First Ride: Guerrilla Gravity's 160mm Gnarvana Enduro Bike - Pond Beaver 2020

Apr 10, 2020 at 18:28
by Mike Kazimer  


Gnarvana. No, that's not the name of a bad '90s cover band – it's what Guerrilla Gravity are calling their new long travel 29er. I have a feeling Kurt Cobain is rolling over in his grave somewhere, but luckily there's more to this new beast than just a cringe-inducing name.

The Gnarvana has 160mm of rear travel that's paired with a 170mm fork, which gives it a slack, 63.7-degree head angle. The made-in-Colorado frame has a carbon front triangle and an aluminum swingarm, and if the overall shape looks familiar that's because it uses the same front end as all of the other full-suspension bikes in Guerrilla Gravity's lineup.

Gnarvana Details

• Wheelsize: 29"
• Revved carbon front triangle, aluminum swingarm
• Travel: 160mm (r) / 170mm (f)
• 63.7-degree head angle
• 450mm chainstays
• Threaded bottom bracket
• Weight: 33.8 lb (w/o pedals, size 3)
• Price: $3,895 - $6,395 USD
• Frame only: $2,195 USD
ridegg.com

By using different seatstays and fork lengths, Guerrilla Gravity are able to get the maximum amount of use out of their carbon molds, which helps keeps the cost down, and makes it possible for riders to turn one model into another by swapping out the seatstays and a few parts.

In theory, the owner of a 120mm Trail Pistol could purchase the $445 Gnarvana Seatstay Tuning kit, along with a different shock and fork, and completely transform their bike in under an hour. I'm not sure how many riders will go that route, especially considering the price of those additional suspension components, but it is an interesting option to have.

The Gnarvana is available as a frame only for $2,195 USD, with complete builds starting at $3,895. The bike shown is spec'd with the Rally build kit plus a few upgrades, namely the Fox 38 fork and DHX2 rear shock, which puts its price at $5,235. Guerrilla Gravity's website allows customers to pick which components they'd like in order to get a more customized build.


Guerrilla Gravity Gnarvana


Frame Details

The Gnarvana frame has a GeoAdjust headset that allows the reach to be changed by 10 millimeters by switching the orientation of the headset cups. It's a simple procedure, and allows riders to fine tune the bike to fit their personal preferences.

One adjustment that's missing on this bike compared to Guerrilla Gravity's other models is ability to switch the shock position between Crush and Plush mode, a change that alters the rear suspension feel of the bike. That adjustment isn't present on the Gnarvana in order to maximize the amount of available travel, and it's permanently set to what would be considered 'Plush mode' on their other models.

Other details include external cable routing that's hidden behind a removable plastic shield, room for a water bottle under the top tube, and the ability to attach a tube and tools using the two bolts on top of the down tube.


Guerrilla Gravity Gnarvana


Guerrilla Gravity Gnarvana

Guerrilla Gravity Gnarvana
The Gnarvana's reach and wheelbase can be adjusted by switching the orientation of the headset cups.
Guerrilla Gravity Gnarvana
A plastic panel hides the derailleur, dropper, and brake lines from view.


Ride Impressions

I only have two rides in on the Gnarvana, so it's still very early in the testing process. I've been impressed with just how quiet the bike is – there isn't any chainslap or cable rattle to be heard, and the lack of distractions makes it easier to focus on the important things, like picking the best line through a tricky section of trail.

The fit of the bike feels similar to the Banshee Titan I recently reviewed, which has made getting up to speed an easy process. It's not the lightest bike, but that's not really as much of a focus in this enduro / bike park category. A little extra heft is more acceptable in this realm than it would be on a shorter travel, more trail-oriented machine. The climbing position is comfortable, and while it doesn't exactly snap around tight uphill sections, with some patience and advance planning it'll get the job done.

On the descents, the Fox 38 fork and DHX2 coil shock are a formidable duo, a potent package that encourages a 'smash through everything' riding style. Add in those relatively long chainstays and you've got a bike that's stable and ready for some seriously speedy shenanigans. Now's not the time to turn the dial to 11, but I'm excited for when that day comes, especially considering how the Gnarvana feels when its only turned to an 8.





Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020






352 Comments

  • 142 12
 Innovative way to hide the cabling.
  • 81 89
flag SammytheSalmon (Apr 13, 2020 at 0:26) (Below Threshold)
 Innovative but not sure about pretty
  • 22 13
 @SammytheSalmon: that’s what I was thinking sounds good, oh it’s right down the side of the side tube, why not the top or bottom....
  • 71 11
 @toad321: underneath makes most sense as it can double up as frame protection and it would be better hidden. But pretty much anything has to be better than side.
  • 13 1
 @mountainsofsussex: Yh underside is used on some of the canyon and it works really nicely
  • 28 31
 Not really innovative, other brands have done this before, but they did it in a way that makes more sense than this, and the cringe-inducing water bottle mount is just sad.
  • 10 1
 @imbiker: I have one of these frames, don't mind the water bottle mount at all as its pretty easy to access. Some sizes/shocks you can fit a bottle on the lower mount too.
  • 17 0
 2 water bottle mounts.
  • 10 3
 @mountainsofsussex: but you would be constantly cleaning crud out of it, unless they sealed it really well, but then it might start to weigh a bit.
  • 14 14
 @mountainsofsussex: Underneath is not good if any of the brake or derailleur lines are exposed and you ride in areas that have lots of loose rocks that get kicked up. I have seen a few smashed brake and derailleur lines over the years on bikes with lines routed under the BB.
  • 3 1
 @toad321: Exactly, interesting placement but I guess Canyon already has their under the downtube. Makes me wonder if it would have been worth embracing the full externally routed look like Evil has
  • 10 0
 @mountainsofsussex: o listened to a podcast where the described that designing this was one of the hardest things do do on this bike.
I guess the process they use to create this bike makes creating something like this many times harder to do then if they used a traditional process.

So I'm sure there is a reason it's on the side and not the bottom, maybe has something to do with the strength of the bike.
  • 14 0
 @SammytheSalmon: maybe GG engineers can confirm this, but I would guess the side placement of the channel is related to the way the molds close and placing it underside the downtube would require additional tooling.
Just a wild guess, but making a frame to a price point requires some compromise
  • 18 40
flag NYShred (Apr 13, 2020 at 5:47) (Below Threshold)
 If this was an alu bike (their roots) and priced at around $2-3k - they'd fly off the shelves. Hell, give me the alu frame-only for $1k and I'd build up around it with my current parts...

The truth is, if anyone has an extra $3k-5k sitting around for a plastic bike, they're likely not going to land on GG. Which is a shame because this bike is F*ing sick! It hits all the marks. Too bad it's $2k more expensive than it should be because of the material they chose to build the foundation on.
  • 9 1
 @freeriderayward: I have a Revved Guerrilla Gravity Smash- and figured the same thing, would be packed full of dirt and mud. I ride in the North East, often in muddy conditions, definitely conditions that lend to ruined bearings, and crud in all places of the bike. I can say this design works and the cable channel has stayed impressively clean.
  • 5 0
 I have one and it's actually quite fiddly to get all the cables to fit probably under the cover. I wish it had standard internal routing instead. That's pretty much my only complaint about the bike though, and it's not a big deal as I've only had to mess with the cables once or twice while traveling.
  • 17 1
 @NYShred: the carbon version is almost the same price as the old aluminum bikes were... Not sure where your $1,000 frame price point is coming from but yeah they would fly off the shelves since they would then be cheaper than any of the competition by a longshot.
  • 18 24
flag ProChargedZ28 (Apr 13, 2020 at 6:05) (Below Threshold)
 @NYShred: I like how you talk about their roots. For years they said they'd stick to aluminum cause it was the best material. They had a Q&A with pinkbike and another site where they flat out said, zero plans to go to carbon. But, during that time, they were already working on getting into carbon.

