Giant Reign Advanced 2018 - First Ride

Jul 23, 2017 at 13:59
by Mike Kazimer  



These days, it's rare that a revision of a bike model isn't accompanied by the tagline “longer, lower, slacker,” but with the new Giant Reign 'longer' is the only one of those words that applies. That's largely due to the fact that the previous model was ahead of its time when it was launched in 2014, with geometry numbers that would still be considered modern today.

With a 65-degree head angle, the previous generation of the Reign was slack enough to meet the needs of Giant's pro enduro racers, but they found themselves wanting to push its already generous reach numbers even further. The result is a new frame with reach measurements that are 15mm longer than the previous version, a design change intended to make the bike even more stable at high speeds. The lineup includes two models with a carbon front triangle and an alloy rear end, and three full aluminum models.
Giant Reign Advanced Details

• Intended use: all-mountain / enduro
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• Rear wheel travel: 160mm
• 65º head angle
• Trunnion mount shock
• Carbon front triangle, alloy swingarm
• Full aluminum versions available
• Boost hub spacing
• Size: S, M, L, XL
• Price: $5400 - $8200 USD
www.giant-bicycles.com

Along with the slightly revised geometry, the 2018 Reign now has Boost spacing front and rear, and a trunnion mounted shock that delivers 160mm of travel. Giant was able to reduce the bike's leverage ratio, which means that lower air pressures are required for air shocks, a welcome change over the previous model. There are also two coil sprung models in the lineup, complete with a handlebar mounted lockout.

Giant Reign Advanced 0 Launch in Santa Caterina Italy
The Reign Advanced now has a forged carbon rocker link, and a trunnion mounted shock.

Similar to the Giant's shorter travel Trance, the Reign now sports a forged carbon fiber upper link, while the lower link is still aluminum. Making the switch to carbon allowed Giant to shed some weight from the frame while also adding stiffness. Thanks to the trunnion mounted shock, the upper link pivot's location now sits slightly lower in the seatube, creating more room for longer travel dropper posts.

The top of the line Reign Advanced 0 pictured above retails for $8,200, with a build kit that includes a 160mm RockShox Lyrik RCT3 fork, a Super Deluxe coil shock, Guide RSC brakes, and X01 Eagle drivetrain, and a DT Swiss' alloy EX 1500 wheelset. That price does seems like it's on the high side to me – after all, only the front triangle of the Reign is carbon, and it's spec'd with a house brand dropper post, seat, and handlebar. The alloy Reign SX could be the standout workhorse of the new lineup – it has an alloy frame, 170mm Lyrik RCT3, coil Super Deluxe, and a Shimano SLX 11-speed drivetrain for $4,000 USD.

Giant Reign Advanced 0 Launch in Santa Caterina Italy
The new frame gains 15mm of reach compared to the previous version.


Giant Reign 2018 geo

Geometry

A size large Reign now has a reach of 473mm, an increase of 15mm over the previous version. That increase, along with the use of a 46mm offset fork (compared to the 'typical' 42mm offset) gives the bike a wheelbase of 1,232mm, which is certainly on the longer side of the scale compared to other bikes in this category.

Fork offset has been a hot topic recently, with several companies releasing bikes that feature less offset, a move in the opposite direction of what Giant did with the Reign. The increased offset was present on the previous version of the Reign as well, a design decision that's intended to give the bike quicker steering than its 65-degree head angle would suggest. It's an interesting move, especially considering how many bikes are on the market now with 65-degree head angles and forks with 'regular' offset; I'd be curious to ride the bike back-to-back with a 42mm offset fork to see how much difference there really is.


Giant Reign 2018
The Reign Advanced 1 retails for $5,400, with a parts spec that includes a Fox 36 Performance Elite fork, a DPX2 shock, and a SRAM GX Eagle 12-speed drivetrain.


Giant Reign 2018
The alloy Reign SX is back, this time with a 170mm RockShox Lyrik, a Super Deluxe Coil complete with a remote lockout, and a Shimano SLX 11-speed drivetrain for $4,000 USD.






Giant chose Santa Caterina di Valfurva, Italy, as the location for the launch of the Reign, a small mountain town surrounded by steep valleys and tall glaciated peaks. The trails were a mix of tight switchbacks, rocky straightlines, and twisty, wooded sections – a good mix of terrain to begin getting a feel for the updated bike.

It took me a little bit to get used to the position of the dropper post lever and the remote lockout; there were a few times when I went to drop the seat down, but inadvertently ended up pushing the lockout with my thumb instead. That's because I'm used to having my dropper post lever located where the remote sits, but I eventually retrained my brain and was able to consistently hit the levers in the right order, and by the end of the two riding days I barely had to think about it.
Giant Reign Advanced 0 Launch in Santa Caterina Italy

The Reign is a decent climber even with the rear shock fully opened, but there is a little extra motion when you're standing up and cranking. That's where the lockout comes into play, and it wasn't long before I found myself hitting it even for short, punchy climbs to take advantage of the additional pedaling support. It's not a lockout in the strictest sense of the term – there's still enough compliance to allow the rear end to take the edge off of hits, and if you do happen to forget to unlock the shock before dropping in it's not going to rattle your fillings loose.

I was a little surprised to see that the Reign's seat tube angle didn't get any steeper to go along with additional reach. 73-degrees is on the slacker side of things, which creates a more stretched out climbing position, especially for taller riders who run their bikes with a lot of post showing. Kevin Dana, Giant's Off-Road Category Manager, said that they did experiment with a steeper seat angle, but found that they preferred the seat position with the slacker angle on steep descents – riders were getting more tire buzz (between themselves and the rear tire) with the steeper seat angle. Mountain bike geometry does require compromise, and in this case it appears Giant placed priority on the bike's downhill performance.

Giant Reign Advanced 0 Launch in Santa Caterina Italy
There's no shortage of rocks in northern Italy.


The plush Super Deluxe Coil / Lyrik suspension combination provided loads of grip, and the bike tracked very well, pitter-pattering over sections of trail that were covered with a thick layer of baseball-sized rocks without any harshness. It's easy to find speed even without stomping on the pedals – pumping into a corner or over a roller kept the Reign charging forward, and it never felt like it was getting hung up on the multiple awkward rock sections that I rode through.

There were a couple times when I found myself wishing the Reign had SRAM's new Code brakes rather than the Guide RSCs. They didn't pump up or fade, but I did need to hang on tighter on sustained steep sections than I would have with the more powerful Codes.

I was especially impressed by just how energetic the Reign felt on the descents – even with the extra length that's been added to the front end and the coil-sprung shock, it's still easy to pop up and over rocks and roots at the blink of an eye. That pep made it easier to navigate through some of the more awkward rocky sections of trail, along with tight switchbacks, the calling card of European riding – they didn't feel any more difficult than usual. While there's no denying that this is a long bike, I didn't have any trouble with slow speed maneuvering.

The new Reign certainly hasn't lost any of its downhill prowess, and the updated suspension layout makes its 160mm of travel feel better than ever. This is a bike that can be a big, rock smashing brute when necessary, but it's also capable of dancing through tighter sections of trail with a surprising level of finesse. As usual, all of this comes with the caveat that these are just initial impressions – two days of riding is enough to get a good idea of how a bike handles, but not enough to suss out all the quirks, or to comment on long term durability – that'll have to wait until we put in more miles on a wider range of terrain.







313 Comments

  • + 130
 C'mon guys..give Giant a break. The actual fact that they make amazing bikes and this is just a prime example. No crazy spec, no swappable 27.5+/29 bull****, no marketing mumbo jumbo, just a awesome Enduro bike that works.
Some brands are spec'ing Star Trak handlebar/stem combos for more bucks.
The way I see it is that the market is complicated enough..this is exactly what the riders of these bikes Need. Simplicity
Looks great, will ride great...and offer enough models with a good spec and pricing is fair.
  • + 28
 Agree. The remote on the coil is a bit fancy, but really dig they are spec'ing a non-DH rig with a coil.
  • + 6
 My friend has a Reign and it was an amazing deal price wise. It's nice that with the insane bicycle price hikes, a company would take the budget end.
  • + 18
 "NO marketing mumbo jumbo" must have forgotten about the whole overdrive 2 ordeal.
  • + 9
 Well done on all models, THANK YOU Giant for not turning the Reign into a 29er or something else it's not meant to be. The prior model was great...but this is now on the SHORT LIST !!!
  • + 4
 Ridden a handful of giants over the past few years. All rentals from various places and various styles. I liked them all! Granted watching the bike shop guys eye roll at the "27.5 is the best thing since coffee" marketing was amusing, the bikes handled their respective terrains without fuss and were a blast to ride. This bike looks like another win.
  • + 12
 I'm on a 2017 Reign and I love it, it's a good bike with a solid spec and a decent price tag that works out the box (though I wish they'd give up with their dropper post already).
Those complaining about the price of these need a reality check - Giant is one of the most affordable brands out there. Direct-sales brands are killing the LBS.
  • - 6
flag fecalmaster (Jul 24, 2017 at 16:14) (Below Threshold)
 I'm considering proposing to that new Reign but when is the perfect time. Anyone who locks out that rear tractor status uphill suspension should be prosecuted to the full extention of my foot in the asset! Guess it's time to start a new ground up joint from frame to fame.
  • + 3
 @fecalmaster: yeah!! Errr.. what?
  • + 4
 still riding (punishing) a 2012 Reign 0 (26, yes) and I have to say that's the best bike i've ever had, props to giant !!!
  • + 2
 @panchocampbell: man I've been trying to kill mine for 11 years and it just won't give up. My body however...
  • + 2
 @sam264: What the issue with their dropper? i've only heard good things (i also just bought one and now your post has me worried)
  • + 1
 @arrowheadrush: They're VERY unreliable. I worked as a mechanic at a Giant dealer and we got loads of them back under warranty (I had to rebuild mine second ride). They don't like dirt or wet weather as the sealing and tolerances are crap. Not good news if you live in the UK (or Canada). My advice is sell it and buy the new x-fusion manic. It's a shame, because it's the only real part that lets the bike down.
  • - 1
 @arrowheadrush: mine lasted 2 years and its sealed, when you live in an island like i do, there's no such thing as warranty, but the reverb will get the job done. Still cant believe they spec the giant droppenr on 8k bikes...
  • + 1
 @sam264: good to know, i live in a very dry part of Canada (SW Alberta) so wet shouldn't be too much of an issue, i'll make sure to keep it clean. I've heard its very reliable, so who knows, seems like every dropper out there has its problems.
  • + 0
 @arrowheadrush: I've returned several under warranty, but I guess as a wrench I tend to see the worst case scenarios. See how you go, you have a warranty at least.
  • + 0
 @sam264: I agree with the seat post comment massively, I've got a reign 2016 and am currently on the market for a new seat post as they aren't the best. Rest of the bike i can't fault at all. Smile
  • + 0
 @haslee: same here! Had mine a year and it's a goner. The rest of the bike though... It's a,amazing, best bike I've ever ridden.
  • + 0
 @arrowheadrush: I've been running one for a year and a half in Southern Alberta and it's been fine.
  • + 1
 @arrowheadrush:

