a wedgie, or worse, whatever that might be. Confiscate their dental tools!
  • 40 2
 What is the point of internal routing or headset routing if it is still noisy, might as well get external and save yourself some time working on it.
  • 16 0
 External cable routing with an internally mounted shock - I’m not sure where Scott would put the twinloc cable, but I am sure it’d be weird
  • 6 0
 For the same reason Apple or Samsung or Google or whoever make their smartphones out of glass.
  • 6 0
 Want In-tube cable routing and down tube storage? Just add 2k to next years model
  • 1 0
 My question would be if you open up the shock access port can you stuff in some foam to stop the rattle or do you have to go through the steerer tube for that.
  • 33 2
 the road riders mountain bike
  • 22 1
 I wonder how much it would cost to take this to the bike shop for a full annual service, compared to a normal bike with normal cable routing, normal shock placement etc. Theres a lot of extra complexity for no performance gain here...
  • 5 18
flag CM999 (Dec 12, 2022 at 7:46) (Below Threshold)
 The same as any other bike as I do it myself. Even at a shop why would it cost more? If its an annual service then I would expect them to be bleeding the brakes as part of the service
  • 13 18
flag Muscovir FL (Dec 12, 2022 at 8:15) (Below Threshold)
 I recently talked to a friend of mine (bikeshop owner) about this question - wheter cable routing through the headset would increase maintenance cost.

His answer was that headset cable routing will add about 15 minutes onto a full service, at the very worst. There wouldn't be any difference in cost for a full service compared to any modern bike that doesnt route the cables through the headset. He also has been selling the Scott Spark with headset routing for over a year now and says they don't see any meaningful decrease in the lifespan of the headset bearings.
  • 22 4
 @Muscovir: Unless the service happens to include swapping a headset bearing.....
"Started selling a year ago" is also no meaningful time frame for headset longevity.
  • 55 2
 @Muscovir: I have a friend that owns a ford dealership. He told me fords are the most reliable cars.
  • 9 0
 @Muscovir: I’m pretty sure this also depends on where you live. And by that I mean how much it rains and how humid the air is. My colleague bought the latest Spark which has the very same cabling solution in July, and he had to replace the upper bearing already in October. Sample size of one, but I’d still consider it a strong case against this solution in the area I live.
  • 7 3
 @kcy4130: Nah, mate. That guy obviously wasn't your friend.
  • 4 1
 It would cost so much the shop would feel guilty and not charge you what they should based on the time spent. Someone has to pay for it and it will be the shops and the people who work in them mostly. A lot of riders don't understand how long it takes to do good work as it is.
  • 5 6
 @Ttimer: He is the owner and title sponsor of a racing team which has the Spark as their race bike. There isn’t really any better test for longevity and durability.
  • 6 0
 I get that going a full teardown isn't going to be affected by headset routing as much, but the issue is that ANY work, no matter how small, has a high potential to end up being a full tear down since you have to cut/bleed the brakes for any number of small adjustments.
  • 9 1
 @Muscovir: Your friends shop doesnt charge extra money for a service that takes extra time? Why ever not?

I wonder if it has anything to do with the fact that he sells Scott bikes, and doesn't want people to be put off by the added complexity for no performance benefit.
  • 2 0
 @gabriel-mission9: I imagine some shops charge by the hour where some other shops charge by the task. For routine things, charging by the task is a lot easier in many ways for the customer as well as the shop. If I owned the shop and we billed per task for routine maintenance, I would not add an extra charge for the extra 15 min, but it would come into my decision making when I consider where the costs should be for each of task in accordance with how much time it was taking my mechs to complete. That cost consideration and charge shift is going to happen quarterly, annually, or whatever the owner feels is appropriate.

Your comment about people being put off from buying a Scott bike if they charge more for maintenance is legit. But if the shop is making more money selling Scott bikes than they are losing money by ignoring the occasional extra 15 min it takes to service, it seems a decent business decision to me?
  • 15 1
 Is YETI now doing Scott -not sure they want to give you more information? See table in article.

