First Ride: Pivot's New Firebird 29

Jun 19, 2018 at 14:47
by Mike Kazimer  


This season we've seen a wave of new long travel 29ers hit the market, and by the look of things there are even more on the way. Pivot's new Firebird 29 is the latest entry into this burgeoning category, with 162mm of rear travel and a 170mm fork up front. It was designed to take on extra-technical enduro race courses, or for knocking out laps in the bike park, with modern geometry numbers inspired by the Phoenix, Pivot's DH bike.

The Firebird 29 may have been created with a strong focus on the descents, but Chris Cocalis, Pivot's founder, says that they wanted to make a bike that was more than just a monster truck. To accomplish that, they worked to keep the weight down, and to ensure that the bike still remained manageable on the climbs.

Firebird 29 Details

• Intended use: enduro / park
• Wheel size: 29" or 27.5+
• Rear wheel travel: 162mm
• Carbon frame
• 65° head angle
• 431mm chainstays
• Frame weight ( w/ shock): 7 lb
• 12 x 157mm rear spacing
• Sizes: S-XL
• 10 year frame warranty
• Price: $5,099 - $9,199 USD
• Colors: sandstorm, steel blue
www.pivotcycles.com, @pivotcycles



Pivot

Frame Details

From a distance, the Firebird 29 does resemble its smaller-wheeled sibling, but there are several key differences. Visually, the most noticeable is the shock mounting position and the shape of the swingarm – the shock is now mounted to the downtube, and the swingarm is less curvy and more angular.

In order to accomplish all of their design goals, Pivot reworked the dw-link suspension layout compared to the 27.5 version, and made the switch to Super Boost Plus spacing. Yes, it's time to poke that hornet's nest again – just like the Switchblade, and the Trail 429, the Firebird has 12 x 157mm rear spacing paired with a BB92 bottom bracket. According to Pivot, going with Super Boost allowed them to give the Firebird short, 431mm chainstays and a generous amount of tire clearance, along with increased wheel and frame stiffness over what would have been possible if they'd stuck with 12 x 148mm spacing.

The Firebird 29 still uses a dw-link suspension design, with two short links connecting the swingarm to the front triangle, but the upper link is now attached to the front of the seat tube, and the shock is driven by a mini-clevis. The suspension has more of a rising rate than the Firebird 27.5, although running a coil shock still isn't fully endorsed due to that mini-clevis mount. The design works well for air shocks, but it can potentially create side loads that can cause unwanted flex in a coil shock due to the reduced bushing overlap.


Pivot
Fox's Float X2 handles the bike's 162mm of travel.
Pivot
You can fit a water bottle, but it'll have to go down here.

Coil sprung shocks may not be recommended, at least until Pivot completes further testing, but the frame is dual crown approved, and that 1.5” headtube is nearly identical to what you'd find on a downhill bike. Of course, with 162mm of rear travel it's best to avoid going too wild – 180mm is the maximum recommended fork travel.

Not surprisingly, the Firebird 29 isn't front derailleur compatible, but all of the bikes do come with Pivot's own upper chainguide as a standard feature. There's also full-length tubing on the inside of the frame for easy cable routing, a BB92 bottom bracket, and metric shock spacing.

There's no room for a water bottle inside the front triangle, but that's not for lack of trying. According to Chris Cocalis, “If we magically could have fit it in there we would have, but the kinematics and the whole platform of the bike came first. Keeping the frame weight down, keeping the bike compact, low standover, and the ability to run a long dropper used up all the space.”


Pivot
The frame is dual crown approved, and uses a straight 1.5" headtube.
Pivot
Pivot introduced Super Boost Plus on the Switchblade, and it's now expanding through their lineup. There are several other companies taking this route as well.

Pivot
The shock is driven by a small clevis, and the geometry can be adjusted via the flip chip on the upper link.
Pivot
There's room for up to a 29 x 2.6" tire, or 27.5 x 2.8".

Pivot


Geometry

The Firebird's geometry can easily be adjusted to accommodate different wheel sizes or to get it as slack and low as possible. The simplest way to make a change is via the flip chip in the upper shock link. That allows for a .5° change to the head angle, along with a 6mm bottom bracket height change.

Pivot also make a 17mm lower headset cup that can be installed in order to keep the bottom bracket height from getting too low when the bike is set up with 27.5+ wheels (27.5 x 2.5” is the smallest recommended tire width in the Plus configuration). Want to run that cup with 29” wheels? Go for it – that'll result in an even slacker head angle, somewhere in the neighborhood of 64.2°.

In keeping with current geometry trends, Pivot increased the Firebird 29's reach by approximately 10mm when compared to the 27.5” version, while steepening the seat angle by .5°, to 74.5° in the low geometry setting. With four sizes in the linuep, riders from 5'4” to 6'7” should be able to find a bike that fits them.


Pivot

Specifications

There are three build kit categories – Team, Pro, and Race – with a Shimano and SRAM drivetrain option in each. Prices for the Firebird 29 range from $5,099 for the Race XT build, which has a Fox 36 Grip fork, DPX2 shock, Shimano SLX brakes, and an XT rear derailleur, and go all the way up to $9,199 USD for the Team XX1 kit, which is fully decked out with Reynolds Blacklabel carbon wheels, a SRAM XX1 drivetrain, and Guide Ultimate brakes. All of the bike are spec'd with forks that have 44mm of offset.



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I've ridden in Moab, Utah, countless times over the years, but I still remember my first time hitting up the Porcupine Rim trail – I was on a scandium XC hardtail, fully clad in spandex, and with my seat sky high. I must be getting soft, because nowadays I wouldn't want to go anywhere near it without at least a few inches of rear suspension. It's not the steepest or most technical trail, but it is unrelenting, with miles of sandstone ledges and lumps. All of those square edged hits make it a prime proving ground for a bike like the Firebird 29 – if there was ever a place that big wheels and a little extra travel make a lot of sense, this is it.

The day's ride was mainly downhill, thanks to a van ride to the top, but there was a short bit of climbing before the descending really began. It wasn't much of an ascent, but it did provide a peek at the Firebird's climbing abilities. It's not going to be able to go head-to-head with something like the Trail 429 when it comes to nimbleness, but it does pedal well, with minimal bobbing even with the Float X2 in the open position.

Pivot
It's designed for going down, but the Firebird 29 can still climb when necessary.


Once that brief climb was over, it was time to bomb down through the desert landscape. It wasn't long before I felt at home on the Firebird, and I found myself sprinting into rocky sections of trail and trying to stay off the brakes as long as possible. There's enough stability and suspension travel that it was more of a mental battle – the bike took it all in stride, but whether my brain could process all of the trail data at that pace was another matter. For the most part it worked out, except for one flat tire, the result of a knife-shaped rock slashing my sidewall. The Firebird has a snappiness that not all bikes in this category possess – it'll plow straight through the rough stuff, but when it comes time to toss in a few pedal strokes it's extremely responsive.

This is just a brief first look, not a review, so I'm not going to dive in too deep, but I do have a pick and a pan to mention. My pan is regarding the Shimano XT 4-piston brakes, specifically the finned brake pads. Those pads rattled incessantly against the caliper on rough sections of trail – if this was my bike the first thing I would do is swap them out for the non-finned version, heat management be damned.

Pivot

As for my pick, it's the Fox 36 Float GRIP2. It's a seriously impressive fork, especially the way that it can handle repeated extremely hard impacts without losing its composure – my hands weren't sore in the slightest after all that trail smashing, which is a good sign that everything was working properly.

The days are long and bike park season is in full swing, so we'll be getting a Firebird 29 in for a long-term review in order to really see how it stacks up in this category. Stay tuned.









