First Ride: The 2020 Norco Sight Has an All-Mountain Focus

Oct 28, 2019 at 16:08
by Mike Kazimer  


The name's the same, but the Norco Sight has received a dramatic revision for 2020. Version 4.0 has more travel combined with longer and slacker geometry than ever, which pushes it into territory formerly occupied by the Range. It's still available with either 27.5” or 29” wheels, but the rear travel has been bumped up to 150mm, and there's a 160mm fork up front.

The head angle now sits at 64-degrees, which is a whopping 3 degrees slacker than before, and the reach on a size large is now 485mm, up from 460mm. We'll dive deeper into those numbers in a bit, but the main takeaway is that Sight is an entirely new beast.
Norco Sight Details

• Wheelsize: 29" or 27.5"
• Carbon w/ aluminum chainstays and aluminum frame options
• Travel: 150mm (r) / 160mm (f)
• Chainstay length varies by size
• 64-degree head angle
• Weight: 32 lb (as pictured, size L)
• Complete price: $2,799 - $8,697 USD
• Carbon frame only: $2,899 USD
• Aluminum frame only: $1,649 USD
norco.com

Along with two wheel size options, the Sight is also available with either a carbon or an aluminum frame. There's even a youth Sight, which comes in one size that's intended for groms between 4'9" and 5'2" tall. That bike, which retails for $2,799, has 140mm of rear travel, 27.5" wheels, and suspension that's been tuned for lighter riders.

Norco are calling the Sight an 'all-mountain' bike, a term that's been overshadowed in recent years by the popularity of all-enduro-everything. Given the changes that have been bestowed upon the Sight and the Optic, it'll be very interesting to see what the Range morphs into. There were rumors of an HSP version of that model, but there isn't any official news to report at this time.


Those two bolts under the top tube can be used to mount a tube or tool holder.
There's room for up to a 2.6" rear tire.


Frame Details

The overall look of the Sight hasn't changed too dramatically, but a number of changes were made to fully modernize the new bike. Those changes include shorter seat tubes to provide room for longer travel dropper posts; medium and large sizes are spec'd with 170mm posts, and the XL gets a post with 200 millimeters of drop. There's the requisite room for a full size water bottle inside the front triangle, and there are also two other bolts on the underside of the top tube that can be used to secure a tube or tool holder.

The derailleur, dropper, and brake line are all internally routed through the front triangle, and there's a port on the underside of the downtube that makes it possible to run a zip tie around everything to prevent any unwanted rattling. In addition, the derailleur housing is no longer routed underneath the bottom bracket shell, which means it's less likely to get pinched or smashed. Two rubber pads are affixed to the downtube for extra frame protection, and there's a contoured chainstay protector to minimize chainslap noise.


Norco's 'Ride Aligned' Philosophy

The Sight marks the debut of Norco's new Ride Aligned philosophy, which focuses on four main principles: fit, geometry, suspension, and setup. I'll admit, I tend to cringe a little when I see a trademark symbol attached to a new catchphrase, but in this case Norco's goals are sound – to create bikes that fit a wide range of riders and feel stable and balanced out on the trail.

Fit / Geometry

During the development of the Sight, Norco's designers examined anthropometric data to help them understand where the center of gravity would be for a variety of rider heights. Achieving a balanced bike was the goal here, in order to have a 5'2” rider feel just as centered and in control as a 6'2” rider.

One of the tactics used to attain that balance was giving each bike a different rear center length. In this case, a size small Sight has a chainstay length of 430mm, while an XL's chainstay's measure 445mm. This isn't a new concept for Norco – they've used varying chainstay lengths for years, but this time additional attention was paid to the seat tube angle.

In many cases, seat tube angles tend to get slacker as frame sizes get larger, which isn't exactly ideal – that scenario means that taller riders, who often have more seatpost extension, end up further over the back of their bike than their shorter statured counterparts. Norco flipped the script with the Sight, and the seat tube angle gets steeper as the frame size gets larger. The seat tube angle ranges from 77-degrees on a small up to 78-degrees on an XL.

It's also interesting to see that the geometry numbers are nearly identical for both wheel sizes, other than the .5-degree head tube angle difference. The reach, chainstay length, and wheelbase numbers are all closely aligned, which means that deciding which model to go with will boil down to wheel size preference rather than choosing based on another geometry metric.



Suspension

Norco stuck with the tried-and-true Horst link suspension design for the Sight, with a different rocker arm shape and pivot position compared to the previous model. The overall leverage rate has been increased, which was done to improve the bike's small bump compliance and grip. That means higher air pressures are required in the shock, but there's also more leverage to counteract the friction of the shock's seals. The shock's tune has been altered to complement that leverage rate change.

The Sights anti-squat number is 126% off the top, and 110% at sag, numbers that were selected to give the bike a supportive platform while climbing no matter if the rider is seated or standing.


The leverage rate goes from 3.2 to 2.6, a change of 18.75%. Norco's goal was to create a smooth ramp-up with plenty of mid-stroke support without going overboard on the amount of progression. All models come with an air shock, although it should be possible to run a coil shock for riders who want to go that route.

Norco's new app provides suggested suspension and tire pressure settings.

Having an accurate starting point for suspension settings can help minimize the amount of time spent tinkering with a new bike, and maximize the amount of time available to enjoy it on the trail. More and more companies are building suspension calculators where riders input their heights and weights, and a list of air pressures, rebound, and compression settings are spat out. Norco's Ride Aligned setup guide does just that, and it even includes tire pressure and bar height suggestions.



Sight C build 1 - SRAM AXS wireless drivetrain, dropper. Fox Factory Float 36 fork, Float X2 shock. SRAM Code RSC brakes. We Are One carbon rims. $8697 USD.
Build Kits

There are three complete build kit options for each model, but a further level of customization is available with Norco's Build Your Ride program. Potential buyers start by picking their desired frame material – carbon or aluminum – and the color. Next is the suspension, with multiple packages from either RockShox or Fox to choose from. The final step is to select the drivetrain and brake packages, choosing from SRAM or Shimano.

The Build Your Ride program doesn't allow for every single part to be selected individually - that's why there's a frame only option - but it does allow for a wider range of potential build options that what was available in the past. There are a total of 12 complete bikes, which includes a women's version of the C3, A1, and a A2 models. What follows is a selection of the available models.

