Interview: Will Montague, Guerrilla Gravity

Feb 22, 2017 at 13:30
by Mike Kazimer  
Guerrilla Gravity

Quick, name five companies manufacturing full-suspension mountain bikes in the United States.... It's not that easy to do, is it? There was a time when the US was flush with small operations welding up bikes in garages and warehouses across the country, but as the sport grew many of those welders hung up their torches, unable to compete when larger companies began manufacturing bikes overseas.

That's not so say there isn't still a vibrant handbuilt bicycle scene; it's just that the remaining companies tend to be focused on creating higher-end, custom creations. Guerrilla Gravity is an exception to that rule, producing a line of Made-in-USA bikes that aren't exorbitantly priced, and don't require putting your name on a five-year waiting list in order to obtain one.

Based in Denver, Colorado, Guerrilla Gravity are entering their fourth year of production, with a five-bike lineup that runs the gamut from a steel hardtail to the GG/DH, the downhill machine that helped get the company up and running. From the beginning, the company has always positioned themselves as an “everyman bike company,” targeting their products at hard-charging riders looking for a durable bike, rather than producing exotic carbon creations designed to empty the pockets of doctors and dentists.

While their lineup has expanded, Guerrilla Gravity is still a lean operation, with only six full-time employees. One welder produces approximately 40 frames per month, joining tubes in the back of the single-level, brick building that also serves as the company's headquarters and showroom. It may be a small company now, but Will Montague, the company's 31-year-old president, has ambitious goals - only time will tell how much growth lies ahead.

Guerrilla Gravity
It's a fairly bare bones setup, but inside this room there's everything necessary to weld up and prep an aluminum full-suspension frame.



Interview: Will Montague, Guerrilla Gravity President


Guerrilla Gravity has doubled production every year – do you have an end goal? How large would you like to see the company get?

As an end goal, I guess getting sued by one of the big three would signify we've really made an impact, haha. In all seriousness, we do have lofty ambitions and want to keep building on what we've started. One reason we offer the level of customization options we do is because we want everyone to ride a Guerrilla Gravity bike, but also be able to ride their own unique GG bike. For now it's one foot in front of the other, marching towards making that a reality.


What has been the most challenging part of starting a bike company from the ground up?

Getting our manufacturing to the level of efficiency we want with the limited capital we've had. We started from scratch: we designed our own tooling, systematized the workflow, purchased our machines, and sourced our suppliers - all on a shoestring budget. It was definitely the hard way compared to vetting a factory in Asia, which admittedly has its own challenges. But it's also allowed us to remain very lean (requiring less working capital), offer riders customization options, design our frames with manufacturing efficiencies in mind, and have a quick time-to-market. 2016 was our break-even year for us being able to produce our frames for comparative Asian prices, all costs considered. Our goal is to build a business case for manufacturing domestically, not just fly the 'Merican-made flag solely for marketing purposes. 


What's been the most rewarding part of running a bike company? Has the process been what you had expected?

Seeing our approach resonate with the riders is the most rewarding aspect. We're able to look at the industry, see another way, and make changes in that direction. From our manufacturing, to our bikes, to our customer service, to our community involvement, we want to change how people interact with their bike manufacturer. 

When starting a business, it's always advisable to temper expectations as much as possible, but I would say the process of breaking into the industry has been a bit more tedious than expected. I think people are leery of new companies in the industry because it's an easy one to launch the next latest-and-greatest doodad in, but getting market penetration beyond that step is very difficult. There is a lot of marketing noise.


Guerrilla Gravity
Guerrilla Gravity allows their customers a high degree of control over the look and spec of their bike, whether that's the frame color, suspension, or even tire choice.


Whenever a company's lineup consists completely of aluminum-framed bikes, the inevitable question that comes up is, “Will you be making a carbon fiber frame?” So, will you? 