328 Comments

  • + 153
 $5k for the entry level build? The top of the line Capra is only $500 more... Guess that's the beauty of direct sales.
  • + 91
 Correction: Highest end Capra's only $100 more.
  • + 40
 You will see. In few years we will read reviews about "budget bike" at 4/5k$ price point.
The only honest brand has been Hope, droping the price of their beauty by 2k€. Still 7k€, but good point for the effort.
  • + 63
 @Aksel31: and they refunded the difference to anyone who had paid more for it as well.
  • + 41
 @excavator666: Indeed, The Hope guys really deserve attention and respect. Those are really cool dudes for the industry I think.
  • + 4
 To be fair the 5k build comes race ready pretty much. Xt and fox cannot go wrong
  • + 44
 @ibishreddin: To be fair, the only XT component on the "XT" build is a rear derailleur. Everything else is SLX including the brakes. Same thing with the XO1 Race bike, all GX with an XO rear dr. Still SLX brakes.
  • + 3
 @Aksel31: they put a Dhx2 on mine for free all i had to do was pay for the spring. There good guys, the attention to detail on the HB is second to none and for 5.5k its cheap.
  • + 17
 @Aksel31: hope dropped the insane price because nobody was buying the bike.
  • + 11
 Remember when trail frames cost $1300 and DH frames rarely pushed $3000. Some people still build custom complete's but spending 8-10k on a trail bike seems idiotic.
  • + 54
 @fecalmaster: $1300 and $3000 frames are available and significantly better than bikes were back in the misty sepia toned past you are pining for. Just because the top end of the market now exists doesn't mean that cheaper bikes don't exist. The Caliber Bossnut is £1000 and probably rides better than any bike, no matter the pricepoint, from 2008. It is able to do that because companies push the development of the bikes on their flagship models.

If you don't think it is worth spending 5, 7 or 9 grand on a bike then don't spend that, it is as simple as that but don't act like there is no point in those bikes existing, they are making the bikes you do buy better.
  • + 18
 If you owned a business and your sales chart of the last several years resembled a side-shot of a dirt jump takeoff, would you lower your prices?
  • + 6
 What goes up must come down Hahahaha.
  • + 37
 @Patrick9-32: The counter-point to your argument is the down-speccing of bikes at these higher pricepoints. Pivot's XT build has full SLX with XT rear derailleur, total 90's move. I don't think there is anything wrong with a 5+k bike, it is the shit spec and squeezing margins that i think is what most people are getting at. Santa cruz with Aeffect on a 5800 bike? DT 370 hubs on their XE Nomad? No option for compression adjust on a rear shock below $5,800?

I like how there is no mention of what hubs come on the pivot builds. I can only imagine they're terrible. On a 5k bike, it is pretty unacceptable to not even make mention that they're Formula or novatec.
  • + 2
 @Patrick9-32: One major issue remains that dedicated websites and/or magazines do not offer many reviews / feedbacks regarding the lower or mid range from manufacturers.
In any case, except if you are a pure racer/very skilled rider, there is no point in buying a bike 8k$.
90% of the riders here on Pinkbike or on the trails would have enough for their skills level (and difficulty of their trails) with a 3/4 K$ bike. Thing is that it's "relevant choice vs desire". I read a good article in a french MTB magazine regarding this topic, I found it really accurate.
  • + 26
 @fecalmaster: Don't forget that in 1994, a fully rigid Specialized Epic Ultimate frame & fork was $3,800 and a complete bike was about $7,000. Adjust that for inflation and you are at $6,425 & $11,800 respectively in today's currency. Top-end bikes have ALWAYS been super expensive. This is nothing new.
  • + 8
 @RedRedRe: totally incorrect. I visited the factory before the price drop. They had loads of HBs being readied to be sent off to places all over the world. Every frame was sold.
  • - 35
flag fecalmaster (Jun 20, 2018 at 7:15) (Below Threshold)
 @ka-brap: I have a manufacturer level discount on all parts/suspension and wholesale on frames so never been too worried about anything. Also have the phylosiphy of riding a bike for a few years in the pursuit of becoming one with my rig. See many riders flipping bikes often and progressing at a snail's pace.
  • + 34
 That top of the line Capra 29 and the next level down is sold out indefinitely in the US. I’m not quite sure about their strategy but unless you are willing to wait, there’s no point in discussing these bikes as viable options on the market.
  • + 1
 @dirtworks911: And you can use the cool hubs you already have with it
  • + 3
 @HsawAknow: the dt swiss wheels come with dt swiss straight pull hubs with a 36t ratchet upgrade. carbon wheels come with i9 hubs. both are not terrible options at all...
  • + 12
 @fecalmaster: i bet those manufacturers are glad you're telling people about the deals you get.
  • + 10
 @fecalmaster: But your argument wasn't that your discount is rad, but that prices were so much better back in the day. And that's simply false.

If anything, top end prices are about the same but what you get for your dollar is thru the roof. Bikes today, of all price points, are so much better than what they used to be. Jerrys falling off their fancy bikes is also nothing new. There's just more of them now because there are more mountain bikers in general.
  • + 5
 @novajustin: Well see, now you're going up in price. You are talking about the $6,400 Pro XT/XTR build. Sticker on M1700 are $850 online give or take? Yeti is doing almost the same build as the $5,400 Pivot bike with M1900 wheels for $4,999 on their SB5.5.

Sure, super boost will cost a bit more due to availability of parts. But yeti is doing theirs with a fox transfer vs. KS.

It gets worse when you look at the SB5.5 GX Eagle bike vs the Pro XO1 from Pivot. Almost the same group, M1900 wheels on the Yeti vs m1700 on the pivot. Guide R vs XT is fanboy debatable. Transfer vs KS, Yeti wins. Pivot gets the nod on an XO cass and House carbon bar.

However, you're looking at $7,499 vs $5,400. $2,100! That's 5 cassette replacements or enough cash to buy the replacement parts to make the SB 5 better than the pivot.

It is cool that pivot does offer nicer wheelsets, however, those are gravy on top of any of those prices, so for this point I'm making, they don't really apply.
  • - 13
flag novajustin (Jun 20, 2018 at 8:51) (Below Threshold)
 @HsawAknow: and with the yeti you get the comfort of knowing you are riding a bike that hasn't been changed in how many years? r&d does cost money if you want to be on the bleeding edge.
  • + 6
 @novajustin: Well. I was using Yeti as the bar as they've typically been the bar of over-priced for spec.

If you'd prefer I kick it in the dick using another brand, just please tell me so i don't waste my time.

For fun, Orbea's Rallon was just re-done and has been pretty well received by everyone so far who's reviewed it.

www.orbea.com/us-en/bicycles/rallon-m10-18

$4,999- M1900 with same suspension, RF post and full GX group with XT brakes. Pivot is bringing a Xo1 DR and SLX brakes to the party with a $5,499 price tag. Not to mention, no mention of the hub spec on the pivot, so crappy?
  • + 4
 @novajustin: Also, Stop using bleeding edge. It has to be the dumbest cliche term out there. That goes for everyone, everywhere. It was old hat in 2014

www.businessinsider.com.au/business-clichs-to-cut-from-your-vocabulary-2014-12
  • + 3
 Yt is pretty much single handledly killing the majority of the industry. It’s crazy to watch.
  • + 7
 @poozank: To the earlier guy's point, until YT can sort out supply, they are a foot-note. By comparison, Canyon is operating under the same model and their reception and sales in the US have been far from what they'd hoped for.