Sight C build 2: carbon front triangle, seatstays, aluminum chainstays. SRAM Eagle X01 drivetrain, Code RSC brakes. RockShox Lyrik Ultimate fork, Super Deluxe + shock. $7,097 USD.

Sight C2: carbon front triangle, seatstays, aluminum chainstays. Fox 36 Performance Elite fork, Performance Float X2 shock, Shimano XT 12-speed derailleur, shifters, SLX cassette. Shimano SLX 4-piston brakes. $5,199 USD.

Sight A1: Aluminum frame, RockShox Lyrik Ultimate fork, Super Deluxe Select + shock, SRAM Code RSC brakes, GX 12-speed drivetrain. $4,499 USD.
Sight A2: Aluminum frame, Fox Float 36 Rhythm fork, Performance Float X2, SRAM GX / NX drivetrain, Code R brakes. $3,599 USD.




I've been able to get in a handful of solid rides aboard the Sight so far, enough to start getting a good feel for its trail manners.

It may be significantly longer and slacker than its predecessor (there's a 71mm wheelbase difference between the new vs. the old model), but it actually has a less stretched out, more upright climbing position thanks to that steepened seat tube angle. The centered position makes it easy to maintain traction on tricky climbs, partially due to the fact that drastic weight shifts, the kind where you end up perched on the nose of the saddle, are much less necessary. There's minimal unwanted suspension movement, and I haven't felt the need to use that lockout lever yet, even on the paved road approach to my local trailhead.

On the descents, the Sight is all about traction. The slightest impact will get the shock to begin moving through its travel, a trait that helps the rear end stayed glued to the ground, even when that ground is covered with slippery mud. I've been playing around with a few different suspension setup configurations, and at the moment I've been happy with running 30% sag and one additional volume spacer than stock. I added that spacer for a little extra bottom out resistance on larger jumps and drops, but I'm going to keep experimenting – I'll report on my final settings in the long term review.

Not surprisingly, the Sight feels more composed and stable on steeper descents than ever, and it seems to hit the sweet spot as far as downhill handling goes. It's roomy but not unwieldy, and it's still manageable on tighter trails – I'd say that all-mountain designation is accurate here. It has lost a little bit of the poppy quickness that the previous version had, but I think many riders will find the improved downhill prowess makes up for that change. If not, there's always the shorter travel Optic.

Stay tuned for a more detailed report once I get enough muddy miles in over the next few months.









289 Comments

  • 167 3
 Seat angles that get steeper as legs get longer, while other manufacturers do the opposite! Brilliant!
  • 62 2
 Norco is correct though.
  • 72 3
 @jclnv: ...they're correct on increasing chainstay length as sizes go up too!
  • 15 0
 About time!
  • 3 1
 @jclnv: can you explain this to me, I don't understand why it should work.
  • 22 16
 Yes and no. 6'5 dude here. Unless the reach dramatically increases as the seat tube steepens, the cockpit will feel cramped and small for taller riders. Even at 515mm reach on the xl, I bet this version will feel smaller than the predecessor with that 78 degree seat tube. Effectively brings your body way closer to the bars. Just food for thought for all my fellow giants out there.
  • 34 2
 @gbeaks33: only while seated climbing though, a longer reach will still feel longer when standing and descending. The steeper seat angle and longer stays should make seated climbing feel better for taller riders as you won't be fighting to keep weight on the front end (and not near/behind the rear axle) and can probably sit up and spin instead of fighting the bike the whole time.

So even thought it's shorter effectively, it might still feel better while climbing?
  • 16 0
 @BurningBeard: Relating STA to the BB, the higher your saddle goes, the further behind your BB you sit. Assuming a dude with longer legs is on a larger size, a steeper STA on that larger size compensates for the longer legs/higher saddle of a taller person.
  • 5 5
 @gbeaks33: The Top Tube dimension is what to look at if concerned with the pedaling position. If too cramped, you can slam the seat back but that is limited.