The old models develop play in the system and don't have a smooth lever feel at their best.


Giants new lineup has revised dropper posts on some of their models. For instance, the cheaper stance/embolden models come with a completely redesigned externally routed post which runs smoother with tighter tolerances - haven't had any of the new internally routed ones come in yet, so time will tell. I would avoid the 2017 dropper posts, or ask for some extra $$ off of the old model if you find it in a shop due to the improvements for this year
  • + 46
 Two questions :

1.Can carbon be forged ? To me only metals can be forged but I'm not really a specialist in carbon

2. Are there other alloy versions than the SX ?

They look awesome BTW and I'm glad they didn't go for bigger is better like other brands.
  • + 29
 "Forged" is the wrong term but carbon can be compression moulded, where chopped carbon strands, resin, a reactive agent and filler are mixed to form a dough.
The dough is then formed by being forced into shape ('forged') between two or more moulds and heated to cure the resin.
  • + 4
 I'd like to hear from a carbon forging specialist...

Avec les métaux on déforme (corroyage/écrouissage) et ça renforce la pièce : la microstructure est modifiée parce qu'on allonge carrément les grains dans la direction de déformation.

En composite : on peut juste tasser/orienter les fibres en "forgeant" la matrice (et les fibres incluses suivent).

Je trouve que c'est un abus de language, mais ya des points communs. Schéma/vidéo nécessaire pour expliquer plus Smile
  • + 8
 @TyranT21: Yep, I found some readings about this. Seems like it's used by Lamborghini for some parts. The main pro are faster production than regular fiber and it allows more complicated shapes. The con is a lower Young's modulus since fibers are randomly distributed.
  • + 4
 Wow. You learn something new every day. Forced carbon is my new knowledge for today.
  • - 9
flag sq225917 (Jul 24, 2017 at 2:57) (Below Threshold)
 @Whipperman: Forged carbon is just marketing bullshit for cheap sprayed rovings.
  • + 2
 Campag cf parts are forged. They pretty much wrote the book on it.
  • + 8
 @Whipperman: Yup, it's been around for a little while now. Hex MC, from Hexcell, for example - it's pretty much as TyranT21 puts it. The idea is that the "charge" you place into the matched moulding can flow during heating/curing, creating lamina-like structure, less resin pooling in the radii, and supposedly better fracture toughness. BMW tried it and said they were having problems during crash test. We don't see it used much in aerospace, but that's not to say it can't work.

Sorry. Couldn't contain my inner geek.
  • + 3
 @DokonjoDaikon: by the look of it, seems similar to Magura's Carbotecture on MT brakes.
  • - 41
flag enrico650 (Jul 24, 2017 at 6:08) (Below Threshold)
 So, Mike, $8,200 doesn't seem to be a lot of money for You?
It's a shame that people like you have very quickly forgotten what is to survive on minimum wage.
We need new down to earth riders to write these articles rather than overpaid "smart people"
  • + 14
 Giant marketing team is a bullsht forgery that only Trek can match. I remember the new 20% stiffer steerer tube standard that they were sure to take over the industry. Then they said that it is impossible to build a long travel 29er, (only to see Spec release Enudro 29 few months later). Then they forged an impressive pile of Adobe Illustrator Science they claim to be proving that 650B is sooo good that it will phase out not only 26ers but also 29ers.
  • - 29
flag Warburrito (Jul 24, 2017 at 6:19) (Below Threshold)
 @enrico650: Lib-logic says if we raise the minimum wage everyone will be comfortable with their income and there will be no repercussions. Then we won't have to envy everyone around us as much who worked hard, got promoted, and reached a point where their hard work allows them extra luxuries in life. That's so UNFAIR! Less work, more money! It sounds so good and makes me feel all comfy inside. I'm sure they're not leaving anything out of the equation. It should just work. Don't over-think it. #sarcasm
  • + 14
 @enrico650: I'd suggest you re-read the article - he's saying the exact opposite. I'd also suggest spending more time in this comment section as the debate about PB testing expensive bikes vs. affordable bikes comes up all them time. I think PB has it about right - I definitely enjoy reading about what's happening at the bleeding edge of MTB development and reviewing tests of high-end bikes. I also appreciate when PB reviews more affordable kit, which they do all the time.
  • + 11
 @enrico650: he said it does seem like a lot of money for what you get...maybe read more carefully before you accuse people of forgetting what it's like not to have money.
  • + 2
 @DokonjoDaikon: Interesting info, thanks for sharing. If you know any articles online that explain today's carbon fiber use in the bike, industry, I would like to learn more about the carbon fiber materials and manufacturing processes behind all these new carbon bikes. It wasn't that many years ago that carbon was very exclusive either only for the only the very high end bikes or for some brands just for XC bikes. It seems today like carbon is becoming increasingly standard for even mid-level bikes and of course there's also a noticeable uptick in carbon wheels too. I assume there have been advances in both materials and manufacturing processes to allow for this increase in carbon products. If there aren't good articles already out there, it would be an interesting article for PinkBike to do
  • + 9
 @enrico650: Is it his fault you make min wage?
  • - 17
flag enrico650 (Jul 24, 2017 at 6:45) (Below Threshold)
 @gtill9000: My girlfriend's new car was $12,000 and it has more tech than that mountain bike.
This is not the EDGE OF MTB DEVELOPMENT.
Shimano is currently working on a way for DI2 users to share programs for shifting settings acording to an specific trail.
And soon a GPS linked automatic shifting , which is standard equipment on all new Rolls Royce cars.
I'll call that: The edge of mtb.
  • + 19
 @WAKIdesigns: Sounds like they'll be trying to recruit you for the next release since you seem to have something to say about EVERYTHING.
  • - 5
flag enrico650 (Jul 24, 2017 at 6:50) (Below Threshold)
 @Nordicskier1: Just looking out for the little guy.
  • - 13
flag enrico650 (Jul 24, 2017 at 6:54) (Below Threshold)
 @Nordicskier1: I have a new S works Enduro, and I still don't see justification to charge people so much money for a mountain bike.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Yeah.. I was a working for a Giant dealer when they switched the marketing from 29ers are awesome to 27.5 is better than anything before it and anything that hasn't been made yet.. It was good for a laugh...
  • + 3
 @enrico650: Uh, what new car did your girlfriend get for $12K? And yeah I'd agree DI2 is probably at the edge of MTB development. I read all about it here on PB, which is my point. Are you suggesting PB not cover this and instead tell you only about MTB gear you can afford?
  • + 3
 @enrico650: The iPad I'm typing on has more tech than a mountain bike too.... I don't understand the link between a $12k car, an MTB and a Rolls Royce. Are you trying to prove a point or just try and compare a mountain bike to a car that costs as much as a house and why said bike should shift on its own?
  • + 11
 @enrico650: if you make minimum wage then maybe you should educate yourself and work harder instead of looking at $8000 MTN bikes and complaining about the price.
  • + 1
 This guys launched some Kickstarter campaign about carbon forged bike components:

www.bikerumor.com/2016/04/28/carbon-bike-offers-inexpensive-lightweight-components-thanks-to-forged-carbon-construction
  • - 3
 @Whipperman:

Maybe that's why Reigns have been cracking at the headtube?
  • + 2
 @Kenfire24: I know enough about some things to sound like I know a lot about everythingBig Grin
  • + 8
 @enrico650: so I see you have a 2017 enduro. You must have worked a lot of minimum wage hours for that. See it can be done if you believe in yourself.
  • + 2
 @Nordicskier1: yeah! And stop being a cocksucker, Enrico!
  • + 1
 "Carbon fiber reinforced resin" would be more accurate then?
  • - 3
 @justwan-naride: super mega high modulus airforce grade unidirectional weave preimpregnated with graphene reinforced resin. Hand made.
  • - 1
 @Warburrito:

Not sure why all the neg props Warhotdog. Could be indicative if our PB audience, at least the ones trolling, being a bunch of inexperienced Millenials?
  • + 1
 @enrico650: sounds like you need to get after it in the job/education world and step your game up... Ya, $8200 is a lot of quid. But if mtb is a passion and you got a decent gig, making it a priority, it is doable.
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: hahaha Ya dude I remember all that.. Those 29ers sure seem really phased out! That Hightower and new fuel ex sure does suck!
  • + 0
 @enrico650: ya, but now she's stuck with a car!
  • + 1
 @mrgonzo: That, eat canned tuna/kd and wipe your ass with a sideways hand on tha regular! Ya it can be done. Ha
  • + 0
 @WasatchEnduro:I am parted on this... as a long time master topic segwayer, after all those years, I am no longer sure whether using words like "Liberal" on Pinkbike is a sign of intelligence or prime lunacy...
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: And now they had to eat crow and release a new Anthem 29. Amazing how that works.
  • + 1
 @TucsonDon: except Giant never stopped making 29ers and the Anthem isn't a long travel trail bike. It's an XC race bike and 29" hoops were never a dead topic for XC. But if that is eating crow.... I guess you're right.
  • + 2
 @Kenfire24: except, when they were releasing the first batch of 650B models they said that 29ers will be dead in 4 years.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: dropping bangers this early in the week. Respect! ????????
  • + 1
 @0gravity: there's a guy with a YouTube channel who looks at carbon cycling products. He does NDT on items and it isn't good what he finds
  • - 1
 @bohns1: Check my profile.
Just looking out for the little guy
  • + 0
 @mrgonzo: Just looking out for the little guy
  • + 7
 @gonecoastal: I put a banger in my arse to kick start the monday morning
  • + 1
 @TyranT21:
@TyranT21:
Good grief I hope you are wrong. I've worked with glass and resin quite a bit in my other hobby, boating. Chop strand is one of the weakest was to lay up glass and you would probably never see it used with carbon due to the high cost of the material. It is typically used for parts that need less structural strength, or when doing things on the cheap. Think bathtub, or on a boat, something like holding a seat platform in place. No part of a mountain bike is suitable for such a thing.

Putting it in a 'dough' as you suggest would be a difficult material to work with and you would end up with something very weak. What you don't want is a lump of resin with no glass to reinforce it. It is far too brittle.Glass and carbon (or kevlar, dacron, etc) layups get their strength from the interaction of the fibers and the resin. One without the other is fairly useless.

More likely, they are using multiple layers of cloth with continuous strands, then vacuum forming. This allows the exact amount of resin on the shape to be used, fills all voids, etc. Or, they are using the same multi-layered approach and then using a mechanical male-female press to create the shape, with vacuum to get the ratio of resin correct. A release agent is applied to the mold prior to lay up so that it can be removed cleanly without damaging the final product. Extra bits are cut off if needed and off you go.
  • + 1
 @Whipperman:
Very interesting. So they are chopping, impregnating and extruding the material in a press to form the 'cloth', then heat catalyzing after it is in the mold, The economy at scale for that technique must be quite good since they only use the resin needed for a given square measure. It would also eliminate the need for vacuum bagging.
I was wondering if they have to use the chop vs continuous strand in order to get the material to form around the complex shape. A quick bit of Googling found this:
www.fibreglast.com/category/PrePreg_Fabrics
They are using continuous strand in the pics. I'd wager that is what is being used on bikes based on some of the photos and in persion carbon bits I've seen. My Ritchie bars are a good example of long strand lay up.
  • + 0
 Forged composite is like hand made composite: U no say. You know what, their alu frames are... heat treated! But that's not the end of the story, they go through a patented PHTR process. Post heat treatment realignment.
  • - 1
 @Kenfire24:

There were a couple years they killed the anthem 29er. I think they still had the XTC.

They definitely said 27.5 was the future even for XC. Now they have an updated anthem 29er that looks awesome, but they were wrong about people wanting a 27.5 xc race bike.
  • + 3
 @UtahBikeMike: They still had the Anthem 29'r, they just reduced the amount of models, and didn't ever change the bike. For a while, they offered it in only an alloy 'entry level', then a carbon frame with carbon wheels and parts to match. This was the same time they were pushing to 27.5 even for XC, and had 5-6 bikes in the Anthem 27.5 range, and this overshadowed the two 29 options.
  • + 1
 @Whipperman: Exactly, often glass divers are used instead of carbon to increase toughness of thermosetting polymers. It's quite a commonly used process
  • + 3
 Eff me there's a lot of bollocks being spouted here. "Looking out for the little guy"... It's not a fooking cancer treatment, it's a bike aimed at the people who administer the cancer treatment. If you've got half a brain, you can half a kick-arse bike for a quarter of the price that is 95% as capable as this rocket ship... Earn less, spend less, have more time to think shit out and ride.
  • + 3
 @WasatchEnduro: Yeah why do I have to pay for my own bike? Why can't I just use other people's hard earned money to buy it for me? And no, I'm not serious.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: let's not forget about the 51mm fork offset that's going to war right now. G2 vs the world
  • + 2
 @BenPea:

If I were in the market for a 160 bike I'd just buy a freaking Capra and have $ left over for a trip to Whistler. Done.
  • + 2
 @WasatchEnduro: that is a failed logic. When I was smoking as a student, people were telling me that I will save a lot of money when I quit. Well I haven't got any more money by the end of the month. Same with bikes. I haven't bought a single bike thing for. 6 months, and I was equally broke. The moral of the story is that you prioritize spending and as soon as you stop throwing money at bikes you will throw them at things you couldn't afford because of bikes. If you could go to Whistler you would find money for that trip even if you bought a Nomad CC. It is one of fundamental capital dynamics of mountain biking, it is like a second law of thermodynamics.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: Jesus... you talking about failed logic is like Donald talking about fake news...
Anyway, my point is about what one reasonably needs and about the fact that buying what you can actually afford need not be less satisfying. Maybe it's also about getting old and learning how not to give a fock about the external pressure to consume for no good reason. I can afford this mofo, but I know I will gain very little from spending the cash apart from a fear of trashing the thing... I'm starting to wonder whether this post relates to anything mentioned above.
  • + 0
 @BenPea: Jesus, you truly must be going through hormonal phase where you must tell people how you identified peer pressure as trigger to consumption, how belongings stopped matter to you and how time suddenly increased it's value. That was supposed to be a joke at Wasatch... that I find very true. My latest hormonal imbalance led me to think that I don't give a flying fk how other people spend money and time. If you buy a DH E-bike costing more than a decent MX or Enduro moto, I will not judge you. I don't care. This Giant is a cool bike, I don't give a fk if my wife buys it tomorrow. It's a bike. If she buys a shitty cheap, bottom feeding Canyon Strive or Ibis piece of snobbish crap - fair enough. Not my money, not my business. If you get on the same plane with me and start singing Lorde songs out loud, I will come to you and gently ask you to stop, because it pisses me off. Then if you won't I will find an insult that will get to you and make you want to hit me in the face. And I will enjoy it. So I worry only about things influencing my quality of life.
  • + 1
 @mtnbykr05:

Interesting, didn't think they still had the 29er in 15&16. Thought I had the last year. I had a carbon '14 and an alloy '10. They were the same bike. It was a decent bike but twitchy.
  • + 2
 Not sure if anyone replied to your second question, but yes there are 2 different aluminum colors. And they look even better in person
www.giant-bicycles.com/us/reign-2-2018
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: don't worry about my hormones, they haven't budged for about a quarter century. I don't disagree about not caring about others' purchases, I'm on board with your argument. If you ain't got the cash, Mr Little Guy (enrico's words), don't bitch about it on PB, just find a way of rationalising it in your head, saying nevermind and being happy with what you can afford. It's possible. The alternative is debt and the philosophy that sewed the seeds for the financial crash.
  • + 0
 @Kenfire24: “I don’t see the ability to have three wheel sizes in the marketplace,” said Justkaitis. “It’s just not feasible. Dealers can’t keep up with it. Nobody can. I truly see 26 going away, and the phase-out of 29. Giant has in our back pocket a two-year plan of phasing out 29er product.”
Read more at www.velonews.com/2013/07/mtb/giant-goes-all-in-with-27-5-inch-wheels-in-2014-off-road-line_297570#fSo6gMU2Bcqr026o.99

Seems you are wrong. The internet doesn't forget.
  • + 2
 @TucsonDon: So did you ignore the last 7 paragraphs of the article or are you on some real-deal insider stuff?

What model year did Giant not make a 29er? Claiming they will go away and actually going away are a little different. Snagging a few sentences out of an article on the hopes that anothers reading comprehension is weak may work for some but it doesn't make you any more correct than Giant was about killing the idea of a bike with 29" wheels.