To be certain, we do have one steel frame in the lineup, the Pedälhead is made from SmashMoly steel, a custom tubeset we had made to maximize ride qualities. However, our aluminum, full-suspension trail frames go head-to-head with carbon-frame bikes all the time. Sometimes people get hung up on frame materials and can't see the forest for the trees. Our advice is to evaluate the bikes based on ride qualities. The Trail Pistol, SS, and Megatrail are all very stiff frames usually within a 1/2 pound (or sometimes the same weight) of carbon competitors, but without the impact fragility. We have experience with carbon fiber manufacturing in the aerospace industry, so it's not an unfamiliar material, but we do not feel comfortable with the level of consistency and durability to use it in a mountain bike frame. To answer your question directly, never say never, but riders shouldn't hold their breath for anything in the pipeline.


To follow that up, given the level of proficiency of the factories in China and Taiwan, do you think it's possible to make a reasonably-priced carbon frame in the United States?

Not with current technology.


Inside Guerrilla Gravity
The Trail Pistol is the latest addition to the lineup, with 120mm of rear travel, a 66.6-degree head angle, and the ability to run 27.5+ or 29" wheels.


Bikes have grown increasingly long and slack over the last few years, and Guerilla Gravity's offerings are no exception. Do you think the limit has been reached? With a reach of 465mm on your medium frames, how much further can that number be pushed?

Our goal is to make mountain biking more awesome, which means geometry gets improved as the sport moves forward. Looking back a few years, we felt the bikes would be more awesome if they were longer, so the first generation Megatrail turned out to be longer than most when it debuted. On the latest designs, our riders and us at GG felt the bikes would be more awesome if the actual seat tube angle was steeper, along with shorter chainstays, so that's what we did. The butt-to-hand cockpit lengths on the latest bikes have not actually increased in length and the head tube angles didn't get more slack, albeit the reach number itself lengthened due to how the measurement is taken. Looking solely at the reach number does not tell the whole story of how a bike rides, hence why it may seem that our most recent bikes seem long in the cockpit. So, we aren't in a race to the longest and slackest, it's a continual refinement, which resulted in going longer and slacker several years ago, and now we're on to the next area.  


Are there other aspects to the geometry equation that you think have room for improvement?

Yes, the slack actual seat tube angles, even with a steep effective seat tube angle. Climbing with the saddle far back is sub-optimal, and the cockpit length change when lowering the saddle is unnatural. When powering up a steep climb, the last thing you want is to be hanging over the rear axle with the front end wandering and lifting easily. Second, on rolling terrain when the saddle is a little lower than full climbing height, it gets annoying when the cockpit length changes noticeably along with the saddle height. All of the current GG trail bikes (Pedälhead, Trail Pistol, SS, and Megatrail) now have steep actual seat tube angles.


Guerrilla Gravity
From hardtails to DH bikes, Guerrilla Gravity's current array of options has most of the bases covered.


www.ridegg.com



MENTIONS: @GuerrillaGravity



Author Info:
mikekazimer avatar

Member since Feb 1, 2009
1,710 articles

166 Comments
  • 46 3
 American made full suspension brands: Alchemy (carbon), Guerrilla Gravity, Durango Bike Co., Foes, Reeb, Lynskey (Titanium), Lenz Sport and Ventana!
Also I believe that all Devinci's aluminum frames are still produced in Quebec. So +1 for Canada.
  • 55 9
 You left out the biggest one! Intense Aluminum Intense frames are made in cali.
  • 19 2
 Turner looks like its going under but their aluminum frames as well
  • 17 0
 Don't forget about lichen and spooky!
  • 9 36
flag potthead (Mar 9, 2017 at 4:03) (Below Threshold)
 All of treks carbon frames are produced in Michigan if I remember correctly.
  • 11 0
 @schofell84: honestly I had assumed intense had outsourced by now. Glad to be proven wrong. I had also though Turner had outsourced. They always seem to be about to fold, and always make nice bikes but i never see people riding them...
  • 2 0
 @instigator: I forgot Lichen! They sold me a rad 26" fork from one of their demo bikes!
  • 2 1
 Is Ventana still around? I'd like to rebuild one of their old bikes a guy is selling locally for the wifey. Customer support from mom and pop shops is top notch.
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: Intense still does the full aluminum builds but also has the carbon bikes painted down the road in Cali so while they're not doing it themselves its still locally done.
  • 3 0
 @potthead: not all of them only the project ones so you gotta spend some serious cash to get a us made trek frame.
  • 6 0
 @potthead: WISCONSIN!!! Smile aaaaaaand only the really high end ones.
  • 8 0
 Isn't Alchemy front triangle only in the US?
  • 3 0
 @roflbox: correct
  • 2 0
 @schofell84: No more ALU frames for sale from Turner, sadly. The line up is all carbon now.
  • 1 0
 @potthead: Just the higher grade carbon ones. Cheaper carbon bikes are still made overseas. *Didn't realize people already responded
  • 6 2
 He is wrong about not being able to competitively produce carbon frames in the US based on technology. 100% incorrect. You can go toe to toe with them.