Some new frames that are way bigger (reach and wheelbase) than one of my old frames (2012) have way tighter cockpit pedaling positions.
  • 9 0
 FINALLY someone figured it out!
  • 8 1
 @gbeaks33: Yes, the critical aero seated position is lost on these newfangled bicycles.
  • 4 0
 @scvkurt03: thanks, mate
  • 17 0
 Long time SC rider, turned to Pole last year for something radically different. SC notoriously short > Pole notoriously long. Have discovered the pros/cons of both.. this Norco might have the all around best geo numbers on a mainstream aggr trail bike to date. Did I just say that?? Front center:rear center, STA, BB, HTA, it's all there.
Horst link aside... the Sight on point!
  • 5 1
 @gbeaks33: 6'6" here. I will take a slightly cramped cockpit over wheeling up the hill so bad that you have to get off and push the bike. I push the seat all the way forward on every bike. Last weekend I rented a Offering in Sedona and I only pushed the seat 3/4th of the way forward and it was perfect. I highly recommend this bike for tall riders. With the wreckoning I pushed the seat all the way forward. That is also a great bike for tall riders. Can't decide on which to get. Also I like the short chain stays. Easier to bunny hop
  • 8 0
 @duanehundley: 6'5" here and agree with you and @gbeaks33 I'll take a 78 deg seat angle all day. I'll admit, the bike feels like a hybrid bike on the flats, but puts me over the pedals on steep climbs. When I descend, I'm out of the saddle anyway and then the reach feels just right.
edit: and the pricing on these looks really good.
  • 3 2
 There has to be some disadvantage though surely
  • 4 3
 @enduroNZ: generally you can't have steep seat angles, short stays, good post insertion, lots of travel and an axle path that isn't extremely rearward because as the wheel goes through it's travel it'll hit the seat tube/post.
Most bikes with shorter stays and longer travel have a curve in the seat tube leading to larger sizes having slacker effective seat angles (see: trek slash, kona process 153 etc)
  • 3 0
 @g123: We have demos available... but still no ball pit.
  • 5 1
 @enduroNZ: to the steep STA? No, not in my experience. 1 full season on a 79* STA, and its been really really good. Great for climbing, tons of power and way better seating position, more open chest, more powerful leg position, no more fetal uphill grunts.
The long WB and long front center? Possibly, but it depends what you ride and how. If you try to ride a long front center the same way you did on a conventional geo bike on flatter terrain, you will find the limits of your front tire pretty quickly. Suspension and tire pressures will be different than what you're used to. I haven't found any real disadvantage so far though, just a change - and faster times up/down.
I won't buy another bike without a steep STA... ok maybe a beach cruiser.
  • 3 12
flag g123 (Oct 30, 2019 at 15:55) (Below Threshold)
 @suncountrycycle: that Horst link tho...
  • 4 0
 That's a nice Whip
  • 9 7
 @g123: as in the best suspension design available? What about it? It's only been around and perfect for 30 years or so. Show me a better suspension platform for pedal bikes. Wait, I'll save you the time, there isn't one.
  • 14 2
 @garrisond5: Yeah these anti Horst-link comments are totally dumb. It’s as if they think a design with one can’t have the kinematics of almost any other design. Either that or they hate active braking.
  • 2 0
 @duanehundley: @shredddr Yes totally, when out of the saddle descending or anything other than seated pedaling, the long reach feels great. I will also trade a cramped cockpit vs wheeling out on climbs. But still these bikes aren't ideal tall people. My hands get sore on climbs from being in the wrong position for hours. Only way I can remedy it is put a super-xc 100mm stem to lengthen things out to where it feels comfortable...but then the steering is garbage. I'd love to try a Pole or Geometron or something with a 530mm+ reach and maybe experience what riding a bike that fits properly feels like. All these regular sized folks don't know how good they have it.
  • 4 5
 @garrisond5: well the Horst link bikes I’ve owned or ridden before have had the same problem which is a low anti-squat design. That trade-off for kickback has been less than optimal pedalling performance.
If you think that any one platform is ‘perfect’, I’d say think again. They all have their strengths and weaknesses, some just have clever ways of masking the weakness. If Horst link was the ‘perfect’ design, Specialized would have cornered the market 25 yrs ago and there wouldn’t be anything else. I prefer a good twin-link setup like DW or VPP, but they aren’t perfect either...
  • 3 2
 @g123: Giant Reign 29 has about same geo with Maestro and better specs.
  • 5 0
 @enduroNZ: only disadvantage is if you do a lot of pedaling on flat trails it's a bit hard on your knees, totally worth it for the climbing improvement tho and flat trails suck anyway
  • 2 0
 @g123: The above bike has more AS than a 2020 Hightower.
  • 3 0
 @jclnv: if so it comes at the cost of kickback. You can have one or the other, it’s built into the design. Again, none of them are perfect.
Ride what you like, but Horst is not my thing.
  • 5 2
 @garrisond5: switch infinity or dw for me over horst all day long!
  • 3 0
 @g123: Eh? I agree, high AS dual-link bikes also have high feedback. However, they typically have high anti-rise and tight IC arcs too. Both of which robs them of sensitivity and suppleness.
  • 3 1
 @gbeaks33: Geometron has your name written all over it! That or a Pole Machine XL!
  • 2 0
 @duanehundley: Try a Geometron/Nicolai and you will never experience such difficulties again plus these bikes are exceptional climbers (even with over 160mm of travel at the shock).
  • 1 0
 @g123: banshee Titan - has no horst link.
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: yeah, I wonder why you'll need to change the length of the CS if you already moving the rider forward. And from the pedaling position perspective I guess it makes sence to give shorter riders a more slack SA so the knees will be in the same position relative to BB.
  • 1 0
 Yes!! I was so tired of sliding off the back of the bike on steep climbs...
  • 2 5
 @g123: I had the previous Sight and I'd say it was one bike I was looking to sell within one week of ownership and didn't compare in performance to the SC HT LT. The new SC TB and HT are a much better option, imo, and you have the geo adjust/chainstay adjust (on TB) options. But I agree they tended to be on more conservative reach side ...though are now more or less consistent with other contemporary bikes. I just prefer the vpp for descending and for technical climbing (for my rocky mountain terrain it works). I also found the paint quality of the Norco was somewhat below average. I'd like to give Norco another try but was tainted by my experience on the previous Sight. I have to say that paint job is spectacular though!
  • 3 0
 @foggnm: I’d agree with you based on the platform alone. SC has much improved geo but still more to go IMO, the switch from SC to Pole made the differences pretty clear to me. Changes to FC, WB and mostly eSTA and the TB & LT would be perfect. Reach on the LT is pretty short, 443 is more like a medium than a large. The chainstay flipchip is great, would want that option every time pls.
No idea how this Sight rides but on paper Norco nailed it.
  • 1 0
 @g123: Curious to hear your thoughts. I"m a long time SantaCruz rider and thinking about making similar drastically different purchase (long frame). Thanks for your time.
  • 2 0
 @Quifouett: Not even close. Maybe in a medium but as a tall rider these bikes are massively different.

Reign: Shorter chainstays, steeper head angle, slacker seattube (slacker than the numbers tell you because their effective is not being reported true to size). steeper headtube. way shorter wheel base. As a tall rider I can tell you the sight is a better machine if you are in the XL size because of seat tube and chainstay length.
  • 1 0
 @gbeaks33: I would like to have seen a reach of 525 and I am only 6'3.5" I'm currently on an XXL sentinel with 16mm more effective top tube (due mostly to the slacker seat tube) and a 50mm stem and it feels fine, but I am curious how this will feel seated pedaling.
  • 2 0
 @nwarren: pm sent
  • 1 0
 @duanehundley: thanks for the comment to explain the bike for this issue. I’m 6’6 and have always rode with the saddle all the way forward and haven’t been able to find a good fit on any bike. Will probably get one of these this year
  • 1 0
 @gbeaks33: they should make an xxl. I bet with 6’5 you also run into the limits of a short seattube with this bike.
  • 1 0
 Reggie Miller is 6'7" and it always looks like bikes are too small for him. I think guys that tall need 30.5 wheels. Lol.
  • 1 0
 @BurningBeard: to keep the seat in the same relative position on the CS you need to do both (steeper STA and longer CS) otherwise the CS gets massive and FC / RC ratio is not consistent across sizes.
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: thanks, I'll need to do more math on that.
  • 1 0
 A Sight for sore legs.
  • 2 0
 @tacklingdummy: yep I look like I'm riding a small children's bike all the time. Couldn't imagine being 6'7 or taller and still mountain biking.
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: I just met a 6’11” guy on 32” wheel bike. It was a hard tail, but I bet a s a full suspension it could be rad for the big guys.
  • 1 5
flag tarik28 (Nov 5, 2019 at 12:10) (Below Threshold)
 I don’t give a shit about STA. You people won’t be happy till the sta is 90 degrees
  • 1 0
 @tarik28: There are plenty of bikes out there with 75 and below.
  • 1 0
 @gbeaks33: I’ve taken this XL on 2 demos now. I’m 6’5 and thought I would love it but all I was thinking is I hope the industry doesn’t move toward this as standard. It felt way to cramped
  • 1 0
 @matt721: it might be difficult, but if you can demo an XL Pole (Machine or Stamina 180), or an XL Nicolai then try it out and adjust stem/saddle if you can. An XL Machine has a 535mm reach and a 1360mm wheelbase, it dwarfs anything else on the market. Pair that with a 70 or 80mm stem and I really think even a 6’5 dude like yourself will be comfortable, and have a far better riding position than anything out there with traditional geo numbers.
Pole FB page has a lot of guys your height and over, maybe worth checking out.
  • 1 0
 @matt721: agreed, man. The industry is making really long bikes rideable for short people who don't need them. We need them!
  • 1 0
 @gbeaks33: I'm short (5'7") and super steep seat tube angles can make the cockpit feel a little cramped even for me when pedaling. My knees are too forward. It does help on steep climbs but at the same time it feels cramped.

