Five Ten Freerider Pro Shoes - Review

Jun 6, 2017 at 16:15
by Mike Kazimer  
Five Ten Freerider Pro shoe review


If you're having trouble keeping track of all the Freerider models in Five Ten's flat pedal shoe lineup, you're not alone. By my count, there are at least eight different options, ranging from an insulated high top to a more casual canvas version, plus an assortment of women's and kid's models.

The Freerider Pro reviewed here isn't an entirely new model, but it recently underwent a substantial revision, returning with an updated sole, a reinforced toe box, and a lighter weight. Available in four different colors, the Freerider Pro retails for $150 USD.

Five Ten Freerider Pro Details
• S1 dotty rubber outsole
• Synthetic, weather resistant upper
• Reinforced toe box
• Sizes: US 5–14
• Colors: black, blue, navy, granite
• Weight: 443 grams (size 11, per shoe)
• Price: $150 USD
www.fiveten.com


Five Ten Freerider Pro shoe review
Five Ten's S1 rubber extends the entire length of the sole - there aren't any silly smooth sections to be seen.


Construction

There have been plenty of attempts, but so far, no one has been able to match the flypaper-like stickiness of Five Ten's Stealth rubber compound. Similar to mountain bike tires, there are several different versions of the proprietary rubber, with softer compounds that provide more grip but sacrifice long-term durability, and harder compounds that are a little less grippy but have a much longer lifespan. The Freerider Pro shoes have returned to the 64a durometer S1 rubber compound, and use Five Ten's signature dot pattern along the entire sole.

The overall design of the Freerider Pro is pretty basic, with good old-fashioned laces in place to adjust the fit rather than fancy dials or ratchet straps. The synthetic uppers are designed to be water resistant and quick drying, and there's extra reinforcement around the toe box to keep those little piggies safe from getting stubbed on rocks and stumps.


Five Ten Freerider Pro shoe review
Five Ten Freerider Pro shoe review
The toe box and heel are protected by an abrasion resistant material.



Performance

I've had mixed luck with the fit of Five Ten's shoes over the years. Some models fit me just fine, while others have felt boxy and overly roomy. With the Freerider Pro, the fit around my average-width feet was perfect right out of the box—snug without beeing too tight, and free of any excessive heel lift when walking. The removable insoles provide a good deal of cushioning, a little detail that's often overlooked, but one that makes a difference on long rides.

The S1 rubber provided plenty of traction with the array of pedals I used during the test period—mainly Race Face's Atlas pedals and Specialized's Boomslangs – and although it might not be quite as soft as the Mi6 rubber found on shoes like the Impact VXi, I never found myself wishing for anything grippier. The sole is stiffer than a pair of typical skate shoes, which is a good thing, but it's still flexible enough that walking around off the bike doesn't feel awkward. Off-the-bike traction is decent, although in super sloppy conditions the sole's tread pattern doesn't provide as much grip as something with more aggressive lugs would, but that's just all the more incentive to stay on the bike.

If I had one request, it would be for a mid-top version of this exact shoe, or at least one with an asymmetrical cuff that extended over my inner ankle bone—my feet sometimes end up in funny positions on my pedals, and a little extra protection from cranks and frames would be appreciated.

Durability is something Five Ten has struggled with in the past, but I'm genuinely impressed with how well these shoes have held up—I've been thrashing around in them for the past six months, bringing them on everything from big trail rides to muddy shuttle days, and they're still going strong. The S1 rubber dots on the sole are beginning to show a tiny bit of wear from the hours of being poked by sharp pedal pins, but it's nothing out of the ordinary, and they still have plenty of life left.



Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesFor all-around use, Five Ten's Freerider Pro shoes are tough to beat. They're light, grippy, quick drying, and most importantly, extremely comfortable. Mike Kazimer

