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First Ride: Fox's New Transfer Dropper Post - Adjustable Travel, Up to 240mm of Drop

Apr 11, 2024 at 18:19
by Mike Kazimer  
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Fox has updated their Transfer dropper post lineup for 2025 (yes, it's still 2024; that's just how years work in the mountain bike world), overhauling the internals to increase the durability, reducing the force required to lower the post, and adding in a travel adjustment feature.

An option with 240mm of drop has also been added into the lineup, in order to meet the demand for longer travel droppers posts. That demand has grown over the last few years, spurred in part by changes in bike geometry rather than the entire riding population suddenly getting taller. With a steeper seat tube angle, the seat remains more directly underneath a rider when it's lowered, rather than moving forward and out of the way, which was the case in the olden days, when seat angles were slack and wheels were small.

Transfer Post Details

• Adjustable air pressure
• Travel adjustable in 5mm increments, up to 25mm per size
• Diameter: 30.9, 31.6, 34.9mm
• Travel: 95-120mm / 125-150mm / 155-180mm / 185-210mm / 215-240mm
• Weight: 671 grams (210mm)
• Price: $339 USD (Factory) / $289 USD (Peformance)
ridefox.com
The new Transfer post is available in 30.9, 31.6, and 34.9mm diameters with the following travel amounts: 95-120mm / 125-150mm / 155-180mm / 185-210mm / 215-240mm. The travel can be adjusted in 5mm increments by unscrewing the collar and adding a spacer, a procedure that doesn't require tools and takes less than a minute.

The Factory Series post, with its Kashima-coated stanchion is $339 USD, and the Performance Series post with its better-looking (at least to my eyes) black stanchion costs $60 less, at $289 USD. Those prices are actually lower than the previous versions, which isn't typically the case.

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The post's return speed can be fine tuned by adding or removing air via the Schrader valve at the top of the post.
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Fox made the switch from igus to Ekonol metal-backed bushings.

What's Different?

The basic functions of the Transfer post are the same – it's still cable actuated, and you still push on a lever and weight the seat to lower it – but there have been significant changes to the post's design. There's now a Schrader valve at the top of the post, under the seat clamp, which allows users to fine tune the post's return speed by altering the air pressure.

The seat clamp has been revised too. The stack height is still quite low, but it's not as bulbous looking around the clamping bolts, and it's lighter than the previous version.

On the inside of the post, Fox has revised the sealing system, which involved replacing two dynamic air seals with static seals, a change that's claimed to reduce the overall friction and reduce the likelihood of air loss. The internal bushings are now metal-backed and manufactured by Ekonol, rather than the igus bushings used previously. The metal-backed bushings are said to allow for tighter tolerances, and a reduction in the force required to lower the seat.

All of those internal tweaks allowed Fox to increase the recommended service interval to 300 hours, and even better, that service can be done by users at home without requiring any special tools.

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The collar can be unscrewed and spacers can be added to reduce the amount of drop in 5mm increments.


Weight / Dimensions

My 210mm post weighed in at 671 grams. For comparison, a 210mm OneUp V3 weighs 585 grams.

The distance from the base of the post's collar to the bottom of the actuator is 323mm, and at full extension it measures 569mm from the center of the seat rails to the base of the actuator. To use the OneUp V3 again, that post measures 305mm from the base of the collar to the bottom of the actuator, with a 545mm total length.

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Initial Impressions

I've had pretty good luck with Fox's Transfer post over the years, although previous versions did have a tendency to get sticky and reluctant to return to full travel after a few months of muddy rides. I've been running the new Transfer for the last 6 weeks, and so far things are off to a smooth start – literally. It lowers easily, and returns to full extension with a distinct 'thwank'. I pulled it apart to check out the internals, and it was as quick and simple as Fox claimed.

I currently have the Transfer on one bike and the OneUp V3 post on another - look for a head-to-head review once they've been subjected to enough muddy miles. So far, the Fox does feel a touch smoother when lowering and raising it, and it's a bit more enthusiastic to return to full extension compared to the OneUp post, but we'll see if that remains the case by the end of testing.