I'm a little curious where I was "wrong"? Are you telling me that I wouldn't be able to page through Giant sourcebooks from the last 3 or 4 years at the shop and find a bike 29" wheeled bike?
  • + 2
 I remember that Giant guy saying that too. My take on it was that Giant hoped to get rid of 29ers and 26ers to streamline the range. Unfortunately, people kept buying 29ers so they had to keep making them. Rather like Mercedes with the G Wagon, but not as cool.
  • + 2
 @jaame: my take on it was "we are the oracle, 29ers will be dead! Our calculations made in Adobe Illustrator show clearly that their days are counted. We'll be making them until the sales drop, as we predicted so accurately" Meanwhile Spesh guys said, yes that hated Spesh, that there is no fkng point in going 275, since if you want a larger wheel you should go 29 directly. Anyone who rode Stumpy 29 Evo at that time knew that what they say made perfect sense. Giant 29ers have always sucked arse, both handling wise and structurally. Reign is awesome, Anthem is cool, maybe Glory is good too, but all in all they are one bag of mediocrity.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns:

Time is a flat circle.
  • + 0
 @WasatchEnduro: yes... every time the Earth is at a certain place in it's orbit, Giant sells their bikes at 20-30% off and it makes Reigns and Anthems a few of the most desirable bikes in the Local Group.
  • + 25
 cant believe they kept the 73 degree seat tube angle...? FAIL
  • + 6
 The ironic thing is that even in their own official pictures they slammed the saddle forward.... Something wére used to see in most bike reviews, showing many people would love steeper angle. It seems they got it, but too late, frame molds were done already...
  • + 1
 The ironic thing is that even in their own official pictures they slammed the saddle forward.... Something wére used to see in most bike reviews, showing many people would love steeper angle. It seems they got it, but too late, frame molds were done already...
  • + 2
 @EnduroManiac: "Slammed forward" seems pretty central to me, going by the saddle rails...

Having said that, a steeper ST would probably have been great for climbing.
  • - 1
 @cptmayhem: on the green one it's quite forward. True about the orange one, a bit more centered.
  • + 1
 My measurements show the seatpost on all 3 bikes pictured @ 75 degrees and the scale of the images looks accurate. I've seen other giant bikes with seatpost specs slacker than they measure in person. Maybe someone else can confirm or refute this observation. Anyway looks like a nice bike.
  • + 5
 I applaud Giant for bucking the currently fashionable "steeper is better" trend for STA, but cannot follow the stated rationale: "riders were getting more tire buzz (between themselves and the rear tire) with the steeper seat angle"

If you're buzzing the rear tire then presumably the seat is down, at which point the STA is largely irrelevant.

It's also a bit odd they increased the reach so much without steepening the STA, as usually the two go hand in hand. Was a 25.2" top tube (on a large) just too cramped? Were riders really having to run a 65mm stem to get comfortable?
  • + 4
 Their explanation that a steeper seat angle would give more tire buzz is total BS! If anything it would give LESS tire buzz!
  • + 1
 @SintraFreeride: I don't know, depends what the tyre is buzzing on no? If the seat tube didn't have that curve that moves it away from the tyre and was instead straight, effectively giving a steeper angle, then the tyre would be more likely to hit it. Make sense? Or is everyone suggesting that the ST should stay aligned with its angle at the BB?
  • + 1
 Edit: looking at the pics, that angle is not ideal! Ok, steeper starting from the rocker pivot would be easily doable.
  • + 19
 Who else agrees the old reign looks better? this looks more like a trance
  • + 2
 I was expecting it to look more like a Glory. I saw an insta video of a rider with a blacked out frame that was either a glory or similar to one. Had a single crown fork on it and looked mean. This kinda looks meh. But in person probably a lot better!
  • + 9
 I liked the look of the trance better so I love this reign Wink
  • + 5
 That SX looks pretty no-nonsense, almost makes me want to buy a 27.5 bike
  • - 14
flag adrennan (Jul 24, 2017 at 6:45) (Below Threshold)
 i dont care how well giants ride. they are always ugly to me....
  • + 2
 @adrennan: Well, what bike company do you like?
  • + 1
 yes, i agree, this looks like my trance. the previos version (advanced) was really beautiful.
  • + 2
 @chillrider199: Banshee, Knolly, Transition, YT, Commencal look better imo
  • - 1
 @Jokesterwild: i would give a similar list. include canfield. but hey just personal opinion
  • + 1
 Don't all giants look the same? They all use the same maestro suspension layout so why shouldn't they?
Also last years trance was the first giant to use the updated maestro, its now on the anthem and reign and I wouldn't be surprised to see it on the glory next year
  • + 14
 "they did experiment with a steeper seat angle, but found that they preferred the seat position with the slacker angle on steep descents – riders were getting more tire buzz with the steeper seat angle"

Feels weird that the st angle would make that big difference when you're standing on the pedals and the seat is lowered.
  • + 38
 The comment makes zero sense.
  • + 32
 yea! And how does a steeper seat tube angle equate to tire buzz??
  • + 45
 Steeper seat-tube angle would get the post/ saddle further away from the tyre = less BUzzzzzz. Sounds like a bit of a BS statement to make it seem like it wasn't something they missed during the design.
  • + 6
 If he really said that he should be sacked. As should Mike for not writing "WTF" after the comment Smile
  • + 15
 I suspect that you have to move a steeper seat tube back to achieve The same saddle position as on a slacker one. This could cause the tire interference.
  • + 10
 Yeah I agree, steeper seat angle should = less buzz. Sounds like a bs excuse to me.. besides, if you're getting tire buzz on the saddle of your 27.5 160 Enduro bike you are designing it wrong...
  • - 4
flag funkzander (Jul 24, 2017 at 1:25) (Below Threshold)
 perhaps he meant with tire buzz with the steep st angle that the rear tire is more slipping on steep uphills as youre weight is not so much on the rear tire. otherwise it makes no sense in the meaning that the rear tire collides with the seattube with a steeper angle?
  • + 4
 @HenningV1: The whole point is that you want to be further forward. From the bb, lengthen the front centre and steepen the seat angle to maintain the same effective reach.
  • + 1
 @funkzander:
They specifically write that it happens when you go downhill. So I would say it can only be a tire clearance issue (which still doesn't make any sense to me...).
  • + 6
 plus it would be totally possible to get a steeper f*cking seat angle (aka effective seat angle) and get the same lower position. If your engineers suck that much with a ruler and a pencil then I'm scared. But obviously it's just the marketing explanation of a non-sensical decision.
  • + 1
 +1
  • + 15
 could it be that with the seat further forward (when dropped) the riders found they missed it more often when lowering their weight on the steeps and so hit there bums on the rear wheel instead of the saddle more often?
  • + 3
 Most likely, it's so they could spec their house-brand dropper. Steeper seat angles require more drop to get the saddle out of the way. Several reviewers have mentioned that even 150mm isn't quite enough for really steep angles. I'm pretty sure that Giant doesn't make a 170+mm dropper, so they may have kept the SA static so they could use their own post.
  • + 11
 @Jubbylinseed: This is a very good point.

And as an owner of the 2015 Reign 1 with the dropper fully extended out of the seat-tube, i too am surprised at the fact they kept it the same. The old (current) design has an actual seat-tube angle of ~60°, the 73° number is a virtual angle based on the TThor. measurement.

With the Reverb fully extended on an L frame, i wouldn't be surprised if the actual angle is under 70° given the very low stack value and the actual angle of the seatpost.
  • + 1
 I believe their argument was mentioning tire buzz with your legs.. less clearance around your tights may be?
  • + 6
 Giant engineers made a test frame with a steeper seat angle, and tested it. What absolute bollocks!

I brought a new Giant Reign back in 2013. It had the words "Custom Fox Tuned Suspension" stickers all over the bike.

That frame had terrible leverage ratios, resulting in constant bottoming out (even when running zero sag). The matched Talas fork was famously incompetent too, with Fox australia never coming to the world wide "free upgrade/ recall" party. $4k wasted.
  • + 2
 @Sparkless: My 2013 Reign took a heck of a lot of shock tuning to get it right - biggest volume reducer fitted to prevent bottom out at the back and yes, that fork was awful. Had to add oil to the air chamber to prevent it diving too...
  • + 11
 @Woody25, exactly. That's the point I was trying to explain, but it looks like I made it as clear as mud.
  • + 3
 @mikekazimer: then we're back to what I said. It was 100% possible to get the same lower position with a steeper effective seat angle (eg in high position) by simply reducing or canceling the offset of the seat tube. If they can't figure that out they are probably doing the wrong job!
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: but isn't missing the seat by going behind it the whole point of it being lower, i.e. having the space to move forwards and backwards easier than with it being raised up?

I mean yeah, bikes currently are longer and slacker, which requires a more central riding position, but that doesn't mean you don't get to hang your behind out the back anyways... And true, i am quite tall, but i really haven't ever had a tire buzz thing going with my behind, is this a common occurence with the seat being lower down (for smaller riders)?
  • - 3
 Okay so if he allegedly meant that the saddle interfears with your legs more with a steeper seat angle I'd also say BS. The closer the saddle is to the BB, the less change in F/R saddle position. On my large 75 degree SA bike the saddle would be about 1.5cm further rearward with the dropper fully compressed.

So when you're out of the saddle and your body is moving all over the place relative to the saddle we're supposed to believe that they designed the bike with a slack seat angle for about 1.5cm of rearward saddle position?