What I would like to see is this Bike with:
1) Yeti Switch Infinity - hidden of course
2) Flight Attendant - also hidden - on the fork too
3) NO foam to save weight - but include monogramed earplugs
4) A factory program/ap to determine your bar height and no adjustability once purchased
5) A new rear derailleur that also required bleeding through the same headset bearing (maybe a rotor), and finally
6) use an older model Reverb - once again through the headset
  • 15 2
 I'd like it noted that PRO ENDURO RACERS in the polling, liked their HTA around 64-64.5 on average it seemed. Our trail bikes now have 63-64* HTAs in many cases. What are we doing?
  • 11 0
 I thought the same thing when they were saying the Yeti SB140 had too steep of a HTA at 65. To me, that's spot on for a trail bike.
  • 10 1
 We are not pro reacers so we dont need their headset angles
  • 8 0
 @Benjamin97: Just seems like bikes today are being made for the straight up, straight down crowd. It's even noted in some of the reviews that the steep STAs can be tough on the wrists on "mellow" terrain.
  • 15 2
 In order to ride this bike I feel like it's a requirement to shave your legs and wear full lycra - no loose fitting shorts allowed
  • 12 1
 Sweet! Over ten grand for a noisy bike, with something called a syncros duncan dropper, that looks like an ebike. So futuristic.
  • 12 0
 wired anything (dropper) (shock), and resultant cable rattle is unacceptable on bikes costing this much
  • 16 6
 Now THAT is an ugly bike. Go through the pain in the tuchus of headset routing purely for aesthetic, then go and put that dump truck a$$ on it?!
  • 12 0
 10/10 would follow cheesy with levy
  • 1 0
 11/10 would also follow.
  • 2 0
 Just bought the domain
  • 8 0
 In no way do I support the thru headset cable routing on this bike, but the value of the Scott compared to the Santa Cruz Hightower is worth noting. Even with the Scott selling for $1,200 more, you get a factory fork, carbon cranks, XO1 AXS shifter/derailleur, XO1 carbon cranks, XTR brakes vs G2 Rs, and you don't have to deal with trying to sell/service a non-AXS reverb either.

I am insulted by what Santa Cruz expects people to pay.
  • 11 2
 I think "Futuristic look" should be in the Con column, because that huge bloated bottom bracket area makes it look like an e-bike.
  • 9 3
 I had a 2017 Scott spark. Cool bike but noticeable bobbing under powers during climbing so the lockout lever to me was a GREAT idea. Fast forward to my latest bike with a split pivot suspension and more travel (salsa blackthorn), and it climbs better than my previous Scott did even semi locked out. It feels like the lockout levers are a solution to a problem that really shouldn't exist too much anymore with good suspension kinematics, or if you're Nino and need every last watt of power possible to win the championships.
  • 6 0
 If I remember correctly the Sparks were running around 80% antisquat, would love to hear the reasoning to why but it apparently works just fine for Nino though. I have 19 Genius which runs above 100% antisquat and immediately noticed it on first ride, but I still use the hell out of the Twin-loc. I'd still prefer remote on shock (but not fork).
  • 4 0
 The idea behind the twin lock is that the kinematics can be optimized for descending because the shock takes care of climbing efficiency. According to the review, this works very well for this bike at least.
  • 7 0
 Perhaps proof that bikes designed to win races are not always the most enjoyable/practical/effective solution outside the racecourse? What works for Nino may not really apply to the rest of us.

Scott has always been about the 'Win on Sunday, Sell on Monday' brand identity, (don't get me wrong, there will always be value in selling pro tech and image) but I do think more cyclists across all disciplines are starting to embrace fun bikes that work well for them.
  • 10 0
 7:30
"Nice stiff package"
  • 5 0
 Not going to lie... love the idea of twin lock, but is it 'twin lock' if it doesn't lock the Fork?

Reminds me of the old school Fox CTD - or with the Brain when I had it on my old Camber - though was a pain to service, I loved.

I liked the old Genius - truly a long legged trail bike, or a short one with the flick of a switch. A buddy of mine set some of the best KOMs up at West Bragg with this bike and he attributes the twin lock to giving him 'XC' like liveliness on the climbs.

