First Look: 2023 Scott Genius & Genius ST

Nov 2, 2022 at 19:42
by Mike Kazimer  
2023 Scott Genius
Scott Genius ST 900.

Scott's Genius trail bike has received a massive update for 2023, and not just in the typical longer, lower fashion. Those geometry changes did occur, but the biggest talking point is the location of the shock inside the frame, a design that was first applied to the Spark, and to Bold's line of bikes before that.

Scott acquired a majority share of Bold back in 2019, and while at the time they claimed that there wouldn't be any crossover on R&D, it sure looks like someone at Scott has been peeking at Bold's homework.

Genius ST Details
• Carbon and aluminum frame options
• Wheel size: 29"
• 150mm travel / 160mm fork
• 64° head tube angle (adjustable to 65 or 64.5°)
• 77.2 seat tube angle (size L)
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL
• Pricing: $3,799 - $12,000 USD
scott-sports.com
The new Genius has 29” wheels, 150mm of rear travel that's paired with a 160mm fork, and is available with either a carbon or aluminum frame. There are two different versions, the Genius and the Genius ST. And no, ST doesn't stand for short travel. It stands for – wait for it – Super Trail.

The Super Trail model receives a piggyback shock, and the fork isn't attached to Scott's TwinLoc remote; activating the handlebar remote only affects the shock. On the Genius model the fork is connected to the remote, and it uses an inline shock. All-mountain is a term that's fallen out of favor, but in this case I'd say it makes sense to call the Genius a trail bike and the Genius ST an all-mountain bike. That is, unless you really like the term super trail.

Prices range from $3,800 USD for the alloy Genius 940 all the way up to $12,000 USD for the carbon Genius 900 Ultimate, and there are a total of 10 different models in the Genius lineup – 6 iterations of the Genius, and 4 of the Genius ST.

2023 Scott Genius

Frame Details

The new Genius is available in three different frame configurations – there's the top level, full carbon version, followed by a version with a slightly different carbon layup and an alloy swingarm, and then the full alloy version. Personally, I think the raw alloy frame found on the base model Genius 940 is the best-looking of the bunch.

Compared to the shorter travel Spark, which uses a flex-pivot design, the Genius uses a Horst link layout for its 150mm of travel. The short link that sits between the seatstays and seat tube connects to a splined aluminum link inside the frame that drives the shock.

2023 Scott Genius
2023 Scott Genius
The shock cover can be removed with the push of a button, allowing access to rebound, compression, and air pressure adjustments.

2023 Scott Genius
External sag indicators help speed up setup.


Accessing the shock to make air pressure or rebound adjustments is done by pushing a button on the plastic downtube cover – no tools required. Once the cover is off, the air valve of the shock is located at the top of the shock for easy access. Because the shock's shaft is hidden inside the frame, a sag indicator is built into the upper link. Overall, getting the bike setup doesn't take any longer than it would with a bike that didn't swallow its shock.

2022 has been the year of routing cables through headsets, and the Genius keeps that trend alive (unfortunately). The cables pass through the split plastic headset spacers, then through the upper headset bearing before going to their respective destinations. Changing the the orientation of the headset cups won't require a brake bleed, but that will likely be necessary when it's time to swap out the headset bearing.

2023 Scott Genius
Scott sure do like hiding things inside the frame.
2023 Scott Genius
There aren't internal tubes for the dropper, derailleur, and brake lines - instead, foam tubing is used to keep things quiet.

The Genius doesn't have tube-in-tube routing, relying instead on foam sheaths to prevent rattling, although we still experienced some noise on our test bike.

In keeping with the integration theme, the Genius uses Syncros’ one-piece Hixon carbon stem / bar combo. Sizes small and medium receive a version with 15mm of rise, and the large and XL bikes get the 25mm version.

2023 Scott Genius
The remote's still not the prettiest thing, but it does work as intended, and doesn't take long to get used to.

2023 Scott Genius
The Genius ST (left) and Genius (right).

2023 Scott Genius

Genius ST vs Genius - What's Different?

The travel amounts between the Genius and Genius ST are the same, but Scott has taken steps to give them distinct personalities out on the trail. Out of the box, the Genius has a steeper head tube angle, and uses a Fox Nude 5T inline shock that has 3 modes – Lockout, Traction Control, and Descend. In the Traction Control mode, the shock's air volume is reduced and the fork's compression damping is increased. That causes the bike to sit higher in its travel, giving it a better climbing position.

On the Genius ST, Scott has made it possible to adjust the Float X shock's progression on the fly. There's a fully open, Descend mode, a Ramp Control mode, and a Climb mode. In Ramp Control, one of the air chambers is closed off, which increases progression in the same way that adding a volume spacer would. In climb mode, the compression damping is increased, creating a firmer pedaling platform for getting to the top of the hill. As for the fork, that's not affected by the remote at all, allowing riders to access all of the adjustments that come with Fox's Grip 2 damper.


2023 Scott Genius

Geometry

The Genius has headset cups that allow for two different head angles – either 64-degrees or 65-degrees depending on the orientation of the cup. The Genius ST comes with the cups in the slacker position, and they're in the steeper position for the Genius. The carbon models also come with another headset cup that splits the difference and creates a 64.5-degree head angle.

The Genius's reach numbers have increased significantly compared to the previous version – when it comes to geometry, a lot has changed in the last five years. The reach of a size large is now 485mm, up from 466mm on the old Genius. The seat tube angle has been steepened to balance out the increased reach, and now sits around 77-degrees depending on the frame size – it gets steeper with the larger sizes.

We're starting to see more and more companies go with size-specific chainstay lengths, but that's not the case here – no matter the size, they measure 440mm.

2023 Scott Genius
The carbon Genius Ultimate retails for $12,000 USD. The no-holds-barred built kit includes a SRAM XX1 AXS drivetrain, Syncros Revelstoke carbon wheels, Shimano XTR 4-piston brakes, and a Fox 36 Float Factory FIT4 fork.

Build Kits

As I mentioned earlier, there are 10 different versions of the Genius, with a variety of frame and component options - it's easiest to head over to Scott's website to view the exact specifications. As you'd expect, the highest end options have carbon wheels SRAM's wireless shifting, and Fox's Factory level suspension - a Grip 2 36 on the Genius ST, and a FIT 4 36 on the Genius.

One step down from the top you'll find the Genius 910, which has a carbon mainframe with an aluminum swingarm. The $7,600 price tag gets you SRAM's GX Eagle AXS wireless drivetrain, Shimano XT brakes, and an Ohlins RXF 36 fork.

The base model Genius 940 has an aluminum frame, and is priced at $3,800 USD. It has a Marzocchi Z2 Air fork, X-Fusion Nude shock, SRAM SX drivetrain, and Shimano MT501 brakes.

2023 Scott Genius
Genius 940.


Ride Impressions

The Genius ST was one of the bikes in our recent Field Test that took place up in Whistler, BC. Those articles and videos will be coming out at the end of this month, so you'll have to wait a little bit for the full scoop on the Genius' performance.

Certain features of the Genius are going to be polarizing – the hidden shock and remote lockout aren't going to suit everyone's tastes, myself included. However, the actual ride quality of the Genius ST is excellent – it's quite light for the amount of travel (our Genius ST 900 Tuned test bike weighed in at 30.1 pounds with Maxxis DoubleDown control tires installed), while still remaining surefooted on chunky descents, or getting airborne on Whistler's jump trails. It's stiff without being overly harsh, and even the one piece bar / stem was comfortable for multiple testers

The Super Trail designation is easy to poke fun at, but after spending time on the Genius ST I understand what Scott was going for. This is a bike that can easily be pedaled on big rides without giving up much (if anything) on the descents. There's no reason this couldn't be used to race the occasional enduro either - the geometry isn't going to be the limiting factor between the tape.

Keep an eye out for our Field Test review of the Genius ST, where it'll get compared to other similar bikes, along with being subjected to the Impossible Climb, Efficiency Test, and the Huck to Flat.





446 Comments

  • 726 6
 What's the purpose of having Kashima shock if nobody can see it
  • 67 9
 Its a smooooth operater
  • 7 4
 THIS!
  • 156 2
 Hopefully Fox starts making stickers that say something like “this bike is powered by Kashmina”
  • 27 27
 This right here is: Comment Gold!
  • 9 7
 @blum585: no, stanchion gold
  • 25 3
 @iantmcg: or a sticker to the nearest service center
  • 11 0
 I'm sure I it is like crossfit.
  • 89 1
 @iantmcg: "Kashima Inside" like the old intel inside pc logo
  • 2 4
 @Jaemin97: No according to everyone that works at Fox.
  • 4 0
 5 extra horsepower when you have Kashima
  • 3 0
 Its not whats on the outside that matters, its all inside the frame.
  • 3 4
 What's the purpose of having a Session if nobody can session it?
  • 58 1
 What’s the purpose of riding something that looks like an E-Bike, but does not have a motor?
  • 7 27
flag j1sisslow (Nov 3, 2022 at 11:23) (Below Threshold)
 What's the purpose of caring what others think of your shock color?
  • 10 10
 @scott-townes:
What's the purpose of riding this rebranded bold?
  • 13 2
 What is the purpose of everything having purpose? Sometimes it is just for the hell of it. Not Kashima though. That is for aesthetics only.
  • 10 0
 On the flip side, riders on performance shocks can lie and tell people they're on Kashima
  • 1 0
 #aborttheshock
  • 1 0
 Sooo true and it would be such a pain to work on
  • 3 2
 @iantmcg: "Kashima Inside" ala, the intel logo
  • 2 0
 If a treeeeeeeeeee, falls in the forest....
Does anybody hear?
  • 1 1
 @iantmcg: kashima Inside
  • 1 1
 It's what's called a Genius Brain Fart
  • 3 7
flag trollhunter (Nov 3, 2022 at 19:06) (Below Threshold)
 Just because you might have nice vag or big prick doesn’t mean you have to show to the world. Some stuff is better protected by layering.
  • 1 0
 Maybe the future addition will come with a clear " window " on the ST area to show and still hide the shock? Smile
  • 1 0
 It's stealth, so you don't realise the service intervals and cost you're letting yourself in for.
  • 2 1
 Like wearing underwear, pointless !!!
  • 528 17
 All of my today's worst trends in one massively inconvenient package!
* Remote lockouts (moar cablez!)
* Hidden suspension components
* Cables and hoses running through the headset
* Internal cables and hoses without internal tubes
* Integrated bar/stem combos