156 Comments

  • + 64
 I agree. Some ankle protection or a mid would be a welcome addition to the Freerider line!
  • + 9
 Ditto
  • + 11
 What about the 'Freerider High' Series? Although not in a Pro model, they do provide ankle protection in my opinion. (I have a pair)
  • + 7
 Yep I'd be all over a mid ankle version, I feel vulnerable in these low cut ones with my crazy legs
  • + 3
 Get the High series like I have. Fantastic. In fact I have 3 pairs, 1 pair of 5/10 for clipless and 2 pairs for flats. Even when not mtb'ing the shoes are amazingly comfortable for all day use.
  • + 1
 I have the freeriders and struggle with the same issue. Does anyone make a neoprene ankle strap to protect that bony promennance? That could be a cheap easy fix...
  • + 1
 @ItsOnlyJayke: they have the problem of not having a whole lot of toe protection.
  • + 1
 @jawright602: yes, I know fox makes some ankle protector,or at least did. I have some and don't use them much, I'm sure other companies do too.
  • + 1
 "5.10 Freerider High" is nice. I wish I got those.
  • + 1
 Glad its not just me here, I always wear high tops, added protection from snakes is a bonus too if you have that problem in your country
  • + 0
 Agreed. I like the look of low tops and the mid top protection st the inside. Without it, I'm always bruising and grazing my ankle bones. If 5.10 made them, I would have some by now. Lucky for me, Shimano just announced the release of the new GR series, and according to Dirt, the Specialized 2fo flat is getting reworked as we speak.
  • + 1
 @ItsOnlyJayke: They don't make the Freerider High > size 12. Bummed. Weird as most all of their other shoes they have size 13-14.
  • + 1
 The old Karvers had a nice raised ankle protector on the inside, similar to Shimano shoes. However, they were so bulky they felt like boats on your feet.
  • + 1
 if you want some Mid's you can ride in, that are up to the task, take a look at SCgShoeCo.com The shoes all have the outsoles glued and stitched all the way around, and grippy straight out of the box. Literally made to ride in...
  • + 29
 I just want a Hellcat for flat pedals, is that too much to ask?
  • + 11
 I agree! Why cant we have the Hellcat upper with the Freeride sole?
  • + 2
 They sell a Hellcat sole cover that patches over the cleat insert.
  • + 5
 Not really the same. The hellcat will be way too stiff to work well with flats.
  • + 1
 @Golden-G: Link? I'm lazy!
  • + 2
 couldn't find it. Email them. Shoe will likely be too stiff for flats I think
  • + 2
 @Marqb: Its called the freerider pro.
  • + 1
 Amen!
  • + 1
 @The-dirt-farmer: I use my hellcats all the time on my flats. While they are stiff, they are also very sticky. I rarely feel like I have a problem staying glued to the pedals.

@Golden-G: I designed and 3D printed a sole cover that works pretty well.