Don't confuse the lack of availability with excess in demand. They're in a fortunate spot where they've sold everything but wait until they sit on product that doesn't sell and see how if affects them.
  • - 2
 They forgot 'game-changer. Look no further' wasn't included because it was DOA in 1984, tho Ed Masters tries to revive it here, without irony. Some change since 'Eddie Masters Gets Fat.' Good luck with that here, where the stoke couldn't be less sick.
  • + 2
 @Aksel31:€7k, sold through bike shops and they make 80% of the bike themeselves. Got to wonder what excuse all those brands buying drivetrains out of catalogues and getting frames popped out of molds in China have for themselves.
  • + 2
 @yupstate: I don't think there's many bike companies with sales charts for the last two years looking like that. Most of them will look more like the landing...
  • + 7
 Yep! Love my Jeffsy! I rode a Yeti, Ibis, Giant & Evil at Outerbike and wouldn't take any of them over the Jeffsy, which cost less than half the price of the Yeti & Ibis, and still ~$1000 less than the Giant & Evil, but with a better spec. For most recreational riders, just about any modern bike will do. They are all great. So I just can't fathom spending more for less.
  • + 2
 @Fix-the-Spade: I think most of them look exactly like the past ten years, flat.
  • - 4
flag beerandbikes (Jun 20, 2018 at 10:22) (Below Threshold)
 Except the very few reviews that the capra 29 has says its a shitty bike and you should just get the 27 instead. To me it seems like YT just wanted to have a lt 29er and took the capra 27 frame and made a few minor changes to it instead of designing a lt 29 from the ground up. Kinda like the sc htlt, they took a mid travel 29er and just slapped a new rear triangle on it and called it long travel.
  • + 5
 @HsawAknow: @HsawAknow: You better open the kimono and run it up the flagpole, 'cuz there's only one throat to choke. Just circle back to pick the low-hanging fruit out of pocket. If you know what I mean.
  • - 1
 @Aksel31: Hope doesn't respond to CSAT emails and apparently have no interest in taking product feedback.
  • + 0
 @ka-brap: Oh Oh Oh! Confirmation bias, YESSSSSSS!
  • - 1
 @ka-brap:

Your wrong.
There is very little progress in oem spec’d technoligies.
Carbon isnt new, the dampers arent new, the brake tech isnt new. Super boost is not new (12x150/157) Lockout isnt new, fast engagment hubs arent new, hydrofoing isnt new, suspension linkage isnt new, geometry is hardly new (they are all still emulating spexialized sx trails, except with bigger wheels) foam in tires isnt new(but it is stupid still) short fork offset isnt new. I could go on.

High and low speed compression isnt new, still rarely offered. Better tech though. Oem’s just being cheap.

Talas and other travel adjust arent new. Just being phases out and bad mouthed slanderously to pinch pennies and make it easier for the promoted bean pickers of central california to put together a shitty fox fork for you idiots.

Procore is new. Carbon rims are new. 27.5 is new. One peiece carbon bar stem is new.

The bike industry is practicing apples iphone slow constant “new” hype release style. While actually progressing very little, holding close the best cards from the consumer market, and even racers.

Most of you are too dumb of consumerist to realize that your actually buying the same or cheapened crap for a higher price.

They are not offering more, just charging more; as the sport becomes saturated with middle age know it all duechebags who bought a mtb instead of a shiny harley for their mid lige “revival”.

Doctor bro will pay more, and buy his whiney 12yr old the newest shit before kiddo sells it to buy pot when he moves on to cars.
  • + 0
 @novajustin:

Yeti changes their sus more than almost any manifacture
  • + 1
 @dirtworks911: f*ckin rights bud! I won't be on a pivot anytime soon!
  • + 2
 @HsawAknow: I here ya but for the record my slx have been stellar since 2014..
  • + 1
 @HsawAknow: and this is why it's frame only builds for me!
  • + 12
 @getsomesy: Holy shit, who took the jelly out of your donut?
  • - 6
flag m1dg3t (Jun 20, 2018 at 14:21) (Below Threshold)
 @getsomesy: PREACH! Can't up this comment enough.
  • + 3
 @yupstate: it depends! Is this a chart of sales volume, gross revenue, net profit, or what?
  • + 5
 support your local bike shop.
  • + 5
 @poozank: yep! I’ve owned 8-$10,000 Pivots and Intense Bikes. Sold them all and got my Capra Pro 29. Best bike I’ve owned to date and it didn’t break the bank!
  • + 1
 @Aksel31: trek dropped 3k on their session a year or 2 ago
  • + 3
 @bogey: If I was a betting man, I bet all of the above! LOL, along with Chris Cocalis houses square footage! But lets be real. I don't know their exact numbers, I'm a nobody, but Pivot has been skyrocketing over the past few years in popularity and some dealer chatter I've heard through the grapevine is that their sales numbers have been fantastic. It would stand to reason, look how they repeatedly churn out fantastic new bikes each year, they are probably dumping money back into R&D. Not to mention the advertising increase, snagging and sponsoring great talent. That said, not just a fanboi, my next bike might be an Ibis, but kudos to Pivot LOL.
  • + 0
 @Fix-the-Spade: Agreed, not many! But Pivot and probably 1 or 2 others I'd bet do. Of course I have no way to validate, just my 2 cents and some things I hear via the rumor mill. But you know what's great about the mtn bike industry today? If you see an awesome bike you like and its too pricey......there's probably 4 other brands that make a damn similar bike and one of them is probably alot cheaper!
  • + 3
 @Drtschker: I've been looking at a Capra Pro Race 29, but after reading some reviews it sounds like its not a good bike. This review right here for example: www.outdoorgearlab.com/reviews/biking/enduro-mountain-bike/yt-capra-29-cf-2018

Can you give any comment since it's the best bike you have ever owned?
  • - 2
 @Drtschker: my aluminum reign from 2012 is 4 pounds lighter then the 2018 cf capra lmao. Best bike I think not.
  • + 3
 @mhoshal: You compare the performances of a bike by its weight?
  • - 6
flag mhoshal (Jun 21, 2018 at 5:36) (Below Threshold)
 @Aksel31: ya actually I do and the fact the yt is on a dated suspension system that you could find on bikes pre 2010. Enjoy that brake jake on the shitty four bar linkage lol yt sucks period. Its 2018 and yt manages to put out a trail bike that weighs as much as most new dh bikes thats sad.
  • + 4
 @mhoshal: YT uses a Horst Link (FSR) design so actually it has very minimal brake jack and quite independent from braking forces.
  • + 6
 @getsomesy: You're* wrong.

Show me a bike from 2000 that retailed for around $2,500 and show me a bike from 2018 with the same retail and tell me again how you haven't gotten more bike for your money now.

Even in the last 10 years what has gotten significantly better is the quality of suspension that is widely available. While external features/adjustments offer the same basic idea, the quality of what goes on inside the fork or rear shock is leaps & bounds better now than what was commonly available in 2008. Every fork and rear shock is better now than then.

If you think a Progressive 5th Element shock rides just as well as a DHX2 or TTX, then you just aren't paying attention.
  • + 3
 @beerandbikes I can speak to this review as I own the exact bike but in blood red. Setup of an air shock like the super deluxe or dpx2 will be a challenge, especially for a heavier or aggressive riders who may run higher psi. The result of this combo is going to be a very poppy and stiff-feeling bike, which is an adjustment from other 4 bar bikes I’ve owned (29er enduro included). Our trails are very rocky so it’s taken some getting used to but I will say I’m faster on my Capra by a fair amount compared to my more comfortable and compliant enduro. It’s strange because I don’t feel that way when I’m riding, but if Strava is an indicator, I’m consistently 5-10% faster.

