Pinkbike Awards: 5 Products That Have Stood the Test of Time

Dec 16, 2020 at 12:30
by Mike Kazimer  


Traditionally, the Pinkbike Awards are focused on products that were released over the course of the last 12 months, the latest and greatest bikes and components on the market. This year, we've added a new category, a way to recognize the products that have stood the test of time, remaining relevant years, or even decades after their release. Shimano SPD pedals, Five Ten Stealth rubber, DT Swiss 350 hubs, and Specialized's Z-cage and Purist bottle made the cut this year, products that can be recommended without a second thought due to their proven performance out on the trail.




The Winners Are:



Shimano XT 12-speed


Shimano XT SPD Pedals


Why they were chosen:

Shimano's first SPD pedals and shoes hit the market in 1990, and 30 years later the cleat design remains unchanged, as do the basics of the pedal itself. A wider platform has entered the mix in recent years, but features like adjustable release tension, a cup and cone bearing system that'll keep spinning smoothly for years, if not decades, with only a little maintenance, and a tough body that can handle countless rock smacks have all remained to keep Shimano's clipless pedals at the front of the pack.

It's the XT pedals that are featured here, due to the fact that they seem to hit the sweet spot when it comes to price vs weight and performance, but realistically any of the options in Shimano's lineup will do the trick, and keep on ticking for many seasons to come.




Five Ten Impact Pro review


Five Ten Stealth Rubber


Why it was chosen:

Five Ten's Stealth sticky rubber was invented by Charles Cole back in 1986, and it wasn't long before it became the must-have compound for climbing shoe soles. Eventually, mountain bikers took notice, and by the early 2000s there was a line of shoes designed specifically for flat pedal riders.

Over 20 years later that rubber compound still remains the stickiest and grippiest out there. There have been countless valiant attempts to replicate it, and this year we saw a couple options from other companies that have gotten very, very close, but no matter what, it's the Stealth rubber compound that's become the gold standard that all other flat pedal shoe soles are compared against.

Five Ten raised the bar when it comes to flat pedal shoe performance over two decades ago, and its for that impressive longevity that Stealth rubber earns its spot on this list.





Connor is on the new Maxxis Minion DHR II 2.5 wide out back.


Maxxis Minion DHR II Tire


Why it was chosen:

Yes, the Maxxis Minion DHF is arguably the most popular mountain bike tire of all time, but the introduction of the Assegai has seen it fall out of favor in some locales where riders are looking for the most amount of traction possible.

First introduced in 2013, the DHR II took care of all the issues that plagued the original DHR, with loads of cornering and braking traction, and a tread design that worked well in all but the gloppiest mud. In the years since its debut its popularity has only grown, and it remains the go-to rear tire for everyone from trail riders to downhill racers. Add in the fact that Maxxis has some of the best rubber compounds and tire casings in the business, and its easy to see why the DHR II made it onto this list.




Specialized Kenevo Expert review

Specialized Z Cage / Purist Water Bottle / SWAT Tool


Why it was chosen:

With how much electronic ink we've spilled over the last handful of years asking for bikes with bottle cages inside the front triangle, it only made sense to recognize Specialized's Z-cage / Purist bottle / SWAT tool combo as the standout in this category. The side-loading cage works even when there's limited frame clearance, and it'll hold a bottle securely in place even on rough descents, and that handy SWAT tool is always there when you need it without taking up much room.

As for the Purist bottle itself, it's the best bottle on the market, with a silicone inner coating that makes it easy to keep clean and free of any weird tastes or odors. The valve itself is leak free, and doesn't require turning any dials to get to that precious liquid.





Praxis C32 wheels


DT Swiss 350 Hubs


Why they were chosen:

Hubs are one of those things most of us don't spend much time thinking about, at least not until they decide to self destruct in the middle of a ride, forcing all sorts of MacGyver-esque tactics in order to avoid spending a night in the woods. Thankfully, the elegant simplicity of DT's 350 hubs makes the likelihood of that ever happening extremely rare.

The star ratchet design uses two springs and two ratchet rings, which makes servicing a quick and easy procedure, with no special tools required for a basic service or freehub body swap. Fans of faster engagement can spring for the 54-tooth ratchet ring, which creates 6.7-degrees between engagement points, but there's really not much need to run anything other than the 36-tooth option.