I have an older bike that has a 71.5 degree STA and it pretty good with seat slammed forward and it is a little better than the newer bike I have that has 75 STA. Somewhere around 73 or 74 is where I prefer it.

There is so many different body dimensions longer/shorter legs, longer/shorter torso, longer/shorter arms, etc that is hard for bike companies to make something to fit everyone. At least there is a lot of options to choose from.
  • 84 4
 Jesus Norco is on fire for 2020 ! Alu options, builds that actually make sens rather than trying to shave a few grams with rubbish components to throw right out of the box and the possibility to get custom. Only shadow is that my LBS stopped worked with you for the upcoming season as the bikes were too difficult to get. I'll have to see where I could get one as this and the Optic are very much on point !
  • 11 0
 Check out our dealer finder, it may help you locate someone close! www.norco.com/find-a-dealer
  • 1 0
 @norcobicycles: Come do some demos in Georgia. I'm interested.
  • 2 19
flag radman13 (Oct 30, 2019 at 22:08) (Below Threshold)
 $5200 for a bike with SLX components... LMAO Big Grin
  • 14 0
 @radman13: 3600$ for a 36 and a Float X2 that's where you should be looking at !
  • 13 0
 @radman13: Putting the money where it matters - suspension! Slx works pretty great, btw. Try it.
  • 2 0
 @radman13: Theres always pinkbike buy and sell for ya!
  • 6 0
 @radman13: If you are writing off a bike because of it's drivetrain, then you need to leave the 1990s. Frame design, suspension, and wheels are FAR more important discussion points than SLX vs XT or GX vs XO.
  • 42 0
 I want yellow bike
  • 5 0
 Hell yes!
  • 4 0
 should get the nukeproof taxi Sam was riding before, beep beep
  • 1 0
 #iwantyellowbike!
  • 33 4
 They sure know how to sell to the pinkbike audience with TWO water bottle mounts INSIDE the front triangle, varying chainstay lengths, 64 degree head angle. but the TWO water bottle mounts is what will sell the bike.
  • 20 1
 Or those are just smart details.
  • 13 0
 One is a chamois butt'r holder for long rides.
  • 34 0
 Yeah but how many potatoes can it hold
  • 1 0
 It won't because of the rubbish trunnition, the internal cable routing is debatable. At least for me , the bike look's perfect other than that. Really a shame because I searched all ready for a dealer to replace my two year older 180mm travel rig.
  • 23 0
 Always glad to see a frame option offered. So annoying to buy a whole bike.

My dream "first look" article would always tell us what the bare frames weigh (including the size weighed).
  • 4 0
 Yep, I want to keep a lot of my parts as they are still great. Less waste.
  • 28 5
 I wish the AL had a Shimano drivetrain option
  • 19 0
 You can have that. It is part of the build your ride program.
  • 13 0
 Though only available in North America, you can custom build an aluminum bike with a Shimano drivetrain through the Build you Ride - Ride your Build program.
  • 4 1
 you can buy an entire SLX group with brakes on eBay for under $600
  • 19 0
 The C2 build has restored my faith. Awesome shimano build. I may just have to replace my ‘17 c9.2.
  • 11 0
 I can see that build being super popular

XT/ SLX is a great option and Performance Elite is often more than enough for most riders
  • 21 1
 @matt-15: IMO, PE isn't a dowgrade from Kash. It's just a black option.
  • 1 2
 @matt-15:

Xt/slx is a great option if you want to leak mineral oil all over your pads and discs.
  • 16 0
 Wow, I hadn't been a fan of Norco's bikes for the past few years but this has changed everything for me. The top spec aluminum bike is a huge value for the potential performance. And the geometry is spot on, especially with the proportional seat tube angles/chainstay lengths/head tube lengths that increase with each size.
  • 10 1
 f*ckING FINALLY!!!! (re seat tube angles and sizes)
  • 17 0
 So this is basically a Range now. I'm guessing the new Range will go the Spec Enduro route and get even slacker, with 170mm travel and perhaps a HSP?
  • 4 23
flag cuban-b (Oct 30, 2019 at 9:20) (Below Threshold)
 the geometry matches the 16/17 transition patrol almost exactly.
  • 4 1
 One would guess , I heard they postponed the new Range . The old model still had a huge demand so they followed through for another season. I actually tried this new Sight months back. Pumped into them testing it as a mullet bike.
  • 7 0
 @cuban-b: If the same BB drop and fork offset make the geo an exact match then you would be correct. The amount of travel isn't even the same. The wheelbase on the Norco is over 30mm longer.
  • 4 0
 @WheelNut: Not to mention a degree or so difference in head angle, consistently one size smaller on reach and up to a 3.5(!) degree difference in the seat tube angle!
  • 5 0
 @cuban-b: Im looking at the geo for a 2016 patrol carbon 1 and no- they don't match. Norco is 2.5 degree steeper SA, 30mm longer reach, 60mm longer wb, a degree steeper HA. Am I looking at the wrong one?
  • 2 0
 @cheetamike: I think so... I contacted them earlier this year and asked about the 2020 Range... they said "huge changes will be in store for 2020." I'm sure he didn't mean different paint and a coil shock.
  • 2 5
 @WheelNut: I'm not saying exact match but with 63.5 HA and 160/150mm travel... it's damn close. My only point is that because of this, one would expect even more aggressive geo for the next iteration of the Range.
  • 5 0
 @jawzzy3: Really, if you want to compare it to an older bike- it's a 2016 geometron. And that really is almost identical.
  • 3 0
 @dastone: Hey Dale, watch your vids on YouTube - great stuff! helped me plan my BC trip... So will you be riding a Sight now over your current Range? Also what are these Stans Flow D rims?? Specs??
  • 2 0
 @motorstone: Damn right I am! Already have a yellow C2 on order and I'm stoked! I've ridden one already and for most of what I want to ride it works better than my current Range.