Pure BS.
  • + 4
 Personally, i'm happy to see a bike with a slacker seat tube, so long as it doesn't make it climb poorly. My 74* seat angle bothers my old knee injury after a long day. Nice to have choice in the market!
  • + 3
 A slacker seat angle sucks the seat further forward when it's dropped. If you set the seat in the same position when raised(this is what you do), when dropped the saddle is further forward with the slacker seat angle. It's more out of the way of your tire and body.
  • + 1
 Maybe they were talking about the actual seat tube angle? Steepening the actual seat tube angle while maintaining the same effective seat tube angle would bring the seat tube closer to the rear tire. Think of drawing a line in the picture above straight from the saddle clamp to the bottom bracket, instead of having the kink in the tube.
  • + 1
 @stiingya: I read it as saying Giants test riders were getting buzzed by the tire. To me that means it was rubbing their ass. Keeping the ST a few degrees back helped with that problem.
  • + 1
 No wonder manufacturers can sell half-baked bikes if people can't even get this.
  • + 1
 @flaflow: Yeah but that could also be solved by removing the kink in the seat tube so the dropped position is slacker.
  • + 2
 IDK, but I agree that I prefer a slacker seat angle for descending. It makes it easier to sit while descending, which is a big help when you want to take a break between sections during a race run. Previous version of Reign already climbed like crap. Seems like they are going all in with a mini-DH bike, which is great IMO, since the Trance is a much better all-arounder any way.
  • + 12
 Thats absolute rubbish...I have been on the Reign since 2015 and never has that been an issue. I live in Switzerland where the climbs can be long and steep and have never had an issue with suspension bob(for God sakes, its a full suspension bike)and in my experience, a little movement is key to so that the tires always stay in contact with the gravel, fire road type of conditions. To stiff and the wheel spins out, can only be compensated with low tire pressures.
Alot of the time riders have no idea how suspension setup works, some run 20-25% / and some ride 30-35%. Depends on where you live and what you ride. Almost every shock has some sort of lockout, right?
Now to the uphill performance, we live in a time where there is 11 and 12 Speed drivetrains with changeable chainrings..I'd bet mounting Eagle on a DH bike will get you up the hill...
I for one do not want a carbon back end...after a season of riding with no issues. For me, Aluminium rear Ends make sense.
As an experienced mechanic, I have seen quite a bit and most of these issues are due to lack of greasing, tightening and just generally checking the bike once and a while...
  • + 1
 Was this meant as a reply to @andnyleswillriot ?
  • + 1
 Ageed!!
  • - 1
 Having climbed on a bunch of enduro bikes back to back I can only say that the Giant climbs. It doesn't climb badly but it does not climb anywhere as near as well as a bike like the Trek slash, Specialized enduro, or Norco range. Lots of bob and the slack seat angles make your seat to bar stretch a lot more uncomfortable than other bikes for a given size.
  • + 1
 agree
  • + 2
 @RoboDuck: are you saying the enduro pedals better than giants maestro? I have own both and I can tell you your wrong. I am actually going back to giant after owning spec enduro. Now If you compare to e29er than that's a different argument.
  • + 4
 @RoboDuck: impossible. I owned a reign and an fsr stumpjumper. The latter was way more bob-prone under power. Giant's dual link suspension is inherently more efficient at climbing than Horst link bikes.
  • + 2
 @blackthorne: The bigger question is the comparison done like to like bike. An XC race bike with Spec FSR will liikely climb better than an Reign or Glory due to weight and travel. Even within the Giant lineup I found a noticeable difference between the Trance and the Reign in climbing capabilities and how the bikes felt despite being close in weight, same front travel and similar equipment spec. The Trance was a more efficient climber. So compare Enduro to Reign on Stumpjumper to Trance and then report back.
It's been a long time since I was on either a Stumpjumper or the Enduro, but the older models, to me, were not as efficient as the as the Trance and Reign. Then again, the Enduro did feel like it had more plush travel then the Reign.
  • + 2
 @rsidedown: read blackrgorn response again, I think you have it backwards. He said his giant reign was more efficient than stump jumper.
  • + 9
 I thought I knew what I wanted from a bike. 160mm travel, short chainstays - circa 430mm, not too low a BB (I hate grounding peddles in the rough terrain), 65/66 Deg head angle, ability to fit a 150mm dropper. Reach - no idea? but I always rode Med being 5'-9", 30in inseam. I like to lean back and pop the front up over stuff. I feared a long front end would make it too hard to pop the front up over stuff.

I've owned numerous bikes over the years, generally always around the 150mm/170mm travel. Since 2012 a 1st gen Trek Slash 9 (the green machine), a Trek Session 88, Canyon Vertride 170mm travel and lately a carbon Nomad Mk I (another green machine).

So I test rode a 2016 Giant Reign Advanced 0, size large. I'm 5'9" 30" inseam. In theory I should have been on a medium. It was my mates, so I didn't have a choice. That bike is HUGE with a reach of 458mm (verses Nomad's 383mm, a 75mm difference i.e. 3" to you old money dudes!) and fitted with a 170mm reverb. I couldn't get the seat down to my usual comfort levels. So I was ridding a massively long bike with a seat up my backside.

Well I absolutely smoked all my usual technical trails i.e. rough and steep in sections (some of them are more DH than Scotlands official DH tracks) Anyway, I couldn't believe the difference a significantly longer front end makes. It simply wasn't an issue not being able to pop the front up. However, I did struggle in the tight steeper tree sections. I just could get my position right to twist around the trees.

A year later, after buying a medium Reign. The problem in the tight trees was simply due to the seat up my backside. Having lived with my size med, I now feel I want a size large, but was worried I wouldn't be able to fit a 150mm as it would bottom out on the pivot - BOOM! along comes the 2018 Reign with the a 15mm longer front on a size med. I'm a happy man :-)

So to all you doubters about long front ends. You need to at least test ride one (preferably on your own terrain). I will be very surprised to hear you don't like it........

PS the SA I don't have an issue with mine. But I think it would have made sense to make it steeper!
  • + 9
 As a previous Reign owner, I'm quite disappointed to see they didn't improve on the numbers at all other than the reach. Which is seems to be applied to only the medium bikes and up, and quite a huge jump between the small and medium. At 5'9, I found the 444mm reach on the medium to be dead perfect with the given seat angle, but slamming the seat forward in the rails. Now, they have increased the reach, with no improvement to the seat angle, and didn't make the small any longer.

Really Giant? You had 3 years to improve on the design, and this is the best you could come up with? Really all you did was re-hash the old bike with an update to "the Standards". No carbon rear end? No improvement to the cable routing or plugs? Same old shitty chainstay protector? No change to the way your pivot bolts lock down to the bearings? No change to the size of the bearing to prevent from blowing out so quick? Did you do ANYTHING to improve on the massive amount flex in the rear end?

If you're going to charge that much for a bike, you have to give me worthwhile improvements to the frame over the bike from 3 years ago and the other competitors bikes. I could go out and buy a Nomad4, for similar pricepoints, but I'd have internally guided cable routing, a carbon rear end with custom molded chainstay protection, probably the best bearing preload system on the market and a lifetime warranty on the bearings, a better seat angle and a non-in-house seatpost (which sucks btw), a threaded Bottom Bracket, bolt on downtube protection, and depending on the pricepoint, carbon rims. Then they wrapped up in a package that has clean lines and immaculate paint. Giant, it looks like Hot Wheels came up with your paintjobs. We are adults, we want bikes that adults look good on, not for a 14 year old kid. And you can't keep releasing the same paint schemes that were on your bikes two years ago. :cough: Reign SX :cough:
  • + 6
 To me the internal routing is really important as the previous reign had horrible cable rattling inside the frame out of the box, requiring a lot of messing around to get it to stop. Would rather have cables run outside than have it sound like my bike is broken when I ride it.
  • + 2
 The rear should be stiffer (as is the Trance) thanks to the new link. I don't disagree with your other points though.
  • + 1
 @kevin267: They started putting foam inserts around the cables internally on the newer bikes. No rattle.
  • + 2
 The small is longer 404 vs 424 reach.
  • + 2
 @jclnv: I do agree, that should improve the stiffness. However, where I think I found the most amount of flex was from behind the BB. The link and the connection point and the area around it on the rear triangle is quite spindly. This could be remedied very easily with a carbon rear-end. Also, with boost and the lack of a FD, the link could also be beefed up, (which could be the case) but clearly the marketing department would rather tell us about their PowerCore, OverDrive, and MegaDrive.

@OzarkBike Foam inserts are great and all, but to have it designed into the frame is very doable with Giant's resources and materials, and much easier from a mechanic standpoint. I've reduced the noise on mine through multiple ways, ie zipties, rubber grommets, foam tubes, etc. But having worked on frames with built in routing, both the noise is significantly less than anything else, but also routing the housing isn't a such a chore. In addition, the plugs they use wear out quick, and look like garbage within a short time.