The 350 is a time tested, workhorse hub that should last multiple seasons without putting up a fuss. Yes, DT offers the lighter and fancier 240 hubs, and other manufacturers deliver options with faster engagement, but the 350 remains a rock solid choice for anyone looking for a hub gets the job done, mile after mile.






187 Comments

  • 253 13
 Any DJ frame should make the list. They still work great and have on point geo even if they are 20+ years old.
  • 10 3
 Can’t upvote this enough!
  • 18 1
 octane one zircus left the chat
  • 2 0
 @Noeserd: what's wrong with the zircus?
  • 7 1
 @theoriginalbiker: one of the most cracked dj frame to date
  • 2 3
 Only those that have tapered head tube
  • 3 4
 except literally every steel frame and a huge bunch of total aluminium crap before ~2014.
Still many frames have crappy quality and last no more than a 1-2 season (canyon,commencal,etc.).
and let's not even talk about some really weird thing in geo on a few ones.
  • 1 0
 @Noeserd: Serious? They seem pretty solid to me, had one for a while and Ive rode an NS clash for years, which looks to be an identical tube set, in a (slightly) bigger frame. Where did they fail?
  • 10 3
 @btc1: pretty sure commencal are one of the most solid and heavy duty bike brands out there......just saying
  • 1 0
 @pbuser2299: yeah, one of my friend cracked 3 of them alone. generally headtube welds
  • 6 0
 @Noeserd: what's up with all of these "friends" who crack everything...
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: They ride well enough i suppose.
  • 1 0
 I'm still using a steel 2007 frame from a local MFG (with a very stupid name) and a 2007 Marzo DJ 01 Fork. No need to upgrade the bike. Maybe if I was better I'd go for weight but there are better ways to save it than frame and fork
  • 3 0
 @btc1: Steel Frames don't work? Are you on crack?
  • 1 2
 @spaced: nah, just try to ride them like they're supposed to. They will die pretty fast, not a chance to live a full season.
  • 1 0
 @bush-pig: lol
you've thinking in terms of brands; I said nothing about brand overall, just claiming that their DJ frame is total crap and won't last a proper season. Not a chance. Seatstays, specifically. There're already a few broken one, even amongst my friends.
  • 142 10
 If these are "Oscars", can we also have "Razzie" awards, featuring Elixir brakes, Crankbrother's wheels and Specailized litigation history?
  • 126 1
 Sponsors have left the chat
  • 14 0
 Talas fork and shock from around 2012/2013 maybe too ? The idea seemed great but the execution flawed. I guess progressive geometries have made these useless now.
  • 40 11
 Maxxis Ardent tires...
  • 10 1
 @Will-narayan: All Fox forks from 2010 to 2013 really. I don't know what happened those years but their bushing tolerances went from consistently excellent to, what I can only assume was QC performed with an old tape measure. Then they resolved it and it's never been an issue since.
  • 65 7
 How did we forget the hydraulic Reverb?
  • 15 8
 @ratedgg13: What's wrong with Ardents?
  • 22 8
 Crankbrothers can also win the shit pedal award.
  • 31 0
 E13 rims..
  • 3 2
 Skinsuits, bar ends, discwheels Also new standards every other season are shameworthy
  • 6 5
 @JonnyTheWeasel: Agreed. As someone running Ardents and a Talas-era Fox fork, I was surprised to see all the hate directed at those products. For someone whose rides are, on average, 50% uphill, the low rolling resistance of the ardent is well appreciated.
  • 7 1
 @Wheeeliemann: Heya, barends still have their place! Smile

www.pinkbike.com/photo/19906749
  • 3 0
 @stiingya: I fixed a bike the other day that had purple anodised bar ends and it was acctually pretty cool
  • 4 0
 @Rigidjunkie: This. I had two different CB pedals die on me in a two week period. I switched over to SPD immediately and never looked back. The crazy thing with CB pedals is that their bearings hold the pedal body onto the spindle. If the bearings go your pedal slips off the spindle still attached to the bottle of your shoe. First time was on a commute ride into work amd the second was about six miles into an out-and-back trail ride. The hikers thought it was hysterical watching me push my bike to the top of the climbs and then coast down the descents while trying to not let my calf get stabbed by the terrifying spike of a spindle.
  • 2 0
 SuperCycle