I can't come up with a ton of information on the Flow D rims but they're likely an OEM only model of the Flow lineup. From what I've heard they're comparable in durability to the EX3.
  • 2 1
 @ICKYBOD: Yep, it's taking companies 4-5 years to catch up to Nicolai and Pole...
  • 2 0
 @dastone: Sweet! That’s exactly what I’m thinking about getting. Perfect for the Swiss Alps trails ????
  • 2 0
 Yes, these new Enduros are capable as freeriders once were.

170mm+ travel with either 27.5 or 29" is the future of enduros.
  • 19 0
 That maroon and gold is dope!
  • 28 0
 many leather bound books and the smell of rich mahogany
  • 21 4
 #GRIZTOUR
  • 16 0
 Alloy frame only !
Thanks Norco Smile
  • 8 0
 You're welcome!
  • 3 0
 @norcobicycles: while you’re here: why not make a 26er for the youth bike? Most kids sizing up from a 24incher to a 27.5 seems like quite a jump to me.
  • 12 0
 Wow. How crazy is the new range gonna be at this rate? Kudos to Norco for not taking any half-measures on their geometry updates!
  • 12 0
 Bravo Norco! Every single decision/change on this bike is so well-thought-out. You guys are killing it.
  • 6 0
 They employ some actual engineers so there's less broscience.
  • 13 0
 #CleanAF
  • 9 0
 Glad they've put cable guides on the lower shock mount,used to cringe when I saw the cables rubbing on the rear damper shaft.Looks a great bike.
  • 8 1
 it seems like this improves on the short comings of the transition sentinel. better cable routing around the crank area. 150mm rear instead of 140mm. slightly higher bottom bracket height. if the shock is a standard size, this could be my next frame.
  • 11 0
 Awesome. Love that the alloy frame comes with properly good components.
  • 7 1
 Anyone else cringing slightly at some of the cable noodliness going on at the front of some of those side shots? C'mon, these are promo shots, at least *try* to make them look nice. Or at least the same...
  • 6 2
 As a Brit I wouldn’t complain one bit about the cables. They’re one of the only companies to actually allow a driveside entry for a rear brake hose.
  • 9 0
 Norco has been doing all the right things for a while now.
  • 5 0
 Hey Norco, this bike is exactly what I want to replace my Range, but why is the Sight frame so much more expensive than the Optic frame?
  • 14 0
 Carbon seat stays, bearings in the lower shock pivot, the carbon bike includes a full set of clear 3M frame protectors and other details.
  • 10 0
 @WheelNut: Ah, didn't realize the Optic had alloy seat stays. I was actually wondering how it could be so inexpensive. $2900 is a pretty good price considering the competition.
  • 7 4
 "The leverage rate goes from 3.2 to 2.6, a change of 18.75%. Norco's goal was to create a smooth ramp-up with plenty of mid-stroke support without going overboard on the amount of progression." and then thy ship the shock with volume spacers pre-installed and even that's not enough ramp up for Mike *facepalm*. Just use a linkage with greater progression and every shock, large-volume air AND coil will just work.
  • 3 3
 I had similar thoughts- I'm a larger rider (6'-4", 245#) and I saw this, then I saw THIS: "The overall leverage rate has been increased, which was done to improve the bike's small bump compliance and grip. That means higher air pressures are required in the shock, but there's also more leverage to counteract the friction of the shock's seals. The shock's tune has been altered to complement that leverage rate change." and figured there was no way this was going to work for larger / heavier riders. So frustrating.
  • 4 0
 @Bullit-Boy: The setup guide for this new Sight goes up to 6'3.5" and 240Lbs, so you're very very close to being on the chart still. The 6'3", 240# setup would still provide you with a good starting point.
  • 3 0
 @Bullit-Boy: I’m 6’5” and 240lbs and I’ve been lucky enough to test ride this bike. No issues at all as a taller, heavier rider.
Norco set it up for me and the performance was on par with the best out there - climbing and descending. My favorite Norco of all time!
  • 1 2
 Taken one for a quick spin and noticed it blew through its travel pretty easily and we were running around 26% sag and 2 or 3 volume spacers (cant remember). A meg neg would help a bit but I'm only 83kg so cant imagine it would work well with a heavier rider. Not a fan of high leverage ratios.
  • 1 0
 Luckily there’s plenty of progressive bikes for bigger guys these days.
  • 2 0
 @Bullit-Boy: Hard to find something that works. Raaw bikes made a special rocker for heavier riders and my Nicolai (Geometrons too) works exceptional with my 6'6" and 231 lbs.
  • 2 0
 Just looking at the rocker, someone could offer an aftermarket unit that decreased the leverage ratio and increased progressiveness by moving the upper shock mount a few mm toward the top tube.
  • 5 0
 Added the A1 builds (both wheelsizes) to Bikedigger.com for comparison purposes. Interesting match up with the Ripmo AF. Cool to see more alloy options.
  • 3 0
 Kinda miffed I just got my Ripmo AF when this is basically a 150mm Sentinel that doesn't weigh 10lbs or cost $2k. @norcobicycles is killing it.
  • 4 1
 All-Mtn is the new Enduro! how cliche one of those words were in the first place. Now I am supposed to say sorry for hurting someones feelings, not gonna happen. Keep up the good work guys at NORCO said an old school all-mtn rider.
  • 4 0
 I wonder if Norco have considered not just adjusting the size of the rear triangle for larger riders, but also the kinematics - specifically the anti squat response to counter the higher centre of mass of larger riders.
  • 3 0
 I got into mountain biking in late 2018. At the time, Norco wasn't on my radar.