YT recommends running an additional token and lower pressure. They spec the X2 on the top bike and frankly I think not spec’ing the same shock on their other bikes was a dick move. I’d only assume a more adjustable/linear air shock or coil will provide a level of suppleness and mid-level support that the reviewer was seeking. Thankfully the bike is cheap enough to allow for a $500 upgrade and still be thousands cheaper.
  • + 1
 @Patrick9-32: This kind of shit bothers me. People who buy high end talking about base level bikes. Maybe this isn’t you but I hear it all the time “bikes are cheap and a cheap bike now is better than an expensive bike from blank year” Are you sure? My 04 jamis Dakota al was 900$ Retail I believe. had a nicer 3ish pound air scarab with lockout bb7s mix of x9 x7 okay wheels. My coworker got a similar style of bike last year it had 8speed shit square tapers Swiss cheese no name wheels no name mech brakes. And lastly the fork was horrid I helped him look for the right bike in his range and everything under 1100-1200 had garbage forks most of which where grease filled instead of oil that is a trait of shit forks from the past. Suntour base level forks are the perfect example spring covered in grease. A customer coming in spending 1000$ should not mandatorily have to drop 350 on a new fork because the one on it was complete garbage. The other thing is the bike industry does not have trickle down prices. Big screen TVs are a good example in the past very expensive I recently got a 34in tv for about 130$ the same year as my Jamis I’m sure it would have been much more. Tech is better manufacturing is better and more automated therefore I can buy a tv for 130$ why then are bikes still more expensive? Why are bikes on the low end getting such bad specs. I expect there to be super bikes/products at high prices I think their cool awesome. What I don’t like is everything is getting better and cheaper to make and bikes prices are at best staying the same on the bottom.
  • + 6
 @loganflores: Again, when you look at the spec of 2005 Stumpjumper FSR Comp and look at the new 2018 Stumpjumper Comp Alloy 27.5, the retail prices are about the same (not taking into consideration inflation, just looking at comparative Comp vs. Comp models) but the new bike is better on all accounts. There isn't one thing that is better on the old bike than the new bike. And if we take into consideration inflation, a $2,500 bike in 2005 should cost about $3,200 today (through a LBS, not DTC).

As for full suspension bikes under $1,000... those have always been problematic. If you take into consideration inflation, prices are 33% higher today than in 2004- $900 USD in 2004 is about $1,200 today. So if your coworker paid the same amount as you did, for sure their new bike is going to have a worse spec on it.

As for you asking why bikes aren't as cheap as TVs... because there are about 1,000,000 times more TVs produced than bikes. Economies of scale.
  • - 2
 @ka-brap: so the same suspension setup as an 04 bighit whoopty do and there is still plenty of brake jack on fsr bud watch a vid and you see how much the wheel moves when the suspension is compressed. Everyone just jumped on the band wagon because they all think they're the next Gwin lol YT is no more special then any other fsr horst link designed bike.
  • - 5
flag fecalmaster (Jun 22, 2018 at 8:16) (Below Threshold)
 There is no argument you idiots. I get whatever I want at mega 35% retail, its good to know the right people. Been getting discounts wholesale and manufacture before you were born.
  • - 2
 @ka-brap: I wasn’t talking about 1000$ full squish bikes anyone who’s worked in a shop knows when I customer comes in for an entry level bike you steer them towards a hardtail both of my examples were of hardtails. Base level hadtails have not improved very much except in geometry. My 04 jamis was nicer than a similar setup today. A lot lighter than his new rig. He dropped 350 on a fork 220 on some brakes and got a better crankset for 200 all in the first year. He should have bit the bullet and gotten something nicer. But just like people wandering in to a bike shop it’s hard to convince someone too spend 400$ more than they planned.
  • + 2
 @mhoshal: It's ok to admit you're a Horst/FSR/four-bar hater
  • + 1
 "It's not going to be able to go head to head with something like the Trail 429" ... lol! 2 different worlds
  • - 3
 @number44:
The pathetic numbnuts bike industry woth their slow, overly expensive, small incrimnetal improvements; designed for the daft, slow, and blowhard media crowd.

Gimme travel adjust, different geometry options like long chainstay length, short seat tubes. Progressive spv was dope as implemented for shocks. Good tech is killed off.
  • + 52
 How to sell a bike - get Eddie masters to do the promo video.
  • + 8
 You mean this one?
vimeo.com/120566398
  • + 9
 I'll take four.
  • + 1
 @karoliusz: Though it's more difficult to tell if Masters is trying to be funny in the Firebird video. Carson Storch does a lot more with the same stutter bumps in the last segment of 'Fourtified.'
  • + 41
 Patiently waiting here to use an old 165mm hub from 15 years ago. Give it two more years max.
  • + 25
 Nope. Next in the MTB standards pipeline is Super Boost Metric DUB. A 160mm x 12.49mm.
  • + 0
 it blows my mind that they made a hub wider that the DH 150mm standard
  • + 6
 @ccolagio: 150 and 157 are the same thing. One has axle shoulders and the other doesn't. Its the exact same hub from most all manufactures. Kind of like 135 and 142.
  • + 41
 This looks nomadic but damn this is the finest looking Pivot frame by far.
  • + 7
 First pivot I've seen that I liked the look of. but the price....
  • + 32
 New bike review ctrl+f

"Water bottle"
"Price"
"Hub standard"
"Enduro 29er"

It's like groundhog day in here.
  • + 13
 Damn it, now I have "I've Got You Babe" stuck in my head.
  • + 6
 @mikekazimer: C'mon, buddy. Case Western High. Ned Ryerson. I did the whistling belly-button trick at the high school talent show? Got the shingles real bad senior year, almost didn't graduate? I dated your sister Mary Pat a couple times until you told me not to anymore? Well?
  • + 5
 @HsawAknow: Watch out for that first step. Its a doozy!
  • - 2
 Water bottle mount in the middle of the downtube protector, yeah, that's reassuring. Does not bode well. Should there even BE a mount there? Hmm. Oh wait... Dead Horse
  • + 26
 Inb4 Waki.
  • + 3
 Yes, but just wait for the onslaught.
  • + 10
 Waki waki waki waki waki like pacman
  • + 27
 *Quietly waiting to downvote Waki's comment as quick as possible*
  • + 20
 I absolutely love it...just about everybody is producing a long travel 29er. So many good choices too. One thing in common is all the tan/desert/sand colors
  • + 83
 or "pensioner hearing aid beige" as I like to call it
  • + 1
 As long as they keep making 27.5...
  • - 5
flag Gratis (Jun 20, 2018 at 6:40) (Below Threshold)
 @sewer-rat: ????????????????
  • + 10
 @sewer-rat: that was meant to be a series of crying laughing emojis, which I will now replace with hahahahahahaha
  • - 7
flag fecalmaster (Jun 20, 2018 at 7:24) (Below Threshold)
 Some day MTB will catch up to BMX in the style department hopefully. When a trail bike weighs and costs the same as a DH you have to step back and say Ba Fangool to you.
  • + 6
 @sewer-rat: I like to call it the Fleshlight option.
  • - 7
flag downcountry (Jun 20, 2018 at 7:43) (Below Threshold)
 Shame, the geo is still not correct on any of them....they look pretty though
  • + 4
 @fecalmaster: Since when is a 170mm travel bike a "trail" bike?

I think you've been snorting too much fecal.
  • + 2
 @sewer-rat:
Old Man Tan
  • - 2
 @Lotusoperandi: My 2013 Ibis Mojo HD was 160mm rear with 170mm front was considered a trail bike. I believe long travel bikes start at 180mm.
  • + 7
 "Jake from state farm khaki" as my wife calls it.

It's so it matches your desert sand tacoma
  • + 20
 Extols wheel stiffness improvement with goofy new hub, specs bike with 28 spoke wheels. lol.
  • + 4
 Look up "bracing force." Then the light bulb will appear before your very eyes!