Though, on both points, the Hellcat with a 3D printed sole cover might not play well with some of these pedals that are thicker in the center than on the edges. Work fine with my Answer Roves.
  • + 9
 Having ridden fivetens since the original suede model impact, I have to say, these are the best shoe they've ever made, bar none. So much so, that I really wish they made an "impact pro" for DH days.
  • + 3
 Saw shots of a Impact pro on instagram. I'm holding out for those.
  • + 1
 Isn't the Sam Hill version the "Impact Pro"?
  • + 1
 @Skidsy: I've gone back & forth on that opinion myself. I'm not sure, though for a desert dweller like myself, the Sam Hill looks hot. @Rdot84 I would opt for both, freerider pro are perfect for days outside the bike park. If you're a DH only kinda guy though, yea.
  • + 2
 @Skidsy: No. The Sam Hills are just that. The Sam Hill 3, based off of the updated original impact. This is a new impact all together called the "impact pro." Found the instagram post. www.instagram.com/p/BU3uw_2jY26
  • + 1
 @Rdot84: mmmhmmm, I'll be buying a pair of those. looking really good.
  • + 8
 Looks great! The sole by the toe box doesn't peel away, does it? Looks like it might be stitched to the upper instead of just glued, which is nice. Reinforced toe box is underrated. I learned this after punting a rock that was kicked up by the front wheel.
  • + 5
 Yes, the sole is stitched to the upper, and it's holding tough, with no peeling to be seen.
  • + 2
 I will wait for a bit on the free rider pro line. The previous version of the contacts had a lot of issues with peeling. Hopefully this has been fixed in the new pro line.
  • + 6
 I've had to re-glue mine more times than I can count...
  • + 3
 I've had 3 pairs of the Impact VXi start to peel away from the sole on me. My original Impacts lasted me 5 years without issues. I just ordered the new Sam Hill's and hopefully those wont peel.
  • + 4
 @twelve02: Reglue? Just wait until month 11 and then exchange under warranty. I've done this twice. Shoes last forever this way.
  • + 1
 @twelve02: my 510's are covered in 8 different types of glue in an attempt to keep them alive. the soles fell off after 7 rides
  • + 3
 @dmarsh15: the new Sam hills are so nice. The stitching is bitching
  • - 1
 @mikekazimer: Can you comment on the sole stiffness compared to other mtb shoes? Comparing it to skate shoe stiffness doesn't mean a lot to me because I haven't ridden in a skate shoe in a decade. How are they compared to the older freeriders? To impacts? to impact vxis? Do they still use the same thin fibrous midsole thing that the old ones did or are they using plastic and foam?
  • + 2
 @AgrAde: So many questions... They're definitely stiffer than the Freerider Contacts, but they're not quite as stiff or boxy as the Sam Hills - they strike a nice middle ground between being stiff enough for long rides without been so stiff that you can't feel where your feet are on the pedals. The midsole is covered with an extra layer of foam for a little extra cushion. Hope that helps.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: Hah, definitely wasn't expecting a comparison to each and every one. Just cool to know where they are in the lineup in terms of stiffness. Thanks for the reply - you should put that info in the review Wink
  • + 1
 I sell these shoes and I have found they fit big. I am a 43 in everything. 42's in these. Been very common with customers feet as well. Everyone is dropping 1 euro size from their standard shoe.
  • + 7
 General advice:
people (unless climbers) don't usually know, but climbing shoes are resolable, a pair of shoes lasts many soles, and the rubber is provided by the manufacturesrs, being most common 5.10 and vibram (sticky-ass too).
Ask at your local climbing gym who does it in the area. Prices vary, but most likely it'll worth it, and you can turn any skate shoe into 5.10 grippy goodness.
No dot pattern tho, like in contacts.
  • + 4
 five ten do sell dotty rubber resole kits.
  • + 5
 These are a huge improvement over the original Freerider and the vxi model in terms of grip and comfort. Hands down the best flat pedal shoe I've used in the past 5 years. Durability seems good so far after 6 months of abuse.
  • + 4
 I own a pair, I did find that the arch wasn't quite high enough for me and my foot would cramp up on long descents. I put a pair of sole insoles in side that I had lying around and good to go. To be fair I have this problem with my giro clipless too, which is why I already had a pair of insoles.
  • + 3
 Thanks for the comment. I've been having this issue and forgot how much of a difference good insoles make. I'll need to pick some up...
  • + 4
 Went back to flats after riding VXI clipless/mallets and picked these up (had vxi flats before that barely last 7 months) The freerider pros paired with my chromag scarabs have been flawless. Literally still almost feel like Im clipped in and love how the overall slim design allows you to feel in the pedal compared to the vxi which had a bulky sole. Mega stoked on flats again thanks to these shoes! $200 is expensive though and Im really hoping these will last much longer than my VXI's...
  • + 3
 It's surprising how little FiveTen's shoes have progressed over the last 10+ years. I've had several pairs and have had mixed results. The original pair of Impacts that I had around 2001-ish was the best pair. I'd really like to see them push things and create some innovative pieces of purpose built equipment - get beyond just a skate shoe with some great rubber. If they didn't have hands down the best rubber they wouldn't have a competitive product.
  • + 3
 Your last statement is my guess as to why they haven't pushed things. When you're the leader and no one is challenging you its easy to become complacent.
  • + 5
 Like all 5 10 shoes ive tried so far. They are tough to beat but they give up early!
  • + 2
 Yep my Macaskills have become too ugly to die and the soles are wearing well!
  • + 2
 I made the switch to flats about 6 months ago and have mostly loved it. I have a set of original Freeriders that are as clingy as my first girlfriend, but I find that the sole feels too soft, particularly on big huck-to-flat landings or long jump lines where you are heavy on the bike frequently. My old shimano disco slippers were admittedly way less cool looking, but I felt better supported when the bike was bottoming out. Should I move up to the Impacts? Do the Freeride Pro's have a stiffer sole than the original Freeriders? Does anyone else feel like they miss that rock solid sole of a clipless XC shoe?
  • + 1
 I used to ride in the old Freeriders and now have the Pros. The new shoes are considerably stiffer, to the point that any stiffer would make "feeling" the pedals impossible.
  • + 1
 Is the toe box and forward part of the sole as stiff as the kestrel model?