There are some welcome improvements over the last design, the Trunnion and Metric Shock, the one-piece link, lower leverage ratio, and routing for the shock lock-out and what appears to be a Di2 plug. But all of these changes wouldn't warrant going out and buying a new one, when the last design is still so close to this one. Take a look at the alloy bike and compare to last years; it appears they added a link and shock to match, boost, drilled a few extra holes in the frame, and ditched the FD mount. I could see this as a mid-generation release to update, but not after 3 years, as other bikes have been coming out swinging with their latest releases. Instead of putting themselves head-to-head with the competition, they have come out with a bike that should be dated in 2014 (how long have other brands been putting one-piece carbon links on their bikes?). This would be ok, as there are still a lot of brands still playing catch up, but as a bike manufacturing empire, their prices do not reflect the quality you would expect, when compared to Trek, The Big S, and SC, let alone YT and the others. And as far as the reach goes, 2 options: I really feel they could have expanded their sizing beyond 4 frames, and added an XXL. The height of Josh Carlson would explain the need for the increased reach without having to size up and reduce the height of a dropper post you could insert. But gapping from a S~425mm reach to M~460mm, then only L~473mm is absurd. OR I'd be ok with a 460mm reach on a medium but not with a 73 degree seat angle effective, and a ridiculously slack actual. The last gen already felt like you were pedaling from behind the rear wheel.
  • + 8
 They need to Reign in that price. When boutique costs less than industry Giants.
  • + 14
 What boutique bikes are you buying?
  • + 2
 Especially when they spec performance suspension group set for 5600 gs. compare that to last years bike with factory suspension and x2 for 5500 Canadian. Seems legit
  • + 2
 @Clarkeh: On One
  • + 3
 @kanasasa: on one isn't boutique, they are trade catalog and open mould specials.
  • + 4
 @colourclashing: thanks for reminding me my humor is dry AF
  • + 8
 Giant offers good bikes at usually great prices. I wish they made LT 29ers, I'd consider them.
  • + 5
 I recently purchased a 2015 Giant Trance Advanced off another PB user here and to be honest this is my first "big brand" bike purchase and I'm very pleased with it.

The bike is a really solid climber and can descend quite well even compared to my Supreme Operator DH bike which was a big surprise for me.

No complaints here.
  • + 5
 @arrowheadrush
Their Dropper posts are great...easy to install,replacable cartridges and value for money. Plus,great option for those wanting to upgrade their bike(can either run ex -internal)
Just grease the spot under the collar and the mechanism in the frame to keep dirt away. I liked mine...
  • + 4
 I think that Liv Hail is much better bike. The leverage ratio is improved compared to the old Reign. The geometry is much better than the new Reign. 74 seat angle (great for climbing). 66 head tube angle (not so slack). And the reach is perfect for L frame (450mm). So Liv Hail is just MUCH better bike in my opinion. With Reign they made it longer (too long for me), and the seat tube is still slack. Whatever they changed in leverage ration is not important.

I just hope that it will be possible to buy Liv Hail as a frame only option soon.
  • + 1
 It seems they reduced the initial levarage ratio and didn't change the final. So the suspension will be a bit more linear. The main problem with the previous Reign is that I requires very high pressures in the Monarch to achieve a 25% sag.
  • + 1
 @Whipperman: I had the same problem. Changed the monarch plus debonair air can to the standard volume air can. Reduced required pressure from ~320 to 205. Night and day, dude. SO much more support in the mid-stroke.
  • + 9
 Haha that would be great trend, move to the Women's Brand because the Men's Brand overcooked it in terms of long/slack.
  • + 1
 @MSVF: It would be. But if you think about it is the only logical thing to do. Shame that trends are not very logical most of the time.
  • + 3
 The thing is that Hail has to be two bikes in one as LIV has only Pique (which is way too much of an XC bike IMO) and then there is the Hail. There is no Trance equivalent so they eased up a bit on the Hail to make it more of an all rounder.

For me the Reign is a non-compromising racing bike for enduro and occasional bikepark laps and it is just fantastic. If I did not race I might be inclined to go for Trance which is super capable but more all-day one-bike-quiver type of bike. But when you need to just bomb it through rough rock gardens and root infested trails at race pace I would not want Reign to be anything less than it is really.
  • + 2
 @lp130i: Pique SX is the 120/140 bike. So it fits in the middle quite well.
  • + 2
 @MSVF: Done this when buying my last frame. Bought women specific as cheaper (last years), lighter. Just hope my hump of a mans body isn't to heavy.
  • + 3
 I am pretty giant loyal. I have a 2016 rein with a vivid coil and lyriks. I also have a tcr advanced sl roady. But really....who is gonna buy a reign when you can buy a nomad with carbon wheels and free bearings for life for cheaper? ?
  • + 3
 If I'm going to base a buying decision on bearings (seriously?) I would rather have bearings that don't need replacing all the time than "free bearings for life". In the space of the last 3.5 years I have spent $0 on bearings for my trance, while my buddy who rides a Tallboy has spent the same $, but had his bike in the shop 4 times and missed out on some great rides while his were getting replaced.
  • + 3
 The only reason why the new reign is not equipped with 29er wheels is because Giant has yet to complete the necessary research and development in order to design such a bike. Plus, $10 250 CAD for a bike with XO! eagle and RSC brakes, not to mention the house brand dropper, bar, and saddle. The one thing in which Giant had going for them is that you could get a carbon Reign with XX1, Guide Ultimate brakes, and carbon rims for $8000 CAD. With their new top end bike coming in at a price point at over 10K customers will now be comparing it to other top end builds from various brands, Trek Slash, Specialized Enduro, Pivot firebird, Santa Cruz Nomad. With all these top end builds going for pretty much the same price, its all gonna come to ride quality.
  • + 3
 How could the top pivot be placed any lower due to the trunion shock? The shock size increased, the pivot placements most likely stayed the same as in the last generation with the trunnion mount enabling longer shocks to be used. Which is what the Reign desperately needed.

Also, i see 30 mm wide rims specced as standard, like on more and more brands. What size of tires is mounted on the new Reigns? I don't like this trend of ultrawide rims too much :/
  • + 4
 2.5 front, 2.4 rear
  • + 2
 I think Giant has been making good, light, competitively priced bikes for a while now. For frame materials on long travel bikes, however, I'd prefer aluminum. And the "forged" link...I'd sure like to punch the dude in the dick that started calling that "forging".

For longer travel bikes, I'd say get the aluminum one. Get the right (not just any) carbon bars for hand comfort, and carbon wheels if you really need to rail corners....who's with me? Is the demand for a higher spec aluminum bike going to vanish real soon?
  • + 3
 I tried the Reign 2 and the rear suspension and overall feel was similar to Mondraker Summum and Foxy. I liked it and would use it for steep trail riding. After upgrading that silly rock shox rear shock, ofc.
  • + 2
 I gotta say, I love that they specced this bike with a Maxxis Shorty. finally picked one up, and though it has never seen a ounce of mud, i love the tire's performance in dry, loose conditions- it just cuts right through to the hardpack underneath
  • + 2
 @wavetrance
If you got the same frame not once, not twice but four times..why didnt you just ask the Giant Dealer for a credit note instead of the same frame?
Surely that was an option...and any how, there are so many people that do not have a bike insurance(alot of XC riders do)..
All of the major players have a Lifetime Warranty, or at least crash replacement..but if some crashes or incidents are not covered the insurance surely will.
No Frame is indestructible and everyone knows that..Giants Warranty Service is pretty good, not the best but good
  • + 1
 as a Reign owner I can say that the bike is perfect for me. I don't think a longer TT will make it better since the actual TT is very long. I am even thinking on trying a fork with less offset to see if it climb better.
One thing I can say the bike is perfect one of the best I ever had planning to buy the carbon frame and change just that.
All my friend are crazy about my Reign special after the Ohilins shock that was the best upgrade of my life they say to me they love when I put a picture of the bike alone.
A lot of hate here is from jealous riders that dream with a Reign and stay with this crap seat tube angle problem. No bike is perfect no one.
I will suggest you to buy one and don't stay borrow minder about Specialized or Trek... Giant have good prices for the perfect bike it is. There are better bikes? yes but more expensive.
  • + 2
 Reach numbers are getting longer on every new bike release. I used to judge my bike size with one eye on reach dimension. Are these bikes as stretched out as they seem or are other angles changing to compensate?
  • - 1
 Of course they do, because reach (and stack) is a completely useless measurement on a bike that you pedal with. It's the top tube number in conjunction with the seat angle that defines the cockpit length in that case, which is what i've been saying all the time since reach and stack got so popular.

Reach and stack are great for DH bikes, where you don't sit on the saddle much, but are otherwise useless.

So yeah, if you steepen the seat tube angle, the reach number will get much higher even if the TT length stays the same, since you effectively moved the BB backwatrds in relation to the seat and handlebars. Therefore the reach number lengthens.
  • + 6
 @Primoz: Reach is categorically an important measurement on any bike you plan on pointing downhill (so all mountain bikes). That being said reach/stack measurements need to be viewed carefully with the corresponding seat tube angles to insure the seated pedalling length doesn't get out of control. The reason bikes like the Pole and Geometron are even ride-able is due to extremely steep seat angle. You would be surprised and how rideable the bikes are being as long as they are but you do loose maneuverability through tight stuff for the added straightline/high speed stability.
  • + 1
 @RoboDuck: I'm well aware of all this stuff. And as you can read in my previous post, i said reach and stack are great for DH bikes, meaning when going downhill or riding out of the saddle in general, since the handlebars and the pedals are then your only contact with the bike.