People used to roast bike companies for using one front triangle for it's frames across the lineup. The point of using one front triangle is to reduce the cost. Their process was supposed to create better carbon and reduce cost...... I'm not seeing a coat reduction. I'll buy from Knolly or the Big S

They got themselves a little fan club and that's about it.
  • 2 1
 Looks similar to my old 2013 Ibis Mojo HD, where the cables were run under a large plastic downtube protector. I thought it was a great idea at the time.
  • 3 0
 @Arierep: Fair point actually
  • 9 2
 @NYShred: Alu is the right material for these types of bikes, people have realised it with carbon wheels I think they will realise they are paying too much for carbon bikes that hardly ride any better.
  • 15 1
 @NYShred: the frame price went up $200 when they changed to carbon, and you could barely get an aluminum frame, then the carbon ones have been flying off the shelf, so maybe you should reassess your market evaluation.
  • 17 4
 @ProChargedZ28: I'm guessing you haven't ridden one, or owned one, or dealt with their customer service team. Good luck with the big red S...
  • 11 2
 @ProChargedZ28: You left out US made. Not much available at this price for something made here. Not something I’m huge on for bikes, it changes the landscape of the point you’re trying to make.
  • 4 1
 @scvkurt03: he said made in Colorado
  • 3 4
 @SammytheSalmon: I can see dirt and dust forever filling up the seam between cover and frame making cleaning that bike a pain in the ass.
  • 5 5
 @ProChargedZ28:

Agreed, lots of marketing f*ckery
  • 7 0
 @Honda750: I haven’t had that issue on mine.
  • 2 0
 @toad321: picking up and carrying the bike is easier
  • 6 0
 @gilby82: It's NYShred. He has a pathological hatred of carbon.
  • 2 0
 @SammytheSalmon: Placed underneath the down tube and doubles as a protector would also look better.
  • 7 15
flag jclnv (Apr 13, 2020 at 8:28) (Below Threshold)
 @ProChargedZ28: Yeah but then you’re buying a bike from virusland. Which I’m sure will be an increasing negative for people who like to buy North American made products.
  • 3 1
 @freeriderayward: amusing that someone from a much drier country is schooling a Brit on mud!! But fair point. And thinking about it, if you wanted to put the entry ports high up to avoid mud filling, then you might compromise fork crown clearance.
  • 1 0
 @SammytheSalmon: not pretty in person, and honestly a bike annoying to work on and get all the cables in there as tidy as possible
  • 1 0
 @butters1996: not listened to that. I suppose side avoids bottle mounts, shock mount etc. Not sure about strength, as it makes the frame asymmetrical
  • 1 0
 @catweasel: I have side entry bottle on my bike, and it's fine (after all, your hands had to reach from the side anyway), only thing is, as my cage is left entry, I sometimes put my bike down a bit hard on that side and the bottle falls out...
  • 1 0
 @splsce: PCZ28 mentioned that he didn't see a cost reduction, but unless he's making a comparison between US made carbon bikes, it's apples and oranges. And no, he didn't mention Colorado anywhere in this thread.
  • 1 0
 @SammytheSalmon: Kind of like breast implants....
  • 2 1
 @SammytheSalmon: Because that's what's important, being pretty. This mtb, not a fashion show.
  • 2 0
 @scvkurt03: 35 seconds into the video he’s says “made in Colorado”
  • 2 0
 @scvkurt03: I see what you’re saying... disregard... I’m dumb
  • 8 0
 @ProChargedZ28: lets see you put those components on a Santa Cruz or a trek you'll probably be looking at 8k+ so I'd say they hit the mark great coming in at just over half the price of top tier builds from more well known brands.
  • 78 1
 Pinkbike, we want;
Bikes made following ethical labour laws,
Shorter/longer bikes
29/27.5 wheels
Ability to carry a water bottle
Cheaper bikes

GG;
We have a new carbon process and modular frame so we can competitively make bikes in the US
A reach adjust headset so all 3 sizes can be ridden short or long
2 27.5 and 3 29 bikes with mullet options also available
Options to mount up to 2 water bottles and/or tools
Bikes starting at$3900 with a $4800 build with lyric ultimate, performance dps, code r, GX, carbon cranks and bars, and our builds are all customizable

Pinkbike
Still moaning
  • 12 0
 @ProChargedZ28: Not sure about Knolly but Big S is all made in Taiwan. Maybe it doesn't matter for you but for me being able to purchase a frame for the same price or less that's built in US or Canada is a huge deal. I'm making the switch for this very reason. Good for GG.
  • 14 1
 I’m sure like the rest of the world, Guerrilla Gravity isn’t basing their bike production on what the internet basket cases are saying. These bikes are innovative and up to date. On top of it all they ride great! Nothing is perfect and the whiners are always the loudest. And the best part is you don’t have to buy one, so shut up. Too expensive? Too carbon? Too what ever you need to complain about? These are Domestically produced awesome bikes from a company you can up and talk shop with. @catweasel:
  • 2 1
 @chileconqueso: Never, ever, underestimate the power of Pinkbike basket cases.
Hell, even Scott is handing them bikes
  • 1 0
 Or just leaving the routing open....
  • 1 3
 yup but if you've seen it in person...it looks cheap. but hey! its not a $10k lol
  • 2 0
 @Supergo: So black.
  • 1 0
 Heck yeah! I have an aluminum version that I love. It’s just rite.@catweasel:
  • 18 0
 @catweasel: the thing a lot of people are missing is GG is encouraging you to hack your bike. How many threads are there about long stroking or short stroking your shock, and making it work with offset bushings? How many people wish they had adjustable chainstays to increase wheelbase? How many threads are there about swapping stem length to make the bike fit better? You can do all this with a GG frame with the geo adjust headset, the frames will fit different stroke shocks with the same eye to eye, and they encourage you to do it. Swap the stays and run the wrong wheel size, they don’t care....Hack away.
  • 2 2
 @Supergo: Sad thing is we had adjustable stays on bikes 10 years ago & they are only just starting to come back. Im hoping to see more alu bikes come out that have some adjustment & are made to ride instead of being stared at. Sick of seeing big $ plastic bikes that come with awful components just to get the price of entry somewhere reasonable. For a long travel rig that it going to be ridden hard and put on a lift every so often I just dont see the point in carbon
  • 3 1
 @NYShred: my next bike is for sure going to be a GG in the 3-5k range.
  • 2 1
 @Supergo: yeah love all the options and how willing to work with you they are. I've had 2 bikes from them both times they worked hard to get me custom stuff I wanted. Currently running a megasmash setup as I love the confidence of a 29er front wheel but my little legs don't like how close the rear gets to my butt lol
  • 2 0
 @zyoungson: I’ve had carbon bikes from other manufacturers and spent a lot of time at the bike park with them. I would feel better bringing the Revved frame to the bike park. I get that some people are gonna beat the hell out of a frame, but look at Santa Cruz V10, YT Tues, Intense M29....carbon frames that only spend time at the bike park. You can build a frame to take the abuse.
  • 2 0
 @Supergo: The issue that many people (me included) have with carbon frames is not that they can't stand to heavy duty use (they obviously can) but how much you pay for them relative to the few, if any, performance advantages.