This bike is truly a once size fit all, without relying on a 'tune' to do it all. A little manual intervention gives you truly a bike that covers almost all gaps and all terrain
  • 3 0
 They call it "TracLoc" on the ST bike for that reason.
  • 7 1
 - Proprietary shock, thru-headset cable routing, and integrated cockpit can make maintenance and setup more time-consuming.


What does the word "can" mean to you? I think we're safe to edit from "can make" to "makes" .
  • 5 0
 I think Scott is just trying to set themselves apart. With geo finally settling out, and mid-grade components performing beyond high level rider expectations... there are a lot of really good bikes available.

How does a manufacturer compete? They add their unique design language. This bike and many in Scott's lineup that carry this design language will appeal to some (most likely a small minority), and they will sell a few bikes for that reason alone (looks different, looks futuristic, looks clean).

The maintenance bros (of which Im a member) will gripe about service complexity, but the majority of bikers dont perform their own work... It even seems that this PB group is 50/50 on self-service.
  • 7 1
 I had the spark. Cable rattle was worst I’ve ever seen on a bike. Might not bother some people but that was over 7k and sounded like a schwinn from target going down the trails. Sold after 2 months.
  • 9 0
 michael scott no . gif
  • 11 3
 This is a disaster on wheels.
  • 3 0
 It's inconceivable that anyone who knows better would buy a bike where you can't adjust the stem height and/or length without a huge mechanical hassle and/or buying super expensive new parts. I'm constantly adjusting bar height depending on the terrain, how long I'm riding, how my back feels. Bikepacking trip one height, lift day different, cross country trip to Bend different.

Who are the buyers happy with one bar position from the factory?
  • 1 0
 People with heaps of coin that don't realise these parts are replaceable to make the bike more suitable for intended use.
  • 3 0
 The internet has ruined me.... Every time I see them talk about his bike I think of the well-known 'genius' meme (but I guess that works with through headset cable routing)... www.shorturl.at/oLZ67
  • 5 3
 Would have like to have seen a climbing time with the shock locked out. Also, Scott had plenty of room for in frame storage in that downtube in front of the shock. Got to carry your stuff somewhere and I don't do packs any longer. That was a missed opportunity. Cool bike though.
  • 5 8
 I agree one hundred percent. In frame storage is on the same level as the ability to fit a full size water bottle.
  • 7 1
 @TerrapinBen: Exactly, of zero use to some riders, especially those who care about bike weight.
  • 8 12
flag HeatedRotor FL (Dec 12, 2022 at 8:50) (Below Threshold)
 "got to carry your stuff" no, no i dont.

it maybe matters to the less than 0.05% who go on multi mega hour rides in the alps... otherwise its pointless.

Ive owned a few bikes now with storage an never ever considerd using it
  • 19 2
 @HeatedRotor, wait, why wouldn't you consider using in-frame storage, especially if your bike has it? It's pretty handy to be able to toss a flat repair kit inside the frame and not need to think about it until you need it.
  • 9 2
 @mikekazimer: probably not the best idea to engage with craziness.
  • 5 1
 @HeatedRotor: We've had different experiences and I too am unable to go on 'mega hour rides in the alps.' Walking 8 miles in clipless shoes sucks, especially when a simple tool could have had you going again. Tire plug kits, salt tabs, a multitool, CO2, spare derailleur, etc. It's all came in handy at one point or the other.
At the least Scott should have provided a tool mount on this bike.
  • 5 0
 Walking out sucks, walking out carrying your bike sucks more. Walking out carry your bike and having the time to think about how this was a preventable with some basic tools and supplies. Priceless. @SunsPSD:
  • 5 10
flag EricHarger (Dec 12, 2022 at 10:29) (Below Threshold)
 I view in frame storage as a sales gimmick. No real value and just increases complexity in frame design.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Surely an Australian field test coming soon?
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: you honestly don’t need to carry a flat kit if you ride DD or DH casing tires.

*instantly gets double flat on next ride for making this post*
  • 1 1
 @mikekazimer: I dont get flats so why would i need one? The EWS guys say its just a pain to try remove stuff from most of them.