Author Info:
mikekazimer avatar

Member since Feb 1, 2009
1,753 articles

162 Comments
  • 75 3
 Funny how oneup went from user serviceable to cartridge based, and fox went the opposite direction.
  • 52 0
 Like two ships passing in the night
  • 22 0
 One dog goes one way and the other goes the other
  • 12 1
 @Local717: And this guy's saying, "Whaddya want from me?" The guy's got a nice head of white hair. Beautiful.
  • 3 0
 It will be interesting to see the service procedure once its posted on fox's site. Assuming the service of the spring portion is somewhat similar, I would have to compare the damper side service procedure. I would actually prefer a replaceable cartridge if the alternative is too cumbersome. It would also be interesting to know the lifespan of the cartridge vs damper seals. Glad to see continuous improvement and competition either way.
  • 6 0
 @reks: Looks like somebody we know.
  • 18 1
 @way2manyhobbies2keep: I've had 4 (I think..) OneUps and only had an issue with one cartridge - it didn't leak, but it was super sticky for some reason....anyways), but one of the beauty things with the OneUp is that assuming its not clogged with dirt or something, you can take them apart, clean and have it all back together in a comfortable 30 mins. Maybe more, depending on beer intake or if you drop one of the pins under your god forsaken stove.
  • 12 0
 Not sure I am following, as one up has always been cartridge based. Very clearly lined out on their site with service parts: www.oneupcomponents.com/collections/dropper-small-parts
  • 4 0
 @RBalicious: The new cartridge can't be adjusted though, it's a fully closed system.
  • 5 1
 @Weirdo12345: ah, so fully sealed cartridge, can't adjust air pressure; versus an actual fully serviceable dropper cartridge such as the Wolftooth resolve. Quite distinct differences there... @Mrbadwrench2
  • 1 0
 @Canadmos: Agreed - my 210mm OneUp v2 has now withstood something like 4 years of 5+ rides a week under my heavy ass. The occasional cleaning (15 minutes), one "rebuild" (the kit costs $18 and consists of a wiper seal and a couple bushings and the job only takes a few minutes longer than the cleaning), and it's still working great. Value for money is pretty epic on that one.
  • 2 0
 @Canadmos: lucky.
I’ve had 4 and they’ve all been so sticky I have to pull the saddle back up with my hand.

Good to see an alternative in 240mm
  • 3 0
 @rich-2000: honest question: how tight is your seat post clamp? I’ve seen folks get poor performance from over tightening that clamp.
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: 4-5NM
As per recommendations I tighten to 4, but often even with carbon paste that isn’t enough to stop it slipping so I crank it up a notch…
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby19: even in the fog of war, a gunship is still visible
  • 40 1
 When operating properly (never a sure thing), the Transfer works great. Here’s hoping this iteration is more reliable. The world is better place when there are more good options.
  • 100 3
 Everything works great when it’s operating properly
  • 8 0
 “When it works like it should it works”
  • 20 1
 @rickybobby19: That's not 100% true, your cables can be properly operating through the headset, but it's still a shit solution looking for a problem!
  • 3 0
 When it could work like it should work, it could work good.
  • 12 0
 @rickybobby19: Clearly you've never ridden a bike with Sram SX
  • 5 3
 @rickybobby19: I know you're just here for the upvotes, but I also know you know that's not true. There are products that are terrible on their best day.
  • 6 0
 60% of the time it works 100% of the time.
  • 1 0
 Ive had two transfer posts , both were nearly 100% reliable through years of use, without any gas being added (sealed nitrogen system)
  • 43 13
 We really need to get rid of either 30.9 or 31.6. It's silly to have two sizes so close together. As a 220lb person I really would prefer my 240mm dropper in a 34.9. It just makes sense to standardize around 34.9.
  • 24 10
 As a 230lb person, I would rather not run a post that's not 1.8 lbs, and opt for a shim instead
  • 8 0
 would be especially cool to see a post with a larger diameter 34.9 specific slider, rather than using the spindly 30.9 part across all sizes within a thicker wall (heavy) lower. (someone may be doing this; i haven't extensively perused the current dropper landscape).
  • 4 2
 @xy9ine: Most brands that are willing to invest in the separate tooling are doing this (SDG Tellis V2, OneUp V3). So it's relatively common with brands making quality products.
  • 4 1
 @clapforcanadaa: that's cool I didn't realize anyone other than Bikeyoke was making 34.9 posts with specifically larger internals/stanchion.