Between this new Sight, Optic, and the new Torrent. It is now.

This looks stellar. As an L-XL sized rider (6'1"), short chainstay length for its size is something I've been noticing on my Kona Process. Also I'll freely admit that I'm both slacker-HTA, and longer-wheelbase curious. 64 degree HTA, steeper STA, and a wheelbase that is ~40-90mm longer... I'm curious how it will ride.

Looking forward to a demo at some point.
  • 3 0
 What solutions are around for standalone tool/tube holders to be bolted onto bottle mounts at the mo? I've seen add ons to bottle cages such as the classic pump holder but not any standalone that I can remember. Great feature if there's some good products around to match!
  • 2 1
 Wolf Tooth B-RAD!
  • 5 0
 @Norco Will this be available in Norway? Can't get the 2020 Optic here, but this would also do the trick! That A1 is tasty!
  • 2 0
 Try ordering from Evans Cycles in the U.K. They also have a store practically inside Garwick airport if you want to jump on a plane and pick it up yourself.
  • 2 0
 Rad looking machine. Just wish they made the new Optic a little more 'trail' specced rather than going full enduro. Would've been great if they updated it to be more like the latest Ripley as this new Sight looks to fill the aggressively trail bracket pretty spot on.
  • 3 1
 "shorter seat tubes to provide room for longer travel dropper posts"

I think you mean lower seat post clamps and more insertion room... Because just making the seat tube shorter without allowing room inside for the longer post doesn't really help anyone (except maybe someone riding up a size with a very short dropper).
  • 4 0
 Awesome geo and specs. If I was looking to replace myerida One Sixty, this would be the bike. I think I'll go the Optic and start my bike collection ????
  • 3 1
 I'm just shocked that I'm shocked at the pricing. I have their last Sight C3, love it, changed out only the junk Level T brakes and put a longer travel OneUp and it all came in around $4K. Would be hard to pull the trigger for the new C2 at that pricing.
  • 2 0
 So higher overall leverage rate means better small bump? I thought some mfgs were doing the opposite for other reasons? Less pressure for lower leverage rate means lower friction on the seals. Lower leverage rate is also said to make it easier to control damping.

Also because the overall leverage rate has gone up with the same slope, the percentage progressivity has become slightly less. Maybe that makes the bike feel a little more plush at the 2nd half of the stroke?
  • 2 1
 "Sight C build 1 - ... We Are One carbon rims." The picture shows DTSwiss wheels. I also couldn't find the C1 build on their website other than in the promo pictures and such: www.norco.com/bikes/2020/mountain/all-mountain/sight

Both wheels are rad, and I'm a DT fanboy, but I think I'd prefer WAO wheels if I had a choice.
  • 3 0
 Pretty common for brands to take build pics before they have all the components in stock - it’ll have the we are ones
  • 3 0
 probably just a spec change since after the picture was taken.
  • 4 0
 hrmpf - jaw dropped, real beauty! makes me slightly regret the TR Patrol.... must get respray in yellow!!
  • 4 0
 The sight, the new enduro bike from Norco! The aluminium version looks sick too.
  • 1 0
 Interesting they're showing off the leverage curve graph. Same as least year, just translated higher up in rates. Most of the time people are touting lower overall/average leverage ratios because the shock doesn't have to work as hard.
  • 3 1
 True but higher initial ratio is more supple off the top (grip).
  • 5 0
 That actually looks sweet. Good job norco
  • 3 0
 I hope proportional chain stays become a standard. So glad to see someone finally making proper chain stay lengths for taller riders.
  • 5 0
 Funnest bike I've ever ridden, Love it!! Good job Norco!
  • 3 0
 Hey Norco, your website currently does a very spammy redirect.

EDIT: It appears it's the Pinkbike link that's incorrect.
  • 4 0
 EDIT- Pinkbike fixed it.

Pinkbike has listed the wrong URL in their info box at the top of the article. The correct address is: www.norco.com
  • 12 10
 32lbs on a size large? holy shit bikes are getting porkier. how is it my XL firebird weighs 2lbs less with pedals and doesn't have a top tube that looks like a toothpick?
  • 8 2
 Must be the super boost
  • 3 3
 Norco's are always heavy and overbuilt, sort of like Konas- from what I've seen anyway.
  • 10 1
 Strip it all down to the frame, both bikes would more than likely weigh about the same for each respective size. If you're really that concerned about the extra two pounds of weight, I'd suggest building it up from scratch with components you want...which is an option. Or, just don't eat five Drumstick ice cream cones before bedtime.
  • 8 0
 32 lbs is heavy...? I actually don't mind a slight bit more weight on rowdy descents myself.
  • 3 3
 @j-p-i: You got to carry that way up, though...
  • 7 0
 I think bikes reached a literal breaking point with weight, and manufacturers are responding with something a bit stronger at the cost of weight. Seems like a good thing to me. (and yeah - components make a massive weight difference)
  • 5 0
 @cool3: Well... Many bikes checks of pro EWS racers done over the last year showed that many of them weighted towards 35lbs all kitted up (dh grade tires, inserts and other stuff strapped to their frames) and those girls and boys do still pedal those bikes up to get to stages... Shows that geometry and kinematics are more important than weight and travel for a bike to perform as intended by designers.
  • 2 0
 @nzstormer: If a carbon version was as heavy as an aluminium, but much stronger I would be more than OK with that as well.
  • 3 0
 Ha! I ride a 32 lbs hardtail.
  • 4 1
 @jrouellet: That's true to a point. The main purpose of these bikes are to go fast downhill while still being pedalable uphill. That's pretty different from the average Joe's ride where you have a mix of ups and downs and where the ups are often much longer as the downs (at least in my neck of wood). Plus, those riders are elite athletes who train most of the year on and off the bike. I'm pretty sure Sam Hill would smoke me on his 32 lb enduro bike going up a hill even with me being on a 15 lb road bike (even though I'll try hard).
  • 1 0
 Tires, it’s so nice to see the exo+ which seem to work for most situations.
  • 3 0
 Thats slaaack. My Commencal meta has a 65.5 HTA, and its a full-blown enduro bike.
  • 8 1
 Was...!
  • 1 7
flag Shafferd912 (Oct 31, 2019 at 8:26) (Below Threshold)
 @jclnv: Yeah, I guess. Id still prefer mine over any Norco.
  • 2 0
 @Shafferd912: Have you ridden the new ones? They look pretty good to me. Especially the Optic.