I have a pair or Kestrels, but am hating being clipped in - mainly using them for toe protection and wondering if this new Freerider Pro version might protect my poor toe a bit better...
  • + 1
 No. The kestrel is super stiff. These are nothing like a kestrel.
  • + 1
 @bonfire: ok, ta. Steel toe caps on the old freeriders it is then! Clipping in is just not fun.
  • + 1
 I have the previous version of these, been using them for two season of riding and as my everyday shoe. Still holding up really well, not sure how people have durability issues with these. I am typically hard on my footwear too, I got through new work boots every 6 months. guess I am not riding enough.
  • + 0
 No I think a lot of people exaggerate Smile ... I have been going on 3 years now (will only minor epoxy repair). I think its the "same crowd" that make similar claims like destroying a rear cassette in 2 rides.
  • + 5
 $200 cad........slowly raises middle finger........
  • + 1
 I normally buy the 5ten impact as they are generally a great shoe for the sort of riding I do. The biggest problem I have had was the sole coming away and wearing out quiet quick, so last week I bought a pair of ion shoes, big mistake. Too stiff and sole rubber to hard
  • + 1
 bought my 2nd pair. First pair at the end of the second season fell the f. apart. It was comical, one day I was stepping off my pedals and the soles decided to stick on pedals. I will give it one more try, even when they told me that I was SOL for a warranty but after that I will go else where. God forbid clips.
  • + 1
 you guys want some good shoes to ride in, that are meant to handle the abuse and hold up, check out SCgShoeCo.com Shoes are grippy straight out of the box, outsoles glued and stitched all the way around. Shoes are designed for riding... First Rider Owned Shoe Co. , 1999
  • + 2
 Ps. it IS an entirely new model. From top to bottom.That's the point. The only thing the same as the old freerider is the name.
  • + 2
 They have strange sizing. Im 44 EU but neither size of 5-10 fits. Its either too big or too small. Tryed everying which was arround 44-43 Frown
  • + 1
 Pretty sure you can get half sizes!
  • + 4
 Geez. The price has gone up crazy in recent years.
  • + 2
 Is it really too much to ask for a flat pedal shoe with some lace retention? First company to make a flat pedal shoe with a tacky sole and Boa laces I'd buy in a heartbeat.
  • + 0
 Hopefully better than the original free riders, My soles fell of after 7 rides and I've had to epoxy them back on around 5 times! very bad quality for what they cost. still using my epoxy/contact cement covered 510's today Frown
  • + 2
 Try a polyurethane glue like Sikaflex Pro. Will take a few days to cure with clamping but is flexible and durable. Epoxy is prone to cracking.
  • + 0
 Crampon 1: Feerider Shoes 0. After 3 rides the rubber came off the sole and started to tear up on the grub screws Worst still the distributer didn't want to know about it. Gone back to the chunkier variety and it is a match made in heaven.
  • + 0
 They are too narrow! I bought the Freerider Contact and they are too narrow, even after going to the shoe maker and having them widened for 24h. It helped, but my three smallest toes on each foot are getting squished. I don't have childrens feet!
  • + 2
 They look to be a new and improved orthopedic shoe... Just what I was looking for. I have the old freeriders and love them, once these go on sale I might need to upgrade.
  • + 1
 I have super wide feet. I started reading, admittedly didn't read all of the comments here, but it appears this shoe is a bit on the narrow side. Which 5 10 shoe is the widest, especially in the toe box? Thanks everyone
  • + 1
 The s1 sole is the one that lasts right, same as is used on my old canvas freeriders and big old orthopaedic impacts? My impact vxi's looked like tramp shoes after about 2mths, total crap.
  • + 3
 Corrrect - it's the more durable option, without sacrificing much, if anything, in the way of stickiness.
  • + 2
 I use mountaineering approach shoes for mountain biking. They cost less, give better protection,have leather uppers and the soles stick like shit to a blanket and as a bonus can be re soled with one of many vibram soles.
  • + 3
 @mikekazimer: the S1 feels grippier to me, vxi's just felt squirmy in comparison to these.
  • + 1
 @DJ-24: Thats a decent idea. Can you get them for cheaper than 5-10's? I love my impact xvi's but for people that don't want to spend an obscene amount on flat shoes that may be a good option.
  • + 1
 @DJ-24: Which approach shoes have you tried that work?