But, with any bike that gets pedalled, so anything from an enduro bike all the way down to XC bikes, the actual seat to handlebar relationship is more important (with other measurements as well, as you note) simply due to the time spent in that position.

I don't know about you, but i ride my Reign (so i'm also well aware of how rideable long bikes are, even if not at the extreme) sitting down for 1,5 hours (okay, there are a few out of the saddle pedalling situations, but not many) and standing up, going down, for about 10 to maybe 15 minutes minutes on a normal afternoon loop. The amount of energy used in the sitting down position is even greater compared to the energy used while standing up.

Therefore it is imperative for any bike that gets pedalled to be optimised for this position, regardless of the amount of travel. These bikes are not DH bikes, these bikes get ridden up. And even sacrificing some performance while going down while gaining it going up will be a benefit since you'll be fresher at the top.

Also, i don't see how optimising the cockpit for the ideal pedalling position would damage the downhill aspect of the bike, since you can adjust the chainstay length, headangle and the suspension characteristics independently from the front triangle hardpoints. Yeah, it does affect the wheelbase, but like you said, even absurdly long bikes are still rideable.
  • + 4
 Ignoring stack, reach + stem length + bar width=out-of-saddle fit. This + top tube length = in-saddle fit. The longer the wheelbase, the greater potential for stability at speed in a straight line. Wheelbase can’t be increased without increasing reach unless you make a too-slack head tube angle or increase the rear center, which no matter how happy it would make @jclnv, makes bike more difficult to turn. The demand for longer reach and wider bars necessitates shorter stems, unless rider plans to have her or his spine and arms lengthened, or adopt xc riding position on all-mountain bike. As we approach the limit of rideable length, influencing cornering by weighting handlebar becomes more difficult. Enter the latest refinements of fork rake on long-travel 29s.

Yet at 5’ 11”, Mr. Rude rides at 426mm of reach—maximized by slamming stem—https://www.pinkbike.com/news/richie-rudes-yeti-sb6-bike-check-ews-round-5-aspen-snowmass-2016.html. See also Callahan’s Cube geometry.

On other end of the spectrum, there’s Geometron, with its frequently slammed and downturned saddle and tiny stem. But hey, like a Shonky, it’s rideable. No single dimension overrides, but with one eye on reach, another on top tube, a third on wheelbase, and a fourth on application, desired geometry is attainable.

But to answer your question—this bike is stretched. A size M is about the same as a Large 2018 Nomad—except with a slacker STA because the tire hits your ass without the saddle there to block it? I admit to a shorter geometry preference for general trail riding and that replying to @Norski specifically is opportunistic, but I really don’t understand how this new Reign is supposed to fit.
  • + 1
 @ceecee: Firstly, thanks all for replying, interesting but still a bit confusing. @ceecee I'm also 5ft 11 (same as Richie R but thats the only thing we have in common !!) and my preferred reach is 420-430 range. I like a slightly smaller bike, sized up on the last bike and it was a very expensive mistake. I used to think the new reach sizes were being influenced by the pro's but if one of the best is riding with a short reach maybe not. I genuinely think they will start winding this dimension back a little over the next few years.

Point to note, in road biking where effective TT and Reach was forcing everyday cyclists to flip stems and buy sub 100mm stems the industry released a whole new set of bikes with shorter reach and higher stack for normal weekend cyclists. The same companies make a lot of MTB's as well. Maybe the product range will split (already did at Canyon where the Strive was offered with a pro geometry).
  • + 2
 @ceecee: if i'm understanding correctly, you can increase the length of your "out-of-saddle fit" by lowering the stem on the steerer tube? is this because, when in the attack position, your arms would have to reach further down (and slightly further out because the stem is sliding both down and forward when lowering it on the steerer) to hold onto the bars now?
  • + 2
 @xeren: That would make sense, the way you described it.
  • + 2
 @xeren: Yes. Or stem angle can be changed. Here's a calculator: yojimg.net/bike/web_tools/stem.php. Increase via lowering may put noticeably more weight on your hands, and make angle at hips/waist more acute. Revisiting this after Transition's publishing of SBG geos, I am still struck by Giant's decision not to maintain comparable top tube lengths by increasing STAs. It would be nice if reviewers had a paragraph on fit in each review, reminding us of their dimensions and the bike size selected for test, which would include stem length.
  • + 1
 @ceecee: awesome, thank you for that tool! i'm trying to lengthen my out of saddle fit on an older giant, to keep it running longer. riding these newer bikes has made me realize just how much better they are with longer reach, and i'm trying to avoid putting a 90mm stem on the bike Smile

but yeah, giant has gone crazy. the reach on a medium is 460mm, 10mm more than even the new kona process line, which is known of course for having long reaches. and not having a steeper STA to offset that makes absolutely no sense to me
  • + 2
 @xeren: No problem. Though I bet you'd learn something if you put the 90mm on there, briefly. Fork may need to be firmed up a couple psi....
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer it would be great if and the rest of the bike review and marketing people would include "seat post insertion depth" in geometry and review charts, it is very relevant and glossed over topic that should be standard.
  • + 0
 The seat angle didn't work for me, I tried a small and a medium, the small fit me better (5'8" 30" inseam) I believe it had a 100mm dropper, with it all the way down and the post as far in as it would go (just slightly too low for me extended) the seat was still really in the way, but there was no room left in the seat tube for a longer dropper
  • + 1
 Il just keep smashing on my 16' thanks and spend some € on upgrades and new parts! New bikes are nice n'all but I'm still getting to know mine and the current machines true limits. #happysmashysmashy
  • + 2
 Bike looks awesome..great job Giant. Ticked all the right boxes without over-shooting. Can't wait for mine to Show up in 2 weeks
  • + 4
 Doesn't look much different to my Custom 2014 Trance 2 27.5
  • - 2
 Agreed. So boring.
  • + 1
 In the end (next year around), giant engineers will "find" that 29ers front wheel is THE SOLUTION...then a full 29er bike will come the next year (and G.Minnaar will drive it to prove them right)...open your ears !!!!
  • + 4
 Missing the ball on that seat tube angle...
  • + 4
 The photoshop job in the first pic... haha
  • + 3
 Yawn. Again thousands of dollars for a half carbon bike. I just dont get it.
  • + 3
 Where does this "advanced" moniker come from? Does that mean that my Reign is retarded?
  • + 2
 Lol. Awesome
  • + 1
 You are not probably that "advanced" to realized this is the front triangle carbon/composite version..
  • + 1
 @danielfox: boy is my finger not on the pulse...
  • + 2
 I'm a Giant fanboy but those weird graphics on the 18 Reigns and Propels make them look cheap
  • + 2
 To me.... Giant feels like Subaru was pre-2010. Great machine, horrible aesthetic.
  • + 2
 Subarus are still ugly as sin. To each their own I guess.
  • - 1
 I feel like they made a mistake not introducing a 29 reign... remember when giant was saying that eventually XC racing would be dominated by 650b? Well, they changed that around pretty quick; now giants XC lineup is all 29. The same thing is going to happen with their Enduro lineup, at least with some models.
  • + 2
 Thanks Giant for constantly having the best builds vs prices in the business. These look awesome, cant wait to try one.
  • + 1
 Glad I have got a 2017 Reign. The reason why I liked the Reign is because it is not too long...and there they have gone and changed it.
  • + 0
 73° seat angle, Giant appears to be quite conservative, no risk taken but not leading the pack either.

Also it's got maxxis tires instead of the usual schwalbe, and maxxis ditched the yellow color for the occasion.
  • + 7
 OEM Maxxis have white labels.
  • + 1
 @iamamodel: Ok, that's looks nicer IMO, more neutral. Not that it matters much for riding quality^^
  • + 2
 @Will-narayan: It matters a lot. "If it looks good, it rides good" Smile
  • + 1
 The 2015 Reign 1 was also specced with Maxxis rubber (Minion on the front, HR2 in the rear, both 2,3 and 3C). And they also came with white labels.
  • + 2
 with a parts spec that includes a Fox 35 Performance Elite fork, a DPX2 shock, and a SRAM GX Eagle. Damn.
  • + 1
 I think they need something between the reign 2 and 1... something that is still fairly affordable but has better than bottom of the range specs
  • + 3
 hope they bring the sx to Australia
  • + 2
 I doubt it, would cannibalize many Glory sales.
  • + 1
 Damn, look at that cocksucker!! Thing is beautiful. I would be eyeing that very closely for when its new bike time! Good job Giant!
  • + 0
 @wavetrance
You could practically put your comment in every bike review here at Pinkbike.
Allow me...
Hope(insert every major bike brand here) have fixed their cracking frame issues
  • + 0
 The main problem being that giant replaces the owners frames with another frame with the same problem not once, not twice but three times and one owners four times, I mean come on. its hard to reassure our customer confidence when this is reacuring. I just wish they would admit there is a problem to make our jobs easier
  • + 2
 I have a 2016 Reign in XL, and I don't think this bike needs to be any longer.
  • + 1
 Giant is one of my favorites. Great bikes and builds for totally respectable prices. You can talk all the shit you want, but if you hate on this bike you haven't ridden it.
  • - 1
 So they did nothing to help its uphill performance? Because that thing pedaled like shit before, so it could only be worse now. I get that it's basically a mini DH bike but there are other similar bikes that at least pedal well. Not to mention the amount of pedal bob that maestro suspension has, I remember watching it use half the shock stroke even at 20% sag and locked out haha
  • + 2
 TBH the current gen (first 27.5 version) pedals WAAAAAAY better than a 2008 Commencal Meta 5.5 did. Which was quite a shocker.