Check out We Are One Composites from Kamloops in the next couple of months.
  • 2 0
 Turner?
  • 15 0
 @schofell84: Intense no longer makes aluminum frames in CA as of last year... They just didn't bother to mention that...
  • 1 0
 @potthead: That's Wisconsin, and no, that is incorrect.
  • 5 0
 Ventana lives..
  • 2 0
 @potthead: no, only the session 9.9
  • 1 0
 @JayTucc: their carbon frames are made in taiwan or china though
  • 1 1
 @fercho25: no the project one bikes are all made in taiwan or china
  • 1 0
 And Trek doesn't manufacture all the high end carbon frames here. Only specific ones like the Session, Speed Concept, Madone, and Emonda I believe. It isn't a quality-control thing so much as part of the process requires their oversight.
  • 4 0
 moots, eriksen, black sheep?
  • 1 0
 @Duncan1104: reference please
  • 3 0
 @schofell84: More than still around! They build bikes for Spooky, Lil Shredder and Squid to name a few, plus they are still making Ventana. Sherwood and crew are still kicking and making bad ass bikes.
  • 1 0
 @schofell84: I know Turner stopped aluminum production via Zen, but didn't know the entire shop was closing.
  • 1 0
 @schofell84: No they are not!! Not anymore, its been a few years since that changed.
  • 4 0
 @bikewriter: Since when is Turner closing? They're a small shop, probably don't have the budget to advertise like crazy, so they're under the radar. Maybe PB shows a fellow West Coast shop some love and requests a new Flux to review?
  • 2 5
 @bikewriter: it was an assumption- the website is down, they aren't making bikes here anymore and just order carbon from tiawan. Doesn't look good or sound like much of a business plan.
  • 3 1
 @schofell84: Yes, Ventana is alive and kicking! They are local to me here in California. Reach out to Sherwood for that bike rebuild.
  • 9 3
 @schofell84: The website is still up (www.turnerbikes.com), and they still make bikes. You obviously don't know shit, otherwise you'd know that they don't "just order" bikes from Taiwan, but design them and have them built to their spec, just like every other bike company that makes carbon bikes. I guess the other guys don't have much of a business plan either? They happen to make excellent bikes, better than most of the bigger players in the game.
  • 3 0
 @schofell84: I'm pretty sure Intense moved Al mfg offshore recently.
  • 1 0
 @schofell84: Not anymore.....
  • 2 7
flag schofell84 (Mar 9, 2017 at 12:05) (Below Threshold)
 @SlodownU: so designing a bike means you make it?? Chill out.