Any material comes with a set of several compromises, cost being one of them. If the higher cost gives you a considerable performance advantage then you can consider it justifiable. For heavy duty trail, enduro, park or DH applications not only the performance advantages seem to be minimal, but it also comes with a set of disadvantages (such as abrasion resistance) and also a massive price difference.
  • 3 1
 @Arierep: I believe I read in one of the interviews with GG the cost jump from alloy to Revved frames was $100-$200? I can’t remember specifically but it wasn’t much.
  • 1 0
 @Supergo: My comment was about the market in general, not specific to GG
  • 1 0
 @Supergo: My last 2 bikes have been carbon and have spent time in bike parks, had broken cranks, wheels, some heavy crashes. I dont think there is a durability issue with the frames they have always been solid. My issue with carbon frames is cost-benefit ratio. enduro bikes are so dh focused now with big tyres & components I dont think weight savings in the frame is worth it. Its annoying to see some manufactures not offering an alu frame option or if they do it has base model components. I can understand why someone would want carbon everything on their down country rig but for a long travel bikes I dont see the benefits.
  • 4 0
 @catweasel: you forgot to mention the joy of being unable to contact customer service, kind of like that girl that you 'dated' in 9th grade because she never answered your call and told you she thought you were a scrub.

GG service is pretty top notch. You can regularly reach a knowledgeable human being which is worth something these days..
  • 2 0
 much like DVO
  • 1 0
 @gilby82: what do you mean by this? I've had one of their bikes for a few years and raking with them has always been quick, easy and a pleasure. Honestly they made me appreciate how bad customer service is with most other companies.
  • 59 6
 I don't mind the name, doesn't make me cringe. Like it doesn't take itself too seriously. I'd ride a Gnarvana in public. :-)
The front triangle re-use is pretty smart too.
  • 14 16
 You have nerves of steel. I cringed.
  • 19 2
 I like the name.
  • 3 12
flag coletrane-mtb (Apr 13, 2020 at 5:10) (Below Threshold)
 I think GG totally got bait and switched by the industry when they went with the same carbon front on all their bikes to get the price down, and to get into carbon. Right after that everyone else started prioritizing even cheaper aluminum frames.
  • 35 0
 @50percentsure: I think you meant he has gnarves of steel.
  • 26 0
 @WishIWazFaster it didn’t make me cringe either. It made me grunge Razz
  • 9 1
 @JohanG: same. It hints at what the bike is meant for as opposed to so many other brands using incomprehensible (to outsiders) systems of acronyms and numbers.
  • 11 0
 @cole-inman: they were already using the same aluminum front triangle for 3/4 of their models, why not continue that in to their carbon frames? Also, they're the first bike company to use this carbon technology, so kinda hard to say they got bait and switched, when they are the pioneers of this technology.
  • 21 1
 In case you are unfamiliar with the brand's naming conventions, all of the models are named (tongue in cheek) after hard rock or punk rock bands or albums. Trail Pistol, Smash, Megatrail, Pedalhead, Shred Dogg... All of it seems self mocking in the spirit of Spinal Tap or Beavis and Butthead. Gnarvana was almost inevitable.
  • 9 0
 Apparently there is was a rumor / joke photo about a new 'Blastodon' from GG. Maybe it's this bike renamed or maybe we'll still see it.
  • 2 0
 @Jacquers: that was done to throw people off the Gnarvana scent.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/edit/?inList[]=18518287
  • 1 0
 @50percentsure: Maybe there's a cultural connection. :-)
  • 6 0
 @herzalot: ok, now I just want to start making up names for GG’s future bikes.

Van Huckin

Stealy Down
  • 43 2
 What does this bike smell like in the garage?

Smells like White Spirit.
  • 46 0
 I hope they use 'Lithium' grease when building.
  • 6 29
flag oregontradesman (Apr 13, 2020 at 5:12) (Below Threshold)
 @tremeer023: or else those bearings will be "red hot chili peppers"
  • 29 0
 @oregontradesman: that hurt my heart shaped box
  • 13 0
 @leadsledpaintrain: almost gave me an aneurysm
  • 2 1
 Nirvana is an ancient word that predates Kurdt.
  • 28 1
 Kurt Cobain is probably not rolling in his grave as much because of that Gnarvana thing, but rather because of misspelling his name, I would say.
  • 3 4
 Nirvana was a word long before the band used it as their name. The bike name is obviously a mix of gnarly and nirvana put together.
  • 1 3
 @h82crash: that's what I thought too. Boomer much do ya? Kids these days may be cool and all, but isnt that a definition of youth anyway?
  • 28 7
 Are there really people who buy GG and then go to all that trouble and cost to have two bikes in one.
When you factor in new fork and shock, having to align everything and probably new wheels, tires, rotors, cassette and mostly likely cockpit, you're much better off buying two bikes.

This business model is great for GG and only for them as their bikes use same front triangle across-the-board, but performance wise it's definitely far from optimal. Why would your drive all that unnecessary weight around on a light trail bike if your front triangle is supposed to work as a freeride bike on another model?
  • 9 4
 I doubt many people would do it.

But, if you plan it right, the total price wouldn't be too bad. Basically just the seatstay kit plus a shock and new air spring for the fork. You can reuse the wheels/tires/rotors/drivetrain, even if a lighter weight set would be more ideal for something like the trail pistol.

So it would definitely be cheaper than buying a second bike... as long as you're ok with an hour or two of labor to switch between "bikes". Maybe it would work for people who occasionally go to the bikepark, but usually are cruising around on a shorter travel rig?

And, as for the weight? Yeah, you're right, but I'm guessing if people are interested in this, they're not overly concerned about their 120mm travel bike weighing an extra 1-2lbs.
  • 18 2
 Consider that most of the "new" bikes in the buy and sell are from people who just bought the wrong bike for their needs. And for 450 bucks, maybe a shock swap depending on what your doing and maybe fork work to adjust the travel you can change the most basic nature of the bike into something totally new. Not a bad deal.

For sure it's a business model that benefits GG. But LOTS of bike manufacturers use the same main triangles for more than one bike model. BUT who else lets you buy the parts to convert from one model to the next? (no other company I know of??)
  • 20 1
 I'm one of those people to be honest! I've had compromise "one bike" solutions before which lead to me being overbiked on all my local trails and under biked in bike parks! Not to mention I can't justify spending for a whole new bike just for the bike park 3 weeks a year maybe? So when this lockdown business is over, I will be buying their short travel 27.5 bike, which I will then be short shocking (a mad dogg according to the gg secret menu) along with the bits to make it into a megatrail when I need to! (tf tuned cheapo marzocchi stuff) I'm light, so won't need another wheelset or brakes. Plus, less garage space eaten up with bikes that aren't being used.
  • 2 1
 @stiingya: who else is repurposing front triangles?

If so you should be able to buy the rear triangle and shock. They may not advertise it regularly, but that's just because they'd rather sell you an entire bike.