"Cause of death: SuperCycle 1800"
  • 4 0
 Sick bikes, or is it still too soon?
  • 6 1
 -Anything Crankbroters.
- All intense FRO frames that leave 2 wheel footprint because the rear end is never in line with anything.
- FOX DHX Air 5.0
- Atomlab Spd Pedals (few have tried it but the ones who did hate it)
- DT 6.0 or 6.1 rims (tires fell of the rims while riding. happened to me on a 10m jump)
- Those Old KHS Frames with milion to one leverage so your bike turned into a hardtail on longer rides
- Pre Oro k24 formulas which instead of stopping working when hot locked your wheel
- Old Conti Tires with random thread design
- Karpiel/Lahar and a few other frame companies with shady business history
- Ellsworth customer support
- Shaman chain guides
- Twenty6 prerunners (220$ Pedals where most high end ones were 50$ with hollow alu pins so they stopped gripping and turned into razors and you ended up with shin bolognese)
- 2010-2012 Solo Air which worked only for people under 70KG and for higher pressures you ended with a shit ton of preload
-
  • 1 0
 @rodeostu: I found Ardents to be pretty terrible, a low rolling resistance can still have good side knobs for corner well, like the Minion Semi Slick
  • 2 1
 @JonnyTheWeasel: I found their lack of grip in the wet was dangerous, you'd be riding and if the root or rock was the slightest bit moist they'd be sliding. They lasted two rides before I swapped them, it would have been 1, but my LBS is here are shut on a Sunday...
  • 1 1
 @korev: Agreed, definitely not a tyre for wet weather. Great in the dry though. Mine will be going back on in the summer for sure.
  • 1 0
 @JonnyTheWeasel: Ah, that probably gets at the ardent dislike for ardents. It doesn't rain much in my part of the world, and when it does, the trails become unrideable. Thus, wet weather performance is not a factor I have to consider.
  • 50 5
 350 hubs should win this, there isn't a more reliable part out there.
  • 74 1
 These are all winners, we’re not going to just pick one. Think of them as lifetime achievement awards. Smile
  • 4 0
 Agree. 350 hubs last thousands of miles
  • 6 0
 Cheap, strong and almost light enough for most people. Can't go wrong with the Camary of bike hubs.
  • 5 2
 I love my schmancy i9 hydras, but I still got a soft spot for those 350s...
  • 1 0
 I'll likely be building a new wheelset in the spring and have money to spend. Should I stick with 350s or go for 240s to save a bit of weight? Any downsides other than price?
  • 6 10
flag housem8d (Dec 23, 2020 at 9:15) (Below Threshold)
 are hope pro 4's on the same level of reliability as 350's? Not talking about ease of maintenance. The Hopes sound better imo
  • 10 0
 @Lornholio: get the 350 and use the extra money for a lighter cassette when it needs replacement
  • 2 0
 @housem8d: I'll be doing that anyway. It's about €200 extra for 100g saved I think will probably go for 350s if there are no downsides besides cost.
  • 3 0
 They can last A heck of a lot longer than hub o.l.d. standards In recent years.
  • 3 0
 @Lornholio: actually, if you go down the 240 road you will be to use the new EXP ratchet system. The main advantage being lighter weight and wider bearing spacing. But hub stiffness and bearing longevity doesn't really hold anyone back on the old classic design. The new design also makes it more complicated to swap engagement with different ratchet rings
  • 2 1
 @housem8d: no, hopes are very reliable but the more moving parts from the pawl system are not as reliable as the star ratchet system in the 350's
  • 4 0
 I love how quiet 350’s can be too with heavier grease.
  • 4 0
 I killed (and I mean killed, had to get a new hub/wheel under warranty) a 350 hub after 35 miles. Replacement has now done nearly 700 and no worries, so I've put it down as utter bad luck on getting one of the few 350 hubs that have ever failed.
  • 3 0
 I destroyed 2 of the 4 pawls and 3 out of 4 bearings in 4 months of use on my brand new Pro4 Fatsno rear hub last winter with an average of 10h per week on the bike. I've never killed a hub that fast. Like @inked-up-metalhead with his 350, I hope it was bad luck also on my side.
  • 1 0
 @housem8d: Got you, thanks. I did a bit of searching and doesn't sound like any downsides to 240s besides cost and that the new EXP design requires a proprietary tool to change. Lots of users saying how many wheelsets they have rebuilt 240s onto. I'm looking for something rock solid without spending silly money (sorry CK) and saving a bit of weight is good if nothing is compromised - sounds like 240s is it.
  • 1 0
 I'm a big fan of DT Swiss hubs, and have used 240s on multiple custom wheel builds, but I have to say that on the one set of 350s I've had, which came OEM on a bike, the bearings failed quickly. And this is in mild California conditions. Not a big deal, just replace them with 240-level cartridges, but I found it surprising.
  • 2 0
 @housem8d: I'm a big guy, and my LBS had to warranty several Novatec hub that came stock on my bike - I kept breaking the damn things (cracking the driver body mostly). They even got Novatec to upgrade me to their top of the line after market hub, same result. So they built me up a rear wheel on a Hope Pro 4. Within a month, the driver body cracked...