Scott seems intent on winning "Hard-To-Service Bingo"
  • 117 22
 Yeah, one of the worst bikes of all times.

also add "proprietary suspension" to the list.
  • 36 130
flag Muscovir (Nov 3, 2022 at 8:35) (Below Threshold)
 @JohSch: ...says you, without even having ridden one, not knowing what you're talking about.
  • 22 3
 I love my shock remote, would do without the rest though.
  • 138 6
 It took a real dumbass to design this genius.
  • 27 3
 @Muscovir: as a scott owner, he is completely correct
  • 36 1
 @Muscovir: and which of his points regarding serviceability are influenced by riding the thing, exactly?
  • 9 1
 It's very true, this bike would suck to own and work on. For me the deal breakers are the internal cable routing without guides and the headset cable routing. All the others can be removed (lockout/bar stem) or are well designed to not matter (hidden shock).
  • 33 1
 It's the full list of stuff I don't want on a new bike.
  • 11 31
flag Muscovir (Nov 3, 2022 at 9:29) (Below Threshold)
 @Mac1987: Reliability and serviceability? You can only know about those things from experience, which he literally can't have at this point. Also the point about "proprietary suspension" is not true. The frame fits all standard metric shocks in the correct length.
  • 38 0
 JFC Scott - why can't you guys get that front brake line INSIDE THE STANCHION?!?! What a hideous mess of cabling and hoses you've left!!! Serious amateur hour over there smh.
/s (in case you're mental)
  • 23 9
 That and the put stupid sized torx bolts on stuff that has no reason to be there. Scott Engineers: "How should we clamp a dropper post cable? I KNOW! Let's use a torx bit that isn't on any other bolt on the bike nor on any multitool. Obviously you need to put huge amounts of pressure on this cable, and the rest of the industry is dumb for using allen head bolts."

f*ck off Scott. That almost ruined a weekend of riding for a friend.
  • 195 9
 @SCOTT-Sports

Making sure Scott officially sees this.

This is a huge recurring theme. Any new mountain bike with heatset cable routing, is immediately removed from the list of potential future bikes by me, and apparently hundreds of other riders. I will not own a bike that makes normally easy maintenance/adjustment tasks so unnecessarily difficult for me, nor will I recommend it to others.

And then, to add insult to injury, you have an integrated bar and stem.

Which means if I want to do something as simple as add a different rise handlebar, I now need to buy a handlebar and stem, do a full bleed of the rear brake, and re-adjust the rear deraileur. Literally no one wants this.

Headset cable routing might make sense for types of road bikes that care much more about aero. But the incredibly large majority of mountain bikers do not want this. There are multiple editorials about it from different publications/websites, and literally _every_single_ new bike that comes out with this, gets roasted about it.

Please help make this a quickly passing fad in the industry, and not a new "era of bike design".

That is all.
  • 19 8
 Oh, you didn't get the memo: Most people don't work on their bikes.
  • 24 1
 + it looks like an ebike
  • 8 1
 @ocnlogan: maybe I'm missing something but wouldn't it be possible to add a spacer without a rebleed? Wouldn't the only maintenance team affected be changing the headset/headset bearings?
  • 1 0
 *maintenance task
  • 9 46
flag Bushmaster123 (Nov 3, 2022 at 12:00) (Below Threshold)
 @NorCalNomad: Wow you are stupid! It comes with a multitool (allen and torx) build into the rear axel. It can service every bolt on the bike.

When was the last time I needed to change a brake line or headset bearing? Yeah like 20 yeads ago..
  • 6 0
 @Bushmaster123: my wife has a ransom with the same system. When she first got it I was like wtf is with these torn. Then I discovered the hidden tool, what a great idea.
  • 20 1
 @Muscovir: The very definition of serviceability is "being able to service it"
I can tell you as a mechanic looking* at this bike, that yes, it's serviceable, but I will charge you £1million in labour hours to do so.


*You can know stuff by looking, not necessarily touching
  • 3 2
 @Tmfnll:

About adding spacers.

It depends on the headset routing used. Some enter the headset by the dust cap, others go through the stem. If it goes through the dust cap, you're good to add/remove spacers, or handlebars without any issue.

In this case, it looks the cables are routed through the stem. Which means you can't add a stem spacer without bleeding the brakes, unless I'm missing something, or you have some two piece stem spacers or something like that.
  • 5 2
 @Tmfnll: It is more involved due to the topcap/stem integration. In my case I wanted to lower the front by removing spacers. This required commitment to the new configuration prior to trying it out. Also, I had to find a way to trim the steerer tube while the fork was still attached to the bike via the control lines. I enjoy the bike in other regards but I can say definitively that it is not fun to work on the simplest of systems due to the level of integration.
  • 11 1
 I am betting it also has a press fit bottom bracket.
  • 1 0
 @BobbyHillbomb:

No, no, no... It takes a _special kind_ of genius.
  • 19 2
 @Bushmaster123: Ah the irony of calling me stupid. I'll spell it out so you don't have such a problem.
1.That bike and the older Genius my friend was riding has the Scott Twinlock lever. Most other Scotts with that twin lock lever don't have an integrated tool, which leads me to point 2.
2.That lever uses a T10 bolt to secure the cables for the dropper and rear shock onto the lever. Huh that rear axle multitool doesn't have a T10...or even a closely sized Allen to get by in a pinch Rolleyes
3. Name another common part on a mountain bike (other than an Avid bleed screw) that uses that size bolt.
4. Come up with a good reason for trading off making the bike harder to work on by using a less common fastener, when a 2-3mm Allen bolt works perfectly fine (I'm sure that 99.9% of the other dropper levers on the market are missing a huge opportunity...)
  • 2 2
 Honestly AXS solves some of these problems, don't have to deal with two of those issues if you remove the dropper and shifter cable. Idk how you'd set up the dropper to work with that lockout lever dingus though...
  • 4 0
 AND as an extra topping: a new thinner cable/ housing standard for seat post actuation!
  • 3 0
 You forgot "plastic headset cups".
  • 5 4
 Forgot press-fit BB At least it is not super boost
  • 2 0
 @NorCalNomad: the dropper post cables have never been torx to my knowledge. It’s been a 2mm hex (since atleast 201Cool and it’s the same size on the cable pinch bolts for the shock and fork.
  • 8 1
 @TimMog: Overall it’s better than the previous version of the genius (I actually know this as I built a few of the new versions). The dropper post cable and housing is quicker to change than the previous version and about as quick as any bike I’ve ever worked on. The rear lockout cable routing is also improved from the previous version. The rear derailleur cable and housing is about the same as the previous version of the genius. Overall it’s about the same as most other internal routes bikes I’ve worked on over the years.
  • 2 5
 Who works on their own bikes anymore? I feel like Scott was always bought by people that didn’t work on their own bikes anyway! As an aside, I jumped around on a friend’s year old Genius and have to say it was like riding in a comfy couch. A tad heavy but quite the plow sled!
  • 2 1
 @Alexdeg: anything on the new Genius or the current Spark that has 3mm housing and a 0.8mm cable is backwards compatible with 4mm housing and 1.1/ 1.2 cables. The smaller housing is easier you route, lighter and more flexible and all systems were designed for backwards compatibility.
  • 4 2
 @Verg: Sooooo, a pain in the arse then? I don't think I've ever worked on a bike where the internal routing has made me think, "yeah, this is worth it" from either a performance or aesthetic perspective.

There's a reason I now own a Geometron.
  • 1 0
 @Verg: It very much was a torq on my friends 2021 Genius ... m.media-amazon.com/images/I/513-8SYzJhL._AC_SL1000_.jpg and another version (older I believe) www.ebay.com/itm/254796703550
  • 3 1
 I honestly can't stand the integrated/proprietary bar/stem combos because it limits customisation for the feel of the bike
  • 4 0
 You missed "wide shell" press fit BB.
  • 5 16
flag Muscovir (Nov 3, 2022 at 16:28) (Below Threshold)
 @TimMog: Come now don't be ridiculous. It's literally not rocket science. If you're actually a mechanic and the prospect of working on something like this scares you, then you clearly chose the wrong job.
  • 14 2
 @Muscovir: Every single mechanic be it bike, car, or otherwise hates when what should be a simple task is far from it because of zero thought of serviceability at the design/ engineering stage. Like how some VW Passat's require the WHOLE BUMPER to be taken off to change a headlight bulb.
  • 5 0
 @NorCalNomad: Add Subaru Outbacks to that list. You don't quite need to drop the bumper as it's just barely possible to access the headlamp housing by removing the wheel arch cladding. But unless your arms are 1.5m long and have three elbows, it's impossible to actually see what you are doing at the same time. Even with my skinny arms the clearances are tight, and I ended up with grazes on both forearms from sharp edges. What would have been a 1 minute job on my old car took well over an hour, not including the extra trip to the auto parts store to replace the plastic panel clips that were too clogged up with dirt to remove without damaging them.
  • 2 0
 All for a scant 12K
  • 3 3
 @NorCalNomad: both of the examples you posted aren’t dropper post levers, they’re both Twinloc levers without the post. On both of the ones you linked to the cable pink bolt is on the shock and fork s d it’s a 2mm hex.
  • 5 15
flag conoat (Nov 3, 2022 at 20:56) (Below Threshold)
 it's only hard to service if you are the type of person that violently refuses to expand their skill sets...
  • 7 4
 @conoat: Stupidest comment ever in PB history
  • 7 5
 @likeittacky: Scott’s aren’t that hard to work on. Get better
  • 3 1
 @drapeau

The lack of internal tube in tube routing is one of the best aspects as it allows Brits and Aussies etc to have better brake routing.
  • 2 1
 remote lockouts are good not having to reach down is useful
  • 4 1
 Yes, Scott is the new Cannondale. Adding weird sh!t to their bikes just for the sake of adding weird sh!t to their bikes…
  • 4 2
 @TimMog: My LBS mechanic told me that he refuses to service headset cable routing, period.
Why? Because his customers are mostly his friends, and either he charges them with fair and astronomically high service bills, potentially losing them as customers and friends, or he accepts to work underpaid.
  • 4 0
 @ocnlogan: You can swap from the barstem to the Syncros stem that matches the covers and fit any rise bar you want.
This without bleeding any hose or changing any cable, because nothing goes through the stem/barstem.
Same goes for spacers.