Id rather the frame be lighter etc than worry about inframe storage, Canyons idea works perfect.
  • 5 0
 Like a high-maintenance "instagram model", this bike is best savored from a distance.
  • 2 0
 I'd actually love to ride a Scott bike for a while. I always thought the Ransom was really intriguing. I don't much care about shock lockouts, but there it changes the pedaling position enough that I think it would be useful for where I ride. They're always super light for their travel category. They usually have aluminum options.

Now would I like to actually own one? Questionable. All the tech tricks that I think would be fun to try make me skeptical of them long term, but if I had tons of money and lots of bikes, I'd grab one.
  • 3 1
 Could the shock inside a sealed box cause issues with over-heating/reduced performance if you're riding hard somewhere hot? Is there airflow/cooling around the shock and if so how do you then clean out all the dust and muck that would get in there?
  • 2 0
 Now, not to be judgy or anything but I think they could've tried a bit more with their review:

1) A rattling dropper housing is a really easy thing to fix, even with the integrated headset cable routing. I mean, last year on the dh test they even tried using different shocks to eek out the most performance out of a bike, and by that I mean the tester/s not just riding the test bike as it comes out of the box and not fixing a well simple issue with it, but fixing it, seeing if it improves the riding but still noting it in the review.
Not to be mistaken I am not a fan of the through headset cable routing. It can make a simple enough task annoying, even more so on a e-bike which has even more cables.

2) You can fit most shocks in the Genius, it has a standard 185x55 trunnion mount. On a video from scotty laughland you can actually see a fox x2 fitted in a polished alu cutaway frame.

3) The one piece bar/stem integrated combo is only on the top end carbon 900 and 910 models, the alu ones (which are the ones that are going to sell the most) get a more conventional setup, it still has a "proprietary" stem but you can get different lengths (40mm to 60mm) at a scott dealer also, a normal stem fits, you just need to play around with the spacers you get in the box (you get a lot extra) and remember to use the plastic hood thing to hide the cable entry.

Love the reviews but I think simple issues and/or bike fitting are resolved by riders themselves or the mechanics putting these bikes together arent cons? I dunno, just my two cents..
  • 3 0
 Is the geometry change in climb mode not really helping when things get steep? I liked this improved body position when I rode the previous model.
  • 6 3
 To all the headset cable routing haters; two words: hinged headset spacers.



And hinged:

Dust Seal

Compression Ring

Top Bearing

Front Triangle.
  • 5 0
 Hinged front triangle would allow for some impressive storage capability inside the frame. Imagine how impressed people would be when you opened it up.
  • 1 0
 @HelterSeltzer: You could store roof trusses in there!!!!! Just slowly transport all the lumber to your house via Scott Genius.
  • 2 0
 I thought you were serious and then I saw the hinged bearing. Bravo sir. Comment of the thread.
  • 4 0
 let's just weight the pros and cons, Cons are much more important then the pro here considering the market, neeeext!
  • 3 0
 I think that @mikelevy might be trying to get a Monster sponsorship with the smooth rotation to bring the label into the picture during the intro
  • 5 0
 That's probably a bike for Batman, not for me.
  • 5 0
 Shame they couldn't put a Trust fork on it to really sell the theme.
  • 9 0
 Poor Alfred having to maintain it.
  • 3 0
 Not the bike we need, but the bike we deserve.
  • 3 0
 More bikes in this range for an all mountain field test, please. You can call it super trail if that makes everyone feel ok about it.
  • 4 0
 Im surprised not pictures with that door open to show the shock and schematic diagram.
  • 5 0
 So far, the Norco Fluid is winning this battle.
  • 2 0
 The shock is custom made for Scott but it's not propietary, the size is standar and if you want to change it it's not a big deal. The shock on the Trek Supercaliber is propietary, if it breaks it's a huge problem...
  • 2 0
 If the evolution continues, pretty soon we can run the entire bike internally, just leave it in the box and it'll never get dirty or need rebuilding. Hell, think how much easy set up would be!
  • 6 2
 30.1lbs is seriously light for a bike of it's size with dd tires. Looks awesome.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer @mikelevy All the controversial stuff aside, as I understand it the bike comes with or has available headset cups for 3 different head angle positions, and was tested in the slackest.

Did you try any of the other positions?