However - Hope's rep claimed that simply didn't happen to their hubs normally, was uber-apologetic, and express shipped out a driver body. My LBS installed it, and here I am almost two years later, and it's not made a peep (other than that nice buzz that helps my dog find me when she runs off trail...). I like the idea of the star ratchet - it seems like the load bearing interfaces are just much more robust than any pawl-based system could ever hope to be. And of course it's n=1 - so it's anecdata at best, but at this point I wouldn't hesitate getting another Pro 4. Oh, and the seals on that hub and the machining and all that are pretty darn solid even in my rather sloppy Pacific Northwest environment, so I'd very much consider a Pro 4 for a front hub as well.
  • 7 0
 @MtbSince84: Are you sure that wasn't a 370 hub? They come on a lot of bikes as OEM and are hot garbage. Bearings fail quickly, they freehub skips a lot, and the engagement is aweful.
  • 3 0
 I liked mine. The only thing thats a total miss is the stock 18 tooth ring. For most people before even mounting the wheels most people will upgrade to the 36t or 54t, which means paying an additional $100. It means that hopes are probably better value pre whatever is going to happen with hope post brexit. It seems extortionate to me, but I went to raceface vaults and have been really happy.
  • 2 1
 I have thousands of miles on my second hand Pro2's (I don't know their history).