I like the idea of being able to resole them. My 5.10s always wear out on the bottom of the sole while the uppers look fine.
  • + 1
 @acali: I currently have a pair of Hanwag which were made in Germany but aren't made any more in that model,however,Icurrently have my eye on the Vasque Grand Traverse which look like they would work well.
  • + 1
 @ihatetomatoes: The shoes I have are no longer made, but have a look at the Vasque Grand Traverse which sell for around $140.00 and are available at Sail Outdoor and MEC.
  • + 1
 I'm always confused when I see a low-top shoe in this sport - if you've ever bashed your ankle on your crank, you'd stay far away from low-top kicks for riding. TEVA Links or 5/10 Impacts all day.
  • + 2
 I've been riding an older version of these Freeriders for years [Coastal BC AM terrain] and I'm not smashing my ankles into anything. I don't have an issue with a high top and a low top version, but I don't want a high top shoe personally.
  • + 0
 High or mid tops, or even just the slightly higher in the heel cup Impacts, can aggravate the hell out of your heelcords if you're doing lots of pedaling. Of course, like all shoe fit, that's different from person to person. I'm wearing Impact VXi (because the Freeriders are just too narrow for my very wide foot - another one of those personal variations), and it's not as bad as the regular Impacts I had before, but I still wish the heel cup were a little lower. Of course, you could always just have an asymmetric flap over the inside ankle without pulling up the heel cup too much - but then people would probably yell about how it's ugly.
  • + 1
 @g-42: "heelcords" I fkn love it! lol Yeah, achilles tendons are pretty reminiscent of little bungee cords, huh.
  • + 1
 @jcrrr13: I wish - mine are so damn tight, they're nothing like bungees...

Actually, my PT wife always corrects me when I use Achilles tendon - apparently, there's a lot more to that overall mechanism than just the tendon.
  • + 1
 @g-42: Interesting! I'm sure most medical/health/anatomy professionals constantly laugh at the faux-terminology we commonfolk use.
  • + 2
 5:10 is good soles stitched to a shoe that last no more than half a season. To bad I like how they perform but I know they'll have holes in them in no time.
  • + 2
 The soles always peel off in the middle outer edge of the shoe for such a very expensive shoe. I'm glad to see the soles are now being stitched on.
  • + 1
 $150? They can come up with all the fancy acronyms they want to for their various compounds but let's be honest... they're still just panels of rubber glued together. Yet another overpriced product in MTB.
  • + 25
 Air Jordan's are $180. Just saying.
  • + 17
 You should buy the cheapest MTB specific shoes you can and let us know how they compare. They are expensive but they certainly work. Good moto boots are 400-600 and last about just as long on the feet of a top level rider
  • + 55
 $150 is too cheap really. I ride in Adidas Yeezy Boost 750's ($350). Absolutely no grip and have to slow right down over any rough stuff, but damn do I look like swag. All the uplift bitches dig them, real talk.
  • + 5
 Not over priced... they are the best shoe for the job. Name other shoes that are best-in-class for their purpose and then check the price....
  • + 7
 My first pair of 5tens where £65, then £75.my second pair deteriorated internaly in a couple months. Now they want £90-£105