It would have been great to see how the bike livened up in the slow stuff with one of the steeper settings, and would have made a more apples to apples comparison to the other bikes on test.
  • 1 0
 I can understand why (especially) Scott builts a bike like this. There is for sure a market for it, and it caters to their typical consumer-type.

But for Heaven's sake, can it please be, that a capable trail bike, affordable for a teenager (who works for it) and easily serviceable, becomes the norm again?

- old man, who used to repair everything, until he had no time for it anymore -
  • 2 0
 Noisy cables?! One of you PB writers -- maybe Travis? -- said it best: If a mfg can't make a quiet bike in this day and age, they might as well turn out the lights on the way out the door.
  • 1 0
 While I'm opposed to all the proprietary crap all over this bike, that's because I like to maintain my own bikes. Scott would not have made this bike unless they understood the types of people they want to sell it to. The target customer for this bike is not the home mechanic type. They will happily send it back to the shop every few weeks to get the chain lubed and other simple things done.
  • 5 1
 Lightest bike but heaviest for your paycheck.
  • 8 0
 PaycheckS
  • 2 0
 Im riding a Canyon Spectral AL 7 with the same shock, and 150mm Pike deluxe, Hunt aluminum wheels, and my bike weighs 30.5lbs. Not sure I even understand how the two bikes can be this close in weight.
  • 3 0
 My heavy wallet was always holding be mack
  • 2 0
 Now that we have Super Trail, the new money is gonna be figuring out what's between trail and super trail... and super trail and enduro. Race starts now
  • 4 0
 Going to be confusing when other manufacturers used ST for short travel. Like the stumpjumper ST.

But maybe it will bring RST forks into their own. Rugged Super Trail! 152 to 157mm of rear travel.

Also, RST seems to have a stem shock with a lockout that Scott maybe could integrate into their Twinlock system for more complexity and cables to hide.

rstsuspension.com/product/stem-shock
  • 4 0
 MM =Most Mountain; not quite All Mountain?
  • 3 0
 @woofer2609: not to be confused with the Many Mountain segment. Most Mountain being for riding most of any mountain. Many Mountain being for riding many but not all of the mountains.
  • 3 1
 Wait til those new shimano and sram brakes land designed specifically for this routing. Super clean look for those who can cope
  • 2 0
 @cedric-eveleigh: If this bike had your Supre Drivetrain, it would complete the look. That would be soooo cool. Just imagine...
  • 3 0
 Ok I am just going to come out and be the first one to say it. I think maybe perhaps bikes are getting to expensive?
  • 3 0
 Wait....Adjustable headset cups.....and through the headset cable routing? Now there's a match made in purgatory.
  • 3 0
 Completely dissemble bike to adjust headset angle! Easy!!!
  • 2 0
 I wonder if the shock will be more reliable, or at least have a longer service interval, given it's tucked away from the dust and grime?
  • 3 3
 Yet another problem with hiding the shock: Easily checking the air pressure. Sure it's got a hatch but I don't want to take it apart every time I need to check the psi which is every ride. The ambient air temp changes the shock pressure by several pounds and I check it for each ride when I get to the trail. On any other bike this is an easy step. Not here.
  • 3 2
 No need to change psi when ambient air temperature changes as the entire riding environment changes too.
  • 6 0
 I think you're over-thinking this
  • 2 0
 Sounds like it's time for a coil shock
  • 1 0
 So, as much as I like the looks... without all the integration and twinlock this bike would have been even lighter, less expensive and performing just as good as it does now?
Sign me up for one of those.
  • 2 0
 access hatch opens with a little button, is there no chance a rock would hit this? also, 11:40 needs to be made into a looping gif
  • 1 0
 lol. I wish I wasnt so lazy or I would do it. Someone needs to do this!
  • 1 1
 I don't think it was a fair test for some of the bikes. The bikes were tested in Whistler, the kind of terrain where you want nothing less than a full on enduro bike. The most downhill oriented bikes in terms of geometry and suspension will take the win. Now i'd like to see a proper enduro bikes testing in this same terrain, bikes like the yeti sb160, santacruz megatower, pivot firebird, trek slash, specialized enduro, etc.
  • 10 0
 We made it clear that we took the bikes on appropriate terrain - not all of the trails in Whistler point straight down, and there are plenty of options that are ideal for modern trail bikes.
  • 3 1
 How do they keep it so light compared to other brands models? Even fully enclosing the shock, are they less durable?
  • 3 2
 Not all heroes wear capes. My 7 yo son says his back hair acts as a cape, but has the advantage of not getting caught in things.
  • 9 0
 Are you raising a werewolf?
  • 4 0
 @mikekazimer: Now that you mention it, he does resist putting the silverware in the dishwasher...I'll keep an eye on him next full moon.
  • 4 0
 No.
  • 4 2
 Muted auto play video while I’m browsing on my phone. Thanks for eating 2gb of my data. Dick move pinkbike.
  • 2 0
 MIkes', we need a 150 travel Super Trail shootout! The SJEvo, the Genius ST, etc.
  • 3 0
 "hey bro,nice hardtail!!"
  • 2 1
 t's a Bimbo-bike. The outside looks good, but the inside is stupid.