That's the ideal scenario for sure, otherwise though, shims are cheap and work fine. Buy 30.9 posts and forget 31.6 exists. Shim when needed.
  • 7 0
 @xy9ine: this new transfer post uses a larger upper post for the 34.9 sizes
  • 5 0
 @clapforcanadaa: according to the parts list, looks like the 1up v3 still uses the same seals / bushings for the 3 sizes.
  • 1 0
 Settle on a 29 / 32 / 35... doneGeek
  • 5 0
 @graveldaddy: If you designed a post to 34.9 it would be lighter. You only lose when companies take the cheap route and use the same parts as the 30.9 use and just make the outer tube 2mm thicker to bring it up to 34.9.
  • 10 1
 34.9 posts are quite a bit heavier. For a OneUp V3 it’s over a 100 grams difference which doesn’t really matter but as a sub 200 lb person I’ve never had reliability issues with modern 30.9 or 31.6 droppers so 34.9 is just adding weight for no benefit for a lot of people.
  • 2 0
 except that most frame manufacturers have no intention of moving to 34.9 seat tube
  • 8 2
 @xy9ine: We are doing this and we've been doing this since 2018. :-)
  • 1 0
 @likeittacky: not how tubing works. B
  • 5 1
 @maybemarcusking: Oh, they do. We've been advocating 34.9 for now more than half a decade now, since 2018 when we introduced the REVIVE MAX. Finally, the 34.9 train is getting some traction. Ibis, Trek, Commencal, Merida have introduced their latest models with 34.9. Not to forget Specialized, Deviate, Norco, and many more who have been using 34.9 for some time now.
  • 3 2
 @clapforcanadaa: I believe one of your two brands is not using larger, dedicated 34.9 upper tubes. What's your source for OneUp using different upper tubes for 34.9?
  • 1 0
 My personal vote is 31.6 and 34.9. No reason to have 30.9. It's smaller and mountain bikes probably benefit from the larger diameter
  • 1 0
 @xy9ine: it looks like this post does this
  • 1 0
 Rework them tubes and throw the old ones down... you know where.
  • 1 0
 If we're standardizing, can we please round up to 35mm? Thanks.
  • 29 0
 Oh so it’s heavier and more expensive than a OneUp post? cool cool cool
  • 16 13
 But does it flop all around like the one up does after one ride? Loudest thing on my bike is the one up dropper by a mile
  • 8 1
 and has longer body length so not able to be slammed as far in the frame. Hard pass.
  • 4 0
 @bigmeatpete420: hit up One Up and they will send you a bearing kit to fix this. Takes about 10 minutes and your dropper will be silent. I think the problem has to do with different brands seat post tolerances or something like that.
  • 1 0
 well.. i love oneups but they do require frequent maintenance (which is super easy, yes) and they aren't as smooth.

if the fox is as good as their previous model but reasonably serviceable, for a few more grams dollars .. it seems like a good deal to me actually.