Just picked some 2FO's for £60
  • + 4
 @Motoracer31: after my good pair of boots were stolen out the back of my truck I decided to cheap out on boots. They were never the same.
  • + 1
 @bikeordie2772: that's effed up. at a local spot or track?
  • + 1
 @Jack-McLovin: you got to be krazy to pay that much for a pair of shoes. how stupid.
  • + 1
 @fullbug: I kinda had it coming, had them in the back of my truck on my way to the dunes went into a gas station and poof their gone.
  • + 3
 @slumgullion: And Air Jordan's are overpriced too...what's your point
  • + 3
 @Stampers: My DC's work pretty damn well for $40.
  • + 2
 Just bought a pair of Impact VXi over the weekend to replace a pair of 10 year old Impacts that just would not die. Soles ended up pealing off due to heat when drying (which takes forever). I would say value is great given longevity of 5.10's. Certainly noticed the Mi6 rubber is softer than original S1 which makes the rubber deform more on the pins giving the impression of less traction on pedals compared to S1 without question. Can't comment on performance on slippery rocks yet. 5.10 says Mi6 is grippier but cant say I agree fully with that statement after the first couple rides.
  • + 1
 @bikeordie2772: ...maybe but more people just suck ass these days
  • + 2
 Yeah, with respect, you are on something my man. These things are the best flat pedal all around shoe you can buy. Go ahead and ride with $20 New Balances and lemme know how it goes. These guys are durable, sticky, fit very well (for me), and will keep your feet moderately dry in most conditions. You can oversimplify anything you want, be it a car, bike, tires, or shoes.
  • + 2
 @slumgullion I've owned several pairs now and the price has crept up every year and the quality certainly hasn't. Neither have my wages. I bet you if we knew the actual cost of producing one of these shoes then you'd be arguing the same as I am. Comparing them to Nike Jordans proves my point.
  • + 3
 @kraf: I have had my Impacts since 2013. Can't kill 'em. Everything has held together well and have been a 5 out of 5 stars. They are not the lightest, and a little warm, but I never worry about how my feet will feel. I use them in the winter as well.
  • + 2
 @bikeordie2772: Dude that sucks! Yea cheap boots just do not compare at all. Its crazy the difference.
  • + 4
 @mkul7r4: have you tried 5.10 though? Used to ride DC shoes and think they "did the job", but then I bought a pair of freerider, and I discovered the meaning of grip.
  • + 2
 I think it's true that they are overpriced but everybody is free to decide what to do with their money. I would buy them regardless the price.
  • - 1
 @Stampers: just because they might be the best show for the job doesn't mean they're not over priced. I'll tell you right now they are since when the new models come out you can easily find them half off or more.
  • + 1
 I do have to say I am also a bit surprised that I used to buy 5 10's for 100$ and now they are 150...doubtful that there is that much redesign in the shoe to warrant a 30% increase in price on one model and doubtful we have that much inflation in 5 years....this is kind of the case for everything...you used to buy dakine shorts for 75$, now the same kinda short different Color fancier name is 150....I do wonder often how much the profit margins have increased in mountain biking...
  • + 3
 @Jack-McLovin: Stay laced and flossin those Yeezyes'zs,bru!!!! Chav Lyfe 4Eva n a day yo.
  • + 0
 If they last 18 months / 2 years which mine normally do you can't really complain about the price.
  • + 1
 @mkul7r4: then ride them and be happy you didn't need to spend more. I've ridden DC's. They are no 5-10 in terms of traction but if you dont need it then good for you.
  • + 3
 @Squeakybb: overpriced is a relative term depending on who you talk to...