PS. I fail to see how they fill any gap in the marketplace. Performance, value, service, anything. The only reason I own one is it was made in the USA.
  • 4 0
 @schofell84: nope! Intense is making all aluminum frames in the good old republic of China starting mid 2016.
  • 1 0
 @WayneParsons: Cool! Tried to find a website and some more info on your rims - keep me posted!
  • 1 0
 @bikewriter: Turner was Zen's cash cow. Without them Zen closed about a year ago, sadly. Turner is still around, though only with the carbon line. It's a small company selling a boutique product so they don't need massive sales to stay afloat.
  • 7 1
 @schofell84: Turner never "made" bikes. They've always outsourced the frame building, it just so happens no one wanted to buy Al USA built bikes anymore, so Dave started doing the same thing everyone else did. Carbon made overseas. In fact Dave was holding out that people wanted to buy US built frames and got bit by it.

As far as the performance, value, service..etc.....read the reviews on the RFX and CZAR is you think they don't perform, the pricing is in line with the other companies they complete with, service as always been great for me(Ventana is also grade A in the category).

Everyone that's in business has a spot they fit into, and Dave had his. He's never wanted to Intense or Santa Cruz so he never tried to become them. They've always been a really small operation, even back in the day when DHRs were everywhere.
  • 6 1
 @schofell84: I'm chill, except for spreading rumors because you don't know how to type in a website address in the search bar.

As far as filling gaps, what bike company out there is filling a gap? Its all about choices Turner, like GG, are a small company that builds a quality product. A good suspension design, durable bike the works really well, no BS. The guys there all actively ride, like GG. I'd rather buy from a rider-owned company vs. the big boys.
  • 6 1
 @SlodownU: i always find the rider owned company thing funny. I have to imagine the CEO of specialized or trek rides. every bike company is probably rider owned (i would love an exmple of a non rider owned company)
  • 3 0
 @schofell84: Naw, Turner aint going to fold...They just fly under the radar and thats the way they've always been...and they have their own group of loyal followers.

FYI Turner is looking to bring back aluminum and will be more competitively priced.

For what its worth I see more people on Turners then Guerilla Gravity but they are both pretty small and boutique. Probably just depends on where you live.
  • 2 0
 @schofell84: I don't have any written proof, but I was speaking with one of their demo van drivers about it last year and she said that production in their California facility had stopped... and that was last April I want to say.
  • 2 0
 @SlodownU: Yep. The Turner Czar is regarded as one of the best 29er XC/marathon bikes available. Slap a 120mm Pike on and it turns into a fantastic pedaling "trail" bike. Laterally super stiff, gobs of rear tire clearance and of course the awesome DW Link.
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13
Lenz and Foes,
Then Ventana,
Anything else is a couple of steps below and just a copycat.
  • 2 0
 @adrennan: I can't speak for Trek or Specialized, but call up Turner and there's a good chance Dave will answer the phone. When was the last time Sinyard answered one of your calls? I would imagine GG has that same type of accessibility. Turner have a pump track in their yard, all the guys ride, Dave participates in Nica, goes on MTB camping trips with his family, all the shit we do. The GG guys sound like they're cut from the same cloth. I'd rather buy my bike and support people like that vs. a bunch of dudes selling over-priced bikes because of the name on the down tube.
  • 1 0
 @schofell84: *ellsworth. Lmao
  • 1 2
 @SlodownU: Listen Einstein, The web page was toast a few weeks ago when I tried to look up a part. Get bent.

The gap? There is a bike out there that beats turner in price, value, performance, etc. I own one that I really enjoy, but I dont see a niche that Turner is filling right now. Maybe the FS fat bike? Doesnt sound like it will keep a company afloat to me. Carry on with the trolling though.
  • 2 1
 @schofell84: None of their new aluminum frames say "Made in the USA" anymore, there's your proof, dumbass.
  • 1 0
 @schofell84: Yes, Intense.
  • 1 1
 I think Canfield too, although they're more of a frame Co than a bike Co. I read somewhere that this may be changing this year or next though - that they may start offering complete custom bikes much the way GG does.
  • 2 0
 @NateForrest: canfields are made over seas. i love mine.
  • 2 0
 @NateForrest: and they currently offer completes
  • 1 1
 @SlodownU: simmer down tough guy.
  • 1 0
 @pigit77: does Ellsworth even make aluminum bikes anymore?
  • 1 0
 Foes
  • 1 0
 @adrennan: Nice - I'm happy to have been wrong about that.
  • 2 0
 @WayneParsons: dead wrong? Except that it doesn't actually exist For the next couple months
  • 1 1
 @mbxmikey: it exists. You have no idea.
  • 1 0
 Also, Alchemy's only makes carbon front triangles in the U.S. not the rear triangle
  • 43 1
 "As an end goal, I guess getting sued by one of the big three would signify we've really made an impact, haha."