You're welcome.
  • 5 1
 @Muscovir: At no point have I said it scares me, wtf are you on about? We've gone from you telling someone they cannot possibly know how serviceable something is without physically having it in front of them, to you you saying people are scared of working on them. What I said was, I can tell from looking at a photo that it's unnecessarily complicated to work on, and it will require more time , hence more charge to a customer.
  • 3 0
 you forgot: looks like an e-bike, but isn't one
  • 2 1
 @Tasso75: I mean, if they were really his friends, they'd pay him the fair price for the hours he works on their complicated bike. But I can see how he feels it's a moral dilemma, and it's easier to just say no
  • 2 0
 @Tmfnll: this.....road bikes with headset routing all use split spacers. No reason that can't be employed here.

yes, headset spacing adds complexity once ever 18-24mo when you swap the headset....ok.
  • 6 0
 Funny-when Dangerholm does a bike like this the fanbois lose their minds. Scott does it from the factory and the (earned) scorn for poor engineering is palpable.
  • 1 0
 @Tasso75: it’s not that hard. It’s annoying, sure, but he is being extremely dramatic
  • 1 0
 @conoat: I use a deity grip clamp as my headset spacer, i can pop it in and out without fully removing my stem
  • 4 1
 As an old Scott user, something went wrong with this company. From the coolest FR/DH future proof bikes with craziest graphics in the world (2013) to soulless, fake, expensive, grayzone mediocore bikes for regulars with no class or love whatsoever. Meanwhile the world drives fake Voltages and Sessions.
  • 2 0
 @number44: aaand front brake cabling goes to: headset -> steerer tube -> stanchion tube..the only complaint is that the hose should be expandable, probably coil-like one, like the leash I am using on my SUP board (or good ol years' telephone wire)
  • 3 1
 @NorCalNomad @Muscovir Exactly this.

Even if you have the skillset already, it's incredibly annoying to have to employ 5 skills to do what used to be one.
An example. A bike comes in with a rear puncture, if it's got a quick release then that's a sub 1-minute job. A bike comes in with a puncture, it's got a coaster brake, rear facing dropouts and mudguards with tight clearance, and a Nexus hub. Changing an inner tube now takes 15-20mins, and six different tools.

Tell me that's not annoying, whilst you're trying to change a puncture at the side of a road, in the rain.
  • 2 2
 @NorCalNomad: Thanks for the book. Don't like it, don't buy it. Going scorched earth on it makes you look stupid. Every bike company has example of broken frames. Pretending Scott is worse than everyone else, well, makes you look stupid. Typical NorCal idiot...
  • 1 0
 @in2falling: don't drag 157mm hubs into this mess.
  • 1 0
 @jclnv: This is something most people overlook.
  • 1 0
 @wyorider: TBF, I think there is a decent delta between a one off custom bike, and a company locking you into a thing because they are trying to save $20. lol

I still don't have the hate for headset routing like all the 23yr olds here seem to.
  • 1 0
 @TimMog: charge more. time is money.

almost any shop has a higher price for puncture/tube/tire change on bikes with gear hubs.
  • 4 0
 @conoat: Yes, that's the point I've been making throughout this thread, and we do.
The other guy has taken my comment about it taking more time/money and taken it to mean I'm frightened of working on a complicated bike.

Bottom line; bike manufacturers have made something overly complicated for "aesthetics", mechanics mention it's more complicated to work on, but somehow we're dickheads for saying that
  • 1 1
 @ocnlogan: The integegrated handlebar/stem only comes on the elit model. Every other model comes with a bar and stem combo.

I guess you only own elite level bikes that are $9k or higher?
  • 1 0
 @TimMog: You've chosen a rather contrived example. If that's the bike you're riding, why on earth would you plan to replace the tube to fix a puncture roadside? Just pop one side of the tyre off the rim and pull the tube out to patch it and there's no need to pull the wheel out of the frame, and the job still only takes 3 minutes. Given you're riding a post-apocalyptic commuter bike, you're not getting those punctures often because you have chosen suitable tyres, you're not obsessed enough with speed to care about the extra 2 minutes on the odd occasion you do puncture, which is a whole lot less often than the times your fenders save you getting a soaking.

Getting back to the point of the argument, how often are you replacing headset bearings anyway? The last time I had to replace a headset on an MTB was in 2005, after I fully submerged my bike on a ride, then put it away wet for 6 weeks while I went on holidays. I ride in all weather, and pressure spray my bikes to clean them, and have kept my last two FS bikes 7 years each. The last time I replaced the headset on my commuter was in 1999, when I changed from a rigid fork with threaded steerer to a suspension fork with threadless steerer. The same headset with original bearings is still on the bike now, and I ride it to work every day rain or shine.

I'm much more concerned about the potential for wear on the steerer from cable rub than time taken to replace bearings.
  • 1 0
 @TimMog: nope. you aren't a dickhead for saying your time has a price. just be clear with customers as to why it is. Never discount your labor, and never accept less than you are worth.
  • 1 0
 @dsut4392: How is it contrived? It's the same idea, a designer has overly complicated what used to be a simple job, for almost no advantage.

In the last year of MTB ownership, I've replaced headset bearings three times. I don't pressure wash bikes, I live in the UK so our weather is awful, and I maintain my own bikes near enough daily. Including road bikes, I sometimes replace those bearings once a year too (thanks Cannondale lower bearing design ) so that's 5 sets of bearings, more than once each per year. I ride a lot, so maybe I'm not indicative of the population, but if I had to bleed brakes or changing cables EVERY time I was doing this, I'd be fuc*ing livid. Not that I'd have bought a bike with internal routing through a headset to start with, because I'm not a martyr.
  • 1 0
 @dsut4392

I live in the PNW, so also wet weather riding for 1/2 - 2/3 the year. But I also only have one bike, and don't ride all that often compared to most. With a couple times a week, to 1-2 times a month sort of average throughout the year.

No new headsets for my personal bike so far. But my old bikes headset was caged ball bearings instead of a sealed cartridge bearing. And I serviced those about once a quarter. My buddies Commencal went through a headset in the first 9 months. My brother in laws Transition Sentinel went through a headset in 7 months.

So, its not a "normal everyday" activity, its totally true. But enough that I wouldn't want to intentionally make it more difficult than it needs to be.

If I cared more about cable length, or frame weight, aero, or a "tidy cockpit", then maybe. But personally those things all rank about as low down on my bikes priority list as I can possibly think. Well below "what color valve cores should I use" and "which water bottle do I take today".
  • 2 0
 @TimMog: Hmm, in hindsight maybe it's not that your example is contrived, but more that it doesn't support your argument, because there's a quick and easy solution to the problem you pose which is "don't do it that way". Besides, IGH with coaster brakes and full mudguards may not be the bike you or I would choose, but there are some significant advantages to them for some riders, far more so than for headset cable routing.

I'm not arguing in favour of cable routing through the headset, but in my experience (having also lived in the UK, and having had 100mm rain last week where I live now) replacing headset bearings is not something that needs to be done routinely enough to be a major factor in the decision either way. I'm honestly baffled as to why your experience with headsets is so different to mine, as I seem to get pretty comparable life from cassettes and chains as most people report, and those are equally related to miles, weather and trail conditions. I agree road hydraulics are a pain because you need to unwind the bar tape, and at least on SRAM it's hard to disconnect the hose at the lever without spilling all the fluid from the reservoir, but every MTB brake I've had is easy to disconnect at the lever without spilling much, and bleeding a brake is no big deal. If you're a pro mechanic, why wouldn't you just charge for the extra 15 minutes work instead of being angry about it?
  • 2 0
 @ocnlogan: I'm similarly unmoved by the supposed pros of internal headset routing, and am highly sceptical of the risks (particularly with road/gravel bikes with carbon steerers) of hidden wear. All else being equal, I wouldn't choose the bike with this routing.

But all else is never equal, and even going into it eyes fully open the extra hassle involved in changing headset bearings isn't something that I would lose any sleep over.
  • 3 0
 @dsut4392:

Agreed to a point. If there were no options without headset cable routing, I’d still be a mountain biker. I’m not a pro mechanic, but bleeding brakes is something we’ll within my skill set. And if I had to, I would do that.

But all things being equal, I’ll try not to make myself do that. I was just trying to inform Scott that I, and apparently hundreds of other people feel the design is sub-optimal.
  • 2 1
 @dsut4392: Rather than tell me how I'm wrong, instead tell me why Scott is right. What is the advantage of routing cables through a headset bearing?
  • 1 0
 @TimMog: If you ride AXS it does look nicer to not have random holes in your frame.
  • 1 0
 @jclnv: I do ride AXS. My frame has holes in it. It doesn't bother me they're there. If I ever sell that frame, I'm not forcing the buyer into using only one type of groupset.
  • 1 0
 @TimMog: Frame designers are maybe a little more focused on those details?
  • 2 0
 @jclnv: Focussed on tiny minutiae and forgetting the bigger picture, like how someone has to dismantle an unrelated component in order to change a bearing. Thumbs up designer, well done.
  • 2 1
 @TimMog: I don't totally disagree, but I see both views.
  • 2 2
 @TimMog: to change a bearing that only needs to be replaced every couple years if you maintain your bike properly. All you people saying this sucks because you work on your own bike maybe shouldn’t be
  • 1 0
 @olafthemoose: See my comments above. The people that do work on their bikes themselves tend to replace bearings more often than every couple of years.
  • 1 1
 @olafthemoose: Also, I work on other people's bikes, that's why this sucks
  • 1 0
 @TimMog: frame bearings, yes. Upper headset bearing? Extremely infrequent
  • 1 0
 @TimMog: If you paid attention, you might have noticed that in all of my posts in this thread I've expressed that I'm not in favour of headset cable routing.
If you actually want to know what the supposed advantages are for this routing, there's a whole article on it that you can go and read, or if you prefer just head straight to the comments section and continue boxing with shadows like you are here.
  • 1 0
 @olafthemoose: Again, see my comments above
  • 2 0
 @dsut4392: I read it, I can't see anything that claims to be an advantage, but ok
I've been called contrived for providing an example, and told my own personal experiences of changing headset bearings is strange.
If neither of us like the routing, why are we even talking about it. Let's just leave it there.
  • 233 8
 Regular people: make e-bikes look more like regular bikes!