I know I can go on any number of B2B sites for bike manufactures and buy rear triangles, they have a wholesale and retail price, so there are no barriers to sell it to a customer.
  • 2 0
 It would make it easier to sell, or help its value on the secondary market.
  • 2 1
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: gt force and sensor
  • 10 0
 I currently ride a 2019 Trail Pistola and I'm seriously considering Getting the seat stay kit for bike park days. I built the bike with a 36 so the fork is just an air spring swap. You can always find second hand rear shocks, so you could probably get the swap down around $700 if you do it smart. Current GG owners get a discount on GG hardware so it brings down the price of the seat star kit jut a bit.
  • 5 1
 I think its the universal frame is a great feature. I personally have two wheelsets for my main mt bike. One XC setup for my local tame trails and an enduro setup for heading to the Mt's. I've theorized for years that having two wheelsets would be awesome. Finally had the opportunity two years ago to make it happen and am so pleased with the results. And it helps that my frame has adjustable geometery too.
  • 5 9
flag racerfacer (Apr 13, 2020 at 5:43) (Below Threshold)
 I also do not see the point of having a 120mm frame when you could have 160mm for no weight penalty (other than the longer fork).
  • 2 0
 Man, I have a beefier trail bike and a lighter hard tail...my solution is simpler - save almost 3 lbs by swapping wheels and rotors when I want more of a marathon ride on my trail bike. Voila! And I can turn my hardtail into a thrasher by doing the opposite - though it is not a race bike, so would not work for for all hardtails! Even just a second wheel set is a better option than this, perhaps?
  • 12 0
 I have a GG and I don't think it's about having 2 bikes in one, but rather having extreme flexibility to setup one bike that's exactly what you want. For example you can setup 120,130,145,160,165mm of travel on the same frame with different wheelsize and suspension options. Then you can switch without buying a whole new bike if you ever decide you want something different.
  • 7 0
 @dthomp325: It’s a lot of things. The modular design allows an American made frame to be cost competitive. The added benefit is that a consumer can choose to access other models via the seat stay lots rather than a whole new bike. I’m mostly interested in a Guerrilla gravity because I’ve liked the company since their single pivot days. I would’ve bought an aluminum bike from them and the modular design is by no means a priority. That said I may end up getting a seat stay kit and some used suspension as it is a great idea.
  • 8 0
 It's a frame that can evolve with your riding style. I don't see it as something people will be swapping back and forth as much as "growing into". The Trail Pistol is plenty capable, but this long legged 29r should feel like a whole different beast.
I love the idea, and will likely morph my Smash into this monster next year.
  • 3 0
 I have a 2018 (aluminum) shred dogg/megatrail and the setup is a little different (no need for $400 seat stay kit), but I run relatively heavy duty wheels and tires all the time and just run a heavy trail bike most of the time, then throw a long coil shock on and put it in slack geometry mode for the bike park. It feels different enough to inspire lots more confidence in bike park mode, and still climbs and pedals great in trail mode. The extra weight keeps me in shape and the bike also inspires confidence if I find a big feature I want to hit on a trail ride
  • 3 0
 @msusic I'm one of those people. (I have the older alu version.) With the MRP travel adjustable fork (140, 150, 160, 170) and 2 shock and 2 bolt positions making rear travel (135,145,155, 165) I can get 4 different configurations with just a shock swap - GG sold me the 2nd shock (RS Debonair coil for about $400 I believe.) Realistically, though, I use it just as @ocnlogan mentions - shorter travel most of the time, and lengthened when I'm headed to the bike park, which for me ends up being 3-4 times/year. So basically a 2nd bike for $400.
  • 4 2
 No, the changeover is time consuming, but it is nice to have the option of changing bikes.

I rode a Revved Shred Dogg, liked it so-so, got some Megatrail stays and swapped forks/shocks, now I love it!

I also have a Pistola which is fun little whip.

I don't think weight is an issue worth worrying about. GG makes burly bikes that don't break, that's really the only thing that matters in the end.
  • 2 0
 @nurseben: the previous gen bikes broke regularly enough that when I snapped a chainstay they knew where I broke it before I sent the picture
  • 3 0
 I think it's got promise. Like many, I live somewhere with mellow trails and take regular weekend trips to gnarly ones. With my quiver of one, I'm a little over-biked at home and under-biked on trips. I love wrenching with a beer and would not mind spending an hour switching it fairly often.

If you bought a Gnarvana, the Trail Pistol seatstay kit + Deluxe + Pike comes out at $1600. Or just change the air spring and its $800 and 1.5 hours to switch. Heck of a lot less than buying an enduro bike and trail bike. The only real weight issue is wheels and tires.

This model won't ever take over much of the market. But there's a niche for it.
  • 3 0
 Skip the list and just get a Nicolai G1
  • 5 2
 @Jimmy0: Yeah, yeah, we know who you are, that guy who broke all those stays. The stays have been revised, so thanks for being a beta tester, sorry you got so butt hurt, maybe it'll heal if you stop picking at scabs.
  • 2 0
 Or just get the smash and a coil and an air shock. 10 minutes! Run the fork at 150mm. @tacoman93. Plush/crush air /coil. Two personalities one bike.
  • 2 0
 @steezysam: I have the same set up on a 2018 and love it. I just adjust fork air pressure to match whatever rear travel set up I am using. Save a pound, more playful, and pedal better with shorter stroke air shock. Or go full travel plushness with the coil.
  • 3 0
 @Jimmy0: I snapped mine too, right behind the front weld on the non drive side. They sent me a burlier redesigned one free and fast, I haven't seen or heard of any problems with the new design.
  • 4 0
 @blitz66: I bought a Shred Dogg and then started discovering a real liking for seriously steep and rough terrain. So, I converted it to a Megatrail and have been extremely happy with it. However, this is the old alu bike and the change just involved a couple of beers and adjustments to fork and shock.
  • 4 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: Being able to go on a B2B site and order a rear triangle is in NO WAY the same thing as what GG is doing and you know it. Also it's designed NOT to need a whole new triangle.

I'm sure there are instances where you could find and buy what you needed. But I've personally seen barriers where you had to have a business/wholesale account to log in to order. I've also seen where I could find the frame component I needed overseas but they were location restricted from selling it to me from their website and I had to go into a local dealer to get them to order it for me and it cost more so everybody could get their cut.

AND ALSO... it makes no sense that your affluent enough in the bike world to know where you can go buy a rear triangle no problem. BUT your gonna try and tell me you don't know of any bike manufacturer that's ever used the same front triangle for more than one model...? That just seems hard to believe.
  • 2 0
 @NWBasser: this would be me if I had any steep rough terrain nearby! As it is a "UK style" short travel smasher plus the megatrail kit for occasional drives to Wales or overseas will be perfect! Plus it looks like I own less bikes to the wife :p
  • 1 0
 @blitz66: contact pedalsbikecare in edinburgh. they have them in stock, as far as im aware they are the only distributor in uk
  • 1 0
 @forkbrayker: planning on doing so! I'll be going via Jtech for squishy bits as well because custom tuned marz stuff is cheaper than everything else out there and will work better for a lightweight like me! I fall through the cracks on govt. help at the moment unfortunately so my savings are for paying mortgages before bikes!
  • 1 0
 @blitz66: this is a very important factor
  • 3 0
 @ocnlogan:Bingo! I trail ride mostly with an occasional weekend at the bike park. I have the trail pistola with a second air shock, Smash kit, and a second air cartridge for the fork. You can get a diamond cartridge for less than 200 and make the swap a no brainer, or just pull it apart and add remove travel spacers. There is no need for a second fork. Second bike for 800ish, less if you can find a deal.
  • 19 0
 Looking at the geo, it is surprisingly similar to the Banshee Titan (~1 degree slacker HTA though), They both have ~450mm chainstays across all sizes, and have a identical reach numbers, and very similar stack numbers.

Actually, selfish request incoming (as I'm in the market), but we seem to be having a lot of new long travel agressive 29'ers coming out. Any chance for a big comparison test "eventually"?

The Gnarvana, Titan, Madonna V2, Privateer 161, the upcoming Super Sentinel, and those are just the new ones this year that I can think of off the top of my head. Let alone all of the existing models (Megatower, Mega 290, etc). Would be cool to see how they all stack up against the "old guard" at some point (most of which have already been reviewed).

Also I really appreciate all this Pond Beaver coverage. Helps keep me sane (and commenting) Big Grin .
  • 2 0
 New sentinel is coming out this year?
  • 4 0
 @acorreao: they've been on sale for a reason
  • 2 0
 Would love this comparison as well
  • 2 0
 First I've heard of a Super Sentinel...
  • 2 0
 @j-p-i: sounds like urban legend, I haven't been able to find anything on it.
  • 2 0
 Comparison of those aggressive long travel 29'ers would be super sick. Exciting category and also selfishly trying to find the right new bike that pedals, but is a killer bike for the PNW area.

Would you add the Yeti SB150, YT Capra, Ibis Ripmo V2, and/or Pivot Switchblade to that list?