"Ah...." You'll say. "I see now."
  • + 9
 Comparing to the Ripmo:
pros:
- flip chip
- 3 year longer warranty
- 17mm longer travel
cons:
- Supa Boost™
- press fit BB
- no water bottle inside frame
- shorter dropper
- 1lb heavier
- no frame only option ($5k is a lot for SLX)
  • + 7
 Con for Firebird is the Ripmo's super low seatpost that is awesome.

However, I'm not sure the Ripmo is a great comparison to this bike, Ripmo is only 140mm rear vs 160mm rear on the Firebird. I think the Ripmo is more of an all arounder where the Firebird is a downhill/enduro race bike.
  • + 5
 @tgent: yeah thats what I meant by shorter dropper. Not a 1 to 1 comparison, but they are both DW-Link, long travel 29ers with similar geo and 44mm offset forks. The rear is only 17mm difference, less than an inch, and the Ibis team does use the Ripmo in EWS races.
  • + 9
 More travel isn't a pro, sorry.
  • - 5
flag papaonessa16 (Jun 20, 2018 at 8:41) (Below Threshold)
 CON: IBIS BLOWS
  • + 0
 @papaonessa16: .....THE DOORS OFF THE COMPETITION.
  • - 5
flag yzedf (Jun 20, 2018 at 9:00) (Below Threshold)
 @tgent: it's not a DH/Enduro race bike if they won't recommend a coil shock. It's a long legged trail bike in my opinion.
  • + 14
 @yzedf, this is definitely a enduro / park bike, no matter if it can take a coil or not. Something like the Ripmo falls into the long-legged trail bike category, but this bike is in a different category as far as how it feels in rough terrain.
  • + 8
 Pro- Pivot uses bearings, Ibis uses bushings.
  • + 6
 @yzedf: Tell that to Aaron Gwinn on his air DH shocks...
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: could be, I obviously haven't ridden it. For a 200lb rider like myself I'll always choose coil over air for a park bike.
  • + 2
 @tgent: bike setup for a hot lap isnt the same as 20 runs in a day.
  • + 1
 @papaonessa16: GOATS. I have proof.
  • + 1
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: bottom only, and you get lifetime replacement
  • + 1
 @tgent: if I got fresh rebuilds every day and had multiple backups... Sure. But I'm in the real world of owning one shock, a season pass and hopefully only doing annual maintenance.
  • + 2
 @tgent: Ripmo is 145 mm rear. But agree with you that they are not really comparable (as a happy Ripmo owner :-D ).
  • + 3
 @yzedf: I'd rather have a bike designed for an air shock or a bike designed for a coil shock. If it works with both there is a compromise somewhere.
  • + 2
 @acali: you can decrease the ramp up on a air shock to play nicely with a frame that's coil shock friendly. Not a big deal.
  • + 1
 @mollow: yeah I agree, some people think so though. I will say if the motion ratio curve is the big U shape (less active from 40% to 60%) it is with the mojo then more travel could be less of a con on this bike.
  • + 1
 @MtbSince84: Do you think you can ride park with Ripmo?
  • + 9
 So.....my beef isn't with this bike (it's a big dollar boutique freeride bike-love it or hate it). It's with the review. Porcupine Rim is a hero trail. Just about all the alt lines can be cleaned by a skilled rider on a 130-140mm trail bike without much trouble.

If you want to provide a snapshot of what this thing can do in Moab-how about a Mag 7-Portal test. Some mellow stuff to see if the bike is Novocain numb on less burly trails, a lung busting techy climb to see if it sucks uphill, and a descent (after you turn off the rim) on Portal that leaves the average trail bike outgunned.

Or (nearby) a Lunch Loops evaluation-less skilled magazine editors can keep it mellow, but rippers can actually vouch for how good this bike is (where it's supposed to be good) on Holy Cross or Free Lunch.

All I learned from this review was that this is an expensive bike with a new rear hub standard. If Pivot is making big claims, they should have allowed reviews on big terrain.

Then again, dentist fanboys will still buy them and ride giggle trails (or walk Enchilada-f#@%#rs).
  • + 3
 You're honestly spot on, but in all fairness I'd imagine an actual review (not just a glorified press release) will be coming soon on it!
  • + 3
 I was thinking the same thing...well how'd it do on Portal? That was the big point of contention on the Trail 429 review. I'd expect this thing to devour Portal under a competent rider like Mike K.
  • + 6
 @peleton7, Hazzard County to Porcupine is a fitting trail for this bike, but I agree - I’m curious how it’ll handle steeper, gnarlier descents (and climbs). That’s why we have one on the way for a longer term review. As I wrote, this is just a first glimpse at the bike, a way to announce the basic details rather than an in-depth performance analysis.
  • + 11
 I have saved Sooo much $ riding my Canfield One for the last 5 years

Yeah ,the frame weighs 3lbs more
  • + 4
 Canfield owner here. Simply rad bikes.
  • + 9
 I think that's the most beautiful 29er I've seen since the Evil following. WANT. Shame its some hooky hub size, but its the first time I've been tempted to rebuilt a rear wheel...
  • + 8
 Wreckoning
  • + 3
 The hub size is an asset. I owned a Switchblade and the rear end stiffness was unreal, most responsive handling bike I’ve ever ridden. All 29ers should move to DH rear ends.
  • + 8
 listen. i got my subaru crosstrek in "desert khaki" in the fall of 2015, just before everyone else. and before all of this. i was here first. i swear.
  • + 0
 So on top of choosing a CrossTrek you picked that colour? Poor neighboors
  • + 4
 @mollow: yeah i hate being able to safely drive in the snow with semi-agile handling. it blows.
  • + 6
 @mollow: oh also the car comes with two bottle holders in the center console. double hydration!
  • + 4
 @jtayabji: the interior is a toyota-designed rubber-maid showroom.
  • + 1
 @mm732: uhhh not really and obviously everything is weathertech for me
  • + 6
 Looks like I should dump the 5 grand worth of boost 148 spaces wheels I have ASAP because it sure seems like this Super Boost stuff is taking over. If the new Bronson has super boost, then you know 157 is the future. That’s the one detail nobody will leak...

It’s also crazy how quickly this reduced offset thing has taken over to the point where it’s not even newsworthy.
  • + 15
 or you could just ride the stuff you have and go lift some weights. Someone on 135 quick-release is still faster than everyone on this forum.
  • + 1
 Yeah, dump it! Go superboost! Get the new NX Eagle while your at it!
  • + 1
 @HsawAknow: I agree to a point, but I grow weary of this sentiment. We ride bikes outside, we discuss them on forums. People need to ride more (myself included), but I just get tired of seeing these kinda comments.
  • + 1
 @YManCave: I have a solution, comments block chrome ad-in. I have the same thing for buying stuff. I have to ice it for 30 days and then the ability to add it and buy becomes available. Helpful for saving money and not chasing bike upgrades.

chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/nocomment/bcaffknecaohmingfdfimlbllnebpepe?hl=en-GB
  • + 5
 Ohhhh MY GOD!!! This is what I’ve been dreaming about waking up to for so long now!!! Don’t know why everyone’s complaining~ Their bikes are always pricey, just don’t buy one if that’s the case.. but MAN I cant Wait to sell everything I own for one ;+p hahah jk but please make an aluminum model in the 3-4K spec
  • + 8
 Bummer about the 157mm x 12mm rear end,
  • + 9
 Yea, I only changed out my hubs for boost about a year ago. My carbon wheelset is 6 years old, but like triggers broom - changed 17 heads and 14 handles.
  • + 1
 @Richt2000: LMAO...such a classic
  • + 8
 If only chainstays were longer in L/XL
  • + 4
 Yeah it seem that manufacturers haven't realized that a lot of tall people want 29ers with longer than 440mm chainstays.
  • + 1
 Np mega
  • + 1
 I ride a medium and I don't want 430mm rear centre either. If I was on an XL I would be on a Geometron.
  • + 6
 The one size fits all chainstay's is one of the most overlooked, corner cutting, cheap bastard moves from the bike industry.
  • + 2
 @Mtb4joe: this, especially when components of this category are specced on bikes with those prices. I´m all down for companies pushing the limits and being the elite stuff, renewing models every 1-2 years, forefront of carbon technology, geometry, good service and all, but then don´t do that and spec SLX on a bike over 5k$?? Crazy.
  • + 3
 I can't understant why no putting a flipper for make it longer or shorter... should be mandatory...
  • + 0
 @Mtb4joe:
I completely agree with you on this. Only Norco seem to give this any consideration. And I'd love to know which size the rear centre / CS length is optimised for. Each extreme gets the raw end of the deal. For me at XL I've ruled out bikes with fashionably short CS lengths.
  • + 3
 I ride a large and I don't want longer CS.
  • + 2
 @vikb: Luddite!
  • + 1
 @vikb: Have you spent much time on a long CS bike?
  • + 2
 @The-Reverend: To be fair. Not only Norco. YT Capra has a 5mm difference between M/L and XL/XXL frames, but to this date only RAAW and Nicolai/Geometron have addressed this like it should've been from the start. Even "the most progressive" bike company, Pole, is stuck with only one size and it is rather long, turning the tables on shorter than XL guys, giving them something to bitch about this time around.
The upcoming Bold Unplugged has an interesting take on this with flip chips in chainstays. So there is some cheap solution to this, at least for Horst link designs.

A good thing is that the industry has started to take notice. Unfortunately some have skipped the opportunity and there probably won't be any change for the next 3-5 years in their otherwise very interesting products, such as this Pivot. What would be more than welcome, and I hope that someone from Pivot reads this, is that the next year when they introduce a 2020 model instead of just following Santa Cruz' year old color pallet and some change in component specs they introduce a meaningful upgrade like different chainstay length for different frame size. This would be the real and meaningful model year upgrade.
  • + 1
 @jollyXroger: thanks, I didn't know about YT but that's interesting to know. Some folks like short CS lengths and others don't. It's the assumption that we all want the same which annoys me.

It's a stunning looking bike and I'm sure it rides well but having ridden and not enjoyed some bikes with a shorter CS I'm happy to keep them longer.
  • + 7
 logs in to pink bike: "what bike has and doesn't have water bottle mounts today I wonder...?"

what's with the tiny rotors?
  • + 11
 @mikelevy

Chris Cocalis, “If we magically could have fit [a water bottle] in there we would have, but the kinematics and the whole platform of the bike came first. Keeping the frame weight down, keeping the bike compact, low standover, and the ability to run a long dropper used up all the space.”

Mike Levy : "Personally, I would never buy a bike that couldn't carry at least one bottle, no matter how good it of a bike it is."
www.pinkbike.com/news/review-commencals-new-meta-am-29-team.html#cid2003363


Too bad Chris, next time ditch the kinematic, weight, etc... questions and focus on what pinkbike editors really stands up for...

bwhahahahahahahahah
  • + 2
 @gnralized: this is most likely why Levy didn't get this bike.
  • - 5
flag mollow (Jun 20, 2018 at 8:12) (Below Threshold)
 @gnralized: right? Why even bother reviewing a bike with no inside the frame water bottle mounts, nobody will consider this bike!
  • + 2
 @mollow: No, I definitely wouldn't.

Hydration is essential apparently.
  • + 0
 @jclnv: apparently 2.5l of water on your backpack, 500ml on the downtube and another 500ml on the top tube will keep you more hydrated than trying to look cool with your essential 500ml bottle inside the frame.

Nice try, tho.
  • - 7
flag mollow (Jun 20, 2018 at 8:56) (Below Threshold)
 @jclnv: you hipster also don't seem to realize this is a gravity oriented bike. If your gonna go on a xc marathon race or all day epic with this bike you're gonna need more than that silly little water bottle you all jerk off to. If you're shuttling or lapping the bike park then you definitely can drink in between runs. If you're gonna dismiss a bike like that because of that f*ckING SILLY OBSSESSION then move the f*ck on and gtfoh and PLEASE stfu.
  • + 6
 @gnralized: Yup, and I still wouldn't buy a bike that can't carry a bottle. Obviously, Chris' point makes complete sense, too. I also wouldn't but a carbon hardtail or a dirt jump bike, but a lot of people do. Everyone's list of priorities is different.
  • + 1
 @mollow: It might be a great bike, but I wouldn't consider it for exactly that reason, silly or not. Then again, I suspect that most riders who'll end up on this type of bike won't mind using a backpack.
  • + 5
 @mikelevy: you need to stop looking at the problems and start focusing on solutions, like the one Wynn Masters has here:
www.adamsandlerinterviews.com/photo-album/otto-the-caddie-covert-with.html
  • + 1
 floppy wheels suck tho.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: I am with you on the water bottle thing. that’s why I am not on a Yeti, even if it has Ohlins forks and shock!
  • + 3
 6" rotors = their product manager just doesn't get it. 7"/8" min. Also, I love my Guides but a smash machine like this deserves Codes
  • + 1
 @tcmtnbikr: I'm not sure what you see, or read, the bike has 180mm rotors front and rear...
  • + 3
 @mollow: do you not ride 1.5 hour 1500'-2000' climbing rides with /\ type profiles? I do rides like this 2x per week and get by with a single bottle just fine, so why take a backpack when they suck? #imwithlevy
  • + 1
 @mollow: I'd need at least 2.5ltrs on my back due to the amount I'd sweat wearing one. I'd also be tired sooner from having that weight on my back.

You see it isn't about having to run a pack as an option to a bottle, a pack just f*cks you over from multiple angles.
  • + 4
 Same with the Nomad too, now that I think of it. Too much khaki IMO. Being honest, who likes the khaki color? I've never been a fan tbh. Living in the desert was enough light brown for me.
  • + 6
 I love the khaki. Then again, it's a pretty novel colour for me, I usually see nothing but green, brown, or white.
  • + 3
 santa cruz draws their color inspirations from the Gap store.
  • + 4
 shuttle bike, looks real fun. But its 90 degrees here today and i'm 2000 feet from the summit, so unless that bike comes with a hydration pack....it can suck it from the back.
  • + 3
 "Those pads rattled incessantly against the caliper on rough sections of trail".