Engineers: make regular bikes look more like e-bikes!
  • 38 12
 Pros- makes it harder for you to be caught riding an ebike on trails where they aren't allowed Cons- now all bikes will be as ugly as ebikes
  • 25 23
 @hamncheez: ebikes on trails were they're not allowed is about as inconspicuous as smoking when smoking isn't allowed. You're not fooling anyone
  • 13 0
 Hats off to MARIN for starting this trend. (wolf ridge / mount vision)
  • 22 2
 @Bro-LanDog: dude its a joke
  • 3 0
 @BEERandSPOKES: MV8 owner, can confirm.
  • 3 31
flag Bro-LanDog (Nov 3, 2022 at 7:33) (Below Threshold)
 @hamncheez: dUdE iTs a JoKe
  • 14 1
 Look at the entire Santa Cruz line up now, massive down tubes.
  • 32 0
 @joshbm1: I want to be able to fit 2 beers, a 6”sub and pudding cup in my downtube
  • 4 0
 @loosegoat: and my self respect
  • 4 0
 @BEERandSPOKES: Lol. I asked a dude about his Marin ebike up on the hill the other day... turns out it was not an e-bike.
  • 2 9
flag adrian-montgomery (Nov 3, 2022 at 8:59) (Below Threshold)
 E-Bikes may have affected overall bike design with the need to have the weight low/centered. So I'll agree, both ends are working towards a middle ground where one day we won't be able to tell the difference. And I think that's OK
  • 5 0
 Going to be shunned off the trail because it looks like a motor.
  • 3 17
flag Bushmaster123 (Nov 3, 2022 at 12:03) (Below Threshold)
 @hamncheez: Your girlfriend is ugly but you think she's beautiful lol.

This is one of the best looking bikes out right now from a bike brand. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, I guess... As a bonus they ride really well both uphill and down. Yes, I know, I have one..
  • 3 0
 @loosegoat:
I'm not a native speaker, and Googled puddle cup, not pudding up...
  • 3 0
 @delarscuevas: lol, thanks for the laugh
  • 5 0
 @loosegoat: I’m waiting for someone to make a refrigerated downtube storage compartment for my goodies.
  • 3 0
 @loosegoat:
Kind of makes sense though, doesn't it? "Not today honey, there's a puddle cup in my down tube."
  • 3 0
 @loosegoat: "fitting things in my downtube" is the dirtiest sounding, non-dirty phrase I have heard today.
  • 1 0
 @corposello: We're used to it, lol
  • 132 0
 All that downtube and no lunchbox?
  • 5 0
 Yeah soo much room for tools and snacks
  • 7 0
 Once you remove your rear shock there's plenty of room.
  • 89 8
 These must be a nightmare to work on. Poor lbs mechanics...
  • 16 5
 The technicians are paid the same. After numerous poor assembly quality Sparks from Scott you know what to do. Still hard to swallow since their rear suspension ain't that great and their bikes aren't that light anymore.
But at least we have won one of the worst cable routing ever. And I'm not even talking about their thinner outer and inner cable for the seat post …
  • 33 2
 These bikes really are beautiful, and a pleasure to look at everywhere except in your workstand.
  • 5 0
 @Euskafreez: Agreed. The thin dropper cable housing and routing through the frame is a total nightmare to change or work on.
  • 5 0
 We take donations of beer, weed and serviceable bike parts. Your consideration is appreciated.

I had to remove some Vittoria foam road inserts yesterday, customer wanted to keep everything for swap onto his new wheels. I’ve been working in a bike shop in some form since 1992, that was one of the more difficult things I’ve worked on.
  • 3 0
 YES; they TOTALLY ARE a nightmare to work on!!!
I just had to replace the new thinner cable/ housing on a customers Patron, due being totally shredded to pieces when he made an attempt at mounting the seat post... A regular sized cable/ housing did fit just fine!
  • 4 0
 Till needs a button on that adds 20% to your work order immediately on these new Scott frames
  • 65 0
 you'll have to make your own gentle whirring noises on the climbs...
  • 19 1
 Joke's on you; I already do that
  • 32 0
 Best I can do is labored wheezing
  • 66 1
 Looks Bold
  • 3 8
flag stiingya (Nov 3, 2022 at 10:17) (Below Threshold)
 This should be the top comment...
  • 2 0
 someone had to make the joke
  • 45 7
 Is it just me, or does it look like an e-bike?
  • 11 4
 They are testing it, this is the Pr"E"bike
  • 15 1
 Fuel EXe looks less pregnant than this thing
  • 2 0
 Biggest downside to this bike for sure.
  • 35 0
 Let's see the cockpit controls? Still tons of stuff goin on? A lockout lever for the lockout?
  • 27 1
 I need at least three lever stacked on top of each other. I don’t know what they do, but I do need them.
  • 16 0
 Sure thing - I've added that in. And yes, it's still a busy-looking remote.
  • 9 2
 @pdxkid--haha--love this paradigm Scott constantly struggles with--loves the 'oh so necessary' levers and cables, then hides, crimps, and tucks them throughout the frame!
  • 7 0
 They got self-conscious of everyone saying it looks the cockpit looks like a rats nest and decided to squish it into the spaghetti maker that is the headset routing
  • 3 1
 Will there be an option to throw the lockout in the garbage?
  • 12 2
 What if Scott just added a bit more antisquat, and dump all these remotes.
  • 5 0
 @hamncheez: The Genius and Ransom before this model already have 100%+ antisquat and it feels that way too. I find the remote still great to use though.
  • 7 7
 @mikekazimer: Does TwinLoc not just scream “this bike climbs terribly”?

For the average person what is it actually adding?
  • 3 1
 @Mooweeman: my wife has a ransom and loves the twin loc. She has one bike and rides a fair bit of different styles and difficulties so it works great. I've ridden it and it's a rocket ship up hill in the 120 mode, way better than my Enduro bike. Full lock out is pointless imo, if they really want 3 modes I'd prefer a 140mm option for descending. I'd also ditch the fork lockout.
  • 7 3
 @Mooweeman: no it means you optimise the shock tube for downhill and use the modes for climbing. Why compromise the shocks dh performance for climbing when you have this solution
  • 2 3
 The #1 factor for climbing efficiency for any bike is the tire selection. When Scott can alter that with a climb switch I'll be all in!
  • 3 0
 @Mooweeman: Can sporty up a big bike in flick of a switch, also helpful on steep climbs to keep the rear from sagging back in weight. Get this bike sub 30lbs and it really does it all.
  • 2 0
 @Mooweeman: No, it screams "this bike is setup to descend and the twinloc will make it climb too" which is surely what we all want?
  • 2 1
 @maglor: That's an interesting interpretation. I thought I heard it yelling "This bike was engineered in a sub optimal way but don't worry we've slapped a band aid on it and we collectively feel it should be good enough!!"
  • 1 0
 So I've designed and experimented with pivot placement on single pivot metal frames (an idea I want to get to, actually, is to use an eccentric BB shell in the main pivot so riders can test different levels of antisquat) and in my opinion, which not everyone is going to agree with, is that (relatively) high antisquat usually makes a bike ride better on the DH, and obviously better on the climbs.

Its pretty clear more rearward travel makes a bike descend better (once again, within reason). Everyone is going to mid to high pivot idler DH bikes now on the World Cup it seems. The problem is that without an idler you get more chain pull too. Too much chain pull and it drags on your suspension, making it less sensitive. I believe, however, this threshold is much higher than most believe. A good example was the last-gen Scott Gambler- a legendary bike. Everyone who rode it loved it. The main pivot on that sucker was so freaking high even without an idler pulley to manage the chain pull. Specialized seems to agree with this, as their Enduro and Demo have extremely forward placed main pivots, which gives you the same effect (its more complicated than just that, obviously). Neko Mulally also agrees with this, although he "cheats" with an O-Chain.

If we sacrifice and get more chain growth to get a more rearward axle path, and that trade off is worth it, what else do we get? More antisquat. Now your suspension is firmer under power too. Win win, in my book.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: it seems like live valve is going to do a lot of this lifting? Jesse Melamed seemed a fan.
  • 2 0
 @tbubier: why would your first thought be the engineers didn’t bother because they have twinloc to fall back on, surely anyone would use twinloc or a climb switch to only enhance the overall experience. Suspension performance is always a balance but having a different tune at the press of button will only give you a wider window of performance, take sports cars with adaptive dampers for example, they don’t exist to band aid poor suspension design, they give you a sporty drive when you want it and a comfy one when you don’t, something no single setup can do as well.
  • 33 3
 Oh man these new Scott bikes are so crappy, had to do some bearing replacements, cable rattling fixes, etc this summer in the shop.
  • 9 0
 *so many
  • 17 2
 I feel your pain bro ! Pure junk they are ! We are one of the biggest Spark and Spark RC reseller in Europe. Not one single bike they send us was assembled correctly. One of our grease monkey is now fast as when it comes to disassembling and reassembling their frame just to grease all the bits and bobs between front and rear triangle.
  • 5 1
 One of the old models came with some genius piece of crap rear hanger that keep together the axle as well. That bike only lasted a few weeks,it was from my boss at that time. It broke a few times ruining some guide rides,waste of money and time. Far from a reliable bike you need to do the job. I do not like Scott bikes a bit.
  • 3 1
 That's job security though!
  • 1 0
 @Lookinforit: not if you work for a Scott dealer and people quit buying them because of servicing costs
  • 29 4
 I was going to comment all sorts of things about this bike, like how I've been converted to the idea that any bike with more than 130mm of travel should be coil, geometry numbers, pros-cons on the internal shock, but really it doesn't matter because of headset routed cables. There is no reason to keep reading the article or ever give this bike a second look.
  • 6 0
 Agree. Absolutely frustrating to see this. Scott’s Engineers are an eccentric bunch. Great at some things but puzzling when they pull crap like this.