today all my bikes run a v2 oneup.
  • 21 1
 Wow, 240mm drop. Rockshox still stuck on 170mm. You'd think that would be embarrassing.
  • 19 2
 The AXS Reverb update to 200mm (or 240mm) has to be just around the corner. Its such an obvious miss
  • 4 2
 I’m still stuck on 170 too! Feel like I’m the only one that prefers it
  • 1 0
 Yup! and the launch of the electronic Bikeyoke should be around the corner too. I'm pretty sure RockShox put that on their priority list when Bikeyoke showed off the prototype at Eurobike.
  • 2 7
flag hi-dr-nick FL (Apr 17, 2024 at 5:50) (Below Threshold)
 @brycebee: Most folks don't know how to use their saddle to lean the bike in when downhilling. Like how most high level enduro folks don't use super long droppers.
  • 3 0
 @mtmc99: The OG Reverb's update from finicky hydraulics to a simpler, more reliable design always seemed like it should be just around the corner, being such an obvious miss. Based on that, I'm not too sure...
  • 1 0
 @g-42: lol fair enough
  • 15 1
 Finally, a 34.9mm! This is HUGE from Fox.
  • 1 0
 so is the upper stanchion dia changes with lower tube size? Or stay the same? OneUP changes it and 34mm is more robust than 31.6
  • 2 1
 @valrock: I'm wondering this too. Hard to find more info on the Fox dropper. Anybody had not insight? If I were to use dedicated 34.9 upper tubes on my new post, I'd definitely highlight the *hit, though.
What makes you think OneUp has larger upper tubes on their 34.9?
  • 1 1
 Meant to say: "Anybody has more insight?"
  • 2 0
 @valrock: 30.9 and 31.6 are the same, 34 has a larger upper (same as oneup)
  • 1 1
 @scribbled: oneup 34.9 v2 at least doesn’t have a larger upper
  • 4 0
 @scribbled: I am sorry, but I need to ask again. Where is your source for OneUp using larger upper tubes on their 34.9 variants? It was not mentioned in any media release I saw and the One Up website states the same service kit for 30.9/31.6/34.9. Three users here mentioned that, but as far as I know this is not the case.
I am genuinely curious. Maybe I am wrong too, and they throw in all the different wipers and bushing sizes in one single service kit, but that does not really make sesne either.
What makes you guys believe that OneUp is using dedicated 34.9 uppers?
  • 1 0
 Is there a plan to recycle forks?
  • 13 0
 339-289 = 60
  • 11 0
 Cons: Longer than One Up, heavier than One Up, and more expensive than One Up
Pros: Gold anodizing option
  • 9 0
 I love that it's easier to service. That's my biggest complaint with the transfer, the previous gen was a nightmare to service at home.
  • 2 1
 On this note - I have a RF Turbine (which I think is the same as the Transfer?) that has gotten sticky (almost unusable) after a full winter of mud riding. Is it worth trying to service this thing or just getting a new post?
  • 2 0
 @Jvhowube: Try a simple service where you just pull the post apart and relube the bushings/pins with slickoleum or similar. That's all I've ever needed to do.
  • 2 0
 @Jvhowube: check with them. Fox just warrantied my 170, current gen, rebuilt with newer (not this) design and sent it back to me free of charge. BTW, Planet Cyclery had/has the Fox on sale for $115. Picked up a 200mm recently and thought about another before finding out they would fix my other.
  • 1 1
 @Jvhowube: RF has lifetime warranty, write them, make is sound worst than it is, they will prob replace it Big Grin
  • 2 0
 @valrock: not on dropper posts.
  • 7 0
 Anyone else going to miss the seat post mounting? Was simply and easy to put a seat on and off.
  • 4 0
 that clamp is a goat for sure. I've installed 4 different clamp designs myself and Fox\RF is the easiest to work with so far
  • 4 1
 wonder why they did away with it, twas trick!
  • 5 1
 I've had the several gens of Fox's droppers (with the most recent one being frustrating how sticky it is) but I was blown away when I tried a Bike Yoke Revive. That said I did have to do the quick bleed thing pretty often. Fast forward to me buying a Wolftooth Resolve and I think I've found the perfect dropper.. well besides how hard it is to change the travel but I almost never do that anyways. Its just so smooth, light, and easily repairable/serviceable at home

These new droppers look great, but for the price I would say check out the Wolftooth first. Its silky smooth and the self bleeding feature is a game changer.
  • 3 0
 I've had a number of BY Revive droppers but I put a Wolftooth on my wife's bike. It failed after 2 rides but they warrantied it immediatly and replaced the stanchion with an updated one. It's much smoother, but still not at smooth as the BY, IMO.
  • 6 1
 Seems to me that being able to rebuild a seatpost using it's core components is more environmentally friendly than replacing a cartridge?
  • 5 0
 Love the caption under the title on the main page: "The Transfer gets a complete overhaul for 2025."
And it will need a complete overhaul by the end of 2024. Fitting.
  • 3 0
 Be interesting to see the OneUp V3 head to head to see if real life gives a different result as on paper the OneUp walks it, significantly lighter, shoter stack for a given travel, cheaper, longer service interval and just as adjustable, unless the 5mm increments vs 10mm really matter to you, but you're likely to be able to round up to a bigger travel on the OneUp thanks to the shorter stack.
  • 4 2
 i just bought a Oneup V3 240mm, since I did not want to pay $200 to service my old Fox Transfer 150mm 2018, and it was a bit short. I even asked Bikeyoke for an early bird prototype, but they don’t have my 240mm length. After testing, I have need for the full 240mm for sure, and I like how slow it is down. No freefall like on the old transfer. At least I won’t have to pay $200 to service the oneup.
  • 1 0
 If you service it yourself it wont cost $200, but parts (cartridge) + shop time will be near $200 I'd say. With the oneup you wont be able to add air to squeak a few more weeks out before getting serviced either...
  • 5 2
 So what is your inseam? I honestly can't wrap my head around why people need 240mm drop. I ride really steep trails around here with a 180mm dropper post and 92cm inseam. With a 210mm dropper it felt really weird to dip so low to drop it and I just don't need the space. I would have no weight on the front wheel at that point.