#champion
  • 1 0
 I actually wonder which company sued them
  • 5 0
 @kev1n: None yet.
  • 8 0
 @kev1n: I'm sure it's a company that Specializes in the art of lawyer douchbaggery. Now which company could that be? Hmmm.
  • 18 0
 Excellent prose on the GG DH on their website:
"The enclosed rear triangle provides snappy cornering and rails lines better than John Belushi."
  • 9 0
 HAHA sick. I like this company. I member their last PB Presser - the haters were out in force. Looks like they have weathered that and I wish them all the success they deserve.
  • 9 0
 @endlessblockades: Thanks. In the grand scheme of hurdles to jump over while starting a manufacturing company from scratch, and running a business without a trust fund parachute, I'd say dealing with keyboard warriors is fairly low on the list of challenges. Smile
  • 19 0
 yay for bikes
  • 15 0
 looks awesome! I wish you guys at Guerrilla Gravity a lot of succes!
  • 11 0
 I'm torn between a Smuggler and a Trail Pistol. I think it may be the Pistol in the raw!
  • 7 0
 This new generation of short travel, slack 29ers with short chainstays is freakin' incredible.
  • 5 0
 I tried out a trail pistol at a demo event very recently. That bike is amazing, for a tail bike I would highly recommend it.
  • 3 0
 @gryphonics: agreed. I am setting PRs both up and down on this bike. I'm so suprised, and so pleased with it, it's incredible! Billing it as just a trail bike is almost selling it short- it hangs with the full on enduro rigs going down.
  • 3 0
 @benthandlebars: Braap, that's awesome! I use my Trail Pistol for racing enduro....
  • 1 0
 I rode both in Sedona last weekend. They're both great and both work really well, I just thought that the GG worked better for me. Another aspect of the Transition which may be a positive or negative depending on your intentions (frame up or complete) is that the Smuggler still uses 100 and 142 hub spacing - could be a benefit if you want to resuse your wheels in that spacing, but buying wheels now for that may result in limited use for them in the future. Also, while nobody with Transition would confirm it out loud, I developed a strong suspicion that the Smuggler is going to become available in the near(ish) future in Carbon and with boost spacing like their Patrol & Scout did. As such, I might hesitate to buy a bike on the verge of a major update unless you can get it for a deal, but that's just me.
  • 9 0
 Great company! They produce nice frames and first time I stopped in the store they gave me a tour of their workshop. Pretty cool to see the frames being welded,all the equipment it takes to build dope bikes.
  • 11 0
 The American Nicolai? Lets hope so.
  • 6 0
 I don't think they have quite the same level of mad science going as Nicolai do. But then I don't think anyone can be quite as crazy as Karl 'still got the jigs and tooling for every bike I ever made' Nicolai.
  • 4 0
 @Fix-the-Spade: Good point, altho I was more referring to the fact that they are made in house, bespoke, high quality, aluminium and reasonably priced.
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: Fair enough. I certainly hope GG continue to enjoy success and make sweet bikes.
  • 10 0
 It's incredible that they broke even just after 4 years in the business.