The new Sentinel looks pretty Sweet!
  • 16 0
 I think the names are part of their brand. I don't know about cringey, but for sure they are silly as f*ck. As far as the modular system goes. I own a Trail Pistol. I recently went to the Pistola setup which is their 130mm set up on that same rear triangle. Just a longer stroke shock in the rear. I'm seriously considering either trying a mullet setup with the shred dog rear triangle or just give the shred dog a shot. I love having that option. There are times that I go back down to 120mm if I'm feeling like I just want to rip some of the XC laps or just want some more pop. You'd be surprised at how much you would use it once you have the option. The carbon they use is burly AF too. I'm not sure, but I would imagine hand building a frame from aluminum like they used to is probably a bit more time consuming than going this carbon route they have gone. I'm not sure though. I just ride the bike.
All of their bikes also have a threaded BB which is super noyce. No creaky madness and it's just easy to work on. You don't have to worry about pounding out bearings or having a bearing press around if you work on your own bike. It has been said that that panel for the cable routing is finicky. It is, but that is probably the only complaint most owners have on this bike. I haven't figured out the easiest way to deal with it yet, but I only took it off out of curiosity. The only other issue I have had with mine was the down tube protector peeled off. It was kind of cheap and crappy anyway, but the new one they sent (At no charge I might add) is of the same type and also starting to peel. They did tell me last time I contacted them there is a new down tube protector coming and it's supposed to burlier and better made so I'll be getting one. A long travel 29er was missing from their line up and if it's your jam then you can get it and still have the option of going to a shorter travel bike without buying an entire complete bike. It's great to have options. Oh and the customer service. Yeah it's second to none. They are always prompt and always quick to solve any issues you have. If you are in the market then you should really consider one. The GG guys will answer any questions you have, and they are super sick, fun bikes to ride and own.
  • 5 0
 I own a Trail Pistola as well and second all of this including my down tube protector starting to peel. Their customer service is amazing though and I will be getting that new guard as well. Also thinking about getting this Gnarvana setup!
  • 3 0
 Agreed, the OG downtube protector was kinda crappy. I need to hit them up for the updated one.
  • 1 0
 @86cucv: I heard they are having issues getting the right adhesive for them so they may be delayed
  • 2 0
 @rowyoboat: Yeah last I heard the COVID situation was causing them problems.
  • 3 0
 The should name there next one "The Bamboozler"...
  • 8 0
 Paragraphs. They're the new shit, brah.
  • 2 1
 @hllclmbr: ??? I don't get it... brah
  • 20 6
 Looks like an absolute weapon
  • 7 0
 Like a shotgun?
  • 1 0
 @HopeFbn: wrong company, Intense makes all the gun bikes! Smile

But there is the freedom linkage sticker with six shooters!!
  • 10 0
 As a bike mechanic and at times race mechanic. The cable hiding side plate is pretty awesome. No goose necking to unclip cables or remove plates from underside of downtube no fishing cables out of a frame, no installing cable holder button majiggers from downtube belly (looking for at you Norco and trek) and I'm sure I am missing some of the other silly things I have seen.

A different paint job and that side plate would be far less noticeable as well. It's hard to make super practical things look great.... Look at any major car manufacturers lineup... Then look at ferrari's
  • 1 0
 since the 488, people have complained about the placement of the doorhandle, which is there for aero considerations.

even ferrari cannot avoid function>form at times
  • 11 1
 I was set on buying a Ferrari until I learned about the door handles.
  • 1 0
 @acali: where the handles located?
  • 5 0
 @flyguyty: on the doors
  • 13 1
 Now Transition needs to hurry up with that Super Sentinel so we can have a head to head!!
  • 1 0
 I'm wondering if they are delaying it at this point... I also hope they update the regular sentinel too so it is a bit more progressive and you don't need all the spacers ever in the shock.
  • 1 0
 @bikekrieg: I missed the news a couple weeks ago, but Cascade components has said they are going to make a sentinel link. Still in development, but looks like currently being tested and sounds like it will be 20% progressive and be about ~145mm with the current shock stroke giving more leverage and ~160mm with a longer stroke/60mm shock. (of which the standard Sentinel shock is a 60mm with a travel restriction to 57.5 " I think")

So anyway, good news for us with the OG Sentinel. Definitely going to get the link as soon as!! (But still really interested in the LT Smash/SuperSentinel and would have bought a Titan but I was too late on getting an XL RAW the last time... Smile
  • 14 0
 come as you gnar
  • 9 1
 Heckin' love my The Smash. Love that I drive past their factory/ HQ on my commute every day (when we're not under a stay in place order). Love that I had the best customer service experience of my whole life when I bought and built up my bike. Love that I can just walk into the shop if I need anything. Love that I spent over $1000 less on my bike than if I had bought a carbon bike from just about anybody else with a comparable build.
  • 8 0
 @mikekazimer didn’t you promise a long term look at the GG smash like a year ago?
  • 5 0
 It’s dope, just buy one
  • 2 0
 They do that all the time.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer whenever the long term review does get done, would love to hear how this bike compares to the older The Smash
  • 5 0
 If the same front end is used and this as on the 120mm trail bike then that must be massively overbuilt and far heavier than it should be. I get they want to use the same molds to keep the cost down but surely they could use a different layup to save weight on the shorter travel bike
  • 7 1
 I'm running my TP in the 130mm mode and treat it worse than most treat their 160mm bikes. I will be damned if I will ride a featherlight frame and pray to the FSM that it doesn't explode when I go a little long on a big jump. Also, because they use a completely different carbon manufacturing process than anyone else, I don't think they can "lay up" a frame the way they do for traditional frames (i.e. by hand). They use a thermoplastic injection method that may not be as conducive to small adjustments in wall thickness - but I may be wrong on that.
  • 1 0
 @jackalope: Do you have a source on the thermoplastic injection method? genuinely curious how it works.
  • 4 0
 @jkiefer:

Albeit this is from their website, but it gives a pretty good overview and if you're truly interested I'd listen to the podcast linked on the page:

ridegg.com/pages/revved-carbon?gclid=Cj0KCQjwm9D0BRCMARIsAIfvfIb9y_teHpdt5xWhp-iQMuSUGQ3iRDxb-3SHGsXygBiFRX2NLejbyPYaAkdKEALw_wcB
  • 8 2
 @jackalope: Awesome thanks for the link. I also did some research and found their patent on the process. I'm glad to see that their "300% more impact resistant" claims have some actual merit.

patents.google.com/patent/US20180264756A1/en?oq=US20180264756A1
  • 5 9
flag Frontrange (Apr 13, 2020 at 8:20) (Below Threshold)
 @jkiefer:

Again... 300% is marketing. They’ve broken frames just like every other company.
  • 3 0
 @Frontrange: I can't verify the 300% claim, and I suspect its difficult to create an accepted test that fully quantifies things like impact resistance. And yes, its possible to break any bike if you do something bad enough like nose case a 45' double or something. But there's a lot of bike brands out there that have frames break a lot more often than at least I think they should - GG is not one of them. I've had/have 4 of their bikes and haven't broken anything. Just anecdotal evidence of course, but I have a morbid hobby of collecting pics of broken mtn bike frames and posting them on my local mtb forum, and you can find some "themes" with certain manufacturers.
  • 4 2
 @Frontrange: Of course they've broken frames, I was just alluding to the fact that their carbon layup offers toughness at the cost of weight as a property of the thermoplastic resin composite. Yes, 300% is a bunch of marketing bs that was likely based off a small sample size test, but the material properties check out.
  • 1 4
 @jackalope:

What about sprocket case a 10’ double and fold the frame in half?
  • 4 0
 @Frontrange: is this before or after the 45' gap nose case?
  • 2 5
 @jackalope:

I just told you it was a 50/50 case on a small double. I can send you the photo if you like.
  • 8 0
 Don't think these guys and gals really give a crap whether you like the name Wink vimeo.com/211049641
  • 6 1
 Haters gonna hate! Love my Revved Shred Dogg! Going from 130mm trail to 140mm gravity with a bolt change truly gives me two different bikes. The kinematics change in the two settings is substantial. Don’t player hate, participate!
  • 1 0
 That burnout is on the money.
  • 8 2
 Bikes nice, name is questionable, sounds like something the d*cks from sick bikes would make up
  • 22 1
 All the GG bikes are mash up of a band name Shred Dog is Snoop Dog, MegaTrail is Megadeath, Trail Pistol is Sex Pistols, The Smash is the Clash
  • 1 0
 Ha, I never noticed. Thanks @Supergo:
  • 3 0
 gg allin
  • 1 0
 @vinny4130: I'll buy whatever bike they finally give that name to!
  • 6 0
 I want this bike, but I only weigh 150 lbs, so I'd build it with an x2 and fox 36, and shave 2 lbs.
  • 5 0
 450mm CS, 160mm rear travel with 29" wheels, sub 64° head angle? That bike should be a good match for MSA and all the newfound gnar around Quebec City.
  • 8 4
 With a frame with that many possibilities, a fork with something like TALAS / U-Turn would be useful to have so there's one less bit of hardware needed for the conversion.
  • 1 0
 I’ve always thought they needed to bring those back. There are so many useful applications for it!
  • 6 2
 Looks amazing to me they are an hour drive from me. I wonder what the weight limit on that beast is. God job gg another rad looking bike for normal people!
  • 5 0
 changeable travel via different seat stays. I love that. why don't more companies do that? that's so smart!
  • 5 5
 *changeable travel via different seat stays, shock, and fork* So basically a whole new bike...
  • 5 0
 @bikekrieg: Depending on how you handle it I guess. I just swap the rear shock and seat stay out and pop a longer airspring in my 36 and then I'm good to go. You can get out for less than a thousand bucks if you do it that way. Not saying that's cheap I'm just saying it can be done comparatively in an economical way.
  • 4 0
 @dbarnes6891: yeah It's like paying $7,000 instead of $12,000 to get two different $6,000 bikes, if that makes sense. It's not quite the same as literally having two bikes, but it's good enough if, for example, you mostly ride terrain that calls for a shorter travel trail bike, but make the occasional trip to the bike park. Also, for people like me who would love the process of switching back and forth it sounds super fun to do.
  • 3 0
 @bikekrieg: If I knew that a shock and stays were an entire bike, I'd have bought WAY more bikes by now!

Who knew, bikes were made from so few parts!

*forks can run different lengths, FYI. My Ohlins goes from 130-170...
  • 2 0
 It's so relevant for where I ride... Around Quebec City, we have the full spectrum of trails and having the ability to easily swap parts and adapt to whatever I'm up to is just awesome. Days at Bromont and MSA, racing amateur XC and trail riding with friends all on same plateform. I'm sold.
  • 2 0
 I could have sworn that it's a brand new frame, looks so much cleaner than the previous GG efforts. I'm glad they're still out there doing their thing at reasonable prices. The trail bikes end up being a bit chunky, but the big travel smashers seems to hit the sweet spot.
  • 1 0
 Probably looks cleaner cuz the adjustable headset is in the forward position. Looks really ugly when it’s set back 10mm. Kinda gives the frame a “nose” that is very aesthetically unappealing
  • 5 3
 Hello PB! Let's make a deal? I know you don't like to use metrical system very often, but some of us (basically the rest of the world) do. How about ALWAYS use both systems in the tech info you provide in the reviews? This thing sometimes you do, sometimes you don't is kind a pain. Tks a lot!
  • 4 0
 Or, only use metric, and maybe America will catch up someday?

I know, I thought it was worth a laugh.
  • 3 1
 I like the modular designs of their bikes made with US manufactured carbon. It's not cheap to buy a kit and suspension for a conversion but it's cheaper than buying a new one. To each their own but if I have the cash for a new bike then it will be a hard choice between a Mega Trail and a Canfield Balance.

Also despite the heavy metal vibe of GG I suspect that the name has more to do with the eastern philosophical idea of Nirvana which is a higher state of being achieved after a lot of Budhist stuff. (Too long to type and no coffee yet)

So Gnarvana is a perfect state of trail shredding.

Or maybe I whiffed here and completely missed the joke. Either way.
  • 2 0
 All their names for bikes are based on bands names, see a few of the comments above but megatrail and megadeth etc
  • 2 0
 oh c'mon @mikekazimer , don't go making MTB all high brow with your 'cringe' comment. Where were those comments for Transition Bikes !? Besides, we need to keep this sport FUN , this type of naming reminds me not to take things too seriously .
  • 8 2
 #27.5snotdead

Too soon?
  • 4 3
 Never.
  • 4 0
 i think so. there are sooo many 29ers...
  • 6 1
 I said this to my mate last night. 27.5 seems to of had a very short life. All new bikes seem to be 29 now.
  • 5 2
 @Allen82: they just dont give us choice....
  • 13 3
 Wait until people start getting bored of monster trucking and proper freeride bikes come back with short stays and smaller wheels... (if only there were a more nimble wheel size than 650b....)
  • 3 0
 @Allen82: Yes and all the new standarts etc. are for 29ers.
29ers are easy to ride and fast as hell. but i like the playfullnes of the 27,5".
  • 1 0
 @Hamburgi: the quantity over quality mindset kills the pleasure.
  • 4 1
 Tried it, didn't like it. #27.5untilsomef*ckinnewstandardwheelsizecomesout
  • 3 0
 @Uchwmdr: Pretty hilarious comment when the 27.5 megatrail has been out for WAY longer than the Smash or this brand new Gnarvana.

We only just got a 160mm 29er choice
  • 2 0
 @Allen82: just waiting to hear of a new 'goldilocks' 28" wheel size now.
  • 4 0
 FWIW, one of my favorite sections of trail, part of the Continental Divide Trail near the CO/NM border is called Gnarnia.
  • 2 0
 Any chance you'd mind sharing which section that is? Always looking for cool new trail in NM.
  • 2 0
 @TheArbez:

On the southern end of this route.

Check out my activity on Strava: strava.app.link/tewKqhnGE5
  • 2 1
 I'm sure GG is a great company and all. I really wanted to try one but when I tried to buy a Smash frame this winter it didn't go so well. The last person I spoke to at GG wanted to ship the frame to a shop in Seattle and then have me drive the 10 or so hours to go pick it up because "shipping to Canada is a pain". In the end I bought a Sentinel. Shipping was not an issue, it got here just fine and the bike is awesome.
  • 1 0
 Awesome American made bikes for the correct application, which this is.

That said, I heavily (pun!) considered a Revved for my wife's new bike last year, but in the end that heavy frame, for a 114# woman riding trails, was just way overkill and would result in a noticeable couple of pounds of extra weight with no benefit at all, in her case. In fact being a stiff chassis with longer chainstays was actually a distinct disadvantage for this application.

In the end I bought her a Foxy 27.5 SL with it's adjustable chainstays, light weight, and flexy nature. Just a better fit for the application at hand.
  • 7 3
 Such a sweet looking bike...
  • 23 21
 So they’re forcing people to cop a 450mm chain stay so they can get the rear travel they want after slapping 29” wheels on of that standard revved front triangle? Pass.
  • 25 6
 Or they just wanted the ride characteristics of a 450mm chain stay. There are good reasons not to want a super short chain stay.
  • 19 15
 @theelias09: This is nothing to do with a geo philosophy or ride quality. This is purely the CS length they had to choose to make a long travel 29er work on that frame. It’s a performance and cost sacrifice masquerading as a feature.
  • 17 1
 @Linc: You have the option to build the MegaTrail as a mullet (MegaSmash) which gives you a bike with very similar geo numbers, but 165mm rear travel and 432mm chainstays. Or the regular Smash 145mm 29er with 434mm stays, options for everybody.
  • 14 1
 @catweasel:

Agreed.