@mikekazimer maybe you guys could make a poll on which dropper height people prefer for their leg length?
  • 1 1
 @mirskeinereingefalln: im 6ft with about 90 and i can easily use 240, my current frame ive had to lift the lift a little.
  • 2 0
 you went from 150 to 240? So did you buy a wrong size now or were you riding very wrong size all your life before that? Big Grin
  • 3 1
 @mirskeinereingefalln: Mate I'm 173cm, so basically a hobbit between my friends, yet 185~200mm dropper seems to be the sweet spot, depending on frame geometry. Without even knowing my inseam I'm quite clear there's people with much longer legs.
  • 3 1
 @mirskeinereingefalln: the limitation is more on the bike frame. My 5'4" wife uses a 180 on her fat bike because the top tube is so low and she likes a low seat for a descent. I'm 6' and use a 180, but would go for a 210 if the bike frame allowed. I like to keep the seat just above the knee joint on the way down.

Whether right or wrong... lower is perceived as better so if the seat can reach your climbing height and drop super low for the down because you like it.... why not?
  • 1 0
 ^double post
  • 3 0
 @valrock: I was slightly annoyed with the Transfers shortcomings (punbintended) for years. I am happy with my purchase so far.
  • 1 0
 @HeatedRotor: 185cm tall here, and my seat post length is 420mm. My seatpost tube length could in theory be 470mm and the Oneup V3 240mm would be in the same position as now, i.e. the same distance from the bottom bracket.
  • 1 0
 @mirskeinereingefalln: It is all about being able to comfortably put your foot down, either when stopping for a red light, something motorcyclists take for granted, or when going fast in a gnarly trail and you want to be as close to the ground as possible, and not balancing high up with no way to save yourself if you have to. And also being able to climb back up the hill and not feel like you are on a clowns tricycle, like on most downhill bicycles.
  • 3 0
 @mirskeinereingefalln: People just want 240mm because it's the biggest size. If they came out with a 300mm dropper, every 5'10-6' person would swear by how they absolutely need it and they'd never go any smaller.
  • 2 0
 @nickfranko: It’s not like 240mm is dramatically long. I would definitely go for a 300mm dropper. But let's save something for next seasons product releases.
  • 2 1
 @joni0001984: once you( generally speaking) go past 90 degree bend with your knees sitting, there is less benefit and more detriment, especially as you age. I rode a 150 for a long time, and then a 170, and now a 200. Outside of really steep decents, I don't see a benefit in the 200 over the other 2 in the situations you describe. I have enough space above the post collar to allow a 240 as long as the depth is there, but it doesn't really help as my butt will just be that much further below my knees. Haha
  • 2 0
 @joni0001984: me too. My custom Reeb would still fit a 300mm dropper if one was out. Until then I'm running a 213mm BikeYoke with a ton of extension. My new hardtail has a 240mm OneUp that's still 2-3" out of the frame.
  • 2 0
 @mirskeinereingefalln: this would be relevant if a post could only be all the way up or down. But most posts can be stopped at any point in the travel. I’m 180cm and sized down to a Medium frame recently. My medium Canfield Tilt can fit a 240 OneUp dropper and it’s awesome. I don’t ride with it all the way down on most trails but it’s nice on jump lines and messing around on trials type stuff. Plus, it’s super nice when I stop, I can sit flat footed with my knees bent.
  • 1 0
 @mirskeinereingefalln: I'm of the same opinion. At 6' with what appears the same dropper in my Switch9er, to drop the post fully it feels like I'm sitting on the floor and I get more unsettled and pulled out the 'flow' and find my shorter dropper (125mm) in my other bike to be adequate. I do like to feel the saddle with my knees for reference though, rather than the feeling of no saddle at all which the longer dropper gives. I am not a trials rider.
  • 4 0
 @JefWachowchow @gmoss Wow, I never realised people drop their saddles all the way down and then sit on them. If I drop my saddle it’s because I want it out of the way so I can move around it, and in many cases the lower the better (for very steep sections, steep jumps, big bunny hops, etc). I would never try to pedal around with it dropped more than about 50 mm. On undulating technical terrain I will sometimes drop it up to about 50 mm and do a mix of pedalling and coasting. I’m currently running 200 mm drop, and will probably get a 240 mm when I need a new post, but for now I can’t justify buying a new one just for longer travel.
  • 2 0
 @grahamvdr: I have to be sitting on it for it to go down as its activated by my body weight. Once its down, I stand up. I assume you're just being facetious though.
  • 3 0
 @grahamvdr: as mentioned, have to get it down, which puts me in that position. At 55, with a bad knee, I only can go so low. 200 is about the max for me. My 175 is actually more natural for me, and my normal riding.
  • 2 0
 So some of these comments suggest more travel=better and you simply dont have to use all of it. I actually cant stand the saddle being 1cm higher or lower than my usual descending position so just lowering it to "about right" doesnt do it for me. I need to drop it all the way so the saddle is always in the same position when descending. And with 212mm its just too low for me. There is some sort of feedback missing when I cant feel where the saddle is.
Also dipping so low to drop it down is a bit annoying when it has to be done quickly.