Good luck Guerrilla Gravity Smile
  • 7 0
 In the search for my next bike, I've ridden pretty much everything in the category (FS 29er w. +/- 130 travel) that I could get my hands on and while some of them were good, none were great, until I rode the Trail Pistol in Sedona last weekend.
I'm completely in love. In addition to riding great (it just did everything I asked it to do and did it well - climbs, faster DH sections, jumps, drops, etc.), it checks a lot of other boxes for me - made in the USA, holds a water bottle in the front triangle, has a dedicated spot to strap on my tire changing crap, and offers mass customization.
That last point is an important one for me - I kept looking at the drivetrains, brakes, seatposts, etc. that were on the bikes I was demoing and none of them were exactly what I wanted until I saw the options on the GG site - I can get exactly what I want and at a pretty reasonable cost.
Anyway, my search is over - I called up the shop the day after I got back from Sedona, talked to Allison, and ordered my own. Should be here in a couple of weeks and I could not be more excited.
  • 6 0
 Super nice folks over at Guerilla Gravity. Managed to grab a few hot laps on the Trail Pistol at the Sedona MTB Festival flow trails with a few of the employees. The guys can definitely ride and the Trail Pistol felt great off the small gaps and tables! Would happily support the GG crew with a frame purchase for my next build.
  • 6 0
 I visited Denver last week for the 1st hopped on google and found theese guys. After some more googling I decided it would be worth the 15 min drive so check it and holy shit was it worth it!! Walked into this warehouse style Front show room and saw theese dope looking ALU bikes sitting on the floor. This awesome chick (sorry I can't remember your name) showed me the bikes and talked for a while about it telling me pricing and build kits ect. Got a lilttle behind the scenes tour and was blown away how much a small group of people could produce some amazing looking frames. So glad to see a small murican made company doing its thing! My next frame will for sure be a GG one!
  • 4 0
 That was Allison in the showroom. And, it's rad you stopped by!
  • 9 0
 i hope to own one of their frames
  • 7 0
 I like what I see with this GG. Small operation , making nice looking AL framed bikes , built in the US with a reasonable pricetag. They appear to be a model bike company.
  • 5 0
 I can't say enough good things about this company. They are making bikes for the everyday rider who wants an aggressive, proper functioning, and reliable bike. I suggest visiting their shop. It's pretty awesome to be able to check out where your bike is being designed and built while also being able to ask questions to the actual designer and builder. Grab a demo bike and see for yourself.
  • 5 0
 Just rode with Will and demoed the megatrail and trail pistol --- megatrail was no joke and climbed well too, trail pistol was a great all around bike-- Will was a class act and the bikes are beautiful and ride great---selling my Hightower and ordering a trail pistol????????????????
  • 5 0
 great bikes, especially the gg dh - which is probably the best (non linkage) singlepivot on the market. i just wish they made a smaller non linkage brother, although the new megatrail is also quite a machine
  • 8 0
 Best bike buying experience I've ever had. GG is a class act.
  • 5 0
 The Pistol absolutely rips! No need to fuss with a climb switch, it felt almost like a hard tail climbing with 25% sag, and really rails at speed. Do more with Less (travel).
  • 7 0
 That hardtail looks like fun
  • 3 0
 I bought a Pedalhead straight through GG a few months back,since they basically produced my dream frame. They were super awesome to deal with,happy to answer any questions,and provided a killer frame that fits and rides like a dream. I hope they stick around making rad frames for a very long time!
  • 4 0
 I love my MegaTrail, I've had it over a year and use it for everything. I've taken it to the bike park at Whistler and is one of the most fun bikes I have ever ridden. I just smile every time I ride it.
  • 3 0
 Bottom line this company is awesome Will, Matt and the rest of the crew over at GG do an awesome job... when I bought my megatrail the helped me every step of the way I was able to literally choose every component as well as the color(Denver Broncos orange). For me it was a huge selling point that I could shake the hand of the guy who welded my frame. It's pretty much the same reason I ride Neversummer snowboards, can't wait to see where this company is in 10 years keep kicking ass GG
  • 3 0
 Love my Megatriail and love Guerrilla Gravity. I got mine in September and the bike has so spoiled me. I honestly have no bike lust or wandering eyes right now (well maybe a new gen Megatrail). It is such a weird spot to be in, ya XYZ looks nice but meh not interested.
Started out with my second ride being a 50 mile race in Marquette mi. (Marji Gesick, love the RAMBA trails/thanks Todd and Danny for the great course). Then went on to ride Marquette, Copper Harbor, Duluth and a bikesgiving trip to Pisgah. it has been the perfect bike for me so far.