Or are you saying you buy based on appearance?
  • 1 1
 @jclnv: I have ridden the new optic, and the new sight. Dont like the suspension linkage. Plus my Meta New Zealand edition looks better too. Wink
  • 3 0
 Wish I could justify having a mid travel trail bike just to shred for fun.. thing looks dope
  • 4 0
 That blue is on my to get list!!! Can't wait to ride this bike!!
  • 2 0
 I'm genuinely curious, how much of a difference is there between 430 and 445 chain stays? I'm 6'2 and I've never ridden anything longer than 435, is it a huge difference?
  • 3 0
 I've a Banshee which has adjustable dropouts for height and length. It makes my chainstays go from 445mm to 455mm and you can absolutely tell the difference.

Is it like a different size of bike? No. But you can feel the better balance and stability. And I'm riding am XL frame.

I'm loving what Norco are doing here.
  • 2 0
 Totally agree with the above. Bikes are so rear biased that you add 10mm to a rear centre and it makes a huge difference. Mainly to front grip (increase).
  • 3 0
 I Wonder when they will change the real enduro Ranger. It seems it needs some update.
  • 2 0
 between this and the new torrent, norco is killing it! Don't they know I need to be saving money right now not getting my CC out.
  • 2 0
 Saw this in person today, looked really nice........Looked really long to be honest. They always look better in person in my opinion.
  • 2 0
 Geometry, LR and antisquat is very similar to Orbea Rallon 2020 which is a good thing.. should ride like a blast
  • 2 0
 If the leverage ratio were also "Ride Aligned" it would be almost perfect. Great bike nevertheless.
  • 4 0
 A rather pleasant sight.
  • 2 0
 3 degrees slacker? Uhh maybe compared to the 2018 Sight.

2019 27.5" was 66, 29er was 66.5. It's all there on Norco's site.
  • 2 0
 I hope we get a first look for the new Norco Bigfoot before winter. That bike looks dreamy AF
  • 1 0
 @norcobicycles is there any difference between the regular and women’s version? Same for the Optic. Specs look identical in any given model. Thanks.
  • 3 0
 Only difference is the touch points: grips, saddles. As you said, the rest of the bike is basically the same! According to their engineers, they adjust for women's weight distributions but adjusting shock pressures instead. Either way it's good news for me, because I want that Jade on Jade bike!
  • 2 0
 @atauro: I'm liking the blue Optic, which apparently is a women's.... but I wasn't sure if they have different shock tunes.
  • 1 0
 nevermind, went on the "build your ride" page and found the spec. Boost. (as expected). that said, the Shimano build spec page pulls up the SRAM build spec page. Oops.
  • 3 0
 Looks great! Nice work, Norco.
  • 2 0
 This is the bike I have waiting for! Too bad it seems like no one is selling Norco in Finland anymore..
  • 2 0
 When I bought my Sentinel 2 yrs ago the internet broke talking about how long it was. Now look.
  • 4 1
 That linkage looks so....German.
  • 5 7
 A lot to like on the numbers and how they orientated the bike. That said, I don't want 445mm stays on my trail bike. I get what they are after but that's maddeningly long for my tastes. PS - the website is an exercise in frustration.
  • 6 0
 I think once you swing a leg over one you'll approve. This thing is a manual machine, super easy to get up on the back wheel and stable- just as easy to pivot on the back wheel as the previous gen Sight.
  • 12 0
 What I've learned about all the new geometry designs from the last couple of years... you really can't just go by the numbers. You have to get on the bike the designer intended your height to ride and feel what it's like... it'll often surprise you. Seems especially true here with so much attention paid to how various height riders fit various sizes etc.
  • 2 0
 That’s a 445mm RC and 856mm FC and you want an even more rear biased weight distribution? Are you going to run 20kg of lead weight on your bars?
  • 1 0
 @jclnv: It's a preference thing. XL patrol now - 430mm CS w/ 500mm reach. I'd tidy up the rear another 5mm if I could. Obviously some people are liking this 445 length and describing the ride in a positive way or maybe they are riding smaller sizes? But don't worry I'm not going to try to change your mind.

I'll try it out for myself if I get a chance - I think I'd target the Large on the Norco tho so 485 reach and 440 stays.
  • 2 0
 @CarlMega: One thing I’ve learned in this shitmix of sizing and geo is the less balanced the F+R ratios are the more precise you have to be with your body position. That gets pretty old fast for me and ultimately I don’t think it’s fast. All for the sake of manuals? Seems nuts to me.
  • 1 0
 @CarlMega: I don't know what to make of these sizings. My current ride (a medium) is closer to a Small, whilst the size guide suggests a Large for my 5'10" (on a tall day), that seems more than my mediocre skills could manage.

Shame the leverage curve doesn't end where the 2019 model was, making it a coil friendly rig.
That ride calculator things reckons 245psi in the shock for my #170 (on a skinny day) and feedback from @trailtalkmtb post above doesn't inspire.

Time to scope one out at the LBS me thinks...
  • 1 0
 @jclnv: so with those figures 856 FC and 445 RC, the ratio is 1.92, pretty much as a Geometron.

Some folk think better balances are around 1.75 to 1.85.

For myself, the really long FC and reach bikes do require a lot of commitment and speed to make them perform well, as a result can be tiring to ride.
The downside of too upright seat posts is more weight on the hands, wrists and elbows on long flat sections of trail.
  • 5 7
 Great looking bike, shame about the short seat tube...it's a full 55mm shorter than my current ride. With a 170mm OneUp dropper I still have 75mm of post showing, that would put me at 125mm of exposed post...that's 5" of post sitting below my already 170mm drop...hah....jeezus this short seat tube trend is getting crazy for us taller riders out there.