But nevertheless interesting to know that for some of you guys more=better.
  • 1 0
 This thread is killing me. How much drop you need depends on how tall you are and what you ride. in bham I love a 240 - I'm 6'3 34in inseam. I can live with a 180 if I have to, but 210 is livable. The extra 30mm is nice when things get super steep, otherwise on galby a 210 is more than enough.
  • 1 0
 @zmums: You would have to be very short to not be able to take advantage of a 240mm dropper. I wear 32 or 34 jeans and this is how high I need my Oneup V3 240mm on a bike frame with 420mm seat post length, to reach normal pedalling height when climbing. I could short enough to need 29 jeans and still use 240mm. Again, the purpose of lowering is to get the seat out of the way for the gnarly stuff - or just to put your foot while resting comfortably on your seat at a traffic light.
  • 1 0
 @gmoss: Ah, OK, got you. Fair enough. I misread some of the comments above and thought that people were staying seated in the low position and trying to ride like that.
  • 1 0
 @JefWachowchow: OK, I understand you now. I guess there would be a point where there is so much drop that the process of pushing the saddle all the way down and then returning to standing is a big enough movement that it could be disruptive or uncomfortable. Because I don’t experience that myself it hadn’t really occurred to me, but it makes sense now.
  • 1 0
 @grahamvdr: At my age and with my knees, its an issue, and can take a longer than ideal to return to 'ready' position. Getting old is a privilege but also a bitch.
  • 1 0
 @JefWachowchow: Then you would appreciate not getting smacked right in the prostate in gnarly sections.
  • 1 0
 @joni0001984: Agreed. My first few bikes where fully rigid with canti brakes and dare I say it, even bar ends. I do believe the dropper seat post to be the best innovation in mtb since suspension and would go back to full rigid and cantis before I give up my dropper. In fact I built a fully rigid mtb a couple of years ago and that has a dropper. Only 100mm mind.
  • 1 0
 @joni0001984: bruh I think ur high. probably never hurts to have more drop but if you're on a medium or smaller and even for an L and Xl on some bikes seatpost insertion is an issue. Like my wife is 5'6" and she will never have an issue with a 150mm post even on super steep shtuff
  • 1 0
 @gmoss: Even at 35 I started noticing that a slammed 200mm is hard to get up from at the end of a long ride.
It's worth it as I still throw myself off anything that looks steep, but there definitely are downsides or such thing as "too long". (always thought they just say that to make me feel better..about my previous dropper)
The argument that I don't have to slam it all the way is a bit moot when there's no hard stop, you've just finished a massive ride and need to drop it for the last descent with little to no energy. You just sit on it and at that moment I'm sure not precise enough to stop it a bit higher than I'm used to yet not too high to be comfortable on the last features..
I wouldn't downsize my dropper, and I'd argue most frames made before the past year won't allow you to have a seat post low (therefore long) enough to have an issue. But with the modern low seat tube geometry (less than 400mm-ish on a M) of those bikes without a shock through the BB area it can become an issue if too long dropper is used and slammed all the way down.
  • 1 0
 @MrDuck: not complaining here. Lots of times I will use a natural feature like a water bar at the start of a down to help lower, the seat, bring the seat up to me without me having to dip so low. It doesn't always go all the way down, but enough for what I am doing usually.
  • 3 1
 Surely it won't get stuck/stick at 90% after every ride or within ~100 miles of getting a service. SURELY. Source- my fox transfer factory is a hot pile of broken dogshit compared to my rockshox on my other bike which ive never had to service and never gets stuck.
  • 4 0
 Too late, I sold my last Transfer post that came new on Switchblade and bought Bikeyoke.
  • 2 1
 About time Fox did something to improve the Transfer. Every Transfer dropper post I've had has failed. Local LBS cannot service it so it has to be sent back to Fox. Frustrating and a waste of $$$! I have replaced them with the BikeYoke Revive each time and they've all been flawless.