But 350's would be near the top of my list for trail hubs if I was shopping.
  • 2 0
 Has the level of engagement actually withstood the test of time? Not sure of the current consensus, but seem to remember hearing about a lot of issues with the 54 under larger riders.
  • 1 0
 I have repeatedly referred to them as the best mountain bike product of all time. I had a season where I broke 5 free hubs, but I’ve never broken a 350. So damn good.
  • 2 0
 @PAmtbiker: Yep. 350 on a Pivot Mach 6. Star ratchet drive, not pawls.
  • 2 0
 I never paid attention to hubs until I bought a bike that came with 350 hubs. Now I'll really miss 350 hubs (at least the rear one) if it doesn't come on my next bike.. I marvel at the simplicity and elegance in engineering. I recently switched from the stock 18 teeth star ratchet to the 36 one and I'm glad I did. To top this off, these hubs (and awesome DT 30mm ID welded rims) came on a 2016 bike that cost only 2000 Euros including 20% VAT tax. You can't get deals like that anymore.
  • 1 0
 I have a couple of sets of 240s. Should last a lifetime with bearing swaps assuming standards don't change, but I have been tempted to try Oynx. Either way, not going back to pawl hubs.
  • 1 0
 OG, 2nd gen (plastic not mag levers) ca 2006 Magura Gustav Brakes. Seriously. I still have a pair in my parts bin and I'm REALLY tempted to put them on my enduro bike. They ALWAYS WORKED and they were ALWAYS consistent. They were also super easy to bleed. The only issues were weight and the fact that they caught some air when upside down (you turned the bike right side up, pumped the brakes a few times and good as new again)
  • 1 0
 Shimano Saint for DH is also worthy of this list.
  • 25 0
 Interestingly, I run every single one of these items on my bikes. I change around rear tires to and from the DHRII, but it is still the baseline for me for rear tires. I agree with this list.
  • 9 1
 4/5 here, only missing the swat system
  • 3 0
 5/5 here, but across a couple of bikes. My Sentinel has DHR IIs, and I use flat pedals and 5.10 shoes there. My XC/DC setup has XT trail pedals, Spesh Z-cage, and DT 350s.
  • 17 0
 To each their own but I feel like you might be able to find a more compatible combo than five tens with XT clipless Wink
  • 2 2
 @Arierep: five tens don't clip
  • 4 0
 @Arierep: Five Tens are usually known as flats and using that on a clipless pedal does not work. There in lies the joke. Five Tens obviously make clipless shoes but that's not what they are talking about.
  • 1 0
 @hardcore-hardtail: I have XT clipless on my mtbs, but then flat pedals on my DJ where I use 510s. But yes, the stealth rubber is not so good on clipless pedals!
  • 1 0
 I use 4 out of 5 here, just because I only run clipless XT pedals.
  • 1 1
 I must be doing it wrong. The only product here that I use are the XT pedals.
  • 24 1
 That tube that's held 30psi in the tyre on the bike in the shed for 20yrs.
  • 22 2
 They need to make the dhr2 in 2.5 immediately
  • 8 1
 I run a 2.6 dhr2 in the front and a 2.4 in the back. Beauty.
  • 6 0
 I've used the DHR2 as a front tire off and on for the last several years. I actually like it better than the DHF here in the desert southwest.
  • 4 1
 Why? The 2.4 WT will do everything you need. If you need bigger for whatever reason there is the 2.6. Loic races on 2.3 butchers
  • 4 0
 @Singletrack990: The DHR corners more consistently when you lean it over. The DHF has to be leaned over more aggressively to get it to bite in. Since I don't always ride like that I like the cornering predictability of the DHR in the front.
  • 4 0
 I'm on my third ride with a 2.6 Dhr2 up front, replacing a Dhf. Mind. Blown.
  • 2 0
 @rrolly: That's been my experience, especially on loose over hardpack.
  • 5 0
 @padirt: Maxxis's 2.6" tyres measure 2.5" across, so they've already got you covered.
  • 1 0
 @Singletrack990: how do you guys like the front DHR2 in loose/muddy conditions? I have this nerdy dream of running the same tyre front and rear and the DD or DH DHR2 seems to be a prime candidate
  • 1 0
 @Arierep: I live in the desert and haven’t ridden in muddy conditions, but it does just fine in sandy conditions.
  • 2 0
 @Arierep: flatted my DHF on the front on second to last stage of super muddy enduro race. Put my spare DHR on and won the last stage. Felt like superhero grip. Minnaar claims same tire front and rear for most predictable cornering
  • 1 1
 @rrolly: same rim iw?
  • 2 0