For Customer service they have been great as well, keeping me up to date on the build and going over all the details. Emails responded to in hours or less for the most part.

Once spring actually hits going to do some fine tuning and maybe a new rear shock, but that is it.....
  • 6 0
 First time hearing of GG. Rock on!
  • 6 0
 Trail pistol looks bad ass.
  • 2 0
 the new SS they made looks like a dream too. One of these days... I live walking distance from the shop
  • 4 0
 The Trail Pistol is on my short list. The American manufacturing and custom build kits is pushing me towards GG!!!
  • 3 0
 i have a megatrail from last year and it is hands down the best full sus bike i've ridden. and i have no qualms about it taking a beating. cheers to GG!
  • 2 0
 Intense no longer makes any aluminum bikes, and half the ones they used to make were outsourced a couple years ago. Read the MBA test of the new Tracer for confirmation. Go GG!
  • 1 0
 Correction: M16A is aluminum, not sure where they make them. The T275A was not made here, though, nor was the last aluminum Spider.
  • 9 6
 I'll be honest, these bikes have always been a bit fugly to me, but now reading this I'm super intrigued.
  • 5 7
 Don't know why you get downvoted for your artistic tastes. I don't like the looks, either.
  • 5 0
 @WaterBear: It's the internet, that's why.
  • 2 0
 @JesseE: man I'm with you, wasn't much a fan of the first gen mega or the DH, but the last 3 bikes have been sexy. Part of the allure to me is the companies attitude, build flexibility, and the overall cool factor of a handmade in the us product. I bought a new Megatrail, and am looking forward to what the next iteration of the DH bike too. A pedalhead would look good in my stable as well.
  • 1 0
 I think the frame design has potential to look really swish, they just need to take a few more risks with their paint jobs
  • 5 0
 @TugboatComplex: I agree. I'm looking at it more and realize it's the logo & graphics that are throwing me off the look. A bike should never be judged by it's graphics (which is hard for me as that's what I do). The geo looks wicked on the trail pistol and I like that it's made in a small shop by riders in North America. This bike has actually moved to the top of my Turning 40 Excuse Build. Take that downvoters!
  • 2 0
 @JesseE: yeah I dislike the stickers too besides the head badge, I actually got some custom ones qued up in silver metallic vinyl to be a subtle touch with the brushed alu frame. Just waiting for the bike to arrive so I can nail down the measurements for the gfx.
  • 2 0
 Cool to see a company that is making cool bikes here in the USA.. I'm curious as to my the GG/DH is a single pivot and the Pistol.and Megatrail went with a linkage...
  • 12 0
 I'm the engineer at GG, and co-founder with Will and Kristy. The design goals were different, hence different layout. Ultimately, it's a fine tuning of the leverage curve shape to work with a bike intended for climbing and air springs that required the linkage on the Trail Pistol, Megatrail SS, and Megatrail. The GG/DH has no such requirements for climbing, and is focused completely on descending. For the leverage curve we wanted in that application, it was achieved sans linkage.
  • 4 0
 @m-t-g: cool... Thanks for the answer... Keep making cool stuff and I can't wait to see what's next... Hopefully if I get out to Colorado to visit my parents, a trip to see you guys will happen also...
  • 3 0
 303 Represent! Their setup is really as small as it looks. Much respect. I definitely want to scoop one of these bikes asap.
  • 3 0
 Darn this is just awesome. I would love to work for a company like this.
  • 2 1
 Yup don't mess with the BEEZ! And the pink bike staff are all stupid canadians anyways so they'll never be able to prove I did it
  • 1 0
 If these guys ever do a long travel 29er I suspect it will be a game changer. If I was in the market for a short travel 29, I'd pick the Pistol maybe even over the Evil.
  • 2 0
 yeah GG! been on my megatrail for 2 years now all over the west coast and this thing rips!! keep up the good work amigos
  • 2 1
 @GuerrillaGravity throw a gearbox, a belt, and a paragon splitter on the Pedalhead, it would be so sick!
  • 3 1
 Shimz and Rootbeer were here congrats dude!
  • 2 0
 How Will the Capulets like this?
  • 3 2
 The only things the yanks are good at building are Bikes, Boats, and Guns.....
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 Butt to Bar = Seated Reach.
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 Seated Reach = Effective Top Tube
  • 6 0
 By the transitive property, then Effective Top Tube = Butt to Bar
  • 3 1
 @adrennan: Not really. ETT doesn't account for ST angle and stem length. As such it doesn't give you a true feeling of sitting on the bike. SR (centre of seat post at a given height to centre of bar at stem) gives you this. See my other comments below.
  • 2 0
 @fartymarty: you whiffed on the joke. I was given two equalities and was making the logical jump
  • 1 0
 @dingus: As @fartymarty mentioned, ETT is a length measurement that does not include stem length. It also neglects saddle/seatpost offset, and it's measured at a saddle height that nobody runs. While it can be useful sometimes, it's best viewed as an approximation, especially when some bikes have really slack actual seat tube angles. We often will work with riders to measure what we call "butt to hand", of which marty is calling seated reach. That one is a direct comparison of how the cockpit length feels while in seated climbing position.
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 @m-t-g: ...at least someone is on my wavelength. I wish people would start quoting this dimension as it is probably the best way to determine the fit of a bike.
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 @fartymarty: He's saying it's a measurement that varies by rider and stem. You can't really quote it any more than you could quote shoe size.
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 @WaterBear: it isnt overly difficult to subtract or add according to stem length. But then again who uses anything linger than a 50mn stem. Inseam length does need standardising hence my suggestion of 30" BB centre to top of seat.
  • 1 0
 Man, that DH looks SSSLLLLLAAAACCCCKKK in that last pic!
  • 2 0
 Will is a great guy!
  • 2 0
 Hire me
  • 5 0
 Do you have any skills? [/napoleon dynamite voice]
  • 1 1
 Don't mess with the BEEZ!!!
  • 1 2
 Mmmm...thx Mr. Farty.
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 No worries. I wish manufacturers would start quoting "Seated Reach". It give you a good idea of how you bike will fit which you can compare to your current bike.