It could easily be a physical reason to have 450mm chainstays (clearance issues at that travel), but there are enough long travel 29'ers out there with much shorter chainstays (Commencal Meta AM 29 has 432mm stays and 160mm travel, and the MegaTower has 435mm) that it could also easily be due to performance/ride manners as well.

Myself, I'm discovering that as a somewhat taller rider (6'1"), that short chainstays are something I avoid now. So either models with longer stays like this or the titan, or ones that change lengths depending on the size of the frame (Raaw/Norco) are appealing to me.
  • 5 0
 You do have a point; with a whole new frame they probably could have shaved some MM's off of the CS length. BUT that would have left their current customer base without the ability to upgrade their bikes to the longest travel 29er platform. Which would have been a dick move when their whole lineup is based on the modular platform.

Ever since the Smash was released people have been asking them for a longer travel version. (same for the Sentinel) and I think everyone knew that would end up with longer stays...

Without a doubt there will be a fair number of people, probably especially shorter riders who will not like the way this bike rides. But the Titan with it's 450 stay's has it's share of fans. So I think this bike will also have it's customer base.

AND, the great thing is that you can always change it over to a 120mm bike with 426mm stays?
  • 4 1
 @Linc: You’re not wrong in terms of packaging, but I wouldn’t call it a sacrifice. Some people don’t care about the agility or playfulness of a bike and want the stability/weight balance of longer chainstays.
  • 5 0
 Maybe. But I like longer cs on my big travel bikes.
  • 11 0
 Last 3 EWS titles been won on long chainstays. Have some major doubts they wouldn't be shorter if Sam Hill wanted them shorter.
  • 2 1
 @theelias09: maybe an engineer can chime in here, but It seems to me the reasons for the 450mm chain stay on the standard front triangle are, indeed technical.
  • 12 0
 If GG put a 430mm CS on the bike people would be complaining that it was too short and unbalanced for a high speed bike like this. If you want shorter CS get a Smash. It's very capable with only 15mm less rear travel. If you want more point and shoot get the Gnarvana. Or get one bike and the seat stay & shock kit for the other and dial in what you want.
  • 7 0
 @vikb: I agree with you. Look at Nukeproof 450 CS, specialized enduro 442. I have no problem with a 450 chain stay for this type of bike.
  • 14 0
 People spend more time riding numbers than riding bikes.
  • 3 0
 A long travel bike with a big wheel will always need a longer CS relative to a smaller wheel because a bigger wheel requires more clearance. Is it a compromise? Sure, maybe, and then again maybe not.

I suspect the proof is in the pudding. I have only ridden one bike with a 450mm CS, a Foes Mutz, and at the time I thought that bike ripped.

If you want a long travel 29er and can find one with a shorter CS, then get that bike.
  • 1 0
 @catweasel: Exactly! I had my Revved frame built as a Shred and I didn't like it, rebuilt as a Mega and I love it. I had a first gen Smash and liked it, but I swing toward smaller wheels, but the Smash is also a good choice if you don't want long travel.
  • 4 0
 @bulletbassman:

Exactly. Long chainstays are stable, and help weight the front end. Both things that people may design in on purpose, especially for a race/park bike.

The shortest chainstay long travel 29'er that I know of is the Kona Process 153 29'er (425mm chainstays on all sizes). So whoever is looking for a jibby long travel bike, thats a good place to start.

For what its worth, Connor Fearon is a Kona sponsored rider, and obviously pretty dang fast. He rides the Process 153 29'er as his EWS race bike. But his race bike has custom made longer chainstays that you can see here.

cog.konaworld.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/EWSZermatt19_m1_6885-695x463.jpg
  • 2 1
 "...the ability to attach a tube and tools using the two bolts on top of the down tube." - How does this work exactly? Do they provide some sort of carrier that attaches to these bolts?
  • 4 0
 They do sell a carrier that mounts here or you can run a second smaller bottle.
  • 3 0
 They have a strap they sell.
  • 1 0
 Frame bags fit under the shock like the Wolf Tooth Roll Top Bag or you can get a custom bag to fill the whole space for max carrying capacity.
  • 1 0
 Comes with a little bracket to run a velcro strap through, or as others have said, put a frame bag on that bracket and hold whatever you’re into
  • 1 0
 @maxyedor: I have a size 3 smash and I have it setup with the full-size bottle on the underside of the top tube and a small fidloc bottle on the lower with cps washers to space it just a touch.
  • 1 0
 @vinny4130: I have a zefal side load cage on the TT of my Pistola, and a tube, levers and multitool on the little bracket above the BB using a velcro strap I had laying around for chord organization. Pretty cool IMHO that it works as well as it does without buying any extra doo-dads and add-ons, although a small bag is in my fture in order to get a little more crap out of my pack. The option to carry a second water-bottle is cool too, but as dorky as they are, I dig having the extra water in a fanny pack over having it on the frame.
  • 1 0
 Cool - thanks for the replies
  • 1 0
 TBH it looks like a upscaled 26" 150mm all mountain bike from early 2010 era with slacker H/A and low BB, which is a good thing, at least much better lookiing than those ultra long wheelbase 27.5 bikes.
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: agreed. I just buy a bike I like, add a part or 2 I like, swap some shit when it breaks, ride my bicycle. Rinse. Repeat.
  • 3 1
 Regarding the comment about weight, what does a light 29er enduro bike weigh then?*

*Not that I care, just curious
  • 1 0
 Enduro bikes are almost built like dh bikes now & add the dropper & wide range gears I think weight goes out the window. A bike needs to be a certain weight to ride well.
  • 2 1
 Cube Stereo 150 models are 29-31lbs without pedals.
  • 4 0
 My race setup specialized enduro weighs 34 pounds even with a carbon frame
  • 6 0
 @zyoungson: If it were possible to make a 160-170mm bike that had all of the positive attributes of a 32 pound enduro sled, but weighed 23 pounds instead - you don't think it'd ride well?
  • 6 7
 @hllclmbr: No, light bikes skip around too much. I ride with a tube & other bits stashed in the down tube & try to keep a full bottle for the sole reason that it settles the bike down. Enduro bikes weigh a bit now, the idea is stick it in a low gear & cruise up the hill then bomb down. I understand people want a bike that will do it all but the fact is as soon as you put big tyres on a bike and set it up to go downhill it is slow everywhere else on the trail.
  • 8 2
 I just built up a size 4 Smash with carbon wheels, cushcore, XTR components, a EXT coil shock and a Fox 36 with a Smashpot in it and the thing weigh's 38 pounds! I was pretty nervous about the weight before I rode it for the first time but out on the trail I didn't notice it. The peddling position is super comfortable compared to my Capra. Strava lies but I did PR a 20min climb yesterday.
  • 7 7
 Scott Ransom can be made durable and under 29 pounds in an XL.
  • 5 7
 @zyoungson:

Nah friend, that’s just marketing telling you that you need a heavier bike because that’s all that’s available.
  • 2 1
 I ride a ~40 pound E29 (ready to ride weight).

Doesn't bother me a bit. But, I smash this shit out of my bikes, they aren't trail queens.
  • 5 1
 @Frontrange: I don't know why we are getting downvoted for posting real numbers for enduro bikes. I had a Stereo 160 in 27.5 that I built to 28.1lbs with pedals that could smash anything. Fact is, there are some light long travel frames out there, and the GG ain't one of them. My Mach 6 ain't one of them either, only got down to 29.2 with pedals.
  • 3 0
 @JSTootell: Im on an enduro 29, which is just under 39lbs loaded up with carbon frame in xl, It rides good. Parts that are on it are there because they work and anywhere weight could be saved the cost-benefit ratio doesnt make sense. Bikes are made for trails not bathroom scales.
  • 5 1
 What it weighs is what it weighs. You can add or subtract Wright based on build, frame and suspension weight I’d the single largest portion, but what is a couple pounds when you’re pounding down a mountain at Mach chicken.