Also, i hardly ever use the compression adjust on both ends, mainly only on tarmac ascents, if i get to pedal out of the sadle. And comparing it to a Slash last year, i couldn't believe how much that thing bobbed. With it closed it bobbed more than my Reign did open in the rear. And i doubt it was to do with shock settings on the Trek too.
  • + 1
 I think it falls well in their lineup. If you're looking for some downhill performance without giving up on climbing, the trance does that EXCEEDINGLY well.. If you're more of a bike park, rugged descent guy who simply climbs out of necessity... This is the ticket.
  • + 1
 @JC9won4: that's the thing though, it would've been so easy to make the reign climb better regardless of its position in the lineup. Especially as a race weapon, easier climbing ability can only aid in overall endurance throughout a whole race course.
  • + 1
 @andnyleswillriot: I wont pretend I know enough about suspension kinematics to form an opinion on whether they could have made it a better climber without sacrificing downhill performance
  • + 1
 @andnyleswillriot: I never notice much pedal bob on my reign.. I find it pedals uphill better than my stumpy did. The only thing I would change is the pike. It's fine on typical mountain trails but it really shows it's limitations on real downhill trails and even on fast flow trails.
  • + 4
 It's strange you say that, I found my Reign pedalled amazingly well, shock fully open. The only issues I had was lateral flex in the rear end and the rear was far to linear (volume reduces helped this).
  • + 1
 Happy my ten-ride-old 2017 Reign Advanced 1 ain't too outdated! Still got three years to pay on 'er!!
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer, do you mind telling me how tall you are and which frame size you were riding?
  • + 2
 I'm 5'11" and I was riding a size large.
  • + 1
 As we have finally settled for a 65HA now the keyboard experts are screaming and complaining about the 73SA.
  • + 0
 Giant has been rocking some similar designs for ages now. It really looks similar to my '08 Reign I rode way back. My '08 was a great bike tho.
  • + 1
 OMG forged carbon fiber..........
What?
Melt forged or cold forged im so confused.
  • + 2
 a remote lockout on a coil shock is super weird.
  • + 2
 Now with Boost spacing front and rear! 1.5 cm moar length! Take my money!
  • + 0
 Is there a real engineering reason for that beer belly in the downtube or it's just for nostalgic reason of their glory bikes?
  • + 1
 Water bottle mount I would guess
  • + 1
 @Whipperman: the old trance don't have that bent downtube and yet still have bottle cahe mount.
  • + 3
 @Zuman: But did it have piggyback shocks fitted as standard?
  • + 1
 73 degree seat angle is plenty steep enough. Slide your saddle forward a cm or two to get an steeper effective.
  • + 1
 Why does the Reign Advanced 0 come specced with a 160mm Lyrik, wherease the rest of the range sport 170mm forks?
  • + 6
 Just the Reign SX has a 170mm fork stock.
  • + 1
 sexy looking bike.. i want
  • + 1
 Saw it live... thats going to be my new bike for next season!!!
  • + 2
 lol
  • + 1
 No Fox X2 this round? DPX2 deemed superior?
  • + 0
 weights ? or, so long as you have forged carbon and a nice paint job its not important
  • + 1
 M'y reign sx 2017 'i'm love it !
  • + 1
 Hope giant have fixed their cracking frame issues
  • + 0
 Good Lord. I would really hope for a lot more than the currently available build kit is for 8200 dollars.
  • + 1
 Is a 170mm/160mm freeride or enduro?
  • + 2
 Lockout means enduro but coil and 170mm is MORE than enduro it must be SUPER ENDURO!!!!! We need more market segmentation!!!
  • - 3
 Anecdotally, nobody pays MSRP for bikes (in fact everyone else pays less than you paid because you got ripped off) and Giant's seem to go further below MSRP than anyone elses bike.

8200$ is a lot of coin for a half carbon bike. The value isn't there with these.

Giant as a brand, despite building bikes for the world has a brand a step below the other big companies. Adjusting for that you would expect a much better build and a much lower price. They are closer to Motobecane than Santa Cruz.

Glad to see them being at the forefront of geometry trends. You would think that because they build everyone elses bikes they would be on top of things.
  • + 4
 "They are closer to Motobecane than Santa Cruz"

ha, that's a bunch of garbage. only someone tricked by all of santa Cruz's marketing would believe that
  • - 2
 @xeren: I didn't say anything about the quality of the bikes. It is undeniable that as a brand, Santa Cruz is the high end bike for dentists and lawyers and Giants are ridden by people who's local shop couldn't get a Trek or Specialized franchise and/or the kind of people who buy store brand cereal instead of Frosted Flakes.

Marketing or not, I have yet to meet anyone on a Giant who acts like the Apple Fanbois 98% of Santa Cruz riders are.
  • + 3
 @wibblywobbly: fair enough- i maybe would have said "the perception of giant is closer to motobecane than santa cruz".

of course (as it sounds like you know) giant's bikes are as good as, if not better than santa cruz, but SC spends a bunch of money on marketing and cool paint jobs, so they get a lot of people who like pretty colors buying their bikes and thinking they are somehow better than a giant
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer Those are some very Italian looking glasses you have Smile
  • + 4
 I wanted to fit in with the locals, but wasn't quite ready to take up smoking, so I settled on some super-Euro glasses.
  • + 1
 So what is the new shock size????
  • + 2
 205 x 62.5mm
  • - 1
 Sounds like carbon particleboard to me Smile No thanks I'll stick to aluminum I still pass those guys on the climbs anyways Wink
  • - 1
 Still the same crappy design where you can't run a long dropper post and an aluminum rear triangle. Lame.
  • + 2
 They lowered the seattube rocker pivot with the new trunnion mount. So a post can go down in the tube further. I believe it says that in the article? If not I read it on Giant release.
  • + 2
 @OzarkBike: Found this on vitalmtb: The S and M sizes feature a 125mm travel version, whilst L and XL get 150mm
  • + 1
 I have 2015 Reign M size and run 150mm seatpost. Seems that with new frame design seatpost clearance will be allright. Another thing that actual vertical drop is smaller due to slacker SA. That's why 150 dropper feels like 125 on my old 2008 one.
  • + 1
 Bike is BIG
  • - 1
 Soooo what the hell is a trunnion mount? Type of mounting that is different to "normal", how?
  • - 1
 Damn! first comment :o now i know what i want for Christmas 3
  • + 0
 Ibis color scheme
  • - 3
 Why Pinkbike articles about new bikes suck big times in last few months? Take a look at Vital, more info, less "rides sweet" etc bs.
  • + 4
 @pegie, I dunno, the new Vital review of this bike calls it longer, lower, and slacker, which is 2/3 wrong. I'm all for "more info," but not if it's just made up.
  • + 0
 8000$ for Giant? C'mon.
  • + 11
 So its ok for trek, specialized and many other brands but not giant? Lol if you dont like the price buy the 3000 aluminum version but im guessing you arent even in the market for a new bike and just needed to whine about something!!!
  • - 1
 Yeah,8200 and according to Mike,they practically giving them away for free at that price.That guy must be loaded. Still very nice looking bike.
  • + 2
 @mhoshal: You're totally right about that,it's all the same but making it sound like 8200 is at the low side of the spectrum,wow.What would he suggest,c'mon guys,that bike is way to cheap.Add another 3000.
  • + 3
 I hope you realize giant manufactures an incredible amount of other companies bikes and small parts.

No doubt what you consider "boutique" frame, bars, etc are often built by giant
  • + 0
 And it's stuff like this that has me looking at downsizing my bike inventory & getting a dirtbike.
  • + 3
 @NoskillNotalent: did any of you f*ckers read the article? Mike was saying basically the opposite of that
  • + 1
 @nyhc00: trust me i have a dirtbike too and you cant ride anywhere with them like you can a mtb. I get way more use outta my reign then my honda
  • + 2
 It's the Sram Eagle that drives the price up. Shame really, they used to offer the advanced 1 with a shimano group for us that prefer shimano. Now i'll be looking into a frame only or be trying to sell some un-used eagle day 1.
  • + 3
 @WolfStoneD: I agree! I bought a 2017 Trance Advance 1 which came with Fox Factory suspension and Shimano XT brakes and drivetrain. The rear cassette is even 11-46. I am soo happy with it. And thankful to have gotten one. The 2018 Trance Advance also does away with the XT group.
  • - 1
 @mhoshal: because Giant isn't for example Intense?
  • + 2
 @Pauiko: i know, Intense is a shitty brand sold by MEC in Canada. Id never purchase a bike from a big box store!!! If Intense was so good they wouldnt need to sell their bikes for half price every month!!!
  • + 2
 @mhoshal: I see what you're saying but a dirtbike would be in addition to my mtb's not a replacement. Fortunately there are plenty of legal places for me to ride where I live in New England.
  • + 1
 @nyhc00: must be nice man its hard to find spots to ride up here unless i go way up north or sit and ride some ten minute trails around my place which gets boring after you've ridden it a thousand times lol
  • + 1
 @Pauiko: sounds like someone fell for the marketing!
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