Saint fined pads do the same, funny how they are not aware of this issue. Every bike even DH sled which has those is audible even by spectators and cameras around the track. Really shame. Only solution is to buy older generation of pads (br-m810) or 3rd party.
  • + 4
 I’ve managed to get around that sound you speak of, especially in the rough stuff.
By dremeling the outer fins on the pad. The fins that come in contact with the caliper.
No annoying rattle
  • + 10
 A nice way to deal with this is just tweak the spring bit... bend each arm out a mm or two further to apply more tension on them when they're in the resting position. This has always taken care of the rattling for me.
  • + 5
 @ndirienzo: that works for side to side movement but to cure the annoying fore and aft rattle you can cut thin strips of an old roadie tube and wrap it around the heatsink. just puts a little cushion there.
  • + 4
 @ndirienzo: Good tip! This is how I justify reading PB comments
  • + 1
 Yup! My Saints do the exact same thing and it drives me nuts!! Excessive play or room between the pads and the caliper body is causing the problem. What works for me is eliminating that extra space with something sound or vibration absorbing (rubber) that would still allow for proper pad movement. Spreading out the spring helps hold the pads against the pistons better and stops some of that side to side rattle but not the fore and aft. I put some heat shrink tubing on the pin that holds the pad to the caliper body and cut it to length, not including the threads at one end and the c-clip slot at the other end. The pin is a lot smaller in diameter than the holes in the pads and spring plus it only threads in at one end, hole at the other end is actually pretty big allowing that pin to move around a bit. The heat shrink tubing was a perfect thickness to take up the room between the pin and the pads and spring as well as the non threaded end where the pin goes through the caliper body by the c-clip. Its not too big however to now allow the pads to retract or move properly. I also cut some an old bike tube and wound it through the fins and around the inside surface of the finned section between the pads and the caliper. Now there is next to no side to side or fore and aft movement and the pads move freely in the caliper body, no drag or rubbing.
Ive also noticed on a few pro bike checks that if Saints are involved often the finned pads are replaced with non finned pads. Even on Shimano sponsored riders..........what does that say?!
  • + 6
 It seems that this frame color is especially popular these days...
- SC Nomad
- new Commencal 29
- this

How's that?!?
  • + 3
 It's a nice color
  • + 2
 it's the new baby blue
  • + 3
 That’s a good thing. Keep these earth tone MTB’s coming. If I never have to look at another MTB in baby blue pastel colour I’m a happy camper.
  • + 2
 How does this compare to the 27.5 version in terms of climbing and overall agility? I used the 27.5 as my trail bike for a while and it was sensational in its ability to clear technical lines, hop up ledges and carve around tight and steep switchbacks both up and down. The 29er as nimble or more a sled?
  • + 3
 hightower gets caught on square edges going uphill. could say not big issue on more downhill oriented bike but these pivots go uphill well where other bikes are energy sapping. theyre similar fun on the way down so..
  • + 1
 Pivot has done a very good job making big bikes climb efficiently and smoothly, like you said, it doesn’t get hung up like other rigs in the category.

Going from a Switchblade, to a yeti 5.5 this was very apparent. The Pivot climbed up square edges with zero effort, absorbing them like they weren’t there, while the yeti basically feels like a hard tail, requiring me to muscle up ledges. I’m used to it now but I definitely prefer a more compliant suspension to a platform that damn near locks out while pedalling.
  • + 2
 if you are looking to buy this bike, the local dealer i checked with today recommended going with the XO1 package instead of the XTR. this bike has the old XTR group, not the one they just introduced. He said Pivot would not be putting the new XTR group until September. just something to consider if you cant decide on the XTR or XO1.
  • + 3
 ...and least not forget. I give the nod to the YETI on value, simply because you can interchange YETI bike stickers with YETI cooler stickers. And that is the sound of science.
  • + 4
 Pivot needs to have a frame only option for their 157mm hub bikes, some of us have been riding that hub for years on our long travel 29ers.
  • + 4
 Probably a bit too much bike for me and my area but what a weapon for alpine assaults, dh runs and park action.
  • + 4
 I really like this bike...and Pivot in general...but don’t think I could buy a US bike these days...
  • + 4
 And there it is again.....another short offset fork on a gnarly 29er....the new norm?
  • + 3
 I tried the ripmo with a 42mm offset at the Malvern Hills Classic - it was a was confident and yet nimble ride but whether that was down to the offset or just the frame I have no clue!
  • + 2
 @Richt2000: I tried the s150 and definitely better steering than a normal 51 offset
  • - 4
flag mm732 (Jun 20, 2018 at 11:45) (Below Threshold)
 wrong offset. wrong chainstay length. bike companies plz stop obsessing over wheelbase. thank you. Pole is coming.
  • + 4
 I have ridden my personal steed, an XL Yeti 5.5, with both 51 and 44 offset of the same fork. I liked the 44 better. After riding the 44 a few times and getting used to it, my first thought was that shorter offset will likely become stock spec on most new high performance 29’ers.
  • + 2
 @Speeder01: great to hear real world experience of running them side by side
  • + 4
 What a masterful release video. Hit all the key details and I'm ready to buy.
  • + 1
 Super cool bike, first Pivot I’d really love to try, Eddie is a fkng class and all that, yes. Now, cane someone plase explain me how to setup for a set of a couple of berms like 3:12 into the movie? Do you do all braking bedore the first spot so that you can make the last one, letting it flow brakeless all the way, or do you do braking in some spot along the way as the speed picks up? Two berms is a no brainer for option no1, 3 are doable but more get me puzzled.
  • + 1
 It's kind of funny reading all this about pricing.... Haha. If you take a look at Pivots Specs, no matter what build you get you will always have the Factory rear shock... Plus what you are paying for is the technology in the frame with the DW link. It has less than 1% pedal Bob right along the lines of Santa Cruz with the VPP. Sure there are cheaper options out there with a higher component group for less money but I can guarantee they won't ride the same. I'd take frame/suspension performance over part spec any day of the week.
  • + 2
 That design side loads the shocks and they die. I know of a few pivots that this kept happening too. They all dumped their frames after blowing 3-4 X2’s.
  • + 5
 Marketing Masters
  • + 4
 Wow, this came out of nowhere!
  • + 0
 My friend whom I met in my senior year of college is the sales manager for Pivot now, and has been for some time. Recruited away from Shimano, and before Shimano worked in bike shops in SoCal. Really cool guy.
We both got the same marketing degree, but me, I decided to move to Boise and have been in a low wage trap ever since (that was 2002). So HE rides whatever he wants. Me, I have a Marin Nail Trail 6 HT now. Good life choices vs. not soo good! Sorry to "derail" this thread.
  • + 0
 The thing I love the most about this bike vs my newly acquired Santa Cruz HTLT is the bottom bracket height. SC please stop making these belly button rubbing the ground geometry! Some of use actually still ride on natural trails and ALWAYS will. Now... it is a real PITA to raise that BB by even a few mms. Higher fork and bigger tires is all you can do. You can't even fit in offset bushings in there!
  • + 1
 Great job Pivot! IMO this is a front runner in the 29er long travel category. Beautiful bike, and I love that they have fine-tuned the suspension kinematics to make it more playful and able to handle the bigger drops.
  • + 0
 @rx1ton
Exactly but first pivot took 4 weeks to warranty my turkeybird, after charging me $760 for a rear crash replacement. Junk small bike company. When you can't run a coil or air shox on a bike that is over 170mm of traveling think you need to hit the drawing board. Everyone of my friends fox air shows blew.
It's why the upper link is shorter and fixed to the shox body.
  • + 1
 157 is now called super boost? I know Knolly just went to the 157 rear as there new trail standard for their 29er Fugitive. Call me when 26 in comes back with the industry new mega ultra super duper boost!
  • + 3
 Wow..ride big or go home..maybe
10 years warranty not bad
The lower link has bearings or bushing?
  • + 2
 Enduro Max bearings.
  • + 1
 I would expect this to pedal even better than the 27.5 version where you totally forgot you were on a 170mm bike after 2 pedal strokes. This is a fantastic freeride bike. Pedaling matters!!!
  • + 1
 Says it's dual crown approved. How does that work? Wouldn't it be raked out if it's stock at 170?
Also will it crack like all the other 27.5 ones did?
  • + 1
 well, the new ohlins dual crown can be set at 150mm travel...
  • + 2
 That means the frame is rated to take the extra stress that can be occur from a dual crown. A 180mm fork would only slacken the head angle by .5 degree or so - it'd be a fun experiment for DH / park riding.
  • + 2
 29'rs aren't as fun. Will never convert no matter how much faster and 'smooth' rolling they are.
  • + 4
 Only 1x11?
  • + 2
 Still routing the cable under the bottom bracket. When will Chris learn about cable routing.
  • + 0
 I think in a couple of years were going to have wider hubs like a motorcycles, My godness they are making our heads spinning around. No I will stay on my 12 x142 enough is enough.
  • + 1
 Rather deal with Santa Cruz and wait for the 29er Nomad called the Damon heard it's gonna be loose. Crack a Turkeybird, glad to see that long rocker design changed.
  • + 2
 You sure Santa Cruz is working on a Nomad 29? Because I need that bike.
  • + 2
 Still waiting for the review for the Mach 6! (even though I already bought one)
  • + 2
 Yeah, pretty quiet about that. I'm a Mach 6 gen 1 owner, and wasn't even aware there *was* a new Mach 6 until I happened to go to the Pivot site to check out Switchblade specs. I ended up buying a Ripmo, but looks like they've addressed the main issues with the Mach 6 (slack seat angle, cable routing) - should be a great bike.
  • + 2
 @MtbSince84: I love mine!
  • + 3
 I have a full blown fetish for long travel 29ers!!
  • + 3
 Was hoping to see Wyn popping a wheelie from the bush on post credit.
  • + 2
 why do intros always happen in Moab? the average trail is not Moab.
  • + 1
 Copied the color of the new Meta 29er I see....but with Orange accents instead of red.
  • + 1
 More Eddie Masters! that was a rad launch vid. more riders and why we want to ride!
  • + 1
 Funny that Pivot, Commencal, and Trek all arrived at beige paint for their long-travel 29ers
  • + 1
 Soooo many options available now. This bike, Capra 29er, or Evil Wreckoning will definitely be my next bike Drool
  • - 1
 I will take the Commencal meta 29r with just as good specs as Pivots top dog. What a joke. Take a lesson in reason from Commencal for pricing because yours makes mo sense and is shit overpriced.
  • + 2
 Awesome geo ...but too cheap ! I´ll pass Big Grin
  • + 1
 So happy my bicycling superpower is being content with SLX brakes and not caring about water bottles.
  • + 1
 Why cant we just get a frame?