All the extra post puts a TON of strain on the frame, being a bigger guy this is a huge issue, that's a lot of leverage! This really starts to limit the frames I can look at if I don't want to get to know the warranty people really well...lol.
  • 8 1
 Are you maybe riding a frame that is too small for you? How tall are you? Do you have proportionally long legs? It is possible with this Norco Sight to go to a 200mm dropper since the seat post diameter is 34.9mm. The 34.9mm post allows for higher strain limits on the frame and dropper in the seat tube area to help mitigate the high stress of long posts.
  • 2 1
 @WheelNut: RIght now I am on a properly sized bike, 520mm seat tube. I could go to 200mm dropper on my current ride, If I go to a 465mm seat tube like on the XL Sight...this would have so much seat post out of the frame...even with a 200mm dropper...lol.
  • 3 1
 @pedalhound: I'm glad someone else of height also feels this pain. I bring it up with people, but unless you have long legs and are tall, you'll never understand what the issue is.
  • 6 0
 @pedalhound: Well, here's an anecdote: I'm 6'4" and I've got a very reasonable amount of seat post above the clamp on my 2020 XL Sight. Maybe 40mm. The thing is for us really tall guys is that we are pretty far outside of the norm. The number of people above 6'3" is small and gets exponentially smaller the farther up in height you go. Products sized for you just become more scarce when your in the 99th percentile. What is your saddle height Pedalhound?
  • 2 1
 @WheelNut: I totally agree with you about how we're a tiny niche. The problem is, as more and more mainstream brands switch to this design pattern of short seat tubes and steep seat angles, the more tall people are excluded. We'll all be forced to go custom or at least way up market, price-wise. This really impacts those who can't afford the more expensive bikes or want to get into the sport.

There's brands like Clydesdale bikeclydesdale.com and Ventana www.ventanausa.com that at least get it.
  • 4 0
 @gdharries: there's not an ROI to create new molds for less than 1% of the population.
  • 2 1
 @jaydawg69: Oh I recognize that. Just sucks to be on the outside.
  • 1 0
 @gdharries: as a hobbit, I've had the opposite problem... Seatposts so long I'm always bottoming out droppers on the clamp, so it goes both ways! Look at canyon bikes
  • 1 0
 @blitz66: I have some hobbit-sized friends that have that same issue. Bikes are mostly made for the masses...Knolly used to build great fitting bikes for smaller riders.
  • 2 0
 I'm the opposite, positive on the ape like index (long arms, short legs) boxer or swimmers build. And I've been on the lookout for a bike with short seat tube on the XL size usually it's 18-20 inches and gets right up my jacksy on descents. The only bike that had a short ST for me was a Process 153 I think - that's why I bought a spitfire (!?) This is perfect. The rest of the geo is perfect for me too. I'm interested big time
  • 2 0
 @jaydawg69: Here's what happens as seat tubes continue to get shorter and shorter www.pinkbike.com/photo/18000443 just so you can see.
  • 1 0
 Why are the brake levers pointed almost straight down in all the trim level profile photos? That's weird.
  • 7 0
 you're supposed to use your thumbs now
  • 3 5
 Cause some people ride their bikes in an aggressive position.
  • 1 0
 This is the 2018 Norco Range... Or pretty much. Perhaps a little slacker. I'm not complaining, great bike.
  • 1 0
 Really similar travel and HTA for sure. Once you get further into geometry numbers and kinematics, the bikes differ more substantially.
  • 3 1
 The Sight or the Ripmo AF? Decisions, decisions.
  • 1 2
 I have also the Banshee Titan in the mix. Not easy.
  • 4 0
 Exactly what I was thinking. I would love to see Mike and Mike do a comparison ride between the two. @pinkbike ???
  • 1 0
 @squarewheel: the Titan does look awesome
  • 1 0
 I can tell you the Ripmo AF is one of my favorite bikes for sure! On the other hand I haven’t tried the Sight since the first 650b version came out. At the time that bike was rad. Hmm that doesn’t seem to help...
  • 1 0
 Bikes get slacker and slacker. My 17' enduro comp with 180 fork has 65° hta what the heck is that 63.5°
  • 1 0
 Bummed to see them leave the climb switch off the X2. Weird move on a trail bike.
  • 3 3
 wish there was more color options. like the co2 build but that color is terrible
  • 3 0
 there are more in the build kit and on the website
  • 4 0
 Yeah you can get blue/black/maroon in a C2 if you do their custom build. It’s a little more money, but it’s definitely nice they offer more options.
  • 1 0
 Norco it´s from BC area?
  • 5 0
 Biggest bike company in Port Coquitlam yo! ????
  • 2 2
 I hope this new one climbs better, test rode a sight before getting an intense tracer. The build a ride thing is genius
  • 1 0
 Which year did you test? I tested a 2018 and cleaned climbs I couldn't/can't otherwise.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, the 2017-newer Sight climbs super well!
  • 2 0
 I think i want one
  • 1 0
 TWO WATER BOTTLE CAGES?! MIND BLOWN!!!!
  • 2 0
 press fit BB?
  • 1 0
 Wondering if the 29er can fit 27.5x2.8 plus tires in there?
  • 3 2
 It's been "Pole-er-ized!"
  • 1 0
 Looks deadly
  • 1 1
 @norcobicycles threaded bb??
  • 1 0
 I guess not. Tried to find any information about it yesterday. They seem to fly below the radar in this question, therefore I assume they use PF BB. Companies using threaded bb highlight it normally.
  • 1 0
 @squarewheel: I can’t see a clear photo other than a carbon one which looks pressfit. Wondering if the alloy one uses the same. Nothing against pressfit, just curious...
  • 3 0
 Carbon is PF & alloy is threaded.
  • 5 5
 Looks like a......Remedy
  • 3 2
 It does
  • 1 4
 23 psi? Really? That works on jumps?
  • 3 0
 Based on rider weight
  • 6 0
 @adventuresbycole: And ability. If you change your skill level to higher on the Ride Alignment calculator, it scales your tire pressures accordingly
  • 2 5
 Difference between this and a Transition?
Serious question
  • 7 1
 Difference between a llama and an alpaca? Serious question.
  • 10 0
 @bishopsmike: llama is better served medium rare.
  • 5 0
 @bishopsmike: llama's are bigger. Alpaca's are softer. Both spit.
  • 2 0
 You have one, you make the other
  • 2 0
 pioneer/refinement?
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