I would not run a noodle frame, nor a brittle frame, nor a flexy fork, nor a shock that heats up and fades.

I don’t weigh my bikes, because I build my bike for function, cuz function is what it needs to do. I’m not a dentist, my bikes get ridden, I ride GG because they build bikes meant to go fast, get ridden hard, and to be put away wet.

Too many dentists, not enough carpenters, what the hell is the world coming to when you pay more to get a damn filling than you pay to get a new fridge?

Somewhere there is village missing their idiots.
  • 1 1
 @Frontrange: this is true.
  • 3 1
 Looks great but something about the triangle by the seat tube being filled strangely bothers me
  • 1 1
 Are the geometry numbers for the short and long not updated corrected? If I remember correctly, the reach adjustments on the other models affect HT, ST, BB height, etc when the headset cup is flipped.
  • 2 0
 flipping the headset cup is diff than the short/long adjust, isn't it?
  • 1 0
 Looking at their website for other bikes, the angles remain the same, reach, ETT, and wheelbase all change.
  • 1 0
 Some models you can change the size of the lower headset spacer to change h/a, bb, etc
  • 1 0
 @catweasel: i guess that is what i always thought peeps were referring to when they "flipping" the cup.
  • 2 0
 @catweasel: The have short and tall lower cups that can be used on all the bikes. But generally the short/zero cup is for 29er forks and the 15mm/tall cup for 27.5 forks. But you can mix and match how you'd like to adjust geo
  • 3 0
 Love it. GG you are doing cool things!
  • 2 0
 Man I really like GGs new revved bikes. Such a sicl lineup! This looks like a destroyer!
  • 4 1
 Dual bottle mount? Rave
  • 4 3
 So basically this isn't even a completely new bike, only the seatstay kit is new Smile ))
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer any word on the progression rate of the rear suspension for this bike?
  • 3 0
 Love the name!
  • 2 1
 Wait till people realize this is exactly like the new Spesh Enduro numbers wise... and it looks better.
  • 2 0
 I, for one, welcome the arrival of The Beast.
  • 2 0
 I would have named it the Lee Gnarvy Oswald. It kills it.
  • 4 3
 Kurt may not approve, but I do!
  • 8 5
 Y'all know that the word nirvana predated Kurt, right?
  • 10 0
 @thegoodflow: You know GG names is bikes after bands, right?
  • 3 0
 @scvkurt03: yes, that occurred to me after I posted this... foot in mouth
  • 2 1
 @scvkurt03:
Pedalhead
Pistol
Shred
Mega
Smash
Gnarvana

Yup, all bands ????
  • 1 2
 @nurseben: they're a stretch and not that clever
  • 4 0
 @nurseben:

Motorhead
Sex Pistols
Snoop Dogg
Megadeth
The Clash
Nirvana

And the GG/DH was AC/DC

Yup. All bands.
  • 3 2
 C'mon not good enough, I want 385mm chainstays, come guerrilla!!!
  • 1 0
 As I remember, all current GG bikes use the same triangle.
  • 1 0
 Sam Gardner is making great progress in his work. Thumbs up.
  • 1 1
 Love everything about GG accept for that dumb ass head tube logo!! Rock On Brah!!!
  • 1 0
 That is a tiny dropper post
  • 1 0
 I ride a Size 3 (large), my inseam is 33”, and I run a OneUp 210mm dropper with room to spare. I have room for a 230mm dropper. Damn skippy!
  • 2 0
 Gnarvana on Gnargus!
  • 1 0
 I was waiting for the rock roll after that punchy climb but no such luck in this video.
  • 1 1
 Did Kenny Powers pick the name?
  • 2 2
 New fork but "old" shock.
  • 2 5
 How come you didn’t mention that if you put the headset spacer in the shorter setting your fork arch smashes the head tube and your bike as about 30mm less travel that you thought it had?
  • 4 1
 Because it doesn't happen with the 38.
  • 5 1
 It doesn't.
  • 3 1
 @Acidlegs: I have not seen this as a problem. Have you?
  • 4 1
 Probably because it’s not an issue.

Making up stuff doesn’t make it true, just saying.
  • 3 1
 @vinny4130: nope. I let the air out of my fork and it wasn’t even close.
  • 1 2
 @vinny4130: Yes you can clearly see it in the drop to flat tests that pinkbike does.
  • 2 0
 @jwdenver: I own one. It doesn't hit.
  • 5 6
 I feel kinda sad for everyone who got a 2020 fox shock/fork on their bike.
  • 18 1
 Why? I'd be stoked with some 2020 kit! My newest suspension component is my '16 36 elite, and it works great!
  • 6 2
 @DownhillDoozy: you're my hero!
  • 12 3
 Why? I bought a set of 2020 Fox 36’s 3 weeks ago. Even after my shop told me the 2021 was coming out with revised lowers. At the end of the day the 2020 models are just as good as they were before everyone knew about the changes on the 2021 models. Anyone that thinks different is a twat.
  • 4 1
 @Teepee146: i hate the "newer, better" mindset too, but the 2021 lineup has recieved some significant updates, and they come at the same price as the 2020
  • 7 17
flag CrispyNuggs (Apr 13, 2020 at 2:16) (Below Threshold)
 @Teepee146: any one who buys Fox is a twat
  • 2 0
 @CrispyNuggs: why?? what is wrong with buying what you like
  • 10 0
 @CrispyNuggs: anyone who makes broad, sweeping statements....
  • 3 4
 Yay, they've finally caught up with Pole's geometry from 6 years ago!
  • 4 4
 Without the egotistical company head :-)
  • 6 4
 @Ajorda:

Guess you haven’t met Will.... lol
  • 4 7
 @Ajorda:

The company co-owner that demanded in order to process my warranty claim on my aluminum Smash front triangle I take the stickers off my frame from another bike shop in town who sponsored me (Mojo Wheels). The frame was eating dropper posts- leaving huge gouges down the front of the stanchion since the day it was new. Customer service was good but we couldn’t figure out why it was happening. It took 4 months but they eventually gave me a new front triangle at the end of the season. Doesn’t feel cool when a company owner tells you you have to remove your sponsors logos in order for them to process the warranty. Luckily Matt, Bobby, and everyone else who works there are very cool. Will is not, and I’m largely not the only one who feels that way locally. I think that’s why he spends most of his time in back. Just my experience $0.02

I think it’s cool what they’re doing but it’s a big compromise. A lot of it is marketing jazz. When other companies are making size specific rear ends it makes you think.
  • 1 0
 @Frontrange: How does a frame eat dropper posts/cause gouges on the stanchion? in-correct tube shape/reaming, seatclamp torque. Genuinely interested. Cheers
  • 1 2
 @ollypack:
I watched them drop a reamer down the seat tube. They were puzzled. I bought the frame in May and in August they finally gave me a replacement. They destroyed/repaired about a half a dozen droppers trying to figure it out but never did. Only thing I could think of is maybe the tubing was slightly ovalized.
  • 3 0
 @Frontrange: OK thanks for the reply-at least you got a new front triangle in the end but definitely frustrating.
  • 2 0
 @Ajorda: You better hope the Pole guy (Leo?) doesn't read that! He might get bent out of shape!
  • 3 1
 @kcy4130: He'll stand up out of his chair so angrily his seat might not stay and then bend!
  • 2 4
 Backwater Beaver
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