@mikekazimer: you guys gonna do a comparison on all these 160 29’ers?
  • - 1
 Because you probably still can't source a super bs rear hub...?
  • + 1
 If you were going to build up the bike from frame only, would you need super boost cranks or is it just an offset chainring?
  • + 2
 What's up with the tan / khaki paint these days?
  • + 2
 tinyurl.com/y8p7j6b7

I'll just leave this here.
  • + 1
 Sure, I can see the design language, but the colors are nothing new:
salsacycles.com/bikes/horsethief/2017_horsethief_carbon_gx1

Yeah, the linkages look similar, but they just aren't the same.

Yeah, this bike is a long(ish) travel 29er, but with 22mm less suspension, a full degree in head angle (before that lower headset that you use with the 27.5+ makes it even slacker when used in 29), and a clearly different design goal, you can just leave it right there.
  • + 2
 Weight? Would love a h2h comparison with the Meta AM 29
  • + 4
 I wasn't able to weigh the complete bike, but we'll pop it on the scale when one arrives for review. Given the frame weight, I'd expect the higher end builds to end up around 30-31 pounds.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: Its boxed and should be enroute today
  • + 1
 Gorgeous looking bike Drool pretty pricey for an entry level build though Frown
  • - 1
 A bike intened for use in the bike park and on DH tracks. Yet they route a cable right underneath the bottom bracket. I guess this one is only for smooth jump lines. A real shame as the bike looks great.
  • + 12
 That's just the derailleur housing - it's pretty unlikely you'd be able to smash that hard enough to cause any issues, and if you did, the chainring and other frame parts would probably have problems too.
  • + 0
 @mikekazimer: Yes its only the derailleur cable but it shouldn’t be put there on any MTB. See Rocky Mountain Instinct/Altitudes as well. There are better cable route options so just don’t put any there. I have some good rock strike marks on bottom bracket of my current Slayer. Also spent too much time replacing damaged cable on my old Glory with bottom of the fame downtube routing. I wiill not be replacing damaged cable all the time on bikes intended for Parks/Gnar/Shuttlin’ever again.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: Agree with Mike - I think you would actually destroy your frame before you'd even get to smashing that cable. My old ASR-5 actually had 2 cables running here and I never had any issues. Sick bike!
  • + 1
 @Jaguar83: Also never had any issues and think it's still the best option for across/around the BB routing.
  • + 3
 Looks like a Nomad V3
  • + 1
 Pivot’s been killing it lately. So many new/updated bikes introduced over the past several months.
  • + 1
 super boost hubs build a much stiffer wheel, anyone who is complaining just hasnt ridden them
  • + 4
 Then why the 28 spoke wheel?
  • + 3
 @leelau: Because you can. Higher bracing force allows for a stiffer build with less spokes.
  • + 2
 @leelau: because of the added stiffness?
  • - 5
flag phops (Jun 20, 2018 at 9:03) (Below Threshold)
 @leelau I can get behind 150 hubs, cause they have been around on DH bikes for ages, but 157 is retarded, there is no need for it. Nobody has ever complained about stiffness at 150.
  • + 2
 @Lotusoperandi: that makes senset. I was just musing about the added stiffness of the wheel then compromise/trade-off by putting in less spokes. But perhaps that's for compliance or weight or both.
  • + 2
 27.5 ain't dead but it seems terminal.
  • + 2
 Wattle bottle under the downtube, deal breaker...
  • + 1
 Something must be done about this geometry chart lunacy
  • + 1
 How the f you pedal on super boost, there isn't any space for heels
  • + 13
 There’s plenty of heel clearance on this bike - I didn’t hit the chainstays or seatstsays at all with my size 11 feet.
  • + 12
 You just sort of move your feet around in circles.
  • + 1
 I ride a Trail 429 and have never hit my feet on the stays. Now my Evil Insurgent and Following I hit them all the time and they where 142. I also always ride with Sam Hill five tens.
  • + 1
 heel clearance is better than many 148 bikes,
  • + 1
 157mm rider here and my size 17 shoes don't hit the CS and that is on a 16.7" long CS so I think you'll be ok.
  • + 0
 Never realized there was an XT platform pedal. I think it looks better than the Saint pedal.
  • + 1
 best looking pivot ever cause it looks like a hightower
  • + 2
 Way way way nicer looking than the Hightower
  • - 2
 Now I want to know: Is it nearly double as good as the News Meta 29 or Capra 29?
I dont get it why you would bis this Bike instead? More expensive, doesnt Go with coil shocks and Super-(Bullshit)-Boost.
  • + 2
 Thats like asking: which running shoe I should get, Nike or Adidas?

You get the one that appeals the most to you, and the one that makes you want to go ride more.
  • + 0
 My Iron Horse in 2007 also had 150 hubs and DW-Link and could fit a bottle in the from triangle. Common guys....
  • + 2
 cool rig. I'd love one.
  • - 3
 Best comment :

Those pads rattled incessantly against the caliper on rough sections of trail – if this was my bike the first thing I would do is swap them out for the non-finned version, heat management be damned.

Result : maybe u just dont go fast enough to hear the rattle !
  • + 2
 such a good looking bike
  • + 1
 Prognar jersey
  • + 0
 Screw you superboost!!!
  • - 3
 Somebody's wife at Pivot saw a Hightower on Pintrest.
Pivot: Nailed It!
  • - 3
 Cable under the bottom bracket. Silly idea.
  • + 8
 i know right! if only they made these thick housings for the cable to ride in that would protect it from the elements.... i've never had an issue with a cable being routed under the BB.
  • - 2
 Super boost. I stopped there!!!
  • + 5
 your loss.
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