Also happy to argue coil shocks sometime. Is there already a forum thread for discussing coils on shortish travel trail bikes?
  • 20 3
 @WasatchEnduro: There are two groups behind every dumb engineering decision:

1. A project manager who came up with dumb idea, is obsessively proud of dumb idea, and refuses to hear any input as to why dumb idea is dumb
2. A group of engineers crying at night because #1 made them implement dumb idea despite numerous objections and explanations as to why it is dumb idea.
  • 4 0
 @WasatchEnduro: Scott must be full of, what we called in the military, "good idea fairies".

This will look good on my resume. Send it!
  • 3 0
 @shinook: we currently have the opposite at our company. architect/engineer comes up with some overly complex assinine design for something that should be a simple thing. decides that this will now be the "official standard." it costs 10x more than it should. its more costly and annoying to maintain. the end user (operations & maintenance) don't want it, program management doesn't want it because its monetarily wasteful and irresponsible and unnecessary. engineering refuses to do a simpler redesign to cut costs or increase simplicity because "its our standard and we can't move off our standard"....... that we ourselves created and decided on. not regulated standards, not due to fire/life safety, just because we said so. and around and around we go. its an odd funny dance to watch.
  • 3 0
 @shinook: i don't think you understand what we do as project managers. It's a thankless task. We take the BS that Marketing give us and try to convince Engineering that it's a good idea. Engineering says we can't do that, it's stupid. Cue both sides yelling at the PM...
  • 1 0
 @cheezario: also the 1% dummy PMs ruin it for the 99%
  • 1 0
 @cheezario: I’m mostly joking, I’ve worked with some amazing PMs who were great to work with.

I’ve also worked with some who came up with dumb ideas that they wouldn’t let go of despite pleading from engineers.

I’m not saying all PMs are like this, but it does happen
  • 3 0
 @shinook:
3. Engineers who have zero practical knowledge. I have met plenty of those.
4. Sales teams who insists that some dumb thing is needed for some reason.
  • 1 0
 @93EXCivic: All totally fair, especially #4.
  • 30 6
 I already rode the Genius ST. Scott sure does some things differently and you may disagree with their ideas, but you really can't fault their execution. The Genius ST is a fantastic bike. If you can see past some design quirks there's very little to critique. The actual ride quality is absolutely superb. If you'll ever get the chance to try one you'll know immediately what I mean.

And to those who complain about TwinLoc: Go and try it, it really works a treat.
  • 17 3
 that could all be true but your opinion is invalidated by headset routed cables.
  • 4 0
 I don’t think anybody is discrediting the ride quality. Based on their last and the number on this bike, I’m sure it rides great. But serviceability is high on most peoples list due to limited hours in the day; and this bike is very close to the bottom when you consider serviceability.
  • 4 0
 I can't hear you over the sound of all those cables rattling around
  • 18 0
 Harder to pedal because you're out of breath from having to explain it's not an eBike.
  • 2 9
flag pargolf8 (Nov 4, 2022 at 5:54) (Below Threshold)
 You eeb haters are just a cesspool of conformity likes
  • 17 2
 I'll likely be in the minority group here, but goddamn does that alloy version look great. Why are are aluminum frames always seemingly relegated to the very basest of models with meager parts specs? Dare I say that we need to make aluminum great again? YT hit it out of the park when they offered the Capra in the "AL LTD" trim. Aluminum frame with top shelf parts spec. More brands need to offer high end aluminum models.
  • 4 2
 I might be biased but if you want an aluminum frame in the 160/150 flavor with nice parts then a Stumpjumper Evo alloy in top spec is so much more appealing than this Genius. The YT isn’t bad either if you prefer DTC
  • 15 1
 I truly despise these hidden cable/hose routing schemes through the headset, especially on mountain bikes. Every time one comes through my workstand at the shop I curse the engineers and the fact I don't have an extra hand built-in to my body. They build up ok frame-up but doing anything even tangential to the headset and you're in for a lot of time and even more foul language.

Home mechanics beware.
  • 8 1
 For the aluminum model, I'd just buy some of those stick on cable guides and route everything externally myself.
  • 24 7
 Headset cable routing. Good job, Scott.
  • 9 1
 Stopped reading the article once I read that. Next!
  • 15 1
 unironically, the only bike that really needed it. We did this, when we made fun of the all the cables dangling off the front end of all the twinloc bikes over the years.
  • 3 2
 It ain't a problem if done right … which is the opposite of what Scott does !
  • 19 6
 Stay away from them lads !
One of the worst customer service on the market especially if you deal with them directly. Prices are high but service is below average. They take ages to answer and make fun of themselves ! They claim that some of their suspension bolts need to be replaced every 12 to 18 months.
When confronted with a Bosch diagnostic and its odometer saying that the bike barely rode during pandemic they still said no. Arguing that some bolts wear out just like that. What a joke and a bunch of tools they are. Needless to say that my customer was not moved by their answer. Poor lad will never buy another 10k bike from them. All they had to do was to ship a 9€ bolts at their expense …
Oh and what about their crash replacement policy ? Did you know what 'Crash Replacement' means for Scott on parts and accessories ? It means GFY after the warranty is over ! Broke your carbon rim on your 4 years old Scott Spark ? Then you do not qualify for a crash replacement.
  • 5 4
 True that. I had to help a customer this summer with rattling issues (not the normal ones, all due to bike design) and it took him months of slow back and forth to get it remedied. In the end it never worked great and he bought a different bike out of frustration with the damn thing.
  • 8 16
flag Muscovir (Nov 3, 2022 at 8:05) (Below Threshold)
 Still leaps and bounds ahead of Specialized though, when it comes to customer service...
  • 3 1
 @Muscovir: It ain't that hard either …
  • 2 4
 @hi-dr-nick: I wonder if the downvotes come from Scott employees or tools that never wrench for a living on Scott haha.
  • 2 0
 My dealer here in the US said he had never heard of a Scott crash replacement policy (note his shop does fairly high volume on multiple brands so its not like he is a dedicated Scott dealer).

I snapped my Ransom frame in half in a crash (not the bikes fault, any frame would have smashed IMO) so it would be nice if there was some other option than the $5500 ($4600 real world price) frameset with a fork I don't need and doesn't even have Grip2.

I looked on their website for anything related to crash replacement but didn't see it, post a link if you got it.
  • 3 0
 @preston67: In Europe where lbs deal with Scott directly, they do offer a crash replacement. When it comes to the frame, if you brake the rear triangle and it's your fault, they will offer between 20 and 30% off. All your dealer had to do was to fill a form on the b2b or send them an email.
  • 1 0
 @Euskafreez: Thanks, I'm inquiring with Scott USA directly.
  • 1 0
 Scott's Australian distributor is basically useless.
  • 19 3
 New genius, legitimately stupid.
  • 14 0
 Finally a bike made for haters . Plenty to hate about this bike . Lol.
  • 11 0
 I honestly don't rememebr the last time I saw a new bike intro spec'd with Shimano components. Is SRAM just killing it or is there more to the story?
  • 20 0
 I don’t understand either why so few bikes are specced with Deore after basically every Review on the internet praising it compared to Sram SX and NX
  • 17 0
 SRAM can provide a full build kit, while if the brand manager specs shimano, they have to handle suspension (and possibly other components, like wheels.) and because sram sells the whole build kit, they can sell them cheaper than build kits from 2-3 brands.
  • 6 0
 SRAM must have crazy good OEM prices
  • 3 0
 @juliuskliemmtb: simple: aggressive OEM pricing by SRAM. Value for the customer only counts with some enthusiast' smaller brands.
  • 1 0
 @JohSch: Crazy is the word...
  • 6 1
 @groghunter: I feel like more then 1 product manager got burned by Shimano's inability to provide a reliable supply of parts the past couple of years and would prefer to just spec SRAM so they can at least sell their bikes
  • 3 0
 It's an availability thing. Shimano is still showing OE availability for brakes and cassettes at something stupid like early 2024.
  • 2 0
 Because shimano’s factory burnt then during covid so deals were done with sram
  • 1 0
 @juliuskliemmtb: totally. As a RS/Sram rider almost exclusively, (on a few bikes so I can swap parts) I was really blown away by deore shifting on a bike I demoed. I think it's just the perfect storm as others have said that gave Sram the inventory edge.
  • 1 1
 They tried it when when the Shimano 12 speed groupsets came out but they didn’t sell as well as the sram equipped bikes and it was harder to get parts as shimano couldn’t reliably supply them and they’d still have to go to sram for suspension and other parts anyway.
  • 1 9
flag thenotoriousmic (Nov 3, 2022 at 14:07) (Below Threshold)
 @juliuskliemmtb: No review has ever favourably compared Deore to NX. You’re confusing actual reviews to what 44 year old pink bikers have said unfounded in the comments.
  • 10 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Kaz seems to say that he likes deore over sub GX drivetrain models pretty frequently in the Pinkbike Podcast to be fair.
  • 2 6
flag thenotoriousmic (Nov 4, 2022 at 1:43) (Below Threshold)
 @Robspittler: well he should be fired for being incompetent if he genuinely believes that or at least made to pay for his own parts. I have nearly two complete broken deore groupsets in my garage including brakes that are both less than a year old, it’s utter junk and not fit for purpose. I don’t know what they make the mechs out of but it’s not metal.
  • 4 0
 @thenotoriousmic: tell me you're a hack without telling me...
  • 2 0
 @m47h13u:
I feel like people get off on telling people how good at breaking bike parts they are. Not trying to disagree about people's opinions, it just has been my experience that people seem to generally get along with deore build bikes. I started breaking/bending less bike parts the better I got at riding (talking DH) and I was riding faster, so I guess what I'm saying is maybe most broken parts are operator error.
Sidenote, brakes on low end builds are always going to be the weakpoint.
  • 3 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Kaz is awesome and practical when it comes to reviews so get outta here with that noise.
  • 2 2
 @Robspittler: I have two broken 12 speed deore groupsets in my garage and half an SLX. Not mine taken of friends bikes and replaced with GX. I like to take them apart, see how they’re made, what they made from, see if I can salvage anything and if I can’t see how easy it is to destroy and that stuff is utter junk. Made cheaply and poorly out of play dough.