(Loose cable routing, proprietary shock, through headset routing, etc.)
  • 1 0
 The one thing that really bothers me about this bike is the external routing of the front brake cable. It just looks odd in context.
  • 2 1
 I used to only run over ebikes at the trailhead, I will expand that to include this ugly monstrosity. I now only run over ebikes and whatever you call this at the trailhead.
  • 1 0
 go away horrible person
  • 2 0
 @Theonelazarus: aha haha I'm just messing no but for real
  • 2 0
 @Theonelazarus: just ebikes although that whatever bike it is might just get mistaken for an ebike and then.. well.. who knows
  • 2 0
 If I had this bike, I'd run it rear brake-only. That pesky front hose is really hurting the aesthetic.
  • 3 0
 Which bike is the “climbers trail bike”?
  • 3 2
 They changed the font design of TUNED so it no longer looks like TURD. What a shame, I liked the TURD.
  • 2 0
 For full integration, just add TQ motor
  • 2 0
 Now if only their customer service wasn't complete crap!
  • 1 0
 Internal shock + headset routing.... I'll buy one just for the privilege of working on it!
  • 2 1
 For me this tests were wrong, you are just looking for the best ENDURO bike...
  • 3 0
 Yeah, this bike is an Enduro bike, not a trail bike. I don't care what Scott says.
  • 2 0
 Looks like you guys have a link to yeti and not to scott.
  • 1 0
 Stroke of genius ! , i see this bike in perhaps few discipline with the right fork and tweaked geometry .
  • 1 0
 There is no mention on the compatibility to upgrade the shock with a Fox X2. Do all sizes accept it?
  • 4 4
 I like it. At this level, I don't give a shit about proprietary this, or hidden that.......the engineers can do whatever they want. This IS a super bike.
  • 1 1
 And you pay for it to be worked on like one.
  • 3 1
 Another huge nope - I’d still go with the Norco.
  • 2 0
 Can you swap the bars and stem and still keep the headset routing intact?
  • 2 0
 The Ultimate is $11,999.99, really? Wtf it’s $12,000.00.
  • 3 1
 Just the lack of adjustability in the cockpit is a deal breaker for me.
  • 1 0
 For the next year no cables needed! Bluetooth 4.0 is coming for the brake system
  • 1 0
 looks like a bold linkin of a bicycle and a space rocket, to much integration for me.
  • 1 0
 They goofed by not going 100% tucked cables and leaving the front brake hose exposed
  • 1 0
 The raw aluminum version of this bike I saw was incredible looking. That’s the one to have.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer, Did you not have an issue with dropper post insertion? Seems like the post is pretty high out of the frame
  • 1 1
 "super" is the new unnecessary word used in every YouTuber's speech, as "like" was 20 years ago. Sigh.
  • 1 0
 Alright, 58 seconds in and I need a double whiskey.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, but the beer goggles are failing miserably.
  • 2 1
 This bike has absolutely zero appeal to me. Interesting
  • 1 4
 Honestly it's a really good looking bike and the weight is impressive. Is it the reported weight with double downs?
But the stem/spacers ruins it - so ugly. If they're going to force internal routing at least make it look good.
  • 3 0
 Yes, the weight is with the DoubleDown control tires.
  • 3 1
 @mikekazimer: That is an insanely light 150/ 160 bike.
  • 3 3
 @SunsPSD: Really? My V2 Ripmo is lighter with similar tires.
  • 1 0
 @dualsuspensiondave: Which also has a very light frame!
  • 3 2
 The shock get hot and over heats mark my words
  • 1 0
 11k doesn't get you a wireless dropper.
  • 2 0
 or a butler
  • 1 1
 Thankfully.
  • 2 1
 double down tyres on a mid travel trail bike? come on.
  • 2 1
 Many an EWS stage has been won on 150mm bikes
  • 2 1
 @Bro-LanDog: not what i was talking about?
  • 1 1
 @HeatedRotor: what were you talking about?
  • 1 1
 @Bro-LanDog: 99% of the genius riders will ride it on non EWS stages... or not even enduro style tracks... so why put a trail bike in this catagory when its not.
  • 1 0
 @HeatedRotor: because it's an enduro bike. Wait till you learn the trails most people ride 200mm dh bikes on...
  • 1 0
 @Bro-LanDog: The genius isnt an Enduro bike lmao. The new ransom will be.