I hope this version is much much more reliable than the previous version.
  • 1 0
 As far as I can see this is a step in the right direction for Fox because the most important thing to me in a dropper is serviceability (all things being similar - drop, weight, action etc.). I have had Transfers, but have avoided them because I couldn't take the top collar off to clean and lube the stanchions, bearings, dust seals etc. My favourite for the past few years have been X-Fusion Manics due to their serviceability. After a muddy ride they get completely stripped down.

I don't mind a cartridge and I've never had one fail.

This may swing me back to Fox.
  • 1 0
 Funny you should use OneUp V3 to compare to the new Fox. The air valve under the saddle mount does let you adjust return rate but this method always leaks air in cold temps and needs adjusting from time to time. Having to take the saddle of is a pain. Cartridge is the way to go as OneUp found out. You can get a OneUp V3 for $269 retail. V3 has less seat tube insertion requirement, weighs less, & no air valve to deal with. Seal cartridge. Easy to service at home. Why spend $20-$70 more for a Fox Transfer.
Fox is behind the curve on this remodel. They missed an opportunity.
  • 3 0
 Really excited about this new post, it seems like a big improvement over the MY 2021-2023 versions.
  • 1 0
 Bikeyoke and Wolftooth still sound like far better options. I have both. In fact, I also have a Transfer...but it's dead, because Fox doesn't know how to design stuff like Bikeyoke and Wolftooth.
  • 21 19
 Fox: "Hey Oneup can I copy your homework?"