I run GX, XT and X01. XT brakes RSC levers on my sram brakes. That stuff lasts forever and doesn’t cost much more.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Now I remember why I just buy GX builds and kinda just work with it. GX always seems to work pretty good and with transition bikes, the GX gets ULT level suspension and RSC brakes, so it's pretty nice. If I had a spur or something I would be X01 curious.
  • 16 4
 Thanks, I hate it.
  • 9 2
 Headset routing especially for the brake can get right in the bin, i appreciate a clean looking bike but is it really any less clean looking to drop the entry point about 20mm lower to the very top of the headtube and into the frame there instead of through the middle of the stem, spacers and bearings, just a maintenance nightmare!
  • 1 1
 It’s much cleaner solution especially for U.K. style brake levers. It’s also cheaper to make this way. Quicker layup times
  • 1 0
 @chrismac70: But any of this doesn't matter a toss when the trade off is much more detrimental, simple maintenance of swapping a headset bearing (a regular occurance in UK winter weather) requires you to unravel all your cables and bleed your brake, plus the chucky stem and spacers (especially with a larger stack) really detract from the "clean" look, would it really look any worse to have a nice neat cable entry right at the top of the headset, you could still tuck the cables on the underside of the bar.
  • 7 0
 I will take headset cable routing and proprietary thin cable and housing (that I usually just throw in the trash where it belongs) over the routing of the rear brake and derailleur under the shock, then back up and through the little rubberized door of doom on the rear triange. It is actually the worst routing I've ever seen by far after working on hundreds of bikes.

Scott,

WHY?
F*CK
NO
  • 7 0
 Imagine spending months, maybe years of your working life producing the next big frame release for a brand, and then missing the mark so enormously that literally everyone who has ever ridden or worked on a bike thinks it's an enormous flaming turd. It's actually almost impressive.
  • 7 1
 Scott out here trying to be the new Cannondale. Time for a custom made "Righty" fork!

Seriously though... we have access to so, so many great bikes and as someone who likes to maintain my own ride while also liking to keep things simple... these bikes have become just an interesting oddity, and nothing I'd ever even consider owning.
  • 10 5
 form over function. lets tuck that unsightly shock in a place that makes adjustment impossible to access and severely restricts seat tube insertion depth thus limiting dropper selection. just when we though internal routing was useless....
  • 2 0
 I agree form over function on things like the headset cable routing but i think you have made some poor assumptions on your 2 points, if you read the article it explains all the shock adjustments are easiliy accessible behind the toolless hatch, sag indicator is on the outside so just as easy as any other bike and certainly not "impossible" then the dropper limitation is no different to any other bike with a kink in the tube, which is most of them, as if you look at the insertion and seat tube sizes you can fit just as big of a dropper as most other bikes, for myself on a medium i could fit a 180mm one up dropper which is the same as i currently use, anyone tall enough for a large could easy fit a 200+ dropper.
  • 1 1
 @maglor:
"Impossible." Figuratively speaking. On none of the frames I have ever owned has it required me to 1) pull a door to gain access and 2) flip the bike upside down to have clear line of sight to the clickers. Furthermore, the rebound adjustment will become impossible to reach with most other shocks that have the rebound on the opposite end of the shock. That begs the question: was that shock selected to achieve the design goal, or is it a compromise.

Any interupted seat tube is a limiter on how long of a dropper is compatible. It's actually not debatable.
  • 9 1
 I bumped into a guy testing a prototype of this and it looked like a nice bike in the flesh.
  • 3 6
 for the ice cream parlor or for your local e-bike group ride, yeah.
  • 11 1
 I think it looks nice
  • 6 0
 Yeah might be my next bike!
  • 6 1
 About time it became official, aside from the headset routing i like it, good looks and good geometry, had the last genius and this just builds on a great bike, especially the ST with no front twinlock and better dampers.
  • 11 2
 Burn it
  • 1 0
 Make it feel the Bern
  • 8 3
 Seems like everyone wants every bike to look like a Session, and if it doesn't, they hate it. I'd rather companies do things differently than all companies to do all the same things.
  • 6 0
 @mikekazimer They should have released this on Halloween, I could have set it up outside my house to scare and give nightmares to any passing bike mechanics.
  • 4 0
 NZer to bike shop assistant, "looks great, I'll take a large, can you just swap it over to right front brake?"
Assistant to mechanic "quick job for you mate" (because we are all mates down here)
Mechanic walks out for extended mental health break!
  • 4 0
 Makes me want to wait for a frame on sale, then build it with all the cables zip-tied to the outside, riser bars, the shock door removed, a(n) STFU and a mudhgger. I'll run the mismatched tires backwards without lining up the hot patch to the valve, too.
  • 4 0
 If that bike had the new auto lockout Fox shock and 2 bottle mounts in the frame plus a tool holder, I'd be getting out the CC right now. 5mm longer CS would be really nice as well. Looks great!
  • 1 0
 Unfortunately, my CC limit is too low for this bike at that equipment level
  • 5 1
 Hey Scott, yes I clicked on the article, but that money hopefully goes to Outside, er, Pink Bike. You will never get a penny from me with that shock and cable placement. Good luck.
  • 6 0
 Good idea, especially useful in the UK where my rear shock gets hammered buy mud.
  • 6 0
 Looks like an ebike, costs like an ebike. Cables through the headset. 3 strikes.
  • 4 1
 I just watched the video breakdown and this thing is badass. I want one.

On a side note, why doesn’t every single bike have a internal
Gearbox? Much less even talking about it?? These bikes in cahoots with the derailleur companies?
  • 6 0
 What Would @dangerholm Do?
  • 4 0
 Strip it and rip it?
  • 14 0
 Crush is between his thighs.
  • 5 0
 Carefully mill out a bunch of carbon in the BB area so that you can see the shock. And then paint everything some sort of Martha Stewart color.
  • 5 0
 The same thing he does on every build.
  • 2 0
 Drill some cable ports in the head/top tube
  • 5 0
 Why do I hate the headset routing and extra controls more than the hidden shock?
  • 3 1
 The geo of this bike and Scott bikes generally being light for their class would make this an awesome do everything/all mountain ripper. I can overlook the cables, headset routing, hidden shock; but the seat post insertion is a deal breaker for me.

204mm insertion on a medium is crazy short and will not accommodate any size dropper fully slammed
  • 1 1
 yeah and only 230 on the large...

surely they'll ride better than the previous edition genius/ransom, those were rubbish
  • 1 0
 This isn't the only dimension in the equation, the 410mm medium seat tube length is pretty low so that takes some of the insertion depth away so you probably wouldn't be slamming the seatpost, for example i would ride a medium and usually have a climbing BB to seat rail height of 690mm, take the 410 seat tube off and i'd have 280mm out of the frame, add on the 204mm inside the frame giving 484mm total dropper space which is enough for a 180mm One Up post set 67mm above the seatclamp, not slammed, you'd have to be super short to need to slam the post in this frame at which point you're probably not tall enough for a big dropper on any frame.
  • 1 0
 @maglor: I hear what you are saying, but still disagree. My Ripmo has a 410mm seat tube length and 300mm dropper insertion. I'm 5'8" and run a 185mm bike yoke dropper and I still have about 5-10mm of post sticking above the seat tube.

I prefer the amount of drop this gives me. The max insertion on the genius seems really limiting
  • 4 0
 Just when brands started to seemingly agree that ST stands for "Short Travel" Scott comes out here and makes the ST the more aggressive version.
  • 6 0
 Needs to include a lever to switch between the levers.
  • 2 0
 When you run out of ideas that actually improve the riding experience, develop proprietary designs that drive up basic maintenance costs and attempt to lock customers into a small dark room so they don't see you stealing their wallet. I never buy proprietary designs. That benefits the seller and screws the buyer. Glad I love my bike so much because I could never love one of these.
  • 6 0
 I can't WAIT to blow up my X2 inside my frame instead of outside of it
  • 1 0
 Out of interest is the Float X having problems too?
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer Is there any issue with over-heating that presents with internal shocks? I was just thinking that most shocks get some air flow over them while riding but not in these designs. Does it not matter?
  • 2 0
 Having owned a previous Genius I am glad they have removed the twin lock from the fork on certain models. I loved how the bike felt on the trail but hated how it effected the fork as it often felt harsh as a result. I often used the little blue lever due to where I ride but I have never felt the need to lock out a well set up fork. Guess it’s horses for courses but I think that is a good call if they are sticking with that system. The cable routing is a deal breaker though for conditions in the UK, well that plus the 12k price tag with things I would change out of the box.
  • 5 0
 Problem is, everyone is going to think you are riding an e-bike.
  • 1 1
 Insecure much?
  • 1 0
 @LiquidSpin: I've been yelled at for riding an e-bike up a trail where no e-biking was allowed. I was on a Ripmo lol. This one looks way more like an ebike than that.
  • 2 1
 I’m sure twinloc works well at what’s it’s supposed to do. But honestly for 99% of riders does it actually add anything other than faff. What problem is it trying to solve that can be solved by proper suspension kinematics and a well tuned shock…?
  • 3 0
 If you like to use a lockout, having it remote is awesome. I dont' think I could live with a lockout that didn't have a remote. AFter a season I switched my Ransom to a coil shock, but before that it was nice to have a lockout on fire road climbs. I never used the middle position. If I had to flip a switch down at the shock and then more importantly remember to flip it back, I woudl never use a lockout at all.
  • 3 0
 This arguably makes the most sense on the Ransom. "Proper suspension kinematics and a well tuned shock" can't make a 170 mm bike climb like a 120 mm bike without also making it descend like a 120mm bike. Design the shock with multiple operating modes however and you're golden.
  • 5 0
 Unfortunately "proper suspension kinematics" are always a balancing act, no matter how many people say just design it right there is no magic do it all, if you choose to tune a bike for climbing it WILL compromise descending and vice versa, most bikes are a happy medium or lean one way or the other depending on the intended use, what twinloc or a climb switch does is gives you 2 or multiple tunes so you don't have to compromise as much on one tune, having used it twinloc or any remote means in reality you use those different modes much more as they can be switched mid trail and so you optomise the bike more of the time to get the best performance for the trail you are on, this is why it's so good and one those that have had it will understand.