Learn? Learn what? i have no issues riding my Session/giga on anything...

Your blowing this away from what this bike is... Mid travel trail with touches on some enduro geo numbers...
  • 1 0
 @HeatedRotor: 63 deg head angle. 150mm travel. Perfect for a flat midwestern pedal about.
  • 1 0
 @Bro-LanDog: OK, Done with this convo. Your just being a knob for the sake of it.
  • 1 0
 @HeatedRotor: ok. Sorry scotts or pb's tire selection didn't fit your needs, hopefully they get it right the next time with some nice fresh exo's for the canadian Rockies.
  • 1 1
 @Bro-LanDog: The last part of my previous comment just got proven, lol.
  • 2 0
 In Whistler - yes, absolutely, at least on the rear. Even DH casing rear on a trail bike is not unheard of. Lots of rough and pointy things.
  • 1 0
 @nicoli: Guys like vancan who are heavy(similar weight) to me mostly run exo+ at the shore and whistler and dont have an issue.

You guys are missing the point here...
  • 1 0
 @HeatedRotor: your point is there's never a need for heavy tires? Plus weren't you done with this conversation
  • 1 0
 @Bro-LanDog: no, i said for this bike and its mostly ridden places.

with you i was, Todays a new day and i initially wasn't replying to you this time...

I ride everywhere with EXO+ Casing, sensible pressure and no issues, I do run a DD rear on my session and giga at the park... but guess what.. thats at the park and still havnt had a flat... so?

spud comments now.
  • 1 0
 @HeatedRotor: glad your specific anecdote is the end all be all for how people ride 6in travel bikes lmao
  • 3 2
 pig fish sandwich. tuna with bacon.
  • 2 2
 Mt bikes are getting way too complicated.
And since when is 30plus lb lightweight?
  • 2 1
 Seeing the front brake hose makes it unrideable.
  • 1 1
 Someone out there probably mentioned this, but curious how this is getting put into the “trail” category.
  • 2 1
 Too much proprietary crap otherwise nice bike
  • 2 1
 Man this is really the dumbest design they could come up with.
  • 1 1
 or the most genius
  • 1 0
 I do like this bike, if I only could install a regular cockpit
  • 1 0
 my headset doesn't jiggle jiggle. It folds.
  • 1 0
 Price and bar/stem combo is a HUGE CON
  • 1 1
 hint... i guess your link is not really reffering to scott right?
  • 1 1
 This bike is a mechanics worst nightmare
  • 1 0
 More like a shop Mechanic's dream/home Mechanic's nightmare. Much like the auto world moved to cars you have to take to the dealer for maintenance and repair, this bike appears to be a harbinger of that in the bike industry. Of course, direct-to-consumer sales mean that there will be companies making the polar opposite of this.
  • 2 0
 frame, cables, wheels, hmmm bike is a bike is a bike
  • 1 0
 @Theonelazarus: Don't ever underestimate people's desire to overcomplicate their life.
  • 1 0
 No Triple XS?
  • 5 5
 it looks nice
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