Oneup: "Sure just make it gold and more expensive"
  • 1 0
 lol Big Grin I was to comment that FOX finally took notes from PNW and OneUp Big Grin These might be a little more "premium" inside tho
  • 3 0
 But...what about the true measure of any dropper post....the stack height.
  • 1 0
 looks like 36mm
  • 1 0
 So no more easy to use seat interface? Fiddling with those two little nuts under a low profile seat sucks, no matter what post it is.
  • 2 0
 Internally, it seem like it's closer than ever to the architecture of the PNW Loam or the OneUp Dropper.
  • 1 0
 Not a bad thing—love my PNW dropper!
  • 1 0
 Is the 300 hour service interval, 300 hours of the post going up and down or 309 hours of it going up and down and the time it isn’t moving?
  • 2 0
 I had hopes of them anodizing the actuator at the bottom, but it seems those hopes have been dashed.
  • 3 0
 can’t wait for the 241mm oneup dropper post
  • 1 0
 @mikekazmier. Im impressed you managed to write so much to say it now goes up and down further than the last one. Maybe thats why Im not a journalist :-)
  • 1 0
 Welcome to 2018, Fox. Aside from the ridiculous price and mediocre specs, specing kashima on a dropper is pure marketing intended to separate $ from idiots.
  • 1 0
 one up better cheaper. I've had like 10 of em. loyal customer over hereeeeeeeeeeeeeee. unless I got a fox one for free/cheap i'll just rock one ups
  • 4 3
 That slack seat post angle, with the seat slammed forward.... typical problem in our world unfortunately....
  • 1 1
 why is it a problem? You are either build unusual ( long arms but not too tall) or purchased wrong size bike. I have slacker seat tube bike and I have no issues with it, the seat is a little more forward but my L frame fits me better than M version and I rather move seat forward and not slide it backwards
  • 1 0
 @valrock: Generally speaking a seat slammed forward is an indication it is in the way on the downhill sections of trail... could be a mis-fitting frame as well though!
  • 2 0
 @cky78: I think that is more "specifically" than "generally" speaking. Wouldn't most people optimize fore-aft position of the seat for optimal pedaling position? And if your seat is in the way on the way down, your seat tube is probably too steep, no? So slamming the saddle forward will exaggerate the effect that has on pedaling position. I'm pretty extreme on the leg to torso length ratio scale, so I have my seat usually slammed forward. But getting it far enough out of the way when descending is rarely a problem.
  • 1 0
 @valrock: It's a problem for frames with large differences between the effective and actual seat tube angles, e.g. The gen 5 Trek Slash. The designers made no allowance for long-legged riders.
  • 1 0
 @boozed: that is why I am saying. Most bikes... majority... almost all mass produced bikes are like car seats adjustments. They supposed to fit 9 out of 10 people just right. People on both edges ( very short or very long ) as well as mutants ( usually log\short hands or legs compared to the rest of the body, giraffe neck lol Big Grin ) are always gonna be at disadvantage.

I doubt that average build person benefits from steeper STA
  • 1 0
 @valrock: They still make multiple frame sizes. Some manufacturers think about the implications of that. In the case of the gen 5 Slash example they know that anyone who buys their XL frames is going to be tall, but that fact apparently wasn't accommodated in the specifics of the XL frame's design, so it ends up having a much longer effective top tube length than the one listed in the geo chart.
  • 1 0
 ...a much longer "real world" ETT, I should say, i.e. now you're hanging way out over the rear axle, because of how slack the actual seat tube is, when running a saddle height that's otherwise normal for XL riders.
  • 2 0
 @boozed: that is what I said pretty much, all these geo complains are really applicable to XXS and XL frames... everything in between pretty much reached Zen Geo \ perfect geo numbers in 2021
  • 2 0
 Will anyone ever run the return pressure less than max?
  • 3 0
 People with nuts might. Username checks out.
  • 2 1
 Oh nice maybe the 240 after a week of riding will stop extending halfway up and be an useable ish dropper finally.
  • 2 1
 Scary to read that running perfectly for 6 weeks is a wonderful thing and not common.
  • 1 0
 On behalf of all of us on this side of the pond, may I be the first to say 'heh, thwank'. Big Grin
  • 2 1
 Oneup better step up their game and just do a 270mm drop for us tall guys lol
  • 2 0
 im happy with my ONE up dropper post Big Grin
  • 1 0
 About time they got rid of that poor bulkhead design. Never could get the nose of my saddle down enough.
  • 10 9
 Transfer it from your bike to the nearest trash can
  • 5 4
 Yep previous Fox droppers were terrible only after a few months
  • 1 0
 Exit completely,if violent fall..Reliability ?
  • 1 0
 I’m confused…where does the battery go?
  • 1 0
 Does anybody from Bellingham still listen to Black Breath?
  • 5 5
 I've owned both and the transfer has always worked better, for longer.
  • 1 1
 I am on 3rd Bontrager ( warranty replacements) and have some issues with barely 2 years old PNWs (they are still working, but I feel like I need to constantly babysit it, or they will brake)... all this time two of mine RF Turbine R just keep working with no service done to it
  • 2 3
 Let's bring out a new dropperpost! Because the older clamping system sucked so hard!
  • 1 0
 Expensive and heavy Smile
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