in my humble experience, you get what you pay for...
  • + 1
 Couldn't agree more! Shoes don't have to be mtb specific anything, have them any day over my old 5-10s. @mkul7r4:
  • + 1
 $150 is cheap compared to the cost or opportunity cost of coming off the bike because you cheaped out on a pair of skate shoes. BTW, my Shimano XC-90s were $400 retail.
  • + 3
 @Jack-McLovin: Are you running boost specific socks?
  • + 2
 @chantalfelten: since they have been bought by adidas,price has not stop rising at indecent rate.
  • + 1
 I'll stick with the Impact VXI. Water resistant, warm, comfy, light weight, super grippy. Just wished the sole lasted longer - probably should stop wearing them around as regular shoes.
  • + 1
 Is it bad that I like to ride in my Dirtbags? The high protects my ankle, and they have plenty of grip. Suede is looking a little janky after a few seasons, but they work.
  • + 1
 My f-ed up old vans with the waffle pattern stick to flats like hell, cost less than half and don't come that burly. I prefer them, but it's just my opinion.
  • + 7
 I had the same opinion until i tomahawk'd my big toe into a boulder and fractured it in 3 places. Vans for mountain biking, never again.
  • + 7
 Have you ever used Five Tens? I used to ride in waffle pattern vans until I switched to a pair of Five Ten impacts, the difference in grip is night and day.
  • + 1
 @davehuffstetler: I did the same, the stiffness of the sole combined with the grip makes for such a better more comfortable ride.
  • + 2
 I'm also definitely pro-Vans, but toe protection with Sk8-Hi's of Half Cabs is an issue. Unfortunately, they don't make the 'Gravel' anymore, awesome shoe, sometimes still available online as a clearance item, but alas, not in my size.
Always been suspicious of Five-Tens as the early models were really bulky, I finally decided to go down a middle-path with the Adidas Terrex (with 5-10 stealth rubber). They stack up a bit higher than the Gravel on the pedal, had to adjust the saddle height a wee bit, but so far, so good. Due to their previous experience in all things sport shoes, Adidas is hard to fault, imo. Time will tell if they're as expendable as the 5-10's as some PB users seem to have made that experience. But pretty please, Vans: BRING BACK THE GRAVEL!!! I'll show myself out, thx. Smile
  • + 1
 @davehuffstetler: no, I haven't, because i was always afraid of the price and was thinking: Aaah, come on. They cannot be THAT good. Although @arrowheadrush is right, the protection in vans is absolutely rubbish, even rotten wood hurts at certain speed.
I must admit, you got me thinking. Such a pity you can't rent them for testing Big Grin 150 bucks into the blue will make my purse transform into my mother screaming at me like she did when i stole a chewing gum.
  • + 1
 @Stahlhaus: pretty much anyone I know said that about 5.10 before they tried them 1st time. Just great riding shoes - and with decent protection as well. I just went to the park with my dirtbike two weeks ago - plastic pedals wihout pins, even they were grippy with my Freeriders... Regular sneakers don't compare.
  • + 4
 @Stahlhaus: the hype is real. Style, fit, durability and value have been issues with Five Tens, but no other shoe, especially no average skateshoe, even comes close to matching the grip of the Five Ten rubber. Even with some of the issues, I'll never go back to a "normal" shoe.
  • + 2
 @countzero1101: Got to agree on the Gravels. I had two pairs and then couldn't get them in my size again and had a few pairs of Five Tens since. A little bit grippier but harder to get dry after a long day out.
  • + 1
 @Stahlhaus: just get a cheaper pair and see what the hype is about. I'm sure it shouldn't be too hard to find them on sale somewhere.
  • + 1
 @Stahlhaus: At big US races 5.10 has demo shoes
  • + 1
 yes but if you kick rocks your toes get destroyed and skate shoes really aren't fun for long days out, like at bike parks.
  • + 1
 The old impacts stick so good I dislocated my ankle on a slightly wind blown sideways landing high tops don't make a difference when it comes down to that.
  • + 4
 But will they blend?
  • + 3
 I'm certainly sticking with my original freeriders
  • + 1
 How does the sole hold up? My new vxi series had 2 pairs with the glue not holding the sole on. My old blue zebra print ones are still chugging along though.
  • + 2
 Can I get a steel cap over ankle workboot with the S1 Dotty sole?
  • + 1
 What a coincidence, just picked up a pair and am wearing them for the first time right now!
  • + 2
 @DJ-24 What brand / model of approach shoes do you use?
  • + 1
 When are they going to make shoes for people with 2E or 4E width feet? We do exist Five Ten...
  • + 1
 I still want a pair of flat pedal shoes with the heel and upper of a clipless shoe.
  • + 1
 These are BY FAR the best five tens I've owned to date. Light weight, tough and stupid grippy!
  • + 1
 freeride vxi is still the best in my opinion
  • + 1
 I've had a pair of these for 2 seasons and they are still as good as day 1
  • + 1
 Nahh thanks but no thanks
  • + 1
 Old impact low are better for me. To each their own
  • + 1
 All they need to be perfect is a little elastic to hold the laces.
  • + 2
 Do your shoes have any sort of toe protection? that is high on my requirements for riding shoes after badly fracturing my big toe last season.
  • + 1
 @arrowheadrush: welcome to the buggered toe club bro! I'm searching for something to help my poor toe too - resorting to super-stiff soled Kestrels that are unfortunately cleat bound, so I'm currently trying to learn how to ride a bike again :/
  • - 1
 Cool, another pair of five tens that the sole will fall off after 3 months......
  • - 1
 Why are MTB shoes so goddamn ugly?! Look like bloody Orthopaedic shoes
  • + 2
 I like these in pictures. They are fairly Ortho looking on your peds, though. that link won't work cuz it knows Im in the US. 5.10 Danny MacAskills check em out - they have the good sole and haven't shown any failure points in 6 months.
  • + 2
 These are about the least crazy-looking MTB shoes available.
  • + 0
 take a peak at some of our shoes, SCgShoeCo.com made for riding, built better, look way better, and grippy straight out of the box.

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