 @Singletrack990: I prefer DHR on the front too. It's much more composed while braking hard in dry terrain. DHF gets loose and squirmy under hard braking in the front.
  • 1 0
 @Arierep: not so nerdy. Rear tyres wear waaay faster than front ones. So, when the rear tyre is cooked, front tyre passes on the rear, and a new one goes up front.
This way, front stays always within 100%-80% of its lifespan, rear always 80%-below, and you buy one tyre a time.
  • 3 0
 @Tasso75: and they brake better than a F. Win win.
  • 1 2
 2.5 in both MaxxGrip and MaxxTerra. Keep the 2.3 because they're good in summer but get rid of the 2.4.
  • 1 0
 @Tasso75: yep, that's one of the main perks I'm looking into.
DH double DHR2, double Assegais or DH22s are on the list
  • 2 1
 @fartymarty: what does a 2.5 do that a 2.4 can’t?
  • 1 1
 @johannensc: bigger = more grip, better braking especially if it's a proper 2.5
  • 3 0
 @ceecee: Yes. 29mm Stan's Flow's. Both are DHR2 WT's.
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: EXO+ ?
  • 1 0
 @Joecx: Yup. Maxterra, exo+. Had the same tires on my last bike, but ran 2.4/2.3 combo.
  • 15 2
 How could you forget to put on list legendary Shimano Saint M820 brakes - they're still the same 9 years after debut and still very popular, present in WC DH and on numerous bikes....
  • 1 0
 Or saint cranks, they don’t die.
  • 2 1
 Because PB (and many others) hate the wondering bite point.
  • 11 2
 What am I doing wrong, my Fiveten soles tear completely through in 3-4 months everytime.
  • 1 0
 My last set of Freeriders had so little grip they compared to my trail running shoes. I just picked up some alternate brands to test out.
  • 7 2
 Came here to mention this. I used to be a diehard 5.10 fan, but have been thoroughly disappointed with the quality since the Adidas purchase. The durability has fallen off drastically, and the overall construction quality seems to have decreased. At the shop I work at, we have had more than a few customers have shoes blow out in a handful of rides, a far cry from the quality 5.10 used to present. The rubber, while still incredibly grippy, has about the same durability as tissue paper any more. Check out Ride Concepts. Reminds me of old 5.10 in all the best ways.
  • 1 0
 @ZootownRider: Im going to warranty them, if that doesn't pan out I'll probably try the ride concepts. I've been riding fivetens for many years. They used to get me 1-2 years.... but you're right, it seems like the durometer of the rubber has decreased, maybe for ultimate grip but at the expense of durability.
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: I find the grip very good which is why I keep buying them. I should try some other brands though. I tried Pearl Izumi's which were the same price and look more casual but the grip was terrible, with the designed contact patch being on the ball of the foot rather than the center where I like to place my foot for aggressive descents.
  • 1 0
 Bought a set in 2012 and it lasted 6 years. Maybe switching to a more mid-foot position had something to do with it. The hole is under the ball-of-foot.
  • 2 0
 Still using the same pedals? Its my impression that many newer pedals have more agressive/thinner pins which tear through soles quicker.
  • 3 0
 @ZootownRider: I think it's confirmation Bias. A ton of people used to complain about 5.10 durability pre adidas purchase. Some models were always not that durable, others were better. I have a new post adidas one and it holds up well.
  • 1 0
 You're not doing anything wrong. That's what they do. Grip comes at a price, just like sticky tires.
  • 1 0
 I bought a pair of Freeride Pros in April and they were destroyed by August... I eventually found another pair online to order and then they’d made them smaller which really hurt my feet Frown FiveTen have lost a customer here...
  • 8 0
 King headset belongs on this list. I just moved my 1 1/8th from bike #7 to #8 it will likely be reliable till after I am gone.
  • 1 0
 For sure. Usually headsets last two to three seasons with once a year maintenance. I started pulling the king set apart after a year and just regressed and reassembled as it looked basically new. My rigid needs a new headset and I’ll definitely spring for another ck
  • 1 0
 I’ve done the same thing and it was dh frames even, before 1.5 tapered was a thing. Best bearings ever.
  • 7 2
 Specialized should make those bottles in larger sizes. If you feel the same, please use my email as a template.