P.S. my new bike doesn't have a remote and i really miss it, especially when you forget to turn climb off before dropping into the descent, which is all the bloody time!
  • 3 1
 I'm still waiting for Scott to team up with SRAM for a custom AXS Flight Attendant model that features a proprietary wireless front/rear shock/seatpost AXS controller on the left side. No cables, just hoses.
  • 3 0
 Will this hide the squishy squelchy sounds you get from failing fox products after a few weeks of riding?
It will stop the oil dripping onto the ground at least.
  • 3 1
 i wonder how that funny piggyback works. doesnt look like it would dissipate heat all too well. where is the IFP? still probably better than an inline, as any bike over 130mm should have a piggyback
  • 1 0
 As a public service for those of us who want to know these things -

Scott is claiming 2300 g for the full carbon Genius frame size unknown.

That is actually a little heavier than the claimed weight of a 2019-2022 Ransom full carbon frame (although the only time I saw real world weight in a German bike magazine it was 2440g (large) not the mfg claimed 2230g).

Of course that's not really very relevant when the only way you can get that frame is to buy an $12k bike.

Geez, seriously, how do you jump from $7500 to $12000 ? A bit more carbon and AXS costs as much as a whole 'nother bike ?
  • 2 0
 Man what is this? As an owner of the previous model of Genius I’m really disappointed with how complicated this frame is, especially with the headset cable routing. Will be holding on to my now old Genius for sure.
  • 1 0
 those plastic headset cups are only held in place and prevented from rotating by a tiny little tab. The spark headset spacers frequently rotate and rattle. This problem is going to get worse on the genius. The leverage of the steerer tube is literally held in check by.....PLASTIC, and custom bearings that only scott sells. Also FIT4 forks do not belong on top of the line bike packages. FIT4 is junk.
  • 1 0
 Idk, if you love adjustment fit 4 is better, and scot clearly loves it. Grip 2 is a way better damper for straight riding, no arguments there.
  • 1 0
 Just out of curiosity, what would you all think if suspension control and dropper post were to become wireless? Would people be more open to the fact that Scott, at the end of the day, makes a damn fun bike? Or would people just conjure up another reason to hate?
  • 1 0
 Just curious..What would everyone think if wireless suspension adjustment and droppers were implemented on Scott bikes? Would people be open to the fact that Scott makes a damn fun bike to ride? Or would everyone just conjure up another reason to hate?
  • 1 0
 I have been re-reading these comments for a day.
It’s kind of happy mind numbing.
You guys and gals get me.
Thank THOR that I don’t work on whole bikes anymore, cuz where I live, lots of Scott bikes seem to be rolling around.
Maybe this new ish nude will be good for the suspension service industry?
But I keep thinking as I’m reading and watching the Santa Cruz ads and the ride wrap ads with Santa Cruz bikes in them pop up at the sidebar……

This bike makes me want a Santa Cruz more.
So that’s something….. I guess?
  • 2 0
 My buddy asked me to switch a dropper post and remote on his new Spark...never again. Something that should take 15 minutes with a beer break took the better part of an hour...no Scott bikes for me, that is for sure.
  • 1 0
 An honest question: how do people avoid catastrophic damage to their frame, especially when doing trials-ish moves when frames have so much material extending ahead of the bottom bracket shell? There's no bash guard long enough to protect these types of frames...
  • 2 1
 Do most people complaining about this bike realize they are complaining about a top tier bike?

So hear me out:
The top level Scott Genius comes with wireless SRAM AXS. Cable routing is only for the brakes and remote. You can opt to remove the remote completely. When it comes to the brakes most of the time you’re going to be bleeding the brakes and not replacing the hose itself,

The top level Scott has the all in one handlebar/stem. The rest of the line comes with a seperate bar and stem. Unless, you can afford a $9k - $12k bike this really doesn’t effect you whatsoever.

If you CAN afford any bike at this price I’m ALMOST certain you can afford to replace the integrated handlebar/stem if you so choose.

As for the internal shock, They did make it accessable. The dials are all on the bottom of the shock, The sag meter is on the outside so you can see. Removing the shock is just as easy.

I’m pretty sure Scott would not be making their Genius line the same as the Scott Spark if it didn’t sell well. Clearly it has and there’s a market for an MTB bike like this.

Hate it if you will, but it’s just another option for everyone to consider. No one is forcing you to own this bike. More options the better for the consumer.
  • 1 0
 All that time and effort pointlessly hiding the shock and running the cables through the headset just to make a bike that still doesn't have internal cable guiding. Everything no one ever asked for rolled into one new bike. Dumb.
  • 1 0
 Didn't Scott just have some massive soapbox moment about how small holes in a frame can weaken it, therefore justifying routing cables thru the headset? Seems to me that gaping hole near the junction where the downtube meets the bottom bracket might, say, slightly compromise the strength of this area. Just saying.
  • 5 2
 Specialized: "I guess that proprietary suspension idea wasn't so great"
Scott: "I have an idea"
  • 5 1
 Looks like a pregnant We Are One Arrival.
  • 4 1
 I would drop Scott bikes if I owned a bike shop. Nobody wants to work on this mess of internal shocks and cables
  • 3 0
 Why doesn't Scott put ISCG mounts on the Genius? Do they want the rider to destroy the chainring?
  • 5 2
 Its the chainring or the ISCG tabs. pick one to keep. Nearly every single frame ive seen take a bit hit to the guard has damaged the tabs(alloy and carbon) id rather bend a chainring... besides wtf are people smashing their bikes into anyway?
  • 1 0
 @HeatedRotor: is it wolf tooth that does a chain ring guard system? Seems smart. MTBers are so darn fickle for looks.
  • 3 0
 Does tucking away the rear shock increase the service internals? Because it's not getting dirt and grime on the seals, etc?
  • 2 0
 i would assume so, but not by a shit ton. oil still loses its properties over time, bushings still wear out, and seals go stale if you live somewhere dry
  • 3 0
 Thats why I wrap all my shocks in saran wrap
  • 1 0
 @milesofpain: good idea
  • 9 9
 Let's all flame a new bike without having ridden it in 3... 2... 1... GO!

"IT's nOt A TrAn-Si-SHuN!!"

Unpopular opinion: I get that not everyone might want internally routed cables through the headset, but honestly, ignoring what a bike offers as a package based off one disliked feature is like avoiding a restaurant because they serve Pepsi instead of Coke.. No wait, that's justifiable.. The point being, there's arguably a lot of good features on the menu here despite one or two things that don't resonate with everyone.

The ramp controls in the Scott Nude shocks are one of the most criminally underrated features in mtb tech today - I wish all shocks had the same on-the-fly ramp up adjustment, it works exactly like adding a removing a token with the flip of a switch. It makes so much sense, but it seems most people are blinded by the answer to the criticism the last Genius got about clustery cable routing.

Back to the regularly schedule bashing...
  • 6 2
 It’s not serving Pepsi instead of coke, it’s cooking a nice meal and then taking a shit on the plate as garnish
  • 1 1
 ya but they blow out so easy. Ive done 5
  • 1 0
 @Upduro: So you're saying there's a nice meal, huh?

Kidding! My advice, don't buy it. Don't let it ruin your afternoon though.
  • 3 0
 @funkentratzen: Its like having Chinese food in the mountains. you enjoy it at first but you pay after
  • 3 0
 Restaurants that serve Pepsi usually have Mountain Dew though, so they are preferred over Coke establishments. Coke establishments NEVER have Mello Yello. Criminal negligence, that's what that is.
  • 2 0
 It's like Feldschlösschen beer here, if I see the sign I go elsewhere Smile
  • 2 0
 @korev: Ah yes, Feldschlösschen. The Busch Lite Ice of Switzerland. All the filling, but none of the great taste.
  • 2 2
 Love the stance of the bike. It would be neat to see this exact layout with zero internal anything and traditional tube locations. Maybe a shock basement like banshees legend could accommodate that low slung center of mass. Oh and a nice crispy CHRIS KING headset with no holes in its covers.
  • 2 2
 I've been looking forward to this bike. I had a Genius years ago and loved it. Honestly, the only reason to buy a Scott is for the TwinLock, but it is very, very cool. Once you use it, you never want to go back. Trust me, when their patent protection runs out on TwinLock, every bike company will add it.
  • 4 0
 Does anybody want to fund one of these to test for my channel?
  • 2 0
 Just gong to leave this here.. Scott Genius Tailored Protection Kit
  • 3 0
 It's almost like everyone's missed the part where "the actual ride quality of the Genius ST is excellent"
  • 4 0
 Yawn...
  • 1 0
 SHould've called it SL. It looks like a lightweight e-bike. I like the looks though. Likely because I own a light weight e-bike LOL.
  • 3 1
 Do a version with external cable routing, and I'd really consider buying one.
  • 3 0
 I'm here for the nude piggyback.
  • 3 0
 No fucking way am I dealing with all that BS.
  • 2 2
 Very simple lines, nothing fancy in and on the frame. No holes, no strange shape.
Should have been cheaper than ever to produce, but it’s more expensive than ever in the end !
  • 2 0
 Still trying to understand how Scott thought no tubes for the internal cable routing was a good idea...
  • 5 1
 Beautiful!
  • 1 0
 I don't like the look - akin to a python that has swallowed a rabbit. An exterior shock looks good ... and don't see the need to hide.
  • 2 0
 Nothing says "f*ck you" to your mechanic like bringing him a Scott bicycle.
  • 1 0
 As a size xl rider, no size specific chain stays means no possible consideration of this bike. Balance is way more important than shorter wheelbase.
  • 2 0
 With such a swollen belly, seems like a missed opportunity for in-frame storage
  • 3 0
 no brake by wire. no integrated dropper. no steering damper. fail.
  • 1 0
 I love a good conspiracy... I reckon bike shops bribed Scott to design it this way so they could offset the post covid sales cool-down. It's the only rational explanation.
  • 1 0
 Even my piggyback shocks get remarkably hot on our long descents. I’d be interested to see how much hotter they get enclosed in a carbon box.
  • 1 2
 My takeaway from this thread is so many people a) can’t, won’t, or can’t be bothered to do their own wrenching any more and b) are so lazy they would prefer less work to a potentially better product.