The only issue with SR is a "standard" seat height is required. As mine is 30" I would suggest 30" is used.
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 @fartymarty: As already pointed out, what you are calling "seated reach" is already a common measurement called "Effective top tube." It's the horizontal distance from the top of the head tube to the line parallel to the seat tube.

In other words, if your seat was more or less level with the head tube, it's the butt-to-bar measurement.
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 @WaterBear: ETT doesn't account for seat tube angle and stem length. SR does.

SR gives you a true guide to how it feels to sit on a bike.
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 @WaterBear: It's not the same. ETT is measured at a saddle height that nobody runs, and neglects stem length and seatpost/saddle offset. It can be a useful number, but there are certainly other measurements that need to go along with it.
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 @m-t-g: Awesome write up guys! Love to see you all getting your time in the spotlight! Well deserved!
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 @dirteveryday: Thanks!
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 @fartymarty: Edit: Never mind, I see what you're trying to say.

You can infer the information you want by combining seat tube angle information with ETTs, I suppose.

TBH I find ETT pretty enlightening. Yes seat tube angle affects things but you can just read the angle information.
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: Thats incorrect, ETT and STA are directly related. A slacker STA means a longer ETT. I'm confused as to why this hasn't been pointed out yet. It's a horizontal line that ends at the virtual seat post. It's a more useful number than reach when determine seated fit.
  • 1 0
 @plume: agreed reach isnt overly useful for seared reach but I am I am talking about a diagonal distance from the top of the seat to the centre of the bars.
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