to: waterbottles@specialized.com
"Please consider making a bicycle bottle with a larger capacity. 34oz would be great please!

Zefal and Elite make bike water bottles with 32oz and 34oz capacity, however their shape is not properly designed to stay in standard bottle cages. Specialized bottles are of much higher quality, I'd prefer to use yours, but would like to carry more water.

Happy trails,"

I emailed in October, they said they'd consider feedback, though I guess more feedback might encourage them to consider more urgently.
  • 1 0
 While I applaud and agree, that's a huge jump in volume/weight for the cage and bolts. How about 26oz, with ease of bottle in/out while riding?
  • 1 0
 @ultimatist: large bottles are readily available, they don't break bottles or cage bolts, but they're not nearly as nice of a bottle as the Purist.
38oz: www.somafab.com/archives/product/further-38-oz-water-bottle
34oz:http://www.zefal.com/en/bottles-sport/182-magnum.html
32oz www.elite-it.com/uploads/product_variant/thumbnail_image/499/thumbnail_image_0160907_Fly-black-grey-logo-950-ml_760.png
  • 6 0
 I always have to remind myself that Pinkbike's tire choices are strongly influenced by living in a wet climate. Living in the desert is just totally different.
  • 4 0
 DHRII is my preferred rear tire in SoCal out of the tires I have used. What are you using?
  • 5 0
 The DHR2 is no wet weather specialist, that would be the Shorty. And you can tune the water affinity of Maxxis tyres by choosing the right compound. Maxxgrip for wet roots/rocks, Dual compound for the desert.
  • 1 0
 @daswolfman:
What do you ride there?
  • 2 0
 @Ktron: I ride DHF/Aggressor in Arizona and I'm thrilled with that combo. Fast enough to not destroy bike handling but enough grip to handle all the rocky chunder we have. I'd consider an Assegai or DHRII up front...
  • 4 1
 Surely as a lifetime award the Shimano DX M647 pedals should be picked over the XT's, given that they have remained unchanged for north of a decade, outliving many generations of XT pedals as well as the DX range from which the came!
  • 5 0
 Same for the PD-M540 and M520.
  • 4 2
 I know, I know, N=1 does not a conclusion make. That said, I bought the Specialized Z Cage with SWAT tool and the cage itself cracked completely on my very first ride during a low speed crash. The inertia of a full water bottle during the fall was all it took to crack the cage into two useless halves.
  • 10 0
 Might have been defective. I have thousands of miles on mine, including all the occasions I bottom the 170mm coils, and the random wrecks.
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: I have years, a morzine trip and loads of enduro races on my current zee cage (and similar on the one handed down from my previous bike onto my daughter's bike). Only lost a bottle due to being so knackered I dropped the bike onto the open side and didn't notice the bottle fall out. This cage is the only way to get a bottle into a Nukeproof Mega frame (with SKS everything mounts). And you can get them in lots of matchy matchy colours!
  • 1 0
 Prob defective. I Had a similiar issue with a top peak cage and the 2nd they sent as a warranty was infinitely better despite being same model
  • 4 0
 I've had my XT pedals and 350 hubs since 2015 and have not had do anything to them. Amazing stuff, considering almost everything else barely lasts a season or two.
  • 1 1
 Fidlock bottles are just the best
  • 1 0
 Wow! Like, never even once lubed/greased? I would repack if you want to see 2025.
  • 1 0
 @ultimatist: no I regrease a few times a season. But haven't had to touch the bearings or take it apart further than that.
  • 1 2
 @deli-hustler: Nice and simplistic so you'll understand them
  • 2 0
 Only problem with the Purist bottles is they are a portable oven. I've never had another bottle that struggled to stay cold on an hour long indoor ride. In the summer you can go from completely frozen bottle to warm water in about an hour as well.
  • 5 0
 You could put about any Shimano crankset, derailleur and brake on that list. Well designed and reliable.
  • 4 0
 I've had the same set of XT pedals on 3 bikes now, never done a thing to them, and they're still going strong.
  • 1 0
 I have a set from 2007 that have never been serviced and they're great.
  • 1 0
 I ride clips. Otherwise all of the other 4 items I have and use. EDC has replaced SWAT on most bikes but that is incredible list picking. I have lots of wheels and I have either 240 or 350 on all. Easy free hub service and parts. XT seem to last long get than XTR. DHR II is what everyone copies.
  • 4 2
 To me the gravity dropper has to make the list. Dropper posts are now standard equipment on most mountain bikes. Without Gravity dropper founder Wayne Sicz, we would still all , likely, be on regular seat posts...
  • 1 0
 My Shimano 520s are still going strong after years.
DHRII works well on the front too. I prefer it to the DHF to due less gap in the transition area. Really versatile tire.
I need a side loading bottle cage - I'll see if the LBS has stock of the Spez one.

Although not my personal favourite many people have been using Stans for years and stick to it.

I wonder what current products (besides these) will stand the test of time.
  • 1 0
 The test of time you haven`t defined how long that period is? I can remember the stuff that this stuff evolved from,well some of it, other stuff is too new to have eveolved from anything... COME ON!
Or am I just older than most of you?
  • 1 0
 I think this is just referring to products that last a really long time and are high quality, not necessarily brand new ideas that have stuck around unchanged for years. Obviously there were precursors to these products, but these models/generations are the ones that stuck out.
  • 1 0
 So apart from farther apart degrees of engagement, I've never had any issues with Shimano cup and cone bearing hubs (after seals were introduced) over the past 20 years and 10's of thousands of km's. Why are the 350's better? Not flaming, honest question.
  • 1 0
 It's not used much anymore, but the Gravity Dropper seat post should be honored for basically starting a new era in MTB riding style and geo. It was the first remote dropper post that worked well, was reliable and easy to service and still available for 1/2 the price of some new dropper posts.
  • 1 0
 DT 350 hubs all day, should be on all my bikes as they always seem to outlast other hubs I have.