Enjoy being ruled by trump.
  • 1 0
 Bold move, Scott! ...I like it, especially that black one, but it looks like an e-bike, so it's a "no" from me.
  • 6 3
 Who buys these?
  • 4 4
 morons, who also have rights
  • 3 4
 @Benito-Camelas: morons with cash to burn.
  • 2 0
 If only it had a couple more lock outs.
  • 3 1
 I wonder if they will have a oil catch for all the blown X2's
  • 3 2
 They really worked hard trying to make the worst 2023 bike at Scott, who can make such an amount of bad decision? damn
  • 4 1
 Ebike racing is lame
  • 2 1
 There needs to be an optional paintwork with bright red letters reading "I'm not an e-bike"
  • 2 0
 Big bikes need love too.
  • 5 3
 What a disastrous design fumble
  • 3 1
 The person who designed this bike downvoted you
  • 1 0
 I meant one even though it’s a trend
  • 2 0
 I wonder if there's an update in the works to hide that bar/stem combo
  • 1 0
 Has anyone had a lot of issues with the shock being outside the frame? This is a solution without a problem.
  • 2 0
 Looks like you gotta be a Genius to work on it.
  • 1 0
 Disappointing I was waiting to see the genius st the headset cable routing is stupid I'll buy something else
  • 1 1
 Sold my Scott Spark 2 months after I bought it due to the cable routing. Absolute rattling mess and super annoying to mess with.
  • 2 0
 It's a Bold strategy, cotton. let's see if it pays off for 'em.
  • 3 1
 I love the look of the bike, especially in the alloy, tempted
  • 2 0
 And a shock cover that falls off at the tap from a rock or stick!
  • 2 1
 Good looking bike. I wish every company would publish axle path and leverage ratio charts.
  • 1 0
 It might be hard to work on but damn it looks sleek. I'm a bit concerned about the ejectable shock cover though...
  • 1 1
 who still buys scott bikes? their previous frames genius/ransom ride like xc bikes up and down... usally crack the frame within a few months(experience)
  • 1 2
 Nonsense. I happen to know that the Ransom is tested to Category 5 standards by EFBE. You are definitley not cracking that frame.
  • 3 1
 @Muscovir: Well i cracked my carbon down by the lower shock twice. Folded my original Alloy ransom.

our biggest brand here in town is scott and they are definitly not known for their strength - Theres always One or more in the shop awaiting replacement. Most sold are the spark as many now buy other brands if they want a big hitting bike... me being one of the 100 that used to ride scott bikes here.... Everybody in the club used to ride scott, 99% of them have changed after issues.

You can test a Frame or car for protection etc as much as you like in a lab under "controlled inviroments" but real world results are always far different.
Car ratings are terrible
  • 1 0
 @Muscovir: Where I'm from Scott's have a long deserved rep for being very fragile and essentially disposable bikes usually sold to Fred's with more cash than common sense. Not saying that necessarily applies to this bike, but that is their rep along their entire overall range of bike. I know two guys personally, neither of whom I would say is overly harsh on their equipment who both cracked their Scott Addict gravel bikes in non crash situations. Just saying.
  • 1 0
 @HeatedRotor: Yep. The world is a much bigger laboratory than the EFBE testing laboratory.
  • 2 0
 That triple lockout is a shitshow.
  • 2 0
 Love to see sales #s on $8k+ bikes vs ebikes year end.
  • 1 0
 thank you for not using the trite corporate lingo: 'year over year'. It brings a tear to my eye. no really, it does!
  • 1 0
 @moroj82: ha, ya not looking to compare previous year.
  • 1 0
 @moroj82: "Year over year" is not corporate lingo. It's a very basic and common accounting and finance phrase that any schmuck that has even a modicum of knowledge about basic business understands. It's a phrase taught in high school level accounting classes. And what he mentioned was not YOY anyway. Just saying. :-)
  • 1 0
 Looks like an ebike, so you may as well get the ebike version and pretend it's not..
  • 1 0
 Sorry, but if I'm buying and swinging a leg over a bike that looks pregnant, it better be an ebike.
  • 1 0
 Certainly Sir, give me 5 minutes and I'll just swap those brake levers over for you!
  • 2 0
 are there any systems to prevent side fumbling?
  • 1 0
 Nice bike. Really really nice bike. But I stopped reading at the words Cable Through Headset. Total fuckup.
  • 1 0
 no dual linkage suspension up front, Structure Cycle Works still leading innovation
  • 1 0
 I am curious about the shock performance
  • 1 3
 It's a normal shock with a piggy back.
  • 2 0
 @Euskafreez: I´ve blanked the tab with shock adjustments somehow. That´s one part, the other is about the shock placement inside the frame so not really good cooling and it´s upside down, so I wonder the O ring won´t see much oil.
  • 3 1
 @bok-CZ: Don't worry about o-rings, worry about the creaks and screams the frame will make from its poor line assembly haha.
  • 5 4
 proprietary shock on a 150 travel bike seems silly.
  • 5 5
 It's not proprietary at all. You can fit every other metric shock in there. The only thing that is proprietary is the multiple air chamber design.
  • 11 0
 @Muscovir, the location of the air valve on the top of the body is also unique to these shocks.
  • 5 1
 Proprietary anything is silly
  • 2 1
 To say it once again: Headset Cable Routing!
  • 2 2
 Ya, you'll definitely sell a lot of those.

Insert: sarcastic Robert Downey Jr. Accent.
  • 2 0
 BOLD move !
  • 2 1
 Popular opinion, my Norco Truax looks better than this thing.
  • 1 0
 Is there a new ransom being released this year? Anybody know?
  • 1 0
 My guess is next year.
  • 2 1
 Looks like a pregnant spark
  • 1 0
 Science...is it true, or is it whack?
  • 2 4
 Ergh. Not more "hidden shock" bikes. It's so frustrating that this sport gets taken over by the trend whores roughly every 10 years. Piss off with your trendy nonsense. Just make bikes that go fast.
  • 2 0
 Genuinely curious, is anyone else doing this aside from Scott (or Bold)? I feel like I've only seen it on Scott's fleet starting with the Spark but a lot of the comments seem to indicate it's a trend across the industry.
  • 1 0
 There have been a number of niche brands who have tried similar things in the past few years. Most of them didnt seem to come to fruition, but it's definitely a growing trend. Bold were the first to make it stick, and Scott jumping on board as a big player is going to give the idea some momentum. Luckily Scott are also kinda infamous for making kooky bikes with a few too many gadgets on, so hopefully the more mainstream big players wont join in.
  • 1 0
 Serious question: what problem is this solving ?
  • 5 2
 What brands to avoid, namely Scott...
  • 4 3
 I wanna flex my kashima shock not hide it
  • 4 5
 This bike looks awesome in my opinion. I love how sleek it is. I'm a fan of integration. Scott is pushing the limits of design even if their is always some haters
  • 1 1
 Hidden stuff AND fit4 damper for the crap lockout. This bike is missing on all cylinders-zero compression.
  • 3 1
 fugly plastic bike
  • 1 0
 But...but...but... I like to see the shock...
  • 1 1
 Y’all act like Scott is forcing you to buy one and do all your own maintenance. If you don’t like it don’t buy it.
  • 1 0
 Correct. People have the power to vote with their dollars.
  • 1 0
 No one suggested Scott forced them to buy it. You just made that up in a weak attempt to make a feeble point. They simply commented on the silliness of the integrated headset cabling, the silly ebike looking concealed shock, and the silly integrated bar/stem combo. :-)
  • 1 0
 something tells me that little 'button' isn't going to last long.
  • 1 0
 I’m trying to buy one and literally nothing is on their website
  • 1 0
 Says right there, visit your dealer. The bikes probably aren't even in country anyway yet.
  • 1 0
 @juanny: they don’t even have the model specs!!
  • 1 0
 Delete your cookies, refresh your browser or select your region. I see them all when selecting north America as the region.
  • 1 0
 That shock layout is “in genious”
  • 2 0
 Nice design, i like it
  • 1 0
 I need a stethoscope and an x-ray machine to work on this bike……
  • 1 0
 Great job, now the front brake hose looks silly!
  • 2 0
 No so Genius , IMO
  • 3 2
 That bike looks awesome, well done to the engineer and designers.
  • 1 0
 this bikes got a dad-bod. just a lil chunk around the midsection
  • 1 0
 Exhibit A of how to design (rather than engineer) a bicycle.
  • 1 0
 $12,000? Just get a carbon ebike at that price..
  • 1 0
 Put the front brake cable through the headset and the fork
  • 3 4
 I crack genius frames blew up so many shocks. I wanted a refund and did not get one. Do NOT BUY A SCOTT GENUIS.
  • 1 3
 my most unreliable bike
  • 1 3
 So I sold it with a new frame and a gx axs
  • 1 0
 Eh too boxy
  • 1 0
 Trail Entabulator
  • 1 0
 All internal...?
  • 1 0
 it's gone pear-shaped
  • 1 1
 So do you guys like this bike
  • 1 0
 Can’t order online :-(
  • 1 0
 A rolling paradox.
  • 1 0
 Looks like an E-Bike!
  • 2 4
 so many reasons not to buy this bike... It's sad because it seems to be a good riding bike
  • 3 4
 Scott: making Horst Link complicated since 2012.
  • 1 0
 What's so complicated about their suspension layout? Looks like a typical horst link to me. Or it looks complicated because the shock is hidden?
  • 2 0
 @k2theg: yeah cant run a coil, most have a rebound adjustment at the shaft eyelet.
  • 2 2
 POS
  • 2 2
 Crap, next
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