DHRII..meh! I always seem to go back to it, to just take it off again not before long. Corners decent, but always slides around too much on steeper, wetter terrain for me liking. So, basically an over-hyped generalist tire (kind of like old Nevegals) that don’t do anything well and roll too slow to keep on in drier terrain.
  • 2 0
 The only thing on this list that I’m not using is the Zee cage and bottle, and that is only because the Meta doesn’t really fit any bottles besides the fidlock ones.
  • 4 0
 Add Hope Brakes. Still running the same for years.
  • 1 0
 The V2 still reigns supreme. These e4/v4s on a tech 3 lever just don't match the savage nature of the V2. I'd like to see the old Louise FR caliper come back too.
  • 4 0
 Nailed it. Just nailed it.
  • 5 1
 Dude they forgot 26 inch wheels what the heck????‍♂️
  • 2 0
 I’ve got Five Ten Impact Pro shoes, Minion DHR II 3C Maxx Terra on the rear and DT Swiss 350 hubs. so I’m geared pretty good I reckon Smile
  • 3 0
 Rock solid list. See you in 2030 cause I doubt these will change much, given how disposable some MTB designs are these days.
  • 3 0
 Time atac.

Didn't Levy just pull out of his Shimano pedals on the impossible climb today?
  • 1 0
 Levy pulls out of every pedal (so many jokes), and I'm 99% sure he was using his usual HT pedals wound down to maximum tension because he's insane.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: HT pedals have some cool perks but that springy unclipping feeling feels like I’m being ejecto-seated away from my bike haha.
  • 1 0
 I broke a XT pedal this year. Spindle and pedal body separated and weren’t repairable. Shop guy said he hadn’t seen a broken spd pedal in 10 years. Photo evidence on my Strava for the naysayers.
  • 1 0
 I broke my XTR 9100 (xc) pedals as well. Clip in bridge sheared clean in two. Can’t imagine it’s too common though, and after a warranty I’m happily using them. Once is a bummer, but I have faith in the quality. Hopefully this second set doesn’t prove me wrong.
  • 3 0
 How do Purist bottles hold up against piggy back shock interference?
  • 1 0
 They come in a variety of sizes. There are two variants of the smaller size, one of which is slightly shorter and is among the shortest on the market. When paired with the lowest-profile cap, it fits where few others will.
  • 3 2
 Yeah those dt swiss hubs are great, right up until you have to change the bearings. What a stupid design, took hours to remove the spine with a mechanical fitters help.
  • 14 1
 Takes 30 seconds with the correct tool.
  • 2 0
 @keewi: I wish
  • 1 0
 Agreed! I have the proper tool and mine is permanent-stuck in my 240 hub. No amount of torque will release that threaded-in piece. I’ve soaked it in penetrating oil, tried heat, tried cold ... nothing will work.
  • 5 1
 @keewi: I second that. I have the correct tool as well. Lock it in a vise, place wheel on, spin it off. 30 seconds tops.
  • 1 0
 @bogey: my buddy used an impact gun on it, took 2 batteries going dead but eventually came out. Have to re true the wheel now as had to use so much force.
  • 4 0
 Saint Cranks
  • 2 0
 I was just gonna say! Almost 10 years old and they're still the preferred choice for lots of riders (myself included!)
  • 1 0
 The whole saint/zee lines deserve a nod
  • 2 0
 Actually...I own all of these now that I think about it!
  • 3 2
 Stealth Rubber for sure. That stuff is amazing even if it does wear out quickly.
  • 3 0
 ODI grips!
  • 2 0
 There is not much out there that could argue for a spot on this list
  • 1 0
 I use all 5 components. I agree with everything on the list. In fact I have a set of the first gen spd pedals.
  • 7 5
 And.....Dentist jokes
  • 1 0
 4/5 in use, hubs are Syntace.
  • 1 0
 I 100% agree with this list.
  • 1 0
 Purist is silcon not silicone
  • 1 0
 I'll second that xt pedals and 350 hubs bit. Both so solid.
  • 1 0
 seems the test of time is a year not 10
  • 1 0
 No Chris King headset? I can not believe it.
  • 1 0
 How long before Cushcores make this list?
  • 3 2
 Hope Parts
  • 1 0
 Steven Peters
  • 1 0
 All great pics.
  • 1 0
 Perfect